2:54
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2:54

London, England, United Kingdom

London, England, United Kingdom
Band Rock Alternative

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The Internet has done wonders for aspiring musicians. Whereas once, the only way to get noticed was to doggedly gig your tits off and spend penniless hours stuffing envelopes with demos and timidly hopeful covering letters, now all you seem to need is a social networking profile with an uploaded mp3. Consider the case of 2:54, two sisters whose sole track was instantly picked up and reposted by the likes of Gorilla Vs Bear, VICE, The Independent and The Fader, the lattermost of which pointed out that the girls ‘look like badasses’, which indeed they do, in their black threads, their rock’n’roll tattoo-peppered arms lifting sweating pints of lager in a dim corner of an understated Dalston boozer (they’re locals).

Colette is draped in a loose shift dress, leaning to one side as though the dense London heat were leaning on her, trying to share her chair, while Hannah is inexplicably ensconced in a black leather biker jacket and looking cool in every sense of the word, despite the oppressive temperature – definitely badass! Both seem a little bewildered (though not unpleasantly so) by the snowball of attention their music has collected. The infamous track ‘Creeping’, from whence the media interest sprung, is a gorgeously abrasive dose of shoegaze, with a backbone built on harsh, metallic guitar crashes, coupled with sensual, deep and drowsy Mazzy-esque vocals and a stung, swollen bass line. There’s an intriguing darkness to the music, and a weight, which is beautifully counterbalanced with an effortlessly nimble, punk-tinged drive. Where did this hybrid of sounds come from?

“I don’t know, it just kind of came out,” says Hannah. “I mean, we listen to a lot of stuff but I don’t think we took much from it.”

“Yeah,” agrees Colette. “There was no plan, Hannah just started writing pieces of music and sending them to me.”

The sisters used to be in a punk band called Vulgarians, who were quite a hardcore outfit – “fast and loud”, as Colette describes it – but split up round about Christmas time. At that point they both dropped their guitars and didn’t touch them again until May, when they started sending each other bits of tracks, eventually meeting up and finishing the songs together. The end results were drastically different to their previous output with Vulgarians (or ‘the other band’ as they refer to it) – “Completely different!”, the sisters laugh.

Both Hannah and Colette play the guitar, and Hannah also took up bass and drum duties for the recordings they’ve made. But how the hell does that work when they play live?

“Oh, we haven’t played live yet,” says Colette. “We’ve done everything in our bedrooms, that’s just how it’s been, we only started a couple of months ago.” She explains that they don’t want to play gigs with a backing track and a drum machine, and their main method of playing and recording has been bedroom sessions with Garage Band, waiting for one or the other’s flatmate to go out – as Hannah puts it, “so we can make a racket in peace.” Now they have a proper rehearsal space and have found a bass player and a drummer to complete the live band. That’s what the girls have been up to today, they’ve been in the studio rehearsing (without the newly recruited boys), and the plan is to lock themselves away in said studio until October, working on the body of work they’ve come up with thus far, getting it ready for a live set. So is this it, ready to rock and roll?

“This is it,” says Colette confidently “the Real Deal!”

“We want this to be a life,” agrees Hannah.

“That’s the dream, for making music to be what we do,” Colette continues. “There’s no set plan, but we’d like to make a really special record – a collection of songs.”

This rough plan sounds vaguely familiar… Talk to anyone in a band that’s still finding its sea legs and they tend to fall into two categories: Hell-bent on world domination within the next fortnight, or playing it by ear, keeping the game plan vague, and focusing on making good music. For now, 2:54 reside in a sub category of the second option, the Hang On, There’s A Piece About Us On Which Website? category. Again, not outrageously out of the ordinary, thus is the power of the net that all you need is a MySpace and an uploaded track and the blogs are falling over each other to give you a shout out and re-post your mp3. In theory. It also helps to be making the right kind of music at the right time, and that’s exactly what 2:54 are doing, albeit completely inadvertently. They admit that there are a lot of female voices about at the minute, “There’s commercial stuff like Florence, then there’s bands like Beach House,” says Colette “but I don’t think anything that’s going on at the moment bears any reflection on what we’re doing.”

“As far as how we write,” Hannah explains, “I don’t think we pay much attention to what else is going on.”

“Of course we’re wary of being lumped in with something,” concedes Colette “because there’s definitely a new breed o - Loud and quiet Magazine


The Internet has done wonders for aspiring musicians. Whereas once, the only way to get noticed was to doggedly gig your tits off and spend penniless hours stuffing envelopes with demos and timidly hopeful covering letters, now all you seem to need is a social networking profile with an uploaded mp3. Consider the case of 2:54, two sisters whose sole track was instantly picked up and reposted by the likes of Gorilla Vs Bear, VICE, The Independent and The Fader, the lattermost of which pointed out that the girls ‘look like badasses’, which indeed they do, in their black threads, their rock’n’roll tattoo-peppered arms lifting sweating pints of lager in a dim corner of an understated Dalston boozer (they’re locals).

Colette is draped in a loose shift dress, leaning to one side as though the dense London heat were leaning on her, trying to share her chair, while Hannah is inexplicably ensconced in a black leather biker jacket and looking cool in every sense of the word, despite the oppressive temperature – definitely badass! Both seem a little bewildered (though not unpleasantly so) by the snowball of attention their music has collected. The infamous track ‘Creeping’, from whence the media interest sprung, is a gorgeously abrasive dose of shoegaze, with a backbone built on harsh, metallic guitar crashes, coupled with sensual, deep and drowsy Mazzy-esque vocals and a stung, swollen bass line. There’s an intriguing darkness to the music, and a weight, which is beautifully counterbalanced with an effortlessly nimble, punk-tinged drive. Where did this hybrid of sounds come from?

“I don’t know, it just kind of came out,” says Hannah. “I mean, we listen to a lot of stuff but I don’t think we took much from it.”

“Yeah,” agrees Colette. “There was no plan, Hannah just started writing pieces of music and sending them to me.”

The sisters used to be in a punk band called Vulgarians, who were quite a hardcore outfit – “fast and loud”, as Colette describes it – but split up round about Christmas time. At that point they both dropped their guitars and didn’t touch them again until May, when they started sending each other bits of tracks, eventually meeting up and finishing the songs together. The end results were drastically different to their previous output with Vulgarians (or ‘the other band’ as they refer to it) – “Completely different!”, the sisters laugh.

Both Hannah and Colette play the guitar, and Hannah also took up bass and drum duties for the recordings they’ve made. But how the hell does that work when they play live?

“Oh, we haven’t played live yet,” says Colette. “We’ve done everything in our bedrooms, that’s just how it’s been, we only started a couple of months ago.” She explains that they don’t want to play gigs with a backing track and a drum machine, and their main method of playing and recording has been bedroom sessions with Garage Band, waiting for one or the other’s flatmate to go out – as Hannah puts it, “so we can make a racket in peace.” Now they have a proper rehearsal space and have found a bass player and a drummer to complete the live band. That’s what the girls have been up to today, they’ve been in the studio rehearsing (without the newly recruited boys), and the plan is to lock themselves away in said studio until October, working on the body of work they’ve come up with thus far, getting it ready for a live set. So is this it, ready to rock and roll?

“This is it,” says Colette confidently “the Real Deal!”

“We want this to be a life,” agrees Hannah.

“That’s the dream, for making music to be what we do,” Colette continues. “There’s no set plan, but we’d like to make a really special record – a collection of songs.”

This rough plan sounds vaguely familiar… Talk to anyone in a band that’s still finding its sea legs and they tend to fall into two categories: Hell-bent on world domination within the next fortnight, or playing it by ear, keeping the game plan vague, and focusing on making good music. For now, 2:54 reside in a sub category of the second option, the Hang On, There’s A Piece About Us On Which Website? category. Again, not outrageously out of the ordinary, thus is the power of the net that all you need is a MySpace and an uploaded track and the blogs are falling over each other to give you a shout out and re-post your mp3. In theory. It also helps to be making the right kind of music at the right time, and that’s exactly what 2:54 are doing, albeit completely inadvertently. They admit that there are a lot of female voices about at the minute, “There’s commercial stuff like Florence, then there’s bands like Beach House,” says Colette “but I don’t think anything that’s going on at the moment bears any reflection on what we’re doing.”

“As far as how we write,” Hannah explains, “I don’t think we pay much attention to what else is going on.”

“Of course we’re wary of being lumped in with something,” concedes Colette “because there’s definitely a new breed o - Loud and quiet Magazine


“Creeping” makes us wish David Lynch would shoot a sequel to Wild at Heart (still starring Cage and Dern, obviously) so we could see how he uses its darkness to make uncomfortable scenes even more awkward. We could see something blowing up to the bent-string chorus, right before some hairy-faced man-creature flashes on the screen… or maybe a close-up of Dern’s hair blowing in the hot Nevada wind, free but somehow caged. It’ll never happen—Cage now requires more demanding roles—but it shows how adept 2:54 is at creating drama on the edge. Also, they are sisters named Hannah & Collette Thurow, and they look like badasses.

- The Fader


“Creeping” makes us wish David Lynch would shoot a sequel to Wild at Heart (still starring Cage and Dern, obviously) so we could see how he uses its darkness to make uncomfortable scenes even more awkward. We could see something blowing up to the bent-string chorus, right before some hairy-faced man-creature flashes on the screen… or maybe a close-up of Dern’s hair blowing in the hot Nevada wind, free but somehow caged. It’ll never happen—Cage now requires more demanding roles—but it shows how adept 2:54 is at creating drama on the edge. Also, they are sisters named Hannah & Collette Thurow, and they look like badasses.

- The Fader


You wouldn't automatically assume 2:54's favouritest thing ever was stoner rock on first listen to their blog-stirring 'Creeping'(click here to download). Old Mazzy Star and Anita O'Day seemed more obvious touchstones.

But within seconds my first conversation with sisters Colette and Hannah Thurlow turned to John Garcia's one-man 'Kyuss Reunion' show in Camden in a few weeks. They both had tickets. It seems the sibling duo were weened on scorched desert sounds, and the kindling dischord that nips at their growing set-list on closer inspection reveals tell-tale signs.

They've been working on bits that sound like Earth, or so Colette's flat mate noted when she overheard their practice session through a wall the other day. Their name itself is a reference to the exact track time when it 'kicks in' on their joint fave Melvins' song.

All this makes the sisters appear even cooler and hotter than you thought a minute ago, right? Which was already pretty hot and pretty cool. - NME


You wouldn't automatically assume 2:54's favouritest thing ever was stoner rock on first listen to their blog-stirring 'Creeping'(click here to download). Old Mazzy Star and Anita O'Day seemed more obvious touchstones.

But within seconds my first conversation with sisters Colette and Hannah Thurlow turned to John Garcia's one-man 'Kyuss Reunion' show in Camden in a few weeks. They both had tickets. It seems the sibling duo were weened on scorched desert sounds, and the kindling dischord that nips at their growing set-list on closer inspection reveals tell-tale signs.

They've been working on bits that sound like Earth, or so Colette's flat mate noted when she overheard their practice session through a wall the other day. Their name itself is a reference to the exact track time when it 'kicks in' on their joint fave Melvins' song.

All this makes the sisters appear even cooler and hotter than you thought a minute ago, right? Which was already pretty hot and pretty cool. - NME


New London duo 2.54 have been getting attention for their song "Creeping".

It's a delicious dash of moody shoegaze, with guitar lines that churn, roll and distort in a nice counterpoint to a hushed vocal. File between The XX and The Big Pink. The pair are unsigned and beyond the aforementioned track on MySpace (ind.pn/c08ay P), there's no further output. Likewise, there are only thin scraps of information about the band: "all noise", as they call it, is made by sisters Hannah and Colette Thurlow, who seem to share a penchant for leather biker jackets. If more efforts like "Creeping" follow, I imagine we'll be finding out plenty more about them soon enough. - The Independent


New London duo 2.54 have been getting attention for their song "Creeping".

It's a delicious dash of moody shoegaze, with guitar lines that churn, roll and distort in a nice counterpoint to a hushed vocal. File between The XX and The Big Pink. The pair are unsigned and beyond the aforementioned track on MySpace (ind.pn/c08ay P), there's no further output. Likewise, there are only thin scraps of information about the band: "all noise", as they call it, is made by sisters Hannah and Colette Thurlow, who seem to share a penchant for leather biker jackets. If more efforts like "Creeping" follow, I imagine we'll be finding out plenty more about them soon enough. - The Independent


Discography

"On A Wire" b/w "Cold Front - Limited 7" Only - House Anxiety Records - May 2011

"Scarlet" EP - 10" Vinyl & Digital Download - Fiction - November 2011

Photos

Bio

For 2:54, everything comes from somewhere deep inside; that shared sisterly bond between Hannah and Colette Thurlow that manifests in their matching, messy hand gestures, the mirroring tattoos down their right arms, and their darkly triumphant, guitar-driven epics. Their relationship and the music they’ve been making together since they were teenagers are so intuitive that they struggle to describe it; but when they do, you know exactly what they mean.

“The songs just feel like something that needs to come out,” explains Hannah, the quieter of the pair. “It’s something I actually feel – I know when it’s coming.”

“It’s like chasing a huge high,” Colette continues, a skull tattoo poking out of her coat sleeve as she repeatedly reties and loosens her messy top-knot.

The musical drug took hold when the Thurlows were teenagers living in Bristol, having moved there from their native Ireland when they were three and one, respectively. Uncharacteristically for siblings, they shared the same music taste and always had a creative relationship. As a teenager, Colette, the oldest by two years, discovered Queens Of The Stone Age’s self-titled debut, an influence the pair still hold dear 13 years later. “Each of their records is a constant innovation, but keeps its heart in the same place,” enthuses Hannah. “From Kyuss onward they’re constantly evolving.” However, it’s Josh Homme’s looser, more feral work for his Desert Sessions project that shows the clearest imprint upon 2:54 – widescreen and landscape-conjuring, their mysterious origins unfettered by needless bluster.

At 16, Hannah taught herself guitar, and then her sister. “A big turning point was discovering punk music in our teens,” recalls Colette. “Seeing bands like The Distillers play – Brody Dalle being such a powerful woman, incredible, scary and brilliant – made it seem accessible. Others had come before, but it was the first time we had seen that in our lifetimes. Then there was Bad Brains’ ‘Banned In DC’, which blew my mind. It’s everything I imagined a solo could be, especially in a two-minute song – it’s so moving, it takes you somewhere and drops you. Those things showed us all that matters is soul.”

After their sole year spent living in different cities, as Colette returned to Bristol for 12 months after studying English Literature at Kings College and Hannah left for the big smoke to study Fine Art Photography, they reunited in London and formed Vulgarians, a bile-laden punk band that ran roughshod over any concept of rules.

“We didn’t have guitar tuners, we didn’t have our own amps, and we definitely had no idea of what to do on stage,” laughs Colette. “It was complete naivety, this idea that we could just turn up and do it. It was brazen in that sense; it just didn’t matter.”

Their emergence in summer 2010 was far more refined, almost bashful, sneaking the Garageband demo of ‘Creeping’ onto a MySpace page with no fanfare. The plaudits, however, were instant. First US blog-bibles like Gorilla vs Bear and Fader caught on, along with the style-conscious NYLON, and before long NME wrote that its “stinging, spite-laden guitar and mesmerisingly chilly tones recall Slint if they’d been signed to Creation and fronted by stony hearted she-demons”. “File between The xx and The Big Pink”, The Independent noted knowingly, with 2:54 clearly forging a unique new transatlantic axis, where the spacial, atmospheric experiments of Now meet the indie drones and brimstone heavy hearts of yore – with their first US dates planned this November. The origin of the band’s name adds further clues as to the root of their sound, a precise moment from a Melvins song.

“I love the Melvins,” states Colette. “They have an incredible canon of work, but the song that inspired the name is from a fairly recent album, ‘(A) Senile Animal’. It’s that point on ‘History Of Bad Men’ where the bass line turns doomy, and dreamy… You can just fade into it.”

Having brought onboard the formidable rhythm section of Joel Porter (bass) and Alex Robins (drums) last September for their first few live stints, after being personally invited on the road with musical siblings, Warpaint and Melissa Auf der Maur before last Christmas. The addition of the boys completed the official line-up. “They’re not brothers, but they have a sibling quality, which feels like the perfect dynamic,” says Colette of the pair who've helped shaped the molten live show that's positioned them as one of the UK's most talked-about breaking names. “We had one rehearsal with them and thought, ‘yep, this is it!’” grins Hannah.

The past twelve months have been spent on tour across Europe, taking in treks with Yuck and Wild Beasts, whose frontman Hayden Thorpe recently gushed in NME, “They're really quite special. They're effortless, and that can't be faked. There’s a grace and elegance alongside their brutality, like striking a knife at something and revealing a flower”. They’ve also astonished in equal