4th World
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4th World

Vieux Fort, Vieux-Fort, Saint Lucia | SELF

Vieux Fort, Vieux-Fort, Saint Lucia | SELF
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"4th World was a Hit"

4th World is freshly back from its debut international performance at the 2010 Montreal International Reggae Festival. Needless to say it was a great experience for 4th World, and they were a hit. The audience was so mesmerized that they stayed out in the rain soaking in the music, which was strictly original.

According to band members, the crowd response and their rave reviews have done wonders for their confidence. They now have concrete proof that they are as good or better than bands out there and they belong on the international stage.

What’s next for 4th World? Well, the band is in the process of completing their 14-track, debut album, following which they hope to tour the world.
- The Voice


"Meet the 4th World Band"

What happens when you team up Nijah "Cold Sweat" St. Catherine, the man some are saying has the best voice in world reggae, with Sylvester "Itoobaa" Peter, the man who gave us Freedom, the best reggae album produced in St. Lucia and the greatest musical endeavor to come out of Vieux Fort, and then add a retired Wall Street software engineer turn drummer called Benson Evans, and two young guitarists who go by the names of Marlon Florent and Darrel "Frenchy" Augier. Well, simply put, what happens is 4th World, the best reggae band on island, and according to some the best band on island, period. But how did 4th World get started or rather how did Cold Sweat, Itoobaa and the rest of the guys get together to equate to 4th World.
According to Dr. Reynolds, managing director of Jako Productions, he got tired of St. Lucian talent who despite any nurturing emerging as if from nowhere as good or better than what obtains elsewhere, but because of no institutional support the talent wanders in the wilderness of lack of opportunity and nothing much becomes of it.
So with the emergence of Cold Sweat and his distinctive and remarkable voice, Dr. Reynolds decided to do something about it by focusing blinding attention on Cold Sweat the artist, and helping to lay down a path to take the artist international.
All this sounded good, but the task of taking Cold Sweat international faced the classic problem all solo artists face. While pursuing the dream of making it big, how does the artist support himself?
At the time Cold Sweat had been fooling around with the guitar and keyboard, so Dr. Reynolds reckoned that surely with his fantastic voice, accompanied with his keyboard or guitar, it would be a no brainer getting him hotel, restaurant and bar gigs. For with such a voice, who would care how proficient he was on keyboard?
So with some encouragement from Jako Productions, Cold Sweat signed up for keyboard lessons, and soon he was getting gigs at restaurants and bars in Vieux Fort. But there was a problem. Cold Sweat didn't like the solo vibe. As he has explained, he has always seen himself as part of a tribe. So the artiste went in search of his tribe.
First he sought Itoobaa and the solo act became a duet: Cold Sweat with his keyboard, and Itoobaa with his guitar, both doing vocals. Interestingly, when Itoobaa was recording his history making Freedom album nearly a decade ago, it was eighteen year old Cold Sweat he used for backing vocals.
Next Cold Sweat brought in Darrel "Frenchy" Augier as vocalist and rhythm guitarist. Frenchy also served as part-time bass man, replacing Itoobaa on bass when Itoobaa occasionally takes on lead vocals.
Dr. Reynolds said that in Frenchy’s first appearance with the band, he was so timid and tentative that throughout the performance he kept his head to one side, hardly moving a muscle, and his guitar strum was so feathery one needed hearing aids to make it out. Now Frenchy presents a whole different picture. His guitar strum starts with a high arm action and comes down on the strings with precise authority. He sings about one-third of the bands repertoire in an impassioned, high pitched, wailing voice. The band is now in studios. And guess what? It is Frenchy's original song, Jah Puppet, which many have pronounced a hit, that is first on the recording list.
After the addition of Frenchy the band was in search of a drummer as replacement for the drum machine they were using. And in walked Benson Evans, son of Bruce Williams, affectionately known as Daddy Bruce, Vieux Fort's politician and great humanitarian, after whom Bruceville is named.
A retired Wall Street software engineer, Benson was down in St. Luca for a few weeks on business. Although for Benson music and drumming was a hobby, he always welcomed the opportunity to gig with a band. In fact, Benson likes to drum so much that one gets the impression that he would be willing to pay a band to have him as their drummer. So upon Benson's arrival, he was pleasantly surprised that 4th World was there as if waiting for his coming.
With a drummer in hand and the goal of recording and taking Cold Sweat international, Dr. Reynolds went in search of Adam Gillmor to better position the band and Cold Sweat to go international. It was natural for Dr. Reynolds to seek out Adam Gillmor because it was with Adam as sound engineer that Jako Productions made history with the release of Freedom by Itoobaa. Adam helped refined the band's act by working with them on their harmonies, their positioning on stage and on choosing the right keys for certain songs.
Next to sweeten things up a bit and to refine the band's sound even further, Marlon Florent of Augier, Vieux Fort, was brought in. Although Marlon performed with 4th World before he had a chance to practice with the band, he was an instant hit. The way he made the guitar cry forced some to immediately compare him to Vieux Fort's Monty Maxwell, long recognized as one of the best guitarists St. Lucia has produced.
At this point Cold Sweat's tribe was complete and 4th World was a hit, because wherever 4th World performed audiences cannot get enough of the band. Up North, besides begging for the band to keep on playing, some in the audience literally grab on to band members to prevent them from getting off stage, others accuse the band of being selfish for not playing well into the early morning hours. Sometimes to forestall mob action, proprietors are compelled to contract an additional set. At both the 2010 National Telethon Concert and the Fond Gens Libre leg of the 2010 Soufriere Creole Jazz, 4th World held the audiences at awe, forcing some to describe the performances as out of this world experiences. And at the 2010 Montreal International Reggae Festival, 4th World held the crowd in such a trance that many remained standing in the rain, soaking in the music.

So although the band came out of Cold Sweat's need for a tribe, and was incidental to Dr. Reynolds' desire to take Cold Sweat international, given the sensation the band is causing, it may well prove to be the path Dr. Reynolds was seeking to take the artist international.
In : entertainment

- The eazee Traveler


"Cold Sweat Releases Keep on Trying"

Until recently, one of St. Lucia's best kept secrets is that Nijah St. Catherine, a.k.a. Cold Sweat, who hails from Vieux Fort, has emerged as one of the best and most unique voices in world reggae. Cold Sweat's voice is deep but melodious, rough but sweet, silken but edgy and his vocal gymnastics could be the envy of any singer. Cold Sweat has the full package. His lyrics is compelling and his performances electrifying. If there is one St. Lucian artist ready for the world stage, Cold Sweat is him.

No where is this more evident than in Cold Sweat’s newly released single (and accompanying video), Keep on Trying. In a husky, sometimes gruff, sometimes melodic voice, Cold Sweat brings us a song of great inspiration. It’s a song for the hopeless, for struggling teenage mothers, for youths hustling on the block or locked up in jail, for brothers and sisters trapped in the system. “No matter what the people say about it,” and “even when it gets rough on the journey,” Cold Sweat urges you to Keep on Trying, “don’t you give it up for one minute,” for “Jah-Jah is the way” and “Jah-Jah is your guide,” He “never leaves your side.” Even though the system erect “their walls and their borders, that won’t keep us away.” And even though “everyday they make living get harder,” with Jah’s help “we will still make it through the day.” “And when they try to keep us in darkness, Jah will shine the light.” “And from time to time He puts a miracle in your life.” Praise Jah.

Cold Sweat's musical journey goes back to the age of four when he used to listen to his mother singing along to slow tunes like Lady in Red by Chris De Burgh. In fact, growing up his home was suffused in music, for his father listened to the music of the likes of Third World nonstop. At bedtime his maternal grandmother used to hold him in her arms and sing to him until he fell asleep. Up till today, Un ti pié pòwié (A small cedar tree), one of the songs with which his grandmother lulled him to sleep, still plays in his head. And then there is his paternal grandmother who used to take him to mass every Sunday. At church Cold Sweat didn't pay attention to anything going on there, but no sooner his grandmother started singing along with the congregation, he would look up at her with rapt attention and wonder how she is able to sing like that? Well, this is exactly the kind of effect Cold Sweat now has on people hearing him for the first time.

In many ways Keep on Trying (song and video) is a metaphor for the life of the artist and that of artists all over the world. For the life of an artist is a life of struggle. Its hard work for little or no financial gain. Its wandering in the wilderness for what seems an eternity. Yet the worse thing the artist can do is to succumb to the hardship, to stop being true to the voice inside of him, to give up the struggle, for Jah can put “a miracle in your life” when you lest expecting.

Cold Sweat's first tentative steps towards becoming an artist came in his preteen years after watching a Michael Jackson television performance. He was so motivated by the show that he immediately proceeded to make a guitar out of wood, metal tins and fishing lines. However, it was at fourteen, after developing a strong liking for reggae and getting hooked on the music of Peter Tosh, Third World and Bob Marley, that he started taking music seriously. Before that the artist said he was more into HipHop and Rap (Tupac, Snoop Dogg, Ice Cube, Bone Thugs-n-Harmony), than reggae.

Today as an artist well into his stride, Cold Sweat's musical style reflects a mixed of genres including reggae, hiphop and R&B. Indeed, his music is about the fusing of genres, much in the manner of Wyclef Jean. And, like Wyclef Jean, Cold Sweat is adept at both the guitar and keyboard.

Produced by Jonathan Jn Baptiste, the beat of Cold Sweat’s new release is an all acoustic guitar and percussion dominated folksy, earthy riddim that has the feel of a Tracy Chapman song. Directed and edited by Ras Livity of Altitude Productions (of St. Pierre, Martinique), the accompanying video is set in Vieux Fort’s Bruceville and Westal Group communities, formerly known as Shantytown and The Mange. These settings amply capture the song’s theme of struggle and hardship. Fascinating camera angles, dynamic camera movements and close up facial shots that provide a reading of the struggle and hardships of life present a video of great drama. People lining the block sing along with Cold Sweat and help him deliver his message of hope and perseverance. Likewise, Cold Sweat teams up with fellow artists of the likes of Allen “Kyatt” Augustine, Itoobaa, to strengthen his message and to provide examples of artists who have not sold out, who have kept on trying despite the odds.

As a national artists, Cold Sweat may have been a well kept secret, but the artist has definitely taken his own advise and has kept on trying. Under the PCL and Lateko labels (run by Lenny Deneb), the artist recorded more than twenty yet to be released original songs. And over the past two years he has been working feverishly with Hotness International (run by Andrew “Yardie” Haynes), and later this year he is planning to release an album of some of the songs recorded at the studios of Hotness International and produced by Andrew “Yardie” Haynes.

More recently, with the help of Jako Productions, Cold Sweat has teamed up with the likes of Itoobaa (the man who brought us Freedom, arguably the best reggae album to come out of St. Lucia) to form the reggae band 4th World. With Cold Sweat as keyboard player and principle lead singer and with Adam Gilmor (widely known as the best sound man on island) as musical director, the band has quickly become the best reggae act in St. Lucia, stunning audiences wherever they perform (including The Pheonix and bars at Rodney Bay and Gros Iset) with the irresistible voice of Cold Sweat and the bands authentic and pure reggae sound. Many who have witnessed a Cold Sweat performance are astonished that St. Lucia can have an artist that good and they didn't know about him and that he isn't already out there on the world stage.

With these developments and the fact that Cold Sweat has had a number of memorable performances alongside the likes of Lucky Dube, Freddy Megregor, Gyption, Sherwin Winchester, Busy Signal and Alison Hines, it is safe to say that Cold Sweat the musical secret has become Cold Sweat the musical revelation. As such it seems that Cold Sweat is destined to leave his mark on the world; all he has to do is Keep on Trying.
- The Voice


"4th World Releases 5th Single, Stereotype"

4th World, the St. Lucian reggae band that rocked the crowd at the 2010 Montreal International Reggae Festival, and who has announced its tour of the Northeastern USA soon after its participation in St. Lucia Jazz 2011, has released its 5th single, Stereotype, from its debut album, Can’t Stop Us, to be launched March of this year.
The strength, originality and prolificacy of 4th World rest in the fact that it has three lead singers all of whom double as songwriters and instrument players. In previous 4th World releases, we heard from Nijah “Cold Sweat” St. Catherine (Reggae Party, Taking Blows, and Can’t Stop Us), and from Sylvester “Itoobaa” Peter (Now She is Gone), now with the release of Stereotype we are hearing from the third leg of 4th World’s lead singers and songwriters--Darrel “Frenchy” Augier.
Stereotype is all about originality and an artist remaining true to self. In it Frenchy tells the world, “Said I'm an earthling, so different from these human beings / The last of a dying breed /And I'm not your stereotype / Not gonna do what they like / Just gonna live my life / Say, my fingerprint is different! / they cannot predict me, I'm a natural disaster.”
As suggested by the lyrics, Frenchy is an artist who revels in being different, an artist bold and brave enough to artistically stand alone, and to attempt to curve his own niche in the artistic world space. The artist sings in a straight, simple, wailing voice unembellished by vocal tricks and vocal gymnastics. It is a voice that is truly his own and as such as distinctive as that of Peter Tosh. The musical arrangement in Stereotype is startlingly different to anything one may have heard and catches one by surprise. Employing the full force of nature-- wind, thunder, lightning, fire and water—the lyrics and music comes down with elemental force.
Off course it is reggae music, reggae music that takes you to the world of Steel Pulse, Third World, and Bob Marley and the Wailers. But it is reggae music with a difference. What’s the difference? It is edgy music busting with energy. It is music infused with the energy of youth but informed by history and the wisdom of age. It is music with the impatience of a man on a mission, a man armed with the knowledge that he is nearing a break thru, that history is in the making. It is music that jams with guitar licks and the sounds of thunder, lighting, raging fire and rushing water.
Like other great prophetic reggae voices that came before, the artist sees his art as a weapon against oppression, prejudice, and evil. “Let my works be seen, na mix up in religion, that division, one god /
one aim my destiny is to spread love my Lord! / mama earth she sent me! to them directly / So I buss my song at Mussolini and every one that come after.” And in a rap, towards the end of the song, the artist says, “lyrical gunshots, get shot none stop, think them could scare we with them ak-47's, M16's an nuclear bombs? We have some weapons stronger called fender stratocaster, yamaha motif, Ibanez RG 10, pearl bass drum.” And if his art doesn’t do the trick, “an when dem tink we done, we lick dem with earthquake, lightning , thunder, storm.
Frenchy, who first rocked a show at five years old when he sang at his pre-school graduation, said that he first picked up the guitar and started writing songs at the age of fourteen after watching Bob Marley in Redemption Song. Around that same time he signed up for a guitar class but soon dropped out because he was being taught to play Silent Night, not Redemption Song. To this day Bob Marley remains his greatest musical inspiration.

Like the other 4th World releases, Stereotype is edgy, irresistible, revolutionary in arrangement and lyrics, yet it is as true to roots reggae as the music of Bob Marley and Peter Tosh. As such it bridges the gap between the old and the new, but makes no compromises. What a treat, what a thrill to listen to 4th World; What variety of music and voices. There is Cold Sweat, the vocal maestro, who some say possesses one of the best voices in world reggae. There is the veteran, Itoobaa, the man whose rustic and unyielding voice conjure all the great reggae artists of old, and who has a knack of combining reggae with blues and jazz to come up with international hits like Freedom. And then there is Frenchy, a man apart, whose originality in voice, lyrics and arrangement takes one’s breath away.
Out of fear that, thanks to dancehall, reggae is becoming a dinosaur, there is a move afoot in Jamaica to compel the radio stations to give more airspace to reggae. 4th World may well be just what reggae has been missing to reclaim its crown from dancehall as the supreme Caribbean musical form. Jamaica gave the world reggae, but is the fate of reggae in the hands of groups like 4th World (from the Eastern Caribbean) who have never set foot on Jamaican soil?
- The Mirror


"4th World Releases Now she Is Gone"

With the release of its third single, Now She is Gone, 4th World who made a big splash at the Montreal 2010 International Reggae Festival and who has promised fans a debut album early next year, seems right on track to delivering on that promise. In fact, according to band members, besides Now She is Gone, the band has three other songs (Can’t Stop Us, Stereo, and Jah Puppet) that are ready for release.
This new release, Now She is Gone, was composed and sang by Sylvester “Itoobaa” Peter, who, almost a decade ago, brought us Freedom, which is still considered the best reggae album produced in St. Lucia, and the greatest musical endeavor to come out of Vieux Fort.
Apparently, within the warm embrace of 4th World, Itoobaa has found new and great inspiration, because Now She is Gone has the blues flavor of a B.B. King composition and would be right at home in a Rhythm and Blues Festival, or a southern USA cotton belt bar, yet it is roots reggae going back all the way to Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Bunny Wailer, and Burning Spear. Still, this fusion of blues and reggae, has given rise to a reggae track the likes of which have not been heard before.
That Now She is Gone is destined to be a hit, should come as no surprise to those familiar with Itoobaa’s work, for Freedom (whose video is playing on Tempo), the title tract of the Freedom album, remains one of the greatest reggae hits of the Eastern Caribbean, and more recently, Black Cinderella (whose video is also playing on Tempo), written and arranged by Itoobaa for Brandon Harding, has become one of St. Lucia’s biggest reggae hits in recent years.
In Now She is Gone, an inconsolable Itoobaa sings the blues. His voice is raw, harsh, soulful, yet richly layered. Why is he singing the blues? Well, because the one in whom “I have found exactly what I need, … is gone, yet my love still lives on.. though my heart is torn, for me she is the only one… If you could put yourself in my shoes,” he explains, “then you would know why I’m singing the blues.”
This is vintage Itoobaa, this is art in its most uncompromising fashion. This is music that has to be heard, and to make sure of that 4th World will be having a single release Party at 9PM Thursday, December 16 at Tequila Joe’s Restaurant and Bar in Rodney. The band is extending invitations to the media and fans alike.
If the rest of the songs on the album 4th World has promised to release early next year are as good as Now She is Gone and the previous two releases (Reggae Party and Taking Blows), then 4th World’s debut album may well eclipse Itoobaa’s Freedom album.
- The Voice


"4th World Releases Taking Blows"

4th World, the reggae band from Vieux Fort, who in early August thrilled us with their debut single, Reggae Party, and who, based on many accounts, was the highlight of the recently concluded Montreal 2010 International Reggae Festival, has announced the release of their second song, Taking Blows.

Unlike Reggae Party, which was enticing us to rock away the night, cause “reggae make you feel alright, so whine if you want to, grind if you want to,” Taking Blows is a defiant freedom song, dedicated to “all my fallen soldiers, and to my Freedom Fighters on the battle field.”

The song goes on to say: “I’ve been shot and brutalized, accused and victimized; I’ve been locked up in jail and criminalized; I’ve been betrayed, beaten, and crucified; I’ve been sold at a price just because of my pride; I’ve been taking blows, licking wounds and making foes; and sometimes I loose my life; they burry me, but still I rise; still I rise; still I rise; still I rise;”

With such lyrics one cannot help but summon the atrocities of slavery, colonization, and imperialism; the persecutions and prejudices rastafarians face in the system; the struggles and sacrifices that most artists have to endure. And one cannot help but conjure images of Freedom Fighters as Jesus Christ, Martin Luther King, Malcom X, Che Guevara , George Odlum, Nelson Mandela, and Mahatma Gandhi.

However, lyrics aside, in Taking Blows, using only guitar and congas, Cold Sweat, the composer and lead singer of the song, who perhaps possesses the best voice in World Reggae, brings us a powerfully emotional tune reminiscent of the music of Stacy Chapman and Bob Marley’s Redemption Song. Taking Blows conjures images of defiant groups of Africans or Rastafarians around camp fires chanting and beating drums.

With the release of Taking Blows, 4th World who is hard at work in studios is on schedule to complete and release its 14 track debut album by year’s end.

- Mirror


"4th World Releases Debut Single, Reggae Party"

4th World, the reggae band from Vieux Fort that has been captivating audiences across the island, is set to thrill the world even more with its debut single, Reggae Party.

Fusing reggae, dancehall, R&B, rock, and disco, Reggae Party is an upbeat, bouncy, party song that is sure to bring you to your feet.

“It’s a take over,” says the song, “words of the power, break down every barrier;
reggae party in session, rock with you, reggae party all night, rock with you, reggae make you feel alright; funky reggae, whine if you want to, this a funky reggae, grind if you want to.”

The seed that has germinated and blossomed into 4th World was planted when, recognizing that Cold Sweat has one of the most compelling and unique voices in World Reggae, Dr. Reynolds offered to help take the artist international, and as a means of gaining immediate income encouraged him to take up solo gigs in bars and restaurants in the Vieux Fort area.

Cold Sweat’s solo act worked for awhile, but there was a problem. The artist wasn’t thrilled with performing alone. As he explained, he has always seen himself as part of a tribe. So Cold Sweat went in search of his tribe.

First he sought Itoobaa and the solo act became a duet. Interestingly, when Itoobaa was recording his history making Freedom album nearly a decade ago, it was then eighteen year old Cold Sweat he used for backing vocals.

Next Cold Sweat brought in Darrel "Frenchy" Augier as vocalist and rhythm guitarist. Frenchy now sings about one-third of the bands repertoire in an impassioned, high pitched, wailing voice. His guitar strum, which starts with a high arm action and comes down on the strings with authority, makes it difficult to keep your eyes off him.

After the addition of Frenchy the band was in search of a drummer as replacement for the drum machine they were using. And in walked Benson Evans, son of Bruce Williams, affectionately known as Daddy Bruce, Vieux Fort's politician and great humanitarian, after whom Bruceville is named. A retired Wall Street software engineer, Benson was down in St. Lucia for a few weeks on business. So upon Benson's arrival, he was pleasantly surprised that 4th World was there as if waiting for his coming. Last month Benson returned to New York, but not before he had handed over the baton to a young, exciting drummer named Al Prescott.

Next to sweeten things up a bit and to refine the band's sound even further, Marlon “Bad Kali” Florent of Augier, Vieux Fort, was brought in. Although Marlon performed with 4th World before he had a chance to practice with the band, he was an instant hit. The way he made the guitar cry forced some to immediately compare him to Vieux Fort's Monty Maxwell, long recognized as one of the best guitarists St. Lucia has produced.

At this point Cold Sweat's tribe was complete and 4th World was a hit, because wherever 4th World performed audiences couldn’t get enough of the band. Up North, besides begging for the band to keep on playing, some in the audience literally grab on to band members to prevent them from getting off stage, others accuse the band of being selfish for not playing well into the early morning hours. Sometimes to forestall mob action, proprietors are compelled to contract an additional set. At both the 2010 National Telethon Concert and the Fond Gens Libre leg of Soufriere Creole Jazz 2010, 4th World held the audiences at awe, forcing some to describe the performances as out of this world experiences.

Despite these successes, getting to record the band’s originals has been a tortuous undertaken. Bookings at two different studios left the band with empty pockets but with nothing to show. This experience drove band members to pull together their resources and convert their band room into a studio (although with bare essentials), that they named Bad Kali Studios, in recognition of Marlon, the bands lead guitarist who doubles as sound engineer. Reggae Party is the first completed song coming out of Bad Kali Studios.

The studio could not have come at a better time, because 4th World has been invited to perform at the 2010 Montreal International Reggae Festival (August 6 to 8) alongside Lady Saw, Mr. Vegas, Frankie Paul, and Bunny Wailer, and in preparation for the festival the band is hard at work recording a twelve track album.

As a send off to Montreal, 4th World will be performing on Sunday, August 1, from late afternoon at the Sapphire Restaurant and Bar down in Vieux Fort. Band members wish to invite all of its fans, supporters and well wishers to come and party with them.
- The Voice


"4th World Delights Castries Audience"

The official opening of St. Lucia’s second Jamaican Patty Shack took place Friday (October 1) evening on Jeremie Street across from La Place Careenage, where 4th World, the reggae band from Vieux Fort, considered the best reggae band on island, provided two hours of nonstop entertainment that turned the event into a mad reggae party. 4th World provided a steady diet of both originals and popular cover songs, but it was the band’s originals that the audience reacted to and hungered most for. The audience showing a greater preference and appreciation for 4th World’s originals than cover songs, bodes well for the band who is on schedule to release its debut album in December and then to go on a national and international tour.

Long after the band’s allotted two hours of performance had come to an end, the audience kept begging for more. Many hearing 4th World for the first time were surprised that the band was from St. Lucia, receiving the answer to their question: “Where is the band from?” with disbelief. Several in the audience crowded the band manager, Dr. Anderson Reynolds, for his business card to contact the band for future bookings.

Poet, actor, theatre director and educator, Travis Weekes, who had the pleasure of hearing 4th World for the first time had this to say: "That was truly an amazing performance by 4th World last night. These guys are so intense, so passionate , and lively. More people need to see them.”

But 4th World is no Stranger to such fan reaction. At restaurants and bars in Rodney and Gros Islet, besides begging for the band to keep on playing, some in the audience literally grab on to band members to prevent them from getting off stage, others accuse the band of being selfish for not playing well into the early morning hours. Sometimes to forestall mob action, proprietors are compelled to contract an additional set. At both the 2010 St. Lucia National Telethon Concert and the Soufriere Fond Gens Libre leg of the 2010 St. Lucia Jazz Festival, 4th World held the audiences at awe, forcing some to describe the performances as out of this world experiences. And at the August 2010 Montreal International Reggae Festival, 4th World held the crowd in such a trance on the closing day that many remained standing in the rain, soaking in the music, forcing them to conclude that 4th World was the highlight of the festival.

This was the second time that 4th World provided the main entertainment at the opening of a Jamaican Patty Shack, the first time was at the Patty Shack’s grand opening in Vieux Fort, St. Lucia, were 4th World thrilled their home crowd and set the stage for a party that started at 5PM and continued after midnight. It is no surprise that the Jamaican Party Shack has sort the services of 4th World, which has Cold Sweat, the man with probably the best voice in world reggae, at its hem, for how best to brand a Jamaican Patty outlet than with reggae, and reggae of the highest order.

- The Voice


Discography

Freedom (by Itoobaa) 2001 reggae album (Jako Productions)
Lyrical Ammunition (by Cold Sweat) 2006 reggae, R&B and Hiphop album (the PCL Label).
One and Only (by Cold Sweat) 2008 reggae, R&B and Hiphop (Lateka Records)
Reggae Party 2010 reggae single release (Jako Productions)
Taking Blows 2010 reggae single release (Jako Productions)
My Woman is Gone 2010 blues/reggae single release (Jako Productions)
Cheating Games 2010 reggae single release (Jako Productions)
Can’t Stop Us 2010 reggae single release (Jako Productions)
Linger on My Mind 2010 reggae single release (Jako Productions)
Stereotype 2010 reggae single release (Jako Productions)
Jah Puppet 2010 reggae single release (Jako Productions)
Can’t Stop Us Forthcoming April 2011 14 Track- Album (Jako Productions)

Photos

Bio

4th World hails from Vieux Fort, a town at the southernmost tip of St. Lucia, long regarded as the hotbed of St. Lucian reggae. At its core 4th World is a conscious reggae band, but even so the band has no reservations about fusing roots reggae with dancehall, hip-hop and R&B. In fact, the band interprets its sound as the blending of the creative energies of its members. This openness towards music along with the fact that three of 4th World's instrument players take turns serving as the band's song writer and lead vocalist, has enabled the band to create and perform a wide variety of reggae music; some songs remaining true to the music of Bob Marley and Peter Tosh, some veering towards dancehall and Hip-Hop, others serving heavy doses of R&B, Blues and Jazz.

4th World is led by Nijah "Cold Sweat" St. Catherine (vocals and keyboards) who has over forty recordings under his belt and whose deep, husky voice is considered one of the best voices in
world reggae. There is Darrel "Frenchy" Augier (vocals and rhythm guitar) who, singing in a high pitched and passionate voice, is gaining a reputation for composing compelling and captivating songs that are all his own and as such he is an original artist to keep an eye on. The veteran of the band, Sylvester "Itoobaa" Peter (vocals and bass), 2001 album (Freedom) is considered the best reggae album produced in St. Lucia. On lead guitar is Marlon "Bad Kali" Florent, who makes the guitar cry and fills in all the empty spaces of the band. He provides the glue that binds the music together and the spice that gives the band its special flavour. On drums is the energetic Al Prescott, the youngest and newest member of the band, who, coming from a long line of percussion musicians, keeps the band energized and ever ready.

A question many people ask is how did 4th World get its name? or what's behind the name? Itoobaa explains that long before 4th World was formed, in impromptu fashion him and Cold Sweat would be on the block playing guitar and singing, sometimes composing songs on the fly. In fact, many of the songs they have since recorded were first tested in the crucible of those spontaneous gatherings. During one of those sessions, a friend from the neighborhood walked up to them and said, "You all are the 4th World Band, man!" At the time Itoobaa and Cold Sweat thought nothing of it because there were no plans for a band, but after the band got started and they had to come up with a name, the first name that popped up was 4th World. They brainstormed for a different name, but none of the other names they came up with seemed to fit the band as well as 4th World. So the name stuck.

The seed that has germinated and blossomed into 4th World was planted when, recognizing that Cold Sweat has one of the most compelling and unique voices in World Reggae, Dr. Reynolds offered to help take the artist international, and as a means of gaining immediate income encouraged him to take up solo gigs in bars and restaurants in the Vieux Fort area.

Cold Sweat’s solo act worked for awhile, but there was a problem. The artist wasn’t thrilled with performing alone. As he explained, he has always seen himself as part of a tribe. So Cold Sweat went in search of his tribe.

First he sought Itoobaa and the solo act became a duet. Interestingly, when Itoobaa was recording his history making Freedom album nearly a decade ago, it was then eighteen year old Cold Sweat he used for backing vocals.

Next Cold Sweat brought in Darrel "Frenchy" Augier as vocalist and rhythm guitarist. Frenchy now sings about one-third of the bands repertoire in an impassioned, high pitched, wailing voice. His guitar strum, which starts with a high arm action and comes down on the strings with précised authority, makes it difficult to take your eyes off him.

After the addition of Frenchy the band was in search of a drummer as replacement for the drum machine they were using. And in walked Benson Evans, son of Bruce Williams, affectionately known as Daddy Bruce, Vieux Fort's politician and great humanitarian, after whom Bruceville is named. A retired Wall Street software engineer, Benson was down in St. Lucia for a few weeks on business. So upon Benson's arrival, he was pleasantly surprised that 4th World was there as if waiting for his coming. Benson has since switched his attention to establishing a software company but not before he had handed over the baton to a young, exciting drummer by the name of Al Prescott.
With a drummer in hand and the goal of recording and taking Cold Sweat international, Dr. Reynolds went in search of Adam Gillmor to better position the band and Cold Sweat to go international. It was natural for Dr. Reynolds to seek out Adam Gillmor because it was with Adam as sound engineer that Jako Productions made history with the release of Freedom by Itoobaa. Adam helped refined the band's act by working with them on their harmonies, their positioning on stage and on