Aaron Beaumont
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Aaron Beaumont

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"L.A. Weekly"

"Maybe, just maybe, a new Elton John might be just what the doctor ordered, someone who can bring a new life to the ancient music-hall/pop piano-man tradition, with clear-headed songs of genuinely witty lyrical oomph and, most of all, a historically informed musical depth -- all delivered with style, grace, wit and elan, of course. Your candidate for such a new contender might very well be one Aaron Beaumont, a young L.A.-based singer-songwriter who's just put out this very choice platter on Milan Records called Nothing's Forever, Not Even Goodbye. Beaumont's love of the melodic flair of the '20s and '30s will take him far; his stuff simply never sounds trite, at least not in the earnest passion of his emotional palette -- and he's got that in spades. It might have something to do with his training as a classical pianist, or his experience playing trumpet in jazz bands, or being a bassist in hard-rock bands, sure, but ultimately it's a matter of talent + taste + a keen intelligence." John Payne, L.A. Weekly

- John Payne, L.A. Weekly


"ESD Music"

"Maybe, as Aaron Beaumont suggests in the title of his recently reissued debut album, nothing is forever – no, not even goodbye – but some things do come awfully close, and on that list, tastefully ragtime-drenched piano playing and the smooth croon of a natural pop vocalist must rank awfully high. That’s good news for Beaumont, whose Nothing’s Forever (Not Even Goodbye) is filled with impeccably crafted, pleasantly retro songs that rescue piano pop from the arch snarkiness of late-period practitioners like Ben Folds – while avoiding the occasionally nauseating heights of seriousness attained by, say, Jack’s Mannequin... In lesser hands, Beaumont’s extremely retro vibe would be nothing but a flimsy gimmick, but he’s clearly a songwriter who understands the difference between the strongly nostalgic and the simply timeless." - Jeff Giles, Eat Sleep Drink Music


"New York Cool"

"Optimistic, heartfelt and slightly quirky, Beaumont stands out in the sea of singer-songwriters who descend upon dark bars in Manhattan... Equipped with moving, personal lyrics, a humble attitude and an image reminiscent of a 1920’s nickelodeon actor, Aaron Beaumont appears to have a very bright future ahead of him." - Kristen Salen, New York Cool


"Flavorpill"

"With flurries of Wurlitzer, glockenspiel, and reindeer bells layering Aaron Beaumont's tunes, the singer/songwriter seems to have popped out of a music box. In fact, Beaumont recently relocated from Nashville, bringing with him a folky aesthetic chock full of charm and whimsy." - Jane McCarthy, Flavorpill


"The Lemur Blog"

"I'm absolutely blown away by this man's music right now. The man who's name sounds just too perfectly fitting with his music to be true, creates piano-based soul-tinged songs that ooze with a revivalism of older composing values while yet staying timeless." - The Lemur Blog


"Racket Mag"

Singer-songwriter Aaron Beaumont’s musical journey will come full circle at the Hotel Café in Los Angeles on June 20th, 2009. The LA-based troubadour celebrated the release of his debut album Nothing’s Forever (Not Even Goodbye) at the Café last year and since then, the musician toured the country and according to LA Weekly, his record signaled the arrival of a new Elton John.

While those are some flamboyant shoes to fill, Beaumont’s record actually channels the spirit of music from the 20’s and 30’s. As a result, he manages to create a refreshingly unique sound that does not loose that nostalgic touch.

Take for instance, the track “Any Other Way”- Beaumont’s old-fashioned crooner-type voice tells the plight of two people over the sound of delightful piano keys. It fits the timeless scene of a dimly-lit saloon overrun by flapper girls that smell like cigarettes. He sets this playful, ragtime spirit even more with his clever lyrics: “His blues are wasted on some pinstripes chasing the green.” In the midst of all this old-school imagery, Beaumont’s stylized piano-playing breaks free of time-period comparisons and makes way for a solid arrangement that only modern-day artists dare to attempt on their debut record.

The second track, “Time Will Come” reveals his thought-provoking, sensitive side. The classically-trained pianist pays close attention to every detail in order to evoke this feeling: soft-sounding instruments that include reindeer bells, a soothing Rufus Wainwright-type voice, and lyrical references to a higher power. It is an all-encompassing piece of music that shares profound dialogue like this one: “The sublime is being loved by one you’ve hurt and the divine is loving who hurts you the most.” This speaks of humility as a result of faith and forgiveness. Once the song hits the bridge and everything is stripped down, the message becomes more blatant and dramatic.

The sophistication level in his music is outstanding and in a sense, this album pays homage to classic styles of instrumentation such as the early 20th century piano roll. The LA wordsmith’s vocal phrasing is melodic and his lyrics are personable and loaded with metaphors. But the biggest stand-out quality of this record is Beaumont’s willingness to take calculated risks. For instance, in the song “Julia” there’s a Beatles-esque flavor to it- the melody captures the same tone as the song, “Maxwell’s Silver Hammer.” His influences span over a long musical history and Beaumont is pretty brave to incorporate these sounds to mold his first album.

The way Beaumont approaches subject matter in this record is also intriguing because he makes a deliberate attempt to play up the lyrics amidst a plethora of instruments that he throws in the mix. “When You Lost Yourself” is a great example of dark, haunting lyrics supported by upbeat, circus-like music. The energetic, happy music challenges the threatening words in a way that makes the song fascinating and unconventional (if you don’t count many Beatles and Franz Ferdinand songs that accomplish the same thing).

However, Beaumont understands how to complement the energy level of his lyrics and music too. For some reason he goes with the concept of taking it slow- literally. The last few songs signal Beaumont’s comfort level with the piano and stripping down his music to find its emotional core. In doing so, he avoids being predictable or going overboard vocally and trying too hard with the musical arrangement. Instead, this direction works in Beaumont’s favor because this stripped-down approach suits him. “The Park Bench Song” is a beautiful demonstration of this because Beaumont goes back to basics, frees himself from trying anything fancy, and just plays the song. In addition, musician Justin Saunders tugs at the heart strings on the cello.

Elton John he ain’t, but Aaron Beaumont has the potential to ride a wave of success all on his own. His debut record has so many dimensions to it, from taking classic influences from different musical decades to layering his lyrics with metaphors. This is a good sign for an artist, especially one who can make an impact first time around in the studio. - Racket Mag


"Guilt Free Pleasures"

I have a new music crush and his name is Aaron Beaumont. Without honestly knowing much about him, I ventured out into the terrible cold, rainy weather to see him play at Living Room last night and it was well worth the wet trek.

Aaron is one of those musicians that makes it look so easy. He has an effortlessly gorgeous voice and is a skilled piano player. He's handsome and well-dressed, but not pretentiously so. He was friendly but not showy and told interesting little stories between songs about his car suddenly bursting into flames on Sunset Boulevard (he's from LA). And while I don't know anything about his song-writing process, he makes that seem easy too. He has some really lovely songs that sounded so full, even though it was mostly just him and his piano (he had a flutist for a few songs, and while she was good and it was a nice addition, he honestly didn't need her because the piano music is so beautiful and voluminous on its own). - Guilt Free Pleasures


Discography

Nothing's Forever (Not Even Goodbye)
KCRW Radioplay: Traffic

Photos

Bio

A genre-blending synthesis of 1920s ragtime piano pop and melodic lines reminiscent of the Beatles, along with nods to Tom Waits, Ben Folds, and Elliott Smith, Aaron offers a piano-centered aesthetic that is at once daring and refreshing. A crowd favorite at his home base, the Hotel Cafe, his musical pedigree ranges from performing piano concertos with an orchestra to playing trumpet in a jazz quartet to touring the U.S. and Europe in a rock band. And that was just the first 25 years. The next 25 are even more promising.

During the past year, Aaron has shared bills with Ernie Halter, Josh Hoge, David Ryan Harris (featuring John Mayer), Chris Pierce, Jay Nash, Amber Rubarth, Greg Laswell, and Tyrone Wells.

Aaron will have full promotion on this outing--local press, media, and radio--via his publicist Samantha Tillman (Daffodil Publicity, formerly Tell All Your Friends P.R.) in conjunction with Milan Records.

Aaron just released his debut album, Nothing’s Forever (Not Even Goodbye) on Milan Records recorded by Mike Odmark (Tyler James, in Nashville, and is fresh off successful East Coast and West Coast tours in Spring 2009, backed by tour press, radio, and retail efforts as well as continued online viral promotion.

“Maybe, just maybe, a new Elton John might be just what the doctor ordered, someone who can bring a new life to the ancient music-hall/pop piano-man tradition, with clear-headed songs of genuinely witty lyrical oomph and, most of all, a historically informed musical depth--all delivered with style, grace, wit and elan, of course. Your candidate for such a new contender might very well be one Aaron Beaumont.” John Payne, Music Editor, L.A. WEEKLY.

"Aaron is one of those musicians that makes it look so easy." Guilt Free Pleasures

"Optimistic, heartfelt and slightly quirky, Beaumont stands out in the sea of singer-songwriters who descend upon dark bars in Manhattan... Aaron appears to have a very bright future ahead of him." New York Cool

"I'm absolutely blown away by this man's music right now. The man creates piano-based soul-tinged songs that ooze with a revivalism of older composing values while yet staying timeless." The Lemur Blog