Aaron Burton
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Aaron Burton

Dallas, Texas, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2014 | SELF

Dallas, Texas, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2014
Solo Blues Acoustic

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"Rootstime review of The Return Of Peetie Whitestraw"

Aaron Burton aka Peetie White Straw , is a Texas singer- songwriter - guitarist and mandolin player , who plays traditional Delta blues and country , and to give their own Texan twist. Burton is a musician who manages to sound like a black , traditional and authentic. Burton is accompanied sometimes by backing up consisting of Pat Boyack ( lead guitar ) , " Stompin ' " Bill Johnston (harmonica ) , Christian Dozzler (piano / accordion ) , Sonny Collie (bass ) and Dick Cordes (drums ) . Aaron not confuse Aron Burton , the Chicago blues bassist who plays and who played along with Freddy King in the late 50s ... Aaron Burton is a self-made musician . Hence his own unique sound and approach that characterizes him as he writes his own songs . It's the life experiences and everyday things , according to Burton comes in blues and he still sings again , in a simple but engaging and own way . He draws his music from Memphis to Maine , where he way to earn its cost plays in local clubs, bars and on the street . Burton has worked with many musicians. He opened as such for David Edwards ( Shaw , 1915/2011 ) . Edwards was an American Delta blues guitarist and singer . He is better known as David " Honeyboy " Edwards . Edwards learned to play guitar from his father at an instrument he had purchased . For $ 8 In the 40s he moved to Chicago , where his career began in 1942 . He played there with , among others, Muddy Waters , Howlin 'Wolf and Charlie Patton . He was present on the night his friend Robert Johnson drank poisoned whiskey and died . So some additional interesting details of this great musician and friend of Burton . A man who admires Burton is the Delta blues guitarist Robert Lockwood Jr. Chess . (1915-2006) , from whom he covert numbers ... and from whom he ever busker as a tip received in Helena , Arkansas . Robert Lockwood Jr. . played with the harmonica player Sonny Boy Williams II ( ± ° 1912) and one of the pioneers of blues and harmonica player , singer Little Walter ( 1930-1968 ) . In East Dallas Burton doing his weekly Tuesday night " Delta Blues Jam " in a club ' The Goat ' . Burton could already get a lot of interesting people on his weekly shows , such as Ray Reed , Hash Brown , Texas Slim , Pat Boyack , Cheryl Arena , " Stompin ' " Bill Johnston , Joel Foy , Holland K. Smith , KM Williams , James Hinkle , Andrea Dawson , Christian Dozzler and many others ...

Aaron Burton spent from 2005 all four albums . His debut album " aka Peetie White Straw . On the fifth album "The Return Of Peetie White Straw " all songs written by Aaron Burton . Burton has returned to his old country blues roots and the tracks sound like they in the years '40 - '50 are written . The new album from Burton is peeking back to his debut album . Hurton is a stubborn person and wants an independent musician / busker and therefore brings this album in -house. On three of its tracks Burton is accompanied by the harmonica player " Stompin ' " Bill Johnston . " Stompin ' " (video ) ? Because he sometimes used as a stomp box bass drum ? For his foot stomp ? ... Tell me !

1 " Skeleton In My Closet" [ Weird and ambiguous , but funny opening number and title / Acoustic fingerpicking Delta blues with referrals, advice and just what clapping and percussion ] - 2 " Lonesome " [Slide blues on a resonator ] - 3 " LaFayette " * [ Which Lafayette he would mean : the college , the gallery , the Marquis , the hotel, the city in Indiana and Louisiana , the newspaper , the family ... ? / A handsome country blues with a Mexican flavor and a great back up with the harmonica of William " Stompin ' " Bill Johnston ] - 4 " The Return Of Peetie White Straw " [ Burton with white straw sun hat is back ... / Instrumental slide slow blues ] - 5 " Treat You Right " [ Uptempo country rocker with more slide guitar ] - 6 " High Class Woman" * [Second intervention of Bill Johnston in a relaxed atmosphere and with many wondering glances at the passing parade ran and strolling ladies , who do not laugh ] - 7 " Grandma's Door" [ Country Folk with mandolin and a story about his grandmother ] - 8 " Monkey Makin ' Woman" [ Blues on women of men use and lunatics or simians ] - 9 " Leave My Girl alone " [ Folky and playful, but with a very clear message: do not touch , hands off ! / Loudon Wainwright III, folk ] - 10 "When April Comes' Round" [ Time for change , because : " See, see baby what you have done ... " ] - 11 " Seven Days A Week" [ A week long drunk ] - 12 " DFW Waltz " [ DFW ( Dallas - Fort Worth ) : the economic and cultural metropolis in North Texas / a slow waltz in Dallas Texas ] - 13 " If That 's Religion" [ and biblical story of a non-believer with many questio - Rootstime


"Aaron Burton: Old recipe of blues"

An Interview with Texan Aaron Burton: The musical heritage of Texas through the prism of the folk blues

Posted by Michalis Limnios BLUES @ GREECE on November 13, 2012 at 1:00pm
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"Life - I believe everyone has experiences that could be put to music."
Aaron Burton: Old recipe of blues
Aaron Burton is a young Texan guitarist, mandolinist, and vocalist who plays country traditional blues with a distinctly Texan spin having the talent. Aaron channels the rich and diverse musical heritage of Texas music through the prism of the country blues. Like many of the great country blues men and women before him, Aaron is completely self taught on his instruments which leads to a unique and interesting approach.
His fifty plus original compositions are drawn from various life experiences and are delivered with warm, soulful, and unforced vocals. His travels have taken him from Memphis to Maine but he has truly honed his skills playing for his daily bread in the clubs, bars, restaurants, house parties and streets of his native DFW, Texas.
Debut album was "aka Peetie Whitestraw" (2005), low-fi classic blues from Texas. All original Texas country blues and roots music “How Can I Be Blue?” (2008) album featuring Christian Dozzler on piano, harp, accordion and organ. In 2010 "Recession Blues" with original country blues gems featuring Christian Dozzler, Hash Brown, Stompin' Bill Johnston, Kevin Shermerhorn and Drew Alain. "Rising Sun" (2011) combines Aaron's authentic country blues/roots style with producer Pat Boyack's well established blues rock/soul sensibilities.

Interview by Michael Limnios

What do you learn about yourself from the blues and what does the blues mean to you?
That I'm stubborn and independent and will keep doing what I'm doing regardless. For me, the blues is therapy and expression.

What experiences in your life make you a GOOD BLUESMAN and SONGWRITER?
Life - I believe everyone has experiences that could be put to music. To me, the iconic bluesman embodies the American ideal of rugged individualism.

How do you describe Aaron’s sound and lyrics and what characterize your music philosophy?
It's like cooking; you take the recipes that have been handed to you mix 'em up, add your own touch, and create something new.

What's been their experience from “studies” on the road with the blues?
My studies have been living life and emulating musicians that I admire.




From whom have you have learned the most secrets about the blues music?
Mostly from various artists through their recordings. Alan Lomax's The Land Where the Blue Began is probably the best book I've read about blues.

Which was the best moment of your career and which was the worst?
It's all been pretty positive. I mean any day I get paid to play music is a good day.

What is the “feeling” you miss most nowadays from the “OLD DAYS OF BLUES”?
What's cool about the pre-war guys is that they were largely self-taught and so their guitar approaches are highly original.

Which is the most interesting period in your life and why?
Every period of my life has been interesting…at least to me.

Are there any memories from Honeyboy Edwards, which you’d like to share with us?
Haha - yeah…he tried to take a girlfriend of mine (Blue Lisa of KNON) back to his hotel room - at 90 something years old! That gives me hope for the future.




I saw a photo with Robert Lockwood Jr. tell me a few things about your meet with him?
I was busking at the King Biscuit Blues Festival in Helena Ark. Jeff Dyson, who had hired me to open for Honeyboy, brought Lockwood by to hear me, knowing I covered a few of his songs. I played five or six of Lockwood's songs for him and he seemed pleased. He had some kind words for me and even put a tip in my case - a very nice man. Lockwood is one of my all-time favorites.

What is the best advice a bluesman ever gave you?
Sam Myers used to call showoff types "glory seekers". I understood that to mean that in seeking to gain fame and respect they weren't being real…and usually playing way to many notes.

What the difference and similarity between the ACOUSTIC and ELECTRIC BLUES feeling?
What I like about country blues is that you don't have to conform to and rely on a band.

Why did you think that Country Folk Blues continues to generate such a devoted following?
It's good stuff! I think a lot of folks like that it utilizes the full range of the guitar. Also, in an age of big, loud bands, various sound technologies, and over-production, it's nice to see a person engage the listeners directly, without fluff.

What’s the best jam you ever played in? What are some of the most memorable gigs you've had?
I've had some really cool jams at my Tuesday night Delta Blues Jam at The Goat in East Dallas. I have a different guest weekly and there are plenty of great players to choose from in the D.F.W. area; Ray Reed, Hash Brown, Texas Slim, Pat Boyack, Cheryl Arena, - Blues.gr


"Rising Sun"


Aaron Burton is a young Texan guitarist/mandolinist/vocalist who plays country/traditional blues with a distinctly Texan spin – having the talent, like our own Ian Siegal, to sound “black”, traditional and authentic but at the same time highly relevant to today’s blues scene.

Backed by a crack band that features Pat Boyack (lead guitar), “Stompin” Bill Johnston (harp), Christian Dozzler (piano/accordion), Sonny Collie (bass) and Dick Cordes (drums), Burton delivers twelve fine blues that could well have been recorded back in the 40s or early 50s.

The title track is a deep North Mississippi Hill Country styled blues replete with downhome harp and almost spiritual vocals accentuated by a “call and response” holler – “I’ll Get Mine” segues into Tampa Red territory, a loping blues fuelled by warbling harp – “Evil Hearted Woman” has a plaintive Nighthawk feel to both the vocals and the slide, the Nighthawk influence again to the fore on “Baton Rouge” which predictably features fine swamp harp and honky-tonk piano.

Dozzler’s accordion adds immeasurably to the wistful Cajun feel of “I Won’t Do That No More” – Tampa Red meets Jimmy Rogers on the compelling “I Feel So Good” – whilst Dozzler’s accordion is again to the fore on the melancholy swamp pop of “Rockabilly Girl”.

Add in “Leaving Blues #2” where Burton sounds like a Chi-Town Willie McTell – the jaunty Crescent City inspired “You Got Me Hooked”, with it’s fine harp – and the hypnotic Hill Country influenced instrumental “Tried And True” with it’s tribal drumming – and you have a set that will delight all lovers of quality traditional country blues. ( HYPERLINK "http://www.aaronburton.net" www.aaronburton.net)
Rating 9
Mick Rainsford
- Blues In Britain


"Rising Sun"


Aaron Burton is a young Texan guitarist/mandolinist/vocalist who plays country/traditional blues with a distinctly Texan spin – having the talent, like our own Ian Siegal, to sound “black”, traditional and authentic but at the same time highly relevant to today’s blues scene.

Backed by a crack band that features Pat Boyack (lead guitar), “Stompin” Bill Johnston (harp), Christian Dozzler (piano/accordion), Sonny Collie (bass) and Dick Cordes (drums), Burton delivers twelve fine blues that could well have been recorded back in the 40s or early 50s.

The title track is a deep North Mississippi Hill Country styled blues replete with downhome harp and almost spiritual vocals accentuated by a “call and response” holler – “I’ll Get Mine” segues into Tampa Red territory, a loping blues fuelled by warbling harp – “Evil Hearted Woman” has a plaintive Nighthawk feel to both the vocals and the slide, the Nighthawk influence again to the fore on “Baton Rouge” which predictably features fine swamp harp and honky-tonk piano.

Dozzler’s accordion adds immeasurably to the wistful Cajun feel of “I Won’t Do That No More” – Tampa Red meets Jimmy Rogers on the compelling “I Feel So Good” – whilst Dozzler’s accordion is again to the fore on the melancholy swamp pop of “Rockabilly Girl”.

Add in “Leaving Blues #2” where Burton sounds like a Chi-Town Willie McTell – the jaunty Crescent City inspired “You Got Me Hooked”, with it’s fine harp – and the hypnotic Hill Country influenced instrumental “Tried And True” with it’s tribal drumming – and you have a set that will delight all lovers of quality traditional country blues. ( HYPERLINK "http://www.aaronburton.net" www.aaronburton.net)
Rating 9
Mick Rainsford
- Blues In Britain


"Dusty Blues review of "Recesion Blues""

Aaron Burton "Recession Blues" Self Production 2010. Aaron Burton is a musician gifted with a special charm, who bases his style on poetic well built songs, with a simple lyrical backing, looking for restrained melodies over any other musical involvement, especially in a speech that emphasizes a calm honest display of the sixteen songs included in the album, that gradually gain in determination, conviction and feeling. After this introduction it may seem Burton has nothing to do with blues, but is the opposite, as Aaron and his musicians are bluesy performers with songs full of the most basic descriptive blues language. The band has also a charming sensitivity which makes them become extremely relaxing but at the same time juicy and delicious for your senses. Aaron Burton is perfectly backed by the great Christian Dozzler on piano, harmonica and accordion, harmonica players Bill Johnston in a couple of cuts and Hash Brown in one cut too, Drew Allain on bass, Kevin Shermerhorn on drums and Burton himself on vocals, banjo, mandolin and guitar. In short words, it is an excellent album that has really touched me deep down in my heart. GREAT


- Dusty Blues


"Dusty Blues review of "Recesion Blues""

Aaron Burton "Recession Blues" Self Production 2010. Aaron Burton is a musician gifted with a special charm, who bases his style on poetic well built songs, with a simple lyrical backing, looking for restrained melodies over any other musical involvement, especially in a speech that emphasizes a calm honest display of the sixteen songs included in the album, that gradually gain in determination, conviction and feeling. After this introduction it may seem Burton has nothing to do with blues, but is the opposite, as Aaron and his musicians are bluesy performers with songs full of the most basic descriptive blues language. The band has also a charming sensitivity which makes them become extremely relaxing but at the same time juicy and delicious for your senses. Aaron Burton is perfectly backed by the great Christian Dozzler on piano, harmonica and accordion, harmonica players Bill Johnston in a couple of cuts and Hash Brown in one cut too, Drew Allain on bass, Kevin Shermerhorn on drums and Burton himself on vocals, banjo, mandolin and guitar. In short words, it is an excellent album that has really touched me deep down in my heart. GREAT


- Dusty Blues


"Il Blues (Italy) review of "Recession Blues""

the lyrics of "Hey Bartender" are a simple metaphor to introduce the song and its author. Not to be confused with Aaron Burton (base player and author), Aaron is a singer - texan guitarist raised as a busker, which still appears to be his current occupation. His style is Piedmont Blues but he has a quality that other young bluesman lack (i'm thinking Little Joe McLeman): Aaron releases only original pieces in perfect style. Musicality and acoustic guitars, pleasant and balanced usage of fingerpicking, slide and banjo: the country influence is evident in pieces like "Fading Every Day" and "Ascap Blues", Burton is sided by a band of other blues players like Bill J and Hash B (harmonica), Drew A at the base. The following contributions are particularly pleasant: Dozzler at the piano, Shermerhorn at the drums with his velvet touch to create a sound that is round, smooth, and soft. I am certain that the album was recorded "in presa diretta" (meaning the band is recorded together and not one instrument at a time). Burton's voice is always appropriate, clean, whiny, but with this don't expect a tearful album because there are several upbeat pieces and they are all great: especially "Workaholic"but also "Gonna Party Tonight", "AB Stomp". The lyrics confirm the validity of the compositions. When I think of the title track and a consistent part of his latest releases, I ponder: in an era when we only produce what sells, Blues attempts to address topics like the economic crisis and unemployment. It does it because it can, correction: of all genres, Blues just cannot escape from doing so. And Burton voices his opinion, "Have you ever felt like you wanted to cry, but tears just wouldn't come out? That's when you look for a job but cannot find one." And I can't not cite the Delta Blues "The Day Sweet Sammy Died", in memory of Sam Myers, authentic bluesman at Jacksonville. This was a modest unshocking production, but generous and of great quality: makes me want to spend the rest of my life sitting on the front porch with my wife and a beer listening to blues looking at the vines and waiting for a monday that will never come - Matteo Gaccioli
- Il Blues


"Il Blues (Italy) review of "Recession Blues""

the lyrics of "Hey Bartender" are a simple metaphor to introduce the song and its author. Not to be confused with Aaron Burton (base player and author), Aaron is a singer - texan guitarist raised as a busker, which still appears to be his current occupation. His style is Piedmont Blues but he has a quality that other young bluesman lack (i'm thinking Little Joe McLeman): Aaron releases only original pieces in perfect style. Musicality and acoustic guitars, pleasant and balanced usage of fingerpicking, slide and banjo: the country influence is evident in pieces like "Fading Every Day" and "Ascap Blues", Burton is sided by a band of other blues players like Bill J and Hash B (harmonica), Drew A at the base. The following contributions are particularly pleasant: Dozzler at the piano, Shermerhorn at the drums with his velvet touch to create a sound that is round, smooth, and soft. I am certain that the album was recorded "in presa diretta" (meaning the band is recorded together and not one instrument at a time). Burton's voice is always appropriate, clean, whiny, but with this don't expect a tearful album because there are several upbeat pieces and they are all great: especially "Workaholic"but also "Gonna Party Tonight", "AB Stomp". The lyrics confirm the validity of the compositions. When I think of the title track and a consistent part of his latest releases, I ponder: in an era when we only produce what sells, Blues attempts to address topics like the economic crisis and unemployment. It does it because it can, correction: of all genres, Blues just cannot escape from doing so. And Burton voices his opinion, "Have you ever felt like you wanted to cry, but tears just wouldn't come out? That's when you look for a job but cannot find one." And I can't not cite the Delta Blues "The Day Sweet Sammy Died", in memory of Sam Myers, authentic bluesman at Jacksonville. This was a modest unshocking production, but generous and of great quality: makes me want to spend the rest of my life sitting on the front porch with my wife and a beer listening to blues looking at the vines and waiting for a monday that will never come - Matteo Gaccioli
- Il Blues


"Review of "How Can I Be Blue?""

How Can I Be Blue?, the new release by blues guitarist and vocalist Aaron Burton, is a gem. The long overdue follow up to his freshman release, Petie Wheatstraw, showcases Burton's considerable talents not only as a performer, but as a songwriter as well – all 15 of the captivating tracks are original compositions. In addition to singing and playing guitar, Aaron also plays mandolin and percussion on the disc.

A natural talent in the country blues style, his vocals and guitar playing are both relaxed and unforced – as comfortable and comforting as a handmade pair of boots. And, every bit as much a custom fit. Burton's warm, unaffected vocal delivery draws you in – and his full, rich guitar style makes you want to stay until the last note has been sounded. This alone would make for a great CD, but Aaron also invited multi-instrumentalist Christian Dozzler to work his considerable magic adding touches of piano, harmonica, organ and accordion through out the project. Everything works in perfect harmony, if you will excuse the pun, tones playing with, not against, each other. Beautifully crafted musical artistry. A joy to listen to.

The songs themselves are well written and interesting, both lyrically and musically. "Talkin' In My Sleep" is a great tale of the nonsense of dreamland. "I.R.S. Blues" expresses the thoughts of many a frustrated taxpayer dealing with an inflexible, irrational, and in many ways outdated system. And although it sounds like it could be the 1930's musically, "Y2K Blues" lyrically brings the blues into the new Millennium.

As does Aaron himself. Relatively young for the genre of blues, Burton proves you shouldn't try to be anything in particular. Just be who you are. Which he does, magnificently. So if Aaron Burton's asking himself "How Can I Be Blue?", the answer from blues lovers everywhere is "We're just thankful you are."

Blue Lisa- S.W. Blues

- S.W. Blues Magazine


"Recession Blues"

Aaron Burton
Recession Blues
Self released

If you’ve ever wondered what Aaron Burton would sound like with a band backing him then you are in luck! In the times that I’ve seen Aaron playing around the Metroplex he’s always been either a solo act or had the accompaniment of a harp player, but never bass and drums. His new CD is a superlative set of songs, each one written by Aaron and featuring several of the top notch “go to” guys who enhance his sound and make the songs come alive.

Aaron’s fine acoustic guitar work is evident throughout the disc. A proponent of country blues, he plays guitar, slide, mandolin and banjo with authority and versatility. His voice is in fine form as well, smooth and mellow. On the title song he evokes a sound that is contemporary and yet sounds as if it came from the last economic catastrophe.

Slide guitar is always a big component of Aaron’s music; he is perhaps the finest acoustic slide player in the area. “Ascap Blues” features his sterling work as well as a comment on the trials and tribulations of the music bizness. There’s some great foot-tapping music throughout the disc including “Gonna Party Tonight” with Kevin Shermerhorn playing a shuffle to die for. “Dirty Dog” is a Delta blues that is simple yet masterfully played.

The finest song on the album is “You’re Wrong,” a haunting blues that gets under your skin with its tale of bad behaviors. Bill Johnston plays a beautifully sad harp solo as Shermerhorn and Drew Allain take the listener down the dark alleys of the city after midnight. “Never Stopped Dreaming Of You” is a sweet waltz that evokes the Evangeline country sides of southern Louisiana.

There are a couple of guest appearances that enhance the disc. Christian Dozzler adds some harp and accordion as well as his trademark piano to “Hey Bartender”. Hash Brown plays some of the greasiest harp this side of the Mississippi on one track as well.

Aaron Burton is a wonderfully eclectic artist, a local treasure, and this release is a labor of love. His fans will undoubtedly be pleased with this CD, and hopefully bring more fans into his camp. Pick up a copy the next time you see him live. Recession Blues is highly recommended. Now if we could only hook him up with T-Bone Burnett…

- Jim Dimock -


Southwest Blues CD Review - April 2010

- Southwest Blues Mazine


"Review Of "Good Old Wagon""

Aaron Burton & Cheryl Arena
Good Old Wagon

Close your eyes and listen to this CD. The feeling is akin to sitting on the back porch of the house belonging to a long time friend, swinging in a hammock on the warm Texas summer night, while your two best friends play the blues on the steps not more than a few feet away. The new release from Aaron Burton & Cheryl Arena Good Old Wagon, is comforting and comfortable, both hypnotic and peaceful. Nothing forced, nothing fake, a natural pairing of two extremely talented blues musicians hand crafting introspective originals and reassuring covers.

This is the kind of CD that blues purists worship and yet has the power to make blues fans out of those teetering on the edge, taking their first dip into that big blues ocean. With so much debate about what is blues and what is not, is a joy to listen to a project where there is no question; this IS the blues. Real. Honest. What else could it be?

Kudos to Engineer Pat Boyack and also to Roger Burton, who mastered the disc. Too many times songs with this kind sparse phrasing yet voluptuous weight are battered about unmercifully by the technicians in the studio. Not here. The subtle timbre of the guitar, harmonica and that most beautiful and complicated of instruments, the human voice, are all here, with a lovely round, rich sound. It almost breathes in your ear!

Chemistry in a musical relationship is a tricky thing, you either have it or you don't. It can't be forced, and that's why "super groups" rarely work - technically it"s okay, but there's just something missing. Nothing is missing here - the pairing of Burton's warm rich guitar tone is the perfect match for Arena's heartfelt harmonica lines. They both take turns at the vocals, in the best of natural interplay that musicians have when they respect each others talents. The musical connection is so complete; it's hard to believe they have only been playing together about a year. It's obvious, Aaron Burton and Cheryl Arena have come to this point from their own musical journeys, but it was meant for them to join forces. It was destiny that Good Old Wagon be born.

- Blue Lisa -


Southwest Blues CD Review - October 2006 - S.W. Blues Magazine


Discography

A.K.A. Peetie Whitestraw- 2005
Good Old Wagon- 2006
How Can I Be Blue? 2008
Recession Blues 2010
Rising Sun 2011
Various tracks from each cd have received local and international radio airplay.

Photos

Bio

"A must for fans of Delta blues music..."
-Eric Schuurmans, Rootstime 2013

"Burton delivers twelve fine blues that could well have been recorded back in the 40s or early 50s...you have a set that will delight all lovers of quality traditional country blues. Rating 9."
-Mick Rainsford, Blues In Britain, Dec. 2011

" Burton's warm, unaffected vocal delivery draws you in and his full, rich guitar style makes you want to stay until the last note has been sounded."
- Blue Lisa, Southwest Blues Magazine

"...proficient in every imaginable guitar style such as delta blues, piedmont, fingerstyle, flat picking, ragtime, bottleneck, Texan acoustic, and a bit of zydeco."
- Freddy Vandervelpen, Rootsville

"He has that easygoing confidence...And his lyrics walk right into your head."
-Tim Shuller, Buddy Magazine

"...a superlative set of songs...he plays guitar, slide, mandolin and banjo with authority and versatility. His voice is in fine form as well, smooth and mellow...Recession Blues is highly recommended."
- Jim Dimock, Southwest Blues CD Review - April 2010

"Aaron is a great Blues sogwriter and performer, the real deal (and I don't say that often these days).
-Pat Boyack, guitarist for Marcia Ball, Ruthie Foster, the Prowlers

" Aaron Burton is a musician gifted with a special charm...an excellent album that has really touched me deep down in my heart.' - Vicente Zumel, Dusty Blues- Nov. 2010 CD Reviews