Agnostic Mountain Gospel Choir

Agnostic Mountain Gospel Choir

BandBluesAlternative

There are few bands who conjure the intensity of the original blues and and folk music pioneers while uniting roots and rock audiences. Hollering, growling, and high, lonesome keening. Duelling slide guitars, tin can banjo, frenetic finger picking, sheet metal percussion, and pounding upright bass.

Biography

“Ten Thousand is not an homage to AMGC’s heroes, but rather a bunch of spirited interpretations that kick serious ass”. (Time Out London)

They’re a quartet. And they’re not from the mountains, though Calgary is close. The music, on the other hand, is not a joke. People often mention whiskey, brimstone, the Mississippi Delta and the Appalachian Mountains when they talk about their music. There are few bands who conjure the intensity of the original blues and folk music pioneers while uniting roots and rock audiences. The Agnostics are one of them.

Hollering, growling, and high, lonesome keening. Duelling slide guitars, tin can banjo, frenetic finger picking, sheet metal percussion, and pounding upright bass. That’s The Agnostics.

Critics drop adjectives like ‘punk’, and make comparisons with Tom Waits, and Captain Beefheart. The band maintain that the punk spirit was born in Delta and the mountains. Beefheart and Waits know that too.

Since the band’s first gig in 2001, word has spread. St. Hubert, the AMGC’s first CD, garnered a fist full of college radio airplay in Canada and ushered them into the roots music festival circuit. Their 2005 follow-up, Fighting and Onions, hit the top 10 of Earshot’s Canadian national campus radio chart, landed them a couple of national performances on CBC radio, bumped them up to bigger festivals – including a hit appearance the 2007 Winnipeg Folk Festival, and started a cult following outside Canada.

Ten Thousand, their latest release, ups the ante. The Agnostics push the boundaries of their sound without straying from what endears them to roots and rock fans. Already, it hit the top ten of the Chart Attack, Earshot, and CBC Radio 3 charts. It’s also their first official release in Europe, garnering them more raves from critics and fans - including UK blues phenomenon Seasick Steve - during their 2008 summer festival tour of England and Ireland and a second radio session for BBC DJ Mark Lamarr.

Once again, what’s old is new. And it’s new because the Agnostics make it so.

And We Quote:

A whisky-sodden joy from beginning to end.
- The Independent on Sunday, London

Their raw mountain music, to be sung round the campfire with moonshine in the jar and taters in the skillet, is a real tonic for listeners bored with over-produced, soulless fodder. Sing along, loudly. (8/10)
- Daily Mirror, London

Highly recommended! (Four stars!)
- Uncut, London, England

I’m going to move to Agnostic Mountain if this is what it can produce!
- Blues Matters, England

The songs are raw like a bloodied knuckle; they have the authenticity of a campfire and the impact of a heavy skillet on soft nose cartilage. … All hail to the AMGC - they’ll make a believer out of you.
- Americana-uk.com

The band’s awe-inspiring blend of the boldest and most boisterous elements of artists like Mississippi Fred McDowell and Tom Waits leaves listeners stunned: mouths gaping and ears ringing.
- Exclaim!, Toronto

[I]t’s immediately apparent that there’s a raw, emotional intensity at play here that no amount of bluff can possibly duplicate…. [T]his voice makes Captain Beefheart and Howlin’ Wolf sound like angelic upstarts.
- Penguin Eggs

Discography

Ten Thousand (S.A.P., 2008)
Fighting and Onions (S.A.P., 2005)
St. Hubert (S.A.P., 2003)