Toxic preme-Al amin/Bearded skull
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Toxic preme-Al amin/Bearded skull

Middletown, New York, United States | Established. Jan 01, 1983 | MAJOR

Middletown, New York, United States | MAJOR
Established on Jan, 1983
Solo Hip Hop

Calendar

Music

Press


"YZ - Sons Of The Father (1990) (Full Album)"

Hood science entertainment

YZ - Sons Of The Father (1990) (Full Album) - Hood science entertainment


"Al amin,press items/Reverbnaition"

“Lions Of The Desert - the next big underground group”
boston dru - rap.de

“Lions Of The Desert: the undergrounds next big group”
boston dru - joe538.com

“Lions of the Desert who hail from Middletown, NY have shunned trendy hip-hop topics like fashion, fancy cars, foxy females and violence, and instead opt to weave their narratives around more positive and educational pursuits. If our school and parents aren't going to open our children's eyes to the danger of the world, L.O.T.D. will.”
boston dru - joe538.com

""I'm Contemporary". Crazy tongue-twisting flavors from Al-Amin are combined with this early-90's-sounding production;" Boom-bap.com 4 out of 5
boston dru - joe538.com

"Al-Amin is no stranger to the game, with over 20 appearances on the mixtape circuit, which makes him one of the games most sought after underground artists"
boston dru - joe538.com

"Let there be no doubt,Al amin does not only deliver the most juttin' chorus we've heard in a LONG time("I’m not living a double life,I'm just contemporary,You don't wanna be my adversary,because I'm very well trained in the art of tearing mc's,out of the frame.Al amin's the name!")" Boom-bap.com 4 out of 5
boston dru - joe538.com

“reviews: Boom-bap.com 4 out of 5 Middleton,”
boston dru - joe538.com

“Lions Of The Desert-Top Of My Dome-Commonwealth Records. #8 New Music Charts For April 2004. ** HIP HOP CHARTS * *”
Dj Episode - start.mobilebeat.com

“Lions Of The Desert � Top Of My Dome - #1 Most Added to College Radio Charts - rapattacklives.com 3/29/04”
rapattacklives.com

“Lions Of The Desert – Top Of My Dome #6 on college radio charts – 4/26/04 Lions Of The Desert – Top Of My Dome - #1 Most Added to College Radio Charts - rapattacklives.com 3/29/04 "One of the freshest debuts we've heard in a long time" - boom-bap.com 4 out of 5 - boom-bap.com”
unsignedbandweb

“Lions of the Desert :: Lions of the Desert :: Commonwealth Records as reviewed by Fat Tony”
Fat Tony - www.RapReviews.com

“�In these days, where politics and religion mingle to the point that their distinctive boundaries are blurred, there are few voices strong enough to speak out authoritatively on both sides. Lions of the Desert bring it with passion and deliberate energy, and, hope that there's more to come in the future.� - Fat Tony � rapreviews.com”
Fat Tony - rapreviews.com

""Man made the drugs/man made the guns/man made the ghetto/man made the slums/the battle against evil it's Armageddon/in these last days in time/it's destruction." Al-Amin's voice is big and bullish, with just the right timbre to support such lyrical conviction. Everything he spits sounds dire and loud; explosive." - Lions of the Desert :: Lions of the Desert :: Commonwealth Records.
Fat Tony - www.RapReviews.com

“Local rapper Al-Amin drops his "Masterpiece" - Al amin: The masterpiece.”
Sandy Tomcho - Record on line.com

“ This cd is hip hop at its best. A new blend of Conscience Rap and street. This cd has something on it for everybody From underground to commerical rap, dirty south to soul, R&b to rock, Al-amin covers it all. - Al amin: The masterpiece.”
www.cdbaby.com

“Album Notes. Al-amins THE MASTERPIECE is hip hop at its finest. The title speaks for itself. This album is one of the most creative albums i heard in years. With his bullish voice, off the hook lyricals and 5 star production team THE MASTERPIECE is a hip hop classic! If you're really a fan of hip hop then this cd is what you been waiting for TRUST ME!!!!! - Al amin: The masterpiece. ”
www.cdbaby.com

“ Review. This cd is hip hop at its better A new immingle of Conscience Rap and street. This cd has something on it for everybody From undercover to commerical rap, sordid south to soul, R&b to sway Al-amin cov. - Al amin: The masterpiece.”
www.freefilesfinder.com

“Editorial Reviews.The Masterpiece is hip hop at its finest. Al-amin is able to define streetlife in a way no other rapper has yet done and can do it without a single curse word. This album is truly a work of art. - Al amin: The masterpiece.”
www.amazon.com

“Fan review. chad- this cat is staight up and down ill This cd is the rebirth of HIP HOP. The songs and the tracks are hot to def. no bling bling just straight lyrics like we use to do it in the parks. Money get 2 thumbs up early! - Al amin The masterpiece. ”
www.cdbaby.com

“Fan review. Oz- Who is this dude he's offical did big pun leave his voice box with this dude? who's his producers. he got that premo, wyclef meets def jux sound. Im feeling every track. - Al amin: The masterpiece.”
www.cdbaby.com

“I love radical hip-hop, I love conscious hip-hop. And I love rappers with real and demonstrable talent, which Al-Amin indisputably possesses. Al-Amin :: The Masterpiece :: Hood Science Entertainment.”
- John Teufel - www.Rap reviews.com

“Al-Amin :: The Masterpiece :: Hood Science Entertainment as reviewed by”
John Teufel - Rap reviews.com

“Al Amin of Middletown rapping "Varsity 845" in the Middletown Pro 24 Trax studio on North Street. - Varsity 845,Theme song.”
Recordonline.com - Various


"Local rapper Al-Amin drops his "Masterpiece""

Posted Jun. 24, 2005 at 2:00 AM
Updated Dec 17, 2010 at 9:31 AM


Story by Sandy Tomcho
The room is dark and quiet, with only a sliver of the fading sun finding its way through a shaded window. Music filters into the room, and four heads begin to move up and down in unison .
The players are in their positions. Epik, the record producer, sits in his chair behind a wall of speakers and computers. Rappers Al-Amin and Dred (aka Big Sexy) sit behind him, just off his right shoulder. Behind the microphone, wearing headphones, is another local rapper, Kafrizon.
During this studio session, the four of them are putting the final touches on motivational entrance music for local boxer Barbossa.
Their next project is a little, let's say, bigger. It's definitely more time-consuming. It also demands some determination. Luckily, it's a quality these artists aren't lacking.
Middletown resident Al-Amin and his upcoming solo album, "The Masterpiece," are the weapons they'll use.
The studio is immaculately clean. No soda bottles or sandwich wrappers anywhere. The floor is vacuumed, and you'd need a magnifying glass to find a speck of dust.
Framed movie posters of "Reservoir Dogs" and "Scarface" share the wall space with framed posters of Tupac and Biggie. Current editions of hip-hop magazines are organized in a rack on the floor, and the faint smell of incense lightly hangs in the air.
During a handful of short breaks, Al-Amin talks about his music industry experience.
The soft-spoken 29-year-old got his start with a group called Total Kaos when he was 16. Back then, he and his partner, E-Nasty, were known for their hardcore underground style. Calling themselves Toxic, the two performed with Method Man, Redman, the Fab Five and Real Live. But as Al-Amin's interest and belief in the teachings of Islam, which he had been studying since 1996, increased, so did the divide between the two artists' visions. The partners went their separate ways in 1998.
"Back then, I did a lot of cursing and talking about street stuff and drugs. I was kinda for it," Al-Amin says. "I changed because I started studying Islam and realized that what I was rapping about was the stuff that destroyed you. Rappers are role models, but a majority of them are bad role models. I started studying my religion and tried to stay away from certain things. We just wound up going down different paths."
Pursuing a career as a solo artist, Al-Amin traveled back and forth to New York City, entering MC battles. He teamed with friend Righteous Nova in 2001 and formed Lions of the Desert (LOTD), which recorded a nine-song demo and landed a deal with Boston-based Common Wealth Records.
LOTD's self-titled debut was released in 2003, and the single, "Top of My Dome," was the No. — added single to college radio charts in the country. Despite ending its six-week radio run at No. 6, the album was never distributed because of its strong religious and political content.
In 2004, the group was offered a distribution deal by EMI Saudi Arabia to license its music to be sold in the Middle East, but the censorship board reviewed the album and banned it because of its strong content.
"It was too political, basically. We were talking about terrorism and false misconceptions. It was about a change from negativity to being positive, terrorism as opposed to what Islam actually is," Al-Amin says. "They didn't want me to have a standpoint. They thought my music would incite an uprising."
No stranger to going it alone, Al-Amin decided to release his first solo album, "The Masterpiece." About four months ago, Epik and Dred came on board to help Al-Amin with his album and, in the process, started their own entertainment company, Hood Science.
"We're starting something together and we're using my album as a launch for the company," Al-Amin says. "I've made a lot of progress in the short amount of time with them. Without them, the album definitely would have been delayed."
Epik, Al-Amin and Rob, Al-Amin's manager and street team organizer, sit in a booth during lunch and are ready for business. No one leans back and gets comfortable. With straight backs and elbows resting on tabletops, the trio looks over menus. But they're not discussing food.
"The album's gonna be straight-up hip-hop. There won't be a lot of club songs. No flashy, bolster bling-bling hits," Al-Amin says. "I want to target earlier audiences and take it back."
"He's the truth," Epik adds.
"He doesn't say anything he wouldn't be doing. In the studio, he keeps it real to himself," says Rob. "That's what's unique about him."
Epik, 28, met Al-Amin when they used to battle in rap contests. Rob, 20, is the youngest at the table, but based on his professional demeanor and mastery of his Blackberry, you'd never guess by looking at him. They all hooked up at previous gigs at another production company. They all shared a common dream.
"With Hood Science, we want to find local talent and help them get record deals," Epik says. "We want to get a distribution deal and start our own label."
"We want a broad-based production," Rob says, picking up where Epik left off. "Production, studios, concerts, promotion management. That would bring us to our goal: a label."
Al-Amin's been battling at parties since he was 14. He hit up open mikes, dropped mix tapes and freestyles.
"I have a message, a story to tell," Al-Amin says. "Other rappers talk about the drug game and hustlin'. There's nothin' good about that. There's nothing to glorify."
"Ninety percent are lyin' anyway," Epik points out. "They make it seem like it's more acceptable to flip bags of dope than to get a job at McDonald's."
The use of half-naked women in rap videos is another marketing tool that rubs the trio the wrong way.
"Cats who were raised by a single mom with four sisters can't do that with a conscious heart,' Rob says, shaking his head.
"We're comin' in through the back door and we're gonna kick down the back door hard," Epik says with a confidence that makes others in the diner look up and take notice. "We're not tryin' to depend on anyone else."
Al-Amin sits on a carpeted wall bench surrounded by do-rags, sunglasses and belt buckles. Barbers sweep up their stations while singing whatever happens to be playing on the jukebox. A little girl sleeps in the corner waiting for her dad, and a handful of people hang out just outside the front door on the sidewalk.
Today is a good day for Al-Amin's billboard photo shoot.
He gets into the barber's chair and tells his guy he wants a dark Caesar.
"And when I finish," the older gentleman says with a wink, "it will be."
The two catch up. Al-Amin appreciates the encouragement he receives from his friend, but stays perfectly still while the razor is in motion. The corners of his mouth reveal the slightest smile.
A girl rushes inside and yells something in a frantic voice that sends people rushing outside.
Al-Amin doesn't flinch.
"Don't bring it in here!" the barber yells. "This is a business."
"Kids these days are havin' no respect for other people," the man says sadly.
Epik and Rob walk in during the commotion.
"I think the guy outside got jumped," Rob says. "Looks like his nose is broken."
"You just keep doin' what you're doin,'" the barber says into Al-Amin's ear.
After some final touches, the barber's cape is removed and a soft brush fans away hair that didn't make its way to the floor. The trio walks out the door, each member heads to a separate car. They'll meet again in 20 minutes to finalize plans for Al-Amin's CD release party.
The crowd is still outside, but the police and the guy with the broken nose said their goodbyes a while ago.
Al-Amin was born Kenneth Coles. When he converted from Christianity to Islam in 1998, he took the name Rafiq, which means "friend and companion" in Arabic. That's how his wife of eight months, Tsahai, knows him.
The truthful or trusting. That's what "Al-Amin" means. That's why he chose it to be the name he goes by as a rapper. And it's what Epik meant when he called Al-Amin "the truth."
He wants his fans to know that's what he speaks on his album. He wants his unborn son and 9-year-old stepdaughter, Eshe, to know that's what he stands for.
Soon the public will know it, too. Al-Amin put two years into "The Masterpiece," which Hood Science officially releases today. The 19 tracks on the album reflect many different aspects of its author.
On "The Chemical Devil," he speaks from the standpoint of drugs. That is to say, he takes on their voice. For "I Am Hip-Hop," he declares his love for what he is. It is his culture, what he lives and breathes.
"These are my personal views," Al-Amin says. "It's a positive message compared to a majority of rap. I'm hopeful that this is beginning of something good for rap."
Sandy Tomcho is a music and features writer for the Times Herald-Record. She can be reached at .
If you Go! ...
What: Al-Amin album release party with Kafrizon, Magnetic, M.S., Aneika and the Dalai Lamas
Where: Desperado's Pub, 343 E. Main St., Middletown
When: 9 tonight /June 24/
Tickets: $10
Call: 344-0907
"The Masterpiece" is available at:
Media Play, Town of Wallkill
City Limits, North Street, —
Middletown
www.sandboxautomatic.com
www.cdbaby.com
www.undergroundhiphop.com
www.amazon.com - Sandy Tomcho


"Al-Amin :: The Masterpiece :: Hood Science Entertainment"

Al-Amin :: The Masterpiece :: Hood Science Entertainment
as reviewed by John Teufel
Some of the more optimistic among us see a new horizon dawning on hip-hop music: the commercial viability of so-called "conscious rap." Recent successes by Kanye West and Common, along with uncharacteristically nuanced work from artists like Jadakiss, point to a real change in the art. While no one is naïve enough to dismiss gangsta rap out of hand, there certainly exists the possibility of a return to the type of hip-hop rappers like KRS-One first championed. Maybe, just maybe, the world of urban music is hurdling over the obstacles that caused Jay-Z to admit "dumbing down" his music to increase profit. Or, as underground sensation Immortal Technique put it recently, "The bling-bling era was cute, but it's about to be done."

One gets the feeling that Middletown, New York's Al-Amin is looking for the type of recognition given to artists like Technique. His promo material brags that he's been censored and banned by the Saudi Arabian government for the "religious and political" content of his songs. Even his adopted name speaks to radicalism: Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin was a 1960's era Muslim cleric and political activist charged with the murder of an Atlanta police officer. His arrest and subsequent incarceration have been called a "government conspiracy." Plainly put, this Al-Amin fancies himself a revolutionary, albeit one who hasn't quite achieved the status he would like.

So, so far, so good, right? I love radical hip-hop, I love conscious hip-hop. And I love rappers with real and demonstrable talent, which Al-Amin indisputably possesses. But to be a "conscious rapper" with his mind on "real issues," one has to actually address those issues, not just yell a few buzzwords and then rap about guns. And there lies the problem with "The Masterpiece": it's a bipolar disorder of a rap record, unsure of whether it wants to "dumb itself down" or attack controversy with fangs bared. The result is an uneven mishmash, at times catchy and daring, but often repetitive, cliché, and yes, tritely gangsta.

Al-Amin's voice sounds like a bizarre combination of Big Pun and Biggie, but usually without the emotion and wit of the latter, and the frantic syllable orgy of the former. He's somewhere in the middle, this Al-Amin, able to firmly control his flow and entertain, but unwilling to change it up for the sake of variety. The album begins with "I Am Hip-Hop," (Or "I'm A Hip-Hop," depending on whether you check the CD booklet or the back of the case), a catchy and extremely promising cut. Talk of "politicing with Arabs and Palestinian cats" sounds downright rebellious over the bouncy, danceable beat. We're off to a good start, and Al-Amin follows with "Knock Knock," featuring a Mobb Deep-style beat and that nerd-rap style you either love or hate ("too futuristic for you vintage lyricists," etc.). So we've got great openers and an obviously talented rapper. What could go wrong?

Actually, nothing much goes wrong for the album's first half. It's banger after banger, with a few definite stand-outs. "The Game" tackles the uglier side of gangsta living without glorifying it, telling us about former Gs turned junkies, all over a chick singer and happy "Juicy" strings. On "The Big Gangsta," we continue with Al-Amin's focus on the inherent lack of dignity in much gangsta living. Here, he claims one can't be a respected recording artist and a gangsta at the same time. It's a brave message, delivered with a precise, if slightly monotone, flow. Another brave message emerges on "The Artist," this one reveling in braggadacio about being, yep, an artist, not a gangbanger. The beat (provided by Messiah, who provides some of the best music) is urgent and fierce, driven eloquently by a piano. Al-Amin again manages to flow nicely, despite the creeping feeling of repetition. At this point, basically the album's middle, every word is beginning to sound like the one before it. Switch up your flow, Al-Amin!

Okay, so remember the beginning of this review? Where I lamented the lack of focus on "The Masterpiece"? Here's where that happens. Midway through this album, the tides turn so fiercely that I can only think someone scared Al-Amin into thinking he would never blow up with songs berating the street thug lifestyle. Because we switch from doing just that, to boasts about being "the only conscious rapper kicking those hardcore joints." First of all, where does Al-Amin suddenly grab the label of consciousness from? He's barely touched those issues, save the subtle messages of songs mentioned above. Most disappointing, "Good Stuff" opens with dialogue borrowed from Menace II Society, one of my favorite movies, but never even attempts to lyrically dissect the sample's mentions of Islam "saving the black people." Maybe Al-Amin was disturbed by the film's conclusion, and there I can sympathize, but that's really no excuse to forget about religion after using a sample to introduce it. ("Shareef! No, man!" God, that was some shit.)

And so go the remaining nine tracks. "Crome Meets Crome" (it is beyond me why nobody spell-checked the liner notes) tells an ultra-serious street thug story, but leaves behind the wit and detail that allows artists like Jay-Z and Lloyd Banks to make this type of cut work. "This and That" consists mostly of violent threats, all with a Dr. Dre-style "been there, done that" attitude. This is the most maddening cut on the album, because Al-Amin chooses to throw some "love for my brothers in Iraq" and protest the "Homeland Security Act," but he never gets any deeper than a quick mention. It's incredibly frustrating. He wants the credit for being aware, for being "conscious," but he never puts in the work. Anyone can yell the word Islam, but it takes a talent like Talib to expand and build. Al-Amin, despite his obvious talent, is being either lazy or cowardly here.

For a self-released underground album, production on "The Masterpiece" is often impressive. Producer Burton laces the best tracks, and a highlight is the ungrammatically titled "To Greedy To Share," a track boasting crunchy electric guitars and a rock chorus, so although Al-Amin might have 99 problems, this bitch ain't one. Alas, some of the other cuts are sort of problematic, and the obvious low-budget beats and dismal production bring down already tepid flowing. As a rule, one shouldn't hold cheap production against super-underground efforts, and I'll stick to that here. But I can't help but think that better production and higher work ethic might create an ACTUAL masterpiece for Al-Amin.

On "Studio Killers," Al-Amin lays down a great line that really shows his promise: he's "building the Underground Railroad with every track laid." Although this album as a whole isn't anything to freak out over, it's a nice introduction to someone who could prove to be a true talent in the years to come. Next time, let's hope for better production, a more varied flow, and some actual revolutionary dialogue. Or, at the very least, a spell-checker.

Music Vibes: 6.5 of 10 Lyric Vibes: 5.5 of 10 TOTAL Vibes: 6 of 10

Originally posted: August 23, 2005
source: www.RapReviews.com - RapReviews.com


"Lions of the Desert :: Lions of the Desert :: Commonwealth Records"

Lions of the Desert :: Lions of the Desert :: Commonwealth Records
as reviewed by Fat Tony
"My ideology's Islamicly based/with a trace of the thug life" aptly sums up the Middletown NY duo Al-Amin and Righteous Nova, collectively known as Lions of the Desert. This one lyric serves as the cornerstone upon which their creative existence is based. Their eponymous debut is the result of a rhyme partnership that formed while the two were incarcerated in Upstate New York, and the record is a powerful political and social statement. Taking the various doctrines of Islam and blending them with a street sense of reality, Lions of the Desert offer existential self-examination from the perspective of those who have seen the darkest sides of life and have found a form of upliftment, be it music or religion.

As a debut, Lions of the Desert is very solid, built on a thorough foundation of rugged Islam and the forcefulness of conviction. Both MC's are lyrically tight, well informed, hungry, focused and outraged. While at times they may come off accusatory and judgmental, there is enough personal introspection to balance out what some may consider political rhetoric. Each MC takes the listener on a journey of his personal beliefs and insights, questioning himself and the world in which he lives, and there are as many metaphorical bullet-holes as there are Biblical references. The obvious contradictions of violence and religion are a constant lyrical theme, explored and expressed in verses like: "...How could a man fly into a building?/how could a man strap a bomb to hisself and kill innocent children?/Callin' hisself a Muslim/That's not my religion/Yo it's forbidden in my way of life/I pack a gun and a knife/cause I'm prescribed to fight/I enjoy the right/the wrong is forbidden/a presence worse than slaughter/martyrdom is better than living." It is not so much hard-line, militant preaching that L.O.T.D. do. It's more like creating social awareness and dialogue in a publicly accessible medium. They don't pretend to be saviors or prophets; they don't claim to have any answers. They use their platform of music to attempt to reconcile the concepts of peace and struggle, and, in doing so, create an interesting and sometimes compelling document of human conflict. At the same time, they personalize their experiences and insights by presenting the listener with first-person accounts of what they know and see.

Musically, L.O.T.D. are at their deadliest over booming, anthemic tracks like the opening manifesto produced by D-Tension; "Destruction of Man." Al-Amin and Righteous are both fierce and forewarning over an orchestral, modernized boom-bap beat. Its chorus takes on a history of manipulation and conspiracy: "Man made the drugs/man made the guns/man made the ghetto/man made the slums/the battle against evil is Armageddon/in these last days of time/it's destruction." Al-Amin's voice is big and bullish, with just the right timbre to support such lyrical conviction. Everything he spits sounds dire and loud; explosive. His counterpart, Righteous Nova, is equally deft with wordplay, using clever language in which to encode his social, political and spiritual jewels. Together both bring a sense of purpose and meaning to life on the block. The second track; "AI'm Contemporary," keeps the same heat over a brooding, threatening beat and sonically fuses the subject matter with its soundtrack. The rage displayed lyrically is mirrored by the Messiah-produced beat. L.O.T.D. aren't afraid to mix it up, either. Just after they hit you in the head with the first two heaters, they turn it around and lace a track like the incredibly hook-friendly "Top of the Dome," which highlights a more positive and poetic side of the group. Messiah steps out from behind the boards to deliver a verse; penning the line "...seeing is believing and believing is hope/Eternal and infinite is the definition of dope." "The Gathering" presents the only guest appearances on the album, with rappers Fif Element, Brauu Muun, Emperor and Saga da Sage joining in a cipher-like track over some urgent, crystal-clear keys.

For all of its merits, the album does have a few flaws, the least not being the rawness of its construction. It just doesn't feel cohesive as an album all the way through and there are some definite throwaway tracks that only take away from the overall strength of the album. Still, the standout tracks far outweigh the lesser songs, and make Lions of the Desert worthy of consideration. In these days, where politics and religion mingle to the point that their distinctive boundaries are blurred, there are few voices strong enough to speak out authoritatively on both sides. Lions of the Desert bring it with passion and deliberate energy, and, with the exception of a few misplaced, incongruous-sounding tracks, they deliver a debut that not only impresses, but gives hope that there's more to come in the future.

Music Vibes: 6.5 of 10 Lyric Vibes: 7.5 of 10 TOTAL Vibes: 7 of 10

Originally posted: February 10, 2004
source: www.RapReviews.com - RapReviews.com


"Lions Of The Desert: the undergrounds next big group"

Lions Of The Desert: the undergrounds next big group
Author: boston dru
Published: March 9, 2004
Tools: [printer friendly | email ]
Lions of the Desert who hail from Middletown, NY have shunned trendy hip-hop topics like fashion, fancy cars, foxy females and violence, and instead opt to weave their narratives around more positive and educational pursuits. If our school and parents aren't going to open our children's eyes to the danger of the world, L.O.T.D. will. Al-Amin & longtime partner in rhyme Righteous Nova have come together and done the inevitable. Lions Of The Desert is the name of the group and their self-titled debut LP makes a statement about the attitude, politics and the mind state of today’s hip-hop scene & culture. Al-Amin & Righteous Nova met while both were serving bids in an upstate New York penitentiary and formed a bond through their common ideologies adopted from the Nation of Islam. "...How could a man fly into a building?/how could a man strap a bomb to himself and kill innocent children?/Callin' himself a Muslim/That's not my religion/Yo it's forbidden in my way of life/I pack a ! gun and a knife/cause I'm prescribed to fight/I enjoy the right/the wrong is forbidden/a presence worse than slaughter/martyrdom is better than living." It is not so much hard-line, militant preaching that L.O.T.D. do. It's more like creating social awareness and dialogue in a publicly accessible medium. They don't pretend to be saviors or prophets; they don't claim to have any answers. They use their platform of music to attempt to reconcile the concepts of peace and struggle, and, in doing so, create an interesting and sometimes compelling document of human conflict. At the same time, they personalize their experiences and insights by presenting the listener with first-person accounts of what they know and see. Al-Amin is no stranger to the game, with over 20 appearances on the mixtape circuit, which makes him one of the games most sought after underground artists. The chemistry between these two factions is remarkable and gives them an invaluable “one-two” punch that very! few duos possess. So if you’re looking for a solid album wit! hout the clutter of guest appearances and over priced producers pick up Lions Of The Desert’s Debut LP. Just 14 tracks of straight fire!!! peep out their video & more @ www.commonwealthrecords.com

reviews: Boom-bap.com 4 out of 5 Middleton, Massachusetts based CommonWealth steps back in the game in 2004 with new records and new distribution after having an incredible year in 2002 with stellar, near-classic, releases from Clokworx and Clokworx frontman Ams Uno. So while we have trusted CommonWealth for quality releases only, they are now back presenting new music from Lions Of The Desert and Effect on this split 12". Al-Amin & Righteous Nova equal the Middletown, NY based duo L.O.T.D., who recently released their self-titled debut LP, and here present three DOPE tracks off it. The opener, the back-beat teister "Top Of My Dome" is a sure-shot! Guesting emcee & producer Messiah gets all props for the swell beat, and in the team-up with Al-Amin it's a success within their elegant syllables and well constructed wordplay. Messiah, who we apparently need to keep an extra eye out for, also delivers the grim and gritty soundwaves of the incredible "I'm Contemporary". Crazy tongue-twisting flavors from Al-Amin! are combined with this early-90's-sounding production; it's no doubt that Lions Of The Desert steals the show here. At least for a split single. Still, the Effect side of this record is definitely worth mentioning. Boston based beatsmith D-Tension (Akrobatik, Encore, Mr. Lif) laced all three beats for Effect here - with "Young + Restless" (featuring local heroes Mic Stylz, E Rock & Termology) standing out the most. Lions Of The Desert wins the internal CommonWealth battle though, if there ever was one, for their down-to-earth, back-to-basics style - and tons of charisma. Let there be no doubt, L.O.T.D. does not only deliver the most juttin' chorus we've heard in a LONG time ("I’m not livin' a double life, I'm just contemporary, You don't wanna be my adversary, 'cause I'm very well trained"), but also one of the freshest debuts we've heard in a long time. MASSIVE appeal! - joe538.com


"cdbaby.com/cd/alamin"

Album Notes


Al-amins THE MASTERPIECE is hip hop at its finest. The title speaks for itself. This album is one of the most creative albums i heard in years. With his bullish voice, off the hook lyricals and 5 star production team THE MASTERPIECE is a hip hop classic! If you're really a fan of hip hop then this cd is what you been waiting for TRUST ME!!!!! To see his video g to www.commonwealth.com look under his group lions of the desert




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chad

this cat is staight up and down ill

This cd is the rebirth of HIP HOP. The songs and the tracks are hot to def. no bling bling just straight lyrics like we use to do it in the parks. Money get 2 thumbs up early!



Oz

Who is this dude he's offical

did big pun leave his voice box with this dude? who's his producers. he got that premo, wyclef meets def jux sound. Im feeling every track - cdbaby.com


"MP3 Al-Amin - The Masterpiece"

Description:
(ID 113081)
This cd is hip hop at its better A new immingle of Conscience Rap and street. This cd has something on it for everybody From undercover to commerical rap, sordid south to soul, R&b to sway Al-amin covers it all.

21 MP3 Songs
HIP HOP/RAP: Rap, HIP HOP/RAP: Hip Hop

The Masterpiece Songs


Details:
Al-amins THE MASTERPIECE is hip hop at its finest. The title speaks for itself. This album is one of the most creative albums i heard in years. With his bullish voice, off the hook lyricals and 5 star production team THE MASTERPIECE is a hip hop classic! If you're really a fan of hip hop then this cd is what you been waiting for TRUST ME!!!!! - tradebit.com


"Lions Of The Desert Bio:"

Lions Of The Desert Bio:

Lions of the Desert who hail from Middletown, NY have shunned trendy hip-hop topics like fashion, fancy cars, foxy females and violence, and instead opt to weave their narratives around more positive and educational pursuits. If our school and parents aren't going to open our children's eyes to the danger of the world, L.O.T.D. will. Al-Amin & longtime partner in rhyme Righteous Nova have come together and done the inevitable. Lions Of The Desert is the name of the group and their self-titled debut LP makes a statement about the attitude, politics and the mind state of today’s hip-hop scene & culture. Al-Amin & Righteous Nova met while both were serving bids in an upstate New York penitentiary and formed a bond through their common ideologies adopted from the Nation of Islam. "...How could a man fly into a building?/how could a man strap a bomb to himself and kill innocent children?/Callin' himself a Muslim/That's not my religion/Yo it's forbidden in my way of life/I pack a gun and a knife/cause I'm prescribed to fight/I enjoy the right/the wrong is forbidden/a presence worse than slaughter/martyrdom is better than living." It is not so much hard-line, militant preaching that L.O.T.D. do. It's more like creating social awareness and dialogue in a publicly accessible medium. They don't pretend to be saviors or prophets; they don't claim to have any answers. They use their platform of music to attempt to reconcile the concepts of peace and struggle, and, in doing so, create an interesting and sometimes compelling document of human conflict. At the same time, they personalize their experiences and insights by presenting the listener with first-person accounts of what they know and see. Al-Amin is no stranger to the game, with over 20 appearances on the mixtape circuit, which makes him one of the games most sought after underground artists. The chemistry between these two factions is remarkable and gives them an invaluable “one-two” punch that very few duos possess. So if you’re looking for a solid album without the clutter of guest appearances and over priced producers pick up Lions Of The Desert’s Debut LP. Just 14 tracks of straight fire!!!

Check out our video @ www.commonwealthrecords.com

Lions Of The Desert – Top Of My Dome #6 on college radio charts – 4/26/04

Lions Of The Desert – Top Of My Dome - #1 Most Added to College Radio Charts - rapattacklives.com 3/29/04

"One of the freshest debuts we've heard in a long time" - boom-bap.com

4 out of 5 - boom-bap.com

“In these days, where politics and religion mingle to the point that their distinctive boundaries are blurred, there are few voices strong enough to speak out authoritatively on both sides. Lions of the Desert bring it with passion and deliberate energy, and, hope that there's more to come in the future.” - Fat Tony – rapreviews.com

"LOTD is bringing back the essence of true hip hop while at the same time moving forward into new ground...these kids are nice!!!" – Papa D! (Traffic Ent/Brick Records)

“Lions of the Desert are some intense brothers with a lot on their minds. Fans of Jedi Mind Tricks, Non Phixion, or Wu Tang affiliates such as Killarmy will dig. This CD is definitely worth a listen”. – Insomniac Magazine - unsignedbandweb.com


""Top Of My Dome feat Messiah" » Hip Hop"

#6 on college radio charts@ rapattacklives.com 4/26/04
#6 on college radio charts@ rapnetwork.com 4/26/04
#11 on college radio charts@ Insomniac Magazine 4/26/04 - unsignedbandweb.com


"https://www.reverbnation.com/ToxicPremeAlAminBeardedSkull/press"

https://www.reverbnation.com/ToxicPremeAlAminBeardedSkull/press - https://www.reverbnation.com/ToxicPremeAlAminBeardedSkull/press


"https://www.reverbnation.com/ToxicPremeAlAminBeardedSkull/shows"

https://www.reverbnation.com/ToxicPremeAlAminBeardedSkull/shows - https://www.reverbnation.com/ToxicPremeAlAminBeardedSkull/shows


"(Toxic preme-Al amin/Bearded skull)"

(Toxic preme-Al amin/Bearded skull)

https://www.reverbnation.com/ToxicPremeAlAminBeardedSkull
https://toxicpremealamin.bandcamp.com/

http://commonwealthrecords.com/new2014/release/lotd/

https://open.spotify.com/album/27eOMOS7oQB1EArIaG45Qz
https://open.spotify.com/album/1gjS8cfp2HVWkGjZuyog4O

http://widget.cdbaby.com/253502c6-2eb3-472f-80bd-bd05c49b6f78/full/dark/transparent

https://www.sonicbids.com/band/toxic-preme-al-amin-bearded-skull/ - (Toxic preme-Al amin/Bearded skull)


"https://yandex.com/images/search?text=Toxic%20preme-Al%20amin%2FBearded%20skull&stype=image&lr=102903&source=wiz"

https://yandex.com/images/search?text=Toxic%20preme-Al%20amin%2FBearded%20skull&stype=image&lr=102903&source=wiz - https://yandex.com/images/search?text=Toxic%20preme-Al%20amin%2FBearded%20skull&stype=image&lr=102903&source=wiz


"https://genius.com/ToxicPremeAlAminBeardedSkull"

https://genius.com/ToxicPremeAlAminBeardedSkull - https://genius.com/ToxicPremeAlAminBeardedSkull


"Toxic preme-Al amin/Bearded skull Tour Dates and Concert Tickets"

Toxic preme-Al amin/Bearded skull Tour Dates and Concert Tickets - eventful.com


"Hood science entertainment"

Hood science entertainment

***-Toxic preme-Al amin/Bearded skull- - http://www.nimbitmusic.com/hoodscienceentertainment/#toxicpremealaminbeardedskull


"Rapper-"

https://yandex.com/images/search?text=NEW+Gucci+Mane+Ft.+Future+%26+Lil+Scrappy+-+Secure+The+Bag+%28HQ%29+HOT.mp3&from=tabbar&fbclid=IwAR3iHtV8YtcGCrRTLUQpN6WVE-D9zdF43TRJrsm-G-kd6fb5j4laEYNwZKE - https://yandex.com/images/search?text=NEW+Gucci+Mane+Ft.+Future+%26+Lil+Scrappy+-+Secure+The+Bag+%28HQ%29+HOT.mp3&from=tabbar&fbclid=IwAR3iHtV8YtcGCrRTLUQpN6WVE-D9zdF43TRJrsm-G-kd6fb5j4laEYNwZKE


"Hood science entertainment 2019"

Thursday 31 October 2019 – Wednesday 01 January 2020

Hood science entertainment 2019



Line-up: C-Rayz Walz, Poison Pen, DJ White Shadow, and Toxic preme-Al amin

Pineapple Larry's, Newburgh, NY, US - Hood science entertainment


"*Toxic preme​-​Al amin​/​Bearded skull​,​-​Hood science entertainment​,​2019"

*Toxic preme​-​Al amin​/​Bearded skull​,​-​Hood science entertainment​,​2019

by Hood science entertainment - *Toxic preme​-​Al amin​/​Bearded skull​,​-​Hood science entertainment​,​2019


"Imam T​.​H​.​U​.​G."

Imam T​.​H​.​U​.​G. - Hood science entertainment


"Toxic preme-Al amin/Bearded skull-"

Toxic preme-Al amin/Bearded skull- - https://www.musicxray.com/artists/toxicpremealaminbeardedskull


"Toxic preme-Al amin/Bearded skull***"

Toxic preme-Al amin/Bearded skull*** - https://soundcloud.com/hoodscienceentertainment/sets/toxic-preme-al-amin-bearded-3


Photos

Bio

Band Members