Alice BrightSky
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Alice BrightSky

New York City, New York, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2013 | INDIE

New York City, New York, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2013
Solo Folk Singer/Songwriter

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"Reverbnation: Alice BrightSky"

Alice BrightSky is the project of a New Jersey singer-songwriter with a self proclaimed “passion in her body and soul”.

BrightSky bears a resemblance to guitar maestro Martha Wainwright, alongside her heroes Beth Orton and Joni Mitchell, but there’s a kick to lead song “Up Up and Away” that fellow vocalists of the same category might lack.

Influenced by the varied likes of jazz musician Sarah Vaughn and rock legend Janis Joplin, BrightSky’s music is a funny sort of animal: part sultry finger click, part whisky drenched melody. One thing’s for sure, it’s as catchy as the fires of hell after a particularly bad drought.
- Drunken Werewolf


"Reverbnation: Alice BrightSky"

Alice BrightSky is the project of a New Jersey singer-songwriter with a self proclaimed “passion in her body and soul”.

BrightSky bears a resemblance to guitar maestro Martha Wainwright, alongside her heroes Beth Orton and Joni Mitchell, but there’s a kick to lead song “Up Up and Away” that fellow vocalists of the same category might lack.

Influenced by the varied likes of jazz musician Sarah Vaughn and rock legend Janis Joplin, BrightSky’s music is a funny sort of animal: part sultry finger click, part whisky drenched melody. One thing’s for sure, it’s as catchy as the fires of hell after a particularly bad drought.
- Drunken Werewolf


"Box of Me Review"

Alice Brightsky is a lady we featured a few weeks ago as a promising talent and now with her album “Box of Me” she confirms her ability as a talent singer/songwriter with her blend of folksy pop rock with punch.

“Enter This World” perfectly kicks off the album with Alice’s high register soaring above the guitars and organs that form the various riffs and melodies that are then joined in sumptuous strings for the chorus. The lyrics themselves are beautiful as she describes the unborn waiting to come to life. “Pry Me Away” turns up the tension a crank with some clever percussion effects and some more electric guitar and strings that purge a single drawn note in-between fleeting and galloping acoustic guitar verses. It’s surprising how much Alice is able to rinse from relatively little electric guitar and make it go far. “Lover’s Fate” continues the delicate finger picking that underpins the album as Alice’s voice comes closer to the mic so you can feel every single inflection. It’s intimate and fragile but still with a bite to it and that’s a tricky thing to pull off.

“I Am” see’s things turn to a rockier edge with Alice stretching the power of her voice over a clever guitar riff that really works for moving your body to the track. However one of the best things is its ability to switch it up to a jazzy rock interlude which quickens the tempo and lets it all hand out before tightening back up for the next segment. It works fantastically well and is an album highlight. “Up Up and Away” is the most breezy track in comparison with light organs and open strummed chords and a summery chorus full of vibrant warm sounds. “Troubled Upbringing” brings back the brass to provide the big finale for the mid tempo track that has a waltzing angst to it. As is the case with the album “Girl You Hold Onto” flips back to a more airy feel but this time it’s provided by a warm vocal arrangement behind what is a minimal percussive/acoustic guitar arrangement of a cute song. The vocal hums and oohs really work to make the track stand out and feel slightly ethereal. Equally beautiful in its introverted delivery is “Tie and Untie” which has a complex acoustic guitar chord pattern which for the first half is only accompanied by a taut organ and vocals. It is eventually given some percussion for the second half but the track is so underplayed it feels like it’s constantly spinning and there’s a lethargy that’s set in.

“Canopy” pulls Brightsky back to more folk roots that then breaks out into a chorus fanfare of brass and fun sundance. It’s the effortless transition between whimsy folk and tight euphoria that’s impressive. “Dry” is the longest track on the album and it’s the most bluesy of the album. The interplay between acoustic guitar, vocal delivery and string embellishment make the song a quiet introspective song that manages a lot in its near six minutes. “Box of Me” is the closing track and returns to a warmer feel for a simple and pure nearly entirely two chord track.

Alice Brightsky’s début is self-assured and confident. It is wonderfully produced and does enough with the basic acoustic guitar rock formula to show that she’s capable of pouring plenty of ideas into the melting pot without forgetting what her core is. An exciting talent to watch in the future. - Higher Plain Music


"Whispers of the Plain"

Alice Brightsky’s amazing album “Box of Me” rocked my socks last week and so we asked if Alice could answer some questions about releasing an album, making sure your end product is of the right quality without suffering analysis paralysis and what she’d put in her own box of Alice:

Box of Me is finally out there – how do you feel now it’s in peoples hands?

I’m happy. There were many moments when I thought (as I’ve thought of so many other recordings gone by…) it’s just not good enough. So when I see reviews on iTunes or Amazon that give the album 5 stars or when I hear from a fan or friend who bought the album, that they were blown away, it really affirms to me that it IS good enough.

It’s a great piece of work – did the end result turn out exactly how you expected or did it change whilst making it?

Thank you. I had zero expectations… The producer (Paolo DeGregorio) and I met via a song contest I was in and he offered to produce “Pry Me Away” for free to see if we could work together on a whole album. So I came into his home studio and recorded voice and guitar. A few weeks later he handed me the fully produced track the way you hear it on the record pretty much. I was psyched. He had added all these interesting ambient elements. I was open to as much experimentation as possible with the tracks and Paolo had the right aesthetic for the job. So, I really had no idea at the inception of recording each track, how it would turn out in the end. Each was a unique process of trial and error. We would brainstorm on what kind of vibe we’d like to give the tune and then I’d come in with parts and Paolo would have parts he’d worked on and the song would just evolve. It was a fun and totally new experience for me.

There is some exceptional brass and string work on the album. How did you go about incorporating those instruments?

Again, it was just through brainstorming really. Paolo came to the table with some great ideas and I started thinking more and more like him through the process. I also knew a lot of pro players so we just tried a bunch of stuff and most of it really worked. Also, there were a lot of programmed instruments that Paolo created. For instance, the horns on Canopy.. all programmed.

Your voice and the guitar the album throughout and a personal favourite of mine is “Tie and Untie” feels so mature and delicate. Please tell us a bit about the track and your motives behind it.

Thank you, that’s a favourite of mine too. I’m a fan of Jose Gonzales and I think that track was sort of inspired by him. I was experimenting with different finger picking styles and listening to his first album.. thinking about the stuff that preoccupied me at the time.. commitment, love, truth. This song is about how we become tangled up in relationships and with people before we really truly know and understand them and what we are really seeking from them. So life becomes duplicitous. Every action and event becomes a veiled attempt to detangle the mess.


Alice Brightsky
Also for “Girl You Hold Onto” the vocal collage you build is impressive. How did you get that laid down? It must have been very difficult!

Thanks again. Well, I don’t remember it being difficult but if you asked Paolo he may remember it differently! I usually write songs with multiple vocal parts in mind. So for that song, I had already come up with a lot of the call and response ideas and the lower harmony but Paolo suggested the Ooos in the background which I really think was a brilliant idea.

As a start up musician with a new album out, what would you say to other new artists thinking of doing the same thing?

There is a LOT of advice out there for musicians and I am not sure industry gurus would agree with me but…. I’m going to say, don’t settle for a sub-par product. If it’s not right, stop. Figure out the problem and make true art. Don’t just release stuff to have it out there. The market is so saturated already. I think a lot of people would say just get a product, get it out there.. so you can sell at gigs, online etc. But that’s a business perspective. I’m not the right person to ask about how to be successful monetarily. I still think art should be done for it’s own sake and only the best of what you can do should make it out the gate. Therefore the notion of “an album a year” seems a bit absurd to me. However long it takes to make the music as good as it can be, that’s just how long it takes.

Are there any pitfalls or things you’d recommend doing or not doing when recording your first album?

Sort of following from the last question.. while you shouldn’t settle you also shouldn’t become a victim of paralysis by analysis. Some little issues really don’t need fixing and some amount of “abandoning” is always going to be required of you with respect to your art. It is very easy to overanalyze every track.. try 1000 mixes, fiddle with the vocals, do and redo various parts. While some experimenting and reworking is i - Higher Plains Music


"Whispers of the Plain"

Alice Brightsky’s amazing album “Box of Me” rocked my socks last week and so we asked if Alice could answer some questions about releasing an album, making sure your end product is of the right quality without suffering analysis paralysis and what she’d put in her own box of Alice:

Box of Me is finally out there – how do you feel now it’s in peoples hands?

I’m happy. There were many moments when I thought (as I’ve thought of so many other recordings gone by…) it’s just not good enough. So when I see reviews on iTunes or Amazon that give the album 5 stars or when I hear from a fan or friend who bought the album, that they were blown away, it really affirms to me that it IS good enough.

It’s a great piece of work – did the end result turn out exactly how you expected or did it change whilst making it?

Thank you. I had zero expectations… The producer (Paolo DeGregorio) and I met via a song contest I was in and he offered to produce “Pry Me Away” for free to see if we could work together on a whole album. So I came into his home studio and recorded voice and guitar. A few weeks later he handed me the fully produced track the way you hear it on the record pretty much. I was psyched. He had added all these interesting ambient elements. I was open to as much experimentation as possible with the tracks and Paolo had the right aesthetic for the job. So, I really had no idea at the inception of recording each track, how it would turn out in the end. Each was a unique process of trial and error. We would brainstorm on what kind of vibe we’d like to give the tune and then I’d come in with parts and Paolo would have parts he’d worked on and the song would just evolve. It was a fun and totally new experience for me.

There is some exceptional brass and string work on the album. How did you go about incorporating those instruments?

Again, it was just through brainstorming really. Paolo came to the table with some great ideas and I started thinking more and more like him through the process. I also knew a lot of pro players so we just tried a bunch of stuff and most of it really worked. Also, there were a lot of programmed instruments that Paolo created. For instance, the horns on Canopy.. all programmed.

Your voice and the guitar the album throughout and a personal favourite of mine is “Tie and Untie” feels so mature and delicate. Please tell us a bit about the track and your motives behind it.

Thank you, that’s a favourite of mine too. I’m a fan of Jose Gonzales and I think that track was sort of inspired by him. I was experimenting with different finger picking styles and listening to his first album.. thinking about the stuff that preoccupied me at the time.. commitment, love, truth. This song is about how we become tangled up in relationships and with people before we really truly know and understand them and what we are really seeking from them. So life becomes duplicitous. Every action and event becomes a veiled attempt to detangle the mess.


Alice Brightsky
Also for “Girl You Hold Onto” the vocal collage you build is impressive. How did you get that laid down? It must have been very difficult!

Thanks again. Well, I don’t remember it being difficult but if you asked Paolo he may remember it differently! I usually write songs with multiple vocal parts in mind. So for that song, I had already come up with a lot of the call and response ideas and the lower harmony but Paolo suggested the Ooos in the background which I really think was a brilliant idea.

As a start up musician with a new album out, what would you say to other new artists thinking of doing the same thing?

There is a LOT of advice out there for musicians and I am not sure industry gurus would agree with me but…. I’m going to say, don’t settle for a sub-par product. If it’s not right, stop. Figure out the problem and make true art. Don’t just release stuff to have it out there. The market is so saturated already. I think a lot of people would say just get a product, get it out there.. so you can sell at gigs, online etc. But that’s a business perspective. I’m not the right person to ask about how to be successful monetarily. I still think art should be done for it’s own sake and only the best of what you can do should make it out the gate. Therefore the notion of “an album a year” seems a bit absurd to me. However long it takes to make the music as good as it can be, that’s just how long it takes.

Are there any pitfalls or things you’d recommend doing or not doing when recording your first album?

Sort of following from the last question.. while you shouldn’t settle you also shouldn’t become a victim of paralysis by analysis. Some little issues really don’t need fixing and some amount of “abandoning” is always going to be required of you with respect to your art. It is very easy to overanalyze every track.. try 1000 mixes, fiddle with the vocals, do and redo various parts. While some experimenting and reworking is i - Higher Plains Music


"Know Your NYC Bands With Alice"

BeatCrave brings you artist, Alice, as part of Know Your NYC Band series. Now she may not be a collective group, but this singer-songwriter probably has more passion in her body and soul than all the members of The Polyphonic Spree put together. Alice (Stopkoski) has been in bands before, but it wasn’t until she was solo under the spotlight that she found the core of her sound. With vocals that can come off only soothing to the first-time listener, but wise with an edge to those with an ear, Alice has been entrancing music goers through her lilting melodies that coat her meticulous guitar strumming.

Discovering new music and searching for different perspectives on her own music, Alice has been awarded by several songwriting competitions and playing shows throughout the city. She is also currently putting the finishing touches on an upcoming debut album. Until then, check out our exclusive interview with her where, just as any song of hers, she pours out honesty.


There is an edge to your vocals that definitely does not go unnoticed. Who are some of your influences purely based on vocals?

My early influences were the usual suspects for a female singer-songwriter.. Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez, Nick Drake, Ani Difranco, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday. I love Bjork too, though I don’t know that anything in my voice is derivative of her sound. Currently I’m listening to a lot of Lucinda Williams and yearn for her guteral rasp. I think, of the more current artists out there, I gravitate to the vocals of artists like Meiko and Yael Naim, and I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention Amy Winehouse because who isn’t in complete awe of her voice?
It’s impossible to sum up the NYC music scene because of its great diversity. What are some highlights for you?

I really enjoyed the NYC scene when Luna Lounge was on Ludlow and Brownies was still open. I think the Brooklyn clubs that have cropped up in the last few years have really lent a lot of cool flavor to the music scene. Just as it felt like Manhattan was getting kind of stale, the Brooklyn clubs seemed to broaden the palette and attract some really innovative and interesting music.
Of course, the Williamsburg Live Songwriting Competition is a big highlight for me because I connected with so many great solo performers. Every year that contest, and others like it, shines a light on the raw solo performance and reminds the NYC music scene that there’s a lot to be said for one voice, one mic and one instrument.
The ordinary musician plays as many shows as possible. You’ve gone past this trait by taking part in several songwriting competitions. Would you suggest other musicians to do the same?

I would. I am a big fan of songwriting competitions. But I also have pretty tough skin and can handle the let-downs (there have been MANY). I have singer-songwriter friends who have told me that they could never put their work out to be judged so formally. I understand that too. It’s not easy to open yourself up to something so subjective. What makes a good song? Everyone’s got their opinion on that. I don’t agree with what a lot of people think are good but I’m a curious person so I like to know what people think of mine.
The practical side of me also says, why not get a read on what the industry thinks of you? If you are going to eventually put yourself fully on the line, maybe it’s best to know if you’ve got a product that’s viable. Contests are one way to test that. Each year there are different judges and I have different songs and when you do place or get recognized it kind of gives you a psychological boost. It helps you keep going, even if in theory, you think it’s all B.S.
What are the advantages of being a solo musician?

One big advantage is the obvious lack of conflict over artistic direction. I’m the captain of my own ship and I don’t have to worry that I’m not being true to what inspires me. But that gets lonely too. There’s something very special about bands that stay together for years, but bands also have huge disadvantages which is why so many break up… It’s like a relationship and it can take a lot of trial and error to find the right chemistry.
Getting back to the advantages of flying solo, however, I find that it makes me a better musician, performer and songwriter because you really have to capture your audience when it’s just you and an instrument. Dynamics and structure become really important. A lot of bands get away with pretty or interesting sounds but the song structure is lacking. It’s okay because ultimately it sounds good and we tend to be a little more forgiving when there’s a lot to distract us, but the solo performer is raw and totally exposed. Every note is heard and mistakes are more likely to be remembered. The song is in its purest form with no bells and whistles so it better be compelling.


It’s exciting to know that you’re working on an album. How is it going?

It’s going good but I’ve run into the kind of - Beatcrave.com


"Know Your NYC Bands With Alice"

BeatCrave brings you artist, Alice, as part of Know Your NYC Band series. Now she may not be a collective group, but this singer-songwriter probably has more passion in her body and soul than all the members of The Polyphonic Spree put together. Alice (Stopkoski) has been in bands before, but it wasn’t until she was solo under the spotlight that she found the core of her sound. With vocals that can come off only soothing to the first-time listener, but wise with an edge to those with an ear, Alice has been entrancing music goers through her lilting melodies that coat her meticulous guitar strumming.

Discovering new music and searching for different perspectives on her own music, Alice has been awarded by several songwriting competitions and playing shows throughout the city. She is also currently putting the finishing touches on an upcoming debut album. Until then, check out our exclusive interview with her where, just as any song of hers, she pours out honesty.


There is an edge to your vocals that definitely does not go unnoticed. Who are some of your influences purely based on vocals?

My early influences were the usual suspects for a female singer-songwriter.. Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez, Nick Drake, Ani Difranco, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday. I love Bjork too, though I don’t know that anything in my voice is derivative of her sound. Currently I’m listening to a lot of Lucinda Williams and yearn for her guteral rasp. I think, of the more current artists out there, I gravitate to the vocals of artists like Meiko and Yael Naim, and I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention Amy Winehouse because who isn’t in complete awe of her voice?
It’s impossible to sum up the NYC music scene because of its great diversity. What are some highlights for you?

I really enjoyed the NYC scene when Luna Lounge was on Ludlow and Brownies was still open. I think the Brooklyn clubs that have cropped up in the last few years have really lent a lot of cool flavor to the music scene. Just as it felt like Manhattan was getting kind of stale, the Brooklyn clubs seemed to broaden the palette and attract some really innovative and interesting music.
Of course, the Williamsburg Live Songwriting Competition is a big highlight for me because I connected with so many great solo performers. Every year that contest, and others like it, shines a light on the raw solo performance and reminds the NYC music scene that there’s a lot to be said for one voice, one mic and one instrument.
The ordinary musician plays as many shows as possible. You’ve gone past this trait by taking part in several songwriting competitions. Would you suggest other musicians to do the same?

I would. I am a big fan of songwriting competitions. But I also have pretty tough skin and can handle the let-downs (there have been MANY). I have singer-songwriter friends who have told me that they could never put their work out to be judged so formally. I understand that too. It’s not easy to open yourself up to something so subjective. What makes a good song? Everyone’s got their opinion on that. I don’t agree with what a lot of people think are good but I’m a curious person so I like to know what people think of mine.
The practical side of me also says, why not get a read on what the industry thinks of you? If you are going to eventually put yourself fully on the line, maybe it’s best to know if you’ve got a product that’s viable. Contests are one way to test that. Each year there are different judges and I have different songs and when you do place or get recognized it kind of gives you a psychological boost. It helps you keep going, even if in theory, you think it’s all B.S.
What are the advantages of being a solo musician?

One big advantage is the obvious lack of conflict over artistic direction. I’m the captain of my own ship and I don’t have to worry that I’m not being true to what inspires me. But that gets lonely too. There’s something very special about bands that stay together for years, but bands also have huge disadvantages which is why so many break up… It’s like a relationship and it can take a lot of trial and error to find the right chemistry.
Getting back to the advantages of flying solo, however, I find that it makes me a better musician, performer and songwriter because you really have to capture your audience when it’s just you and an instrument. Dynamics and structure become really important. A lot of bands get away with pretty or interesting sounds but the song structure is lacking. It’s okay because ultimately it sounds good and we tend to be a little more forgiving when there’s a lot to distract us, but the solo performer is raw and totally exposed. Every note is heard and mistakes are more likely to be remembered. The song is in its purest form with no bells and whistles so it better be compelling.


It’s exciting to know that you’re working on an album. How is it going?

It’s going good but I’ve run into the kind of - Beatcrave.com


"Alice BrightSky releases album "Box of Me""

Singer-songwriter Alice BrightSky carts a heavy load around. Latest record 'Box of Me' packs the emotive import and lyrical punch of Miranda Lambert with the melodic range of Jeff Buckley. My fave track here is the torpid thunder of 'I Am.' The song has all the makings of a hard rock tune, but delivered instead with an acoustic brawl. The NYC artist has everything you'd ever want from the loudest music you'll ever hear, but delivered from such an intimate place, you'll pull your ear in closer to find out just what exactly she's lost and loves.

Listen to 'Lover's Fate' below - a song that features none other than Lizzy Grant (now also known as Lana Del Rey) on backing vocals - the two met at the 2006 Williamsburg Live Songwriting Competition. - Mike Levine (@Goldnuggets) - The Deli Magazine


"Starpolish"

To avoid confusion Alizarin Crimson is not an individual but a band. Clearly though, it's one individual, singer/songwriter Alice, whose vision drives this alt/country/rock trio. Both Stopkoski's voice and the group's laid back musical feel are an intriguing blend of Sheryl Crow and Mazzy Star, which makes for some relaxing Sunday morning listening, whether accompanying your morning coffee-and-the-newspaper ritual, or soundtracking an extended stay under the covers. - Gail Worely


"Ben Krieger"

Monday night at Brooklyn’s best rock club (IMHO, anyway). The Williamsburg Live Songwriting Competition...Once again, a cast of competitors thrilled us with more talent than we could have possibly asked for. Once again, three songwriters moved onto the semi-finals: Alice, Cesar Alvarez and Spencer White.

Alice made her appearance early in the evening. My ears perked up at the sound of her voice: a neat combination of the ever-influential Jeff Buckley and Alanis Morrisette, showing off a lovely, fluctuating melody. Apparently, her performance left an impression on the judges as well. Throughout the evening, a steady stream of inspired performances kept me spellbound, but in the end, Alice and “Pry Me Away” rose up to take a winning slot. - JezebelMusic.com


"Java Music"

"Driveway" is introduced by a six string acoustic, flowing quickly into a two bar crescendo with astounding smoothness. You can hear the plectrum striking every string on the acoustic guitar with squeaky-clean clarity. Following close behind are the bass, lead guitar and slide guitar backed by rim shots on the snare dropping like rain on a tin roof. Gathering together into a mellowing first verse. Alice's unique voice will take your breath away. Her vocal range should cover at least three to four octaves with ease. I was beginning to think Alice was Kate Bushes sister! The balance and volume between the vocals and instruments are the best I've heard to date... - Radiocowboy


"Java Music"

"Driveway" is introduced by a six string acoustic, flowing quickly into a two bar crescendo with astounding smoothness. You can hear the plectrum striking every string on the acoustic guitar with squeaky-clean clarity. Following close behind are the bass, lead guitar and slide guitar backed by rim shots on the snare dropping like rain on a tin roof. Gathering together into a mellowing first verse. Alice's unique voice will take your breath away. Her vocal range should cover at least three to four octaves with ease. I was beginning to think Alice was Kate Bushes sister! The balance and volume between the vocals and instruments are the best I've heard to date... - Radiocowboy


"Piano's"

Resonance last week was a family affair. Performing were two brothers, one couple, two finalists from the WLSC2006, and there were multiple guest appearances. OK, so "family affair" is an exaggeration but you get the idea. First up was Chris Farfan, performing a solid set of 12-string-acoustic-driven classic-rock-influenced jams, with his brother Jorge delivering atmospheric, digitally-delayed leads on classical guitar. The brothers were joined by Alice Stopkoski (significant other of Chris) singing back up, who herself was the third performer of the evening. Alice performed an intimate, soulful set, joined by Briana Winters and Chris Farfan on backing vocals. Performing between Farfan and Alice was Bryan Dunn (Bryan and Alice were the 2nd and 3rd place winners, respectively, of the 3rd Annual WLSC), who is not related by blood or in a relationship with anyone in attendance, but is well known by all. - Jezebel Music


"Piano's"

Resonance last week was a family affair. Performing were two brothers, one couple, two finalists from the WLSC2006, and there were multiple guest appearances. OK, so "family affair" is an exaggeration but you get the idea. First up was Chris Farfan, performing a solid set of 12-string-acoustic-driven classic-rock-influenced jams, with his brother Jorge delivering atmospheric, digitally-delayed leads on classical guitar. The brothers were joined by Alice Stopkoski (significant other of Chris) singing back up, who herself was the third performer of the evening. Alice performed an intimate, soulful set, joined by Briana Winters and Chris Farfan on backing vocals. Performing between Farfan and Alice was Bryan Dunn (Bryan and Alice were the 2nd and 3rd place winners, respectively, of the 3rd Annual WLSC), who is not related by blood or in a relationship with anyone in attendance, but is well known by all. - Jezebel Music


Discography

Box of Me is Alice's debut release, now available at CD Baby, ITunes and Amazon.

Photos

Bio

Alice BrightSky began recording "Box of Me" in late 2006 with producer Paolo De Gregorio of the Deli Magazine, in Brooklyn NY. Paolo and Alice met during the 2006 Williamsburg Live Songwriting Competition, in which Alice took 3rd place and Paolo was a judge. Though the album was largely complete by 2009, there was one song that wasn't coming together and needed some major TLC. Uncertain of how to fix the song but not wanting to release the record without it, Alice took a hiatus from music in which time she fell in love, got married and moved to a remote leafy location in Westchester NY reminiscent of her small-town roots. In 2012 Alice picked up the record again and with the help of her friends Mike Savino and Brandon Wilde, finished the last song on the album, allowing for its well-overdue release into the world.