Anjulie
Gig Seeker Pro

Anjulie

| MAJOR

| MAJOR
Band Pop Alternative

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


"Video Premiere: Anjulie "Boom""

I said it before and I will say it again. Anjulie might very well be the next big new thing. Invoking memories of Nelly Furtado and Corrine Bailey Rae, the Los Angeles-based 26 year-old singer introduces a distinct musical style that is eclectic, seductive and very well put together. After audiences are done playing Duffy and Adele, they may be tempted to pick up Anjulie's debut record.

Watch Anjulie's excellent video for her slinky lead single "Boom" (get a guilt-free MP3 download) that is taken from her debut album, which will be out this summer. Anjulie grew up in the Toronto suburb of Oaksville, Ontario. She was raised by immigrant parents from Guyana, "a South American nation culturally influenced by its Caribbean neighbors to the north," according to her biography. Growing up, the singer was influenced by a melange of genres, from Afro-Caribbean calypso to reggae, and from Latin rock to straight up pop.

“I think what separates me from other artists is that I write from a really intimate place,” Anjulie says in a press release. "[My debut album] is like me opening the door to my bedroom, literally. I come off as being pretty put-together, but my songs are the one place where I can pull the string and unravel. They’re where I can be vulnerable, insecure, jealous, silly, and childlike. It's too scary to do that in real life. You have to feel safe. I only feel safe with headphones on.

Anjulie’s self-titled debut was created with her producers Colin Wolfe, who has worked with Dr. Dre and Monica, and longtime songwriting collaborator Jon Levine, keyboardist for Toronto’s funk-pop combo The Philosopher Kings. The album will be released by Hear Music on August 4.

http://www.arjanwrites.com/arjanwrites/2009/04/video-premiere-anjulie-boom.html
- ArjanWrites.com


"Anjulie - The Boom EP"

Anjulie’s debut album for Hear Music doesn’t arrive until Spring 2009, however her 3-song digital only EP, “The Boom EP” is a great taste of creatively fearless and beautiful singer/songwriter, Anjulie. Anjulie was born to immigrant parents from Guyana and raised in Toronto, with a music a steady passion in her life. Anjulie has been honing her craft and writing songs since she was a teen.

Comparisons to Nelly Furtado, Corinne Bailey Rae and Lily Allen are easy to hear and make, however, there’s something more pop colorful about her styling. There is a electro-pop 60s vibe to “Boom” (think a modern day, darker Nancy Sinatra meets Nelly Furtado), while “Love Songs” reminds me of hit sensation Duffy. “Day Will Soon Come” is the most modern sounding radio ready single, but my only fear is if released, people are going to misidentify her as Nelly Furtado. I am eager to hear more of her upcoming album and hear more of her because this is a great first impression of a upcoming new artist that will no doubt be a breakout. - Out Impact


"Concert Review: Anjulie at Joe's Pub, NYC"

Anjulie: Joe’s Pub, June 15th 2009

Anjulie came to the stage with a keyboadist and a programmer/guitarist. The three of them proceeded to fill Joe’s Pub with great sound and great songs. The best way I could describe her would be a cross between M.I.A., Lady GaGa and Rihanna. Every song sounded different and unique, with great beats and catchy hooks. Anjulie had a great stage presence, very poised, loose, funny and confident. Her vocals sounded even better live than they do recorded. She captivated the audience with songs like The Heat, Love Songs, Addicted2Me, Boom, Jamba and an excellent mash-up cover of You Spin Me Round (Like A Record) by Dead Or Alive with Flo Rida’s Right Round, the recent number one smash that samples the Dead Or Alive song. If Anjulie is playing near you, definitely go check her out.

Background:

Anjulie was raised by immigrant parents from Guyana in a Toronto suburb. At 17 she landed an internship at the Metalworks recording studio in Toronto where she met Jon Levine, the keyboardist from The Philosopher Kings. The pair became songwriting partners, writing tracks for teen pop singer Emma Roberts’ debut album, along with The Philosopher Kings’ album Castles, both released in 2005. Three years later, Kreesha Turner had a Top 10 Canadian hit with Jon and Anjulie’s song, Don’t Call Me Baby. Now Anjulie has stepped into the spotlight, singing her own songs. Once you hear her sing, makes you wonder why she wasn’t singing her own songs from the very start. Anjulie’s debut is titled Boom and comes out August 4th on Hear Music. - Street Date (CBS Radio)


Discography

First single "Boom" currently getting heavy radio play on Virgin Radio 99.9 (Toronto)

Remix of "Boom" reached #1 on the Billboard Hot Club Dance Play chart.

'Boom' EP (available now on iTunes)

Debut album available August 4th (Hear Music/Starbucks)

Photos

Bio

With her unique voice, disarmingly frank lyrics, melodic gifts, and exotic good looks, singer and songwriter Anjulie announces herself as a commanding new presence on the music scene. On her self-titled debut album, the Los Angeles-based songwriter comes across as a confident young woman who examines her life, loves, obsessions, and heartbreaks with fearless introspection. “I think what separates me from other artists is that I write from a really intimate place,” Anjulie says.“ This album is like me opening the door to my bedroom, literally. I come off as being pretty put-together, but my songs are the one place where I can pull the string and unravel. They’re where I can be vulnerable, insecure, jealous, silly, and childlike. It's too scary to do that in real life. You have to feel safe. I only feel safe with headphones on.”

The youngest of four children, Anjulie grew up in the Toronto suburb of Oaksville, Ontario, raised by immigrant parents from Guyana — a South American nation culturally influenced by its Caribbean neighbors to the north. As a result, her household was filled with everything from Afro-Caribbean calypso, reggae, and South American Latin music, to the pop and rock emanating from her older siblings’ radios. The mélange has definitely influenced Anjulie’s debut —
a sophisticated blend of indelible pop smarts, hip-hop edginess, and world-music spice, topped by Anjulie’s sultry vocal stylings that she created with her producers and songwriting collaborators Colin Wolfe, who has worked with Dr. Dre and Monica, and her longtime collaborator Jon Levine, keyboardist for Toronto’s funk-pop combo The Philosopher Kings.

Anjulie and Levine first met when then-17-year-old Anjulie, already a multi-instrumentalist, songwriter and performer hustling to catch a break, was doing an internship at Metalworks recording studio in Toronto. “I was basically cleaning the studio and getting coffee for people,” she says. “Jon came in and he was in a famous band, so I knew who he was. He asked me to have some lunch, but the people who work behind the desk are not supposed to hang out with clients, so I got fired.” Despite that minor setback, the story has a happy ending. Levine was intrigued enough to accept an invitation to hear Anjulie perform at an open mic night, which led to their current creative partnership. In 2005, the pair wrote two songs for actress-singer Emma Roberts’ debut album Unfabulous and More. Anjulie’s other songwriting credits include co-writing a track on the Philosopher Kings’ album 2006 album Castles, and penning “Don’t Call Me Baby” — a Billboard Top 10 hit in Canada for EMI recording artist Kreesha Turner.

“Anjulie’s songwriting is strong and confessional, but with a real pop sensibility,” Levine says. “As an artist, she is never satisfied to dole out the same empty pleasantries that most singers do. When we were making her record, I always believed what we put down on tape. Sometimes we’d have a song completely finished and we’d both be happy with it. Then the next day, she’d come into the studio with an entirely different verse written. She wanted to make sure it truly resonated and wasn’t just hooky. It’s that kind of determination that makes an artist great.”

The confident and eclectic mix of songs on Anjulie’s debut explore a wide range of moods, a sign that she is an artist with a lot of range and versatility. The slinky opening track “Boom,” works a dark, Nancy Sinatra-esque ’60s vibe, while ”The Rain” is a sleek, flamenco-flavored urban gem. Anjulie gets steamy on the feverish “The Heat,” the obsessive “Addicted2Me,” and the provocative “Some Dumb Whore,” before entirely switching gears on the uplifting acoustic-driven “Same Damn Thing” and the lovelorn piano ballad “Crazy That Way.”

“We were very particular about creating certain colors with the sound,” Levine says. “Most of the time it was a process of building a track up and then stripping away as much as we could till we found the bare essentials, or the heart of the track. We were really into carving out a lot of space to give the music a dark, open feel.”

It’s not surprising that Anjulie’s debut is as eclectic as it is, as the singer cops to a host of musical influences, everyone from confessional singer-songwriter Alanis Morissette and the always-enigmatic Annie Lennox, to hip-hop mavericks Kanye West and Lauryn Hill. “When you listen to The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, it’s so unbelievably personal,” Anjulie says. “The songs are like snapshots of her life. I’m totally blown away by it.”

That honesty is something Anjulie strives to emulate in her own music. “I think I have something to say lyrically,” she says. “My background is in songwriting, so I’m really invested in melodies, song structure, and payoff choruses, but on this record, I tried to loosen up and just express myself how I wanted to. I really write for myself. I always tell people if they want to know about me, just listen to my music