Anomie Belle
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Anomie Belle

Seattle, Washington, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2008 | INDIE

Seattle, Washington, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2008
Solo Electronic Trip-hop

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Mar
10
Anomie Belle @ The Moroccan Lounge

Los Angeles, California, United States

Los Angeles, California, United States

Mar
08
Anomie Belle @ Brick & Mortar Music Hall

San Francisco, California, United States

San Francisco, California, United States

Mar
05
Anomie Belle @ The Analog Theater

Portland, Oregon, United States

Portland, Oregon, United States

Music

Press


by D. House
October 29, 2011

Classically trained on violin, Anomie Belle is a politically and socially conscientious, Seattle-based electronic trip-hop multi-instrumentalist/composer who taught herself piano and guitar at a young age. She produces her own music and does all of her drum and synthesizer programming. She has lived and worked in Madrid, Glasgow, Amsterdam, New York, Buenos Aires, and London, and has shared the stage with Tricky, Sea Wolf, Mr. Lif and Album Leaf (with whom she has also played as part of a string quartet). Not bad for somebody who is just barely in her 30s.

I read that you’ve lived internationally – Spain, London, New York City, Scotland, Amsterdam and Buenos Aires? What brought you to all those places and what started that journey?
Anomie Belle:

When I was in high school in Portland (OR.), I had an unusual opportunity to participate in a bilingual program which allowed me to learn Spanish from people who were from other countries. There were a lot of Spanish speaking immigrants and it whet my appetite to live in other places. I was really fascinated by experiencing different cultures and refreshed by different points of views. I first moved to Spain and I enrolled in a University there, interned with a record company, and played in a local symphony. When I finished school, I got a fellowship to travel and I spend two years living in different countries and participated in different musical communities. In Argentina, I slept on the floor of a recording studio for a few months and got to engineer during the day. In Amsterdam I volunteered with an experimental record label and learned a lot about producing electronic music. In Glasgow I joined a band and did studio work. I made my way around and got to know the music industry from a really unique perspective all over the world. It was pretty amazing.

After living in all these places, what brought you back Seattle? Was it the familiarity of the Northwest?
Anomie:

The honest truth is that I came here to get my PhD, but eventually I left the program once I realized that I was studying the things that I write about with respect to keeping a critical perspective on culture and society as well as looking at the music industry from the perspective of their political economies. I realized after a couple of years that I wasn’t actually interested in studying these things as much as I was interested in being a part of them.
I wasn’t actually interested in studying these things as much as I was interested in being a part of them

And music is a powerful medium for discussing these sorts of topics and it’s a great platform for making a personal statement on them…?
Anomie:

Yeah, definitely. Initially I was attracted to school because I felt that that was one place where people were very directly talking about issues that were important to me. I realized however – getting to know what life as a professor would look like –that not only is my true passion music, but it’s a better platform for me. It’s more accessible and it’s a way to express the emotional and spiritual things that don’t fit easily into rational/intellectual boxes. Also music lets me interact with a lot more people than an academic life would offer.

So…speaking to that, what are your thoughts about the whole Occupy movement going on right now?
Anomie:

I think it’s awesome. I think it’s really badass! A lot of the themes that I’m hearing in the Occupy movement mirror themes I’ve always spoken about in my music: issues like consumerism, corporate power, suburban alienation and societal inequality. Occupy helps to create a central frame of reference. It helps to shed some light on the systems of power and oppression and is being talked about in a way that’s exciting to me. People are talking about more systemic issues. These systems that we’re living with are essentially defunct, and they need to change. I’ve heard that three-quarters of the people involved in the movemen - Rock 'n' Roll Dating


Saturday, 18 February 2012
Anomie Belle - Slither
Anomie Belle’s new single, ‘Slither’, follows November’s ‘Machine’, a single widely cited as an important part of the soundtrack to Occupy Wall Street. ‘Slither’, a collaboration with Sneaker Pimps’ Ian Pickering, suggests she's since got her hands on some chill pills - this one's much less urgent, a new age, floating down the river kind of track. Frictionless and sleek in its dynamics, it’s both unchallenging and subtly sophisticated.

Belle chews her words in a strange sort of way, with tones, pronunciations, and articulations the conventional singer wouldn’t go near. In a way it’s very similar to what Joanna Newsom does, but in place of Joanna’s folky innocence Anomie has a cool similar to Bajka (known for her work on Bonobo’s ‘Days To Come’).
‘Slither’ might not have the punch of protest that ‘Machines’ brandished, but its understated presence has a tender, almost surreal beauty. With its gentle gongs and House Of Flying Daggers strings towards the end, this is the sort of track Buddhist monks would be swaying to if they’d entered the iPod age. - Groove Orgy


Martedì 07 Febbraio 2012 00:00

ANOMIE BELLE - The CrushUn’americana dai suoni europei. E’ Anomie Belle al secondo album con “The Crush”.

Genere: trip hop, elettronica, downtempo

Ascolta anche: Tricky, Bjork, Hooverphonic

Che musica potrà mai fare una bella trentunenne che arriva da Seattle? Ovviamente qualcosa che non c’entra un bel niente con Nirvana, Pearl Jam e la vecchia guardia del grunge. Evidentemente un accostamento con quelle sonorità sarebbe fin troppo facile, così la signorina in questione, ha pensato bene di lasciare ad altri camice a scacchi, Fender Mustang e pedali Big Muff e rivolgere il suo interesse ad elettronica, downtempo ed affini: tutta roba che va forte principalmente nel vecchio continente ma non certo nella piovosa città statunitense.

Con qualche incursione nell’hip hop con Mr. Lif dei Thievery Corporation e con un “guest” dell’indie-pop come Jon Auer (di The Posies ma anche dei sommi Big Star post reunion) le strade percorse sono quelle del trip-hop, leggasi Tricky, Massive Attack, Lamb, Mandalay, con qualche sperimentazione degna della signora Bjork.

In questo abbondare di citazioni è lecito chiedersi se questo disco sia poco originale. In un mondo dove trovare cose veramente nuove è ormai pura utopia ad Anomie Belle possiamo tranquillamente perdonarlo. Semmai il problema è un altro e cioè che in mezzo ad arrangiamenti pur di qualità, infarciti da una bella voce, i dodici brani presenti faticano a colpire ed a convincere fino in fondo.

Manca qualcosa in grado di colpire veramente al cuore dell’ascoltatore, e di portare “The crush” al di sopra di una pur meritata sufficienza. - Saltinaria


Who: Anomie Belle

From: Seattle, Washington

Sound: Smooth electronic, with hints of jazz and blues

www.anomiebelle.com

Promoter: Ninja Tune @ Electric Owl

She’s a quadruple threat; she plays multiple instruments, sings, composes and produces her own music. With smooth, sultry vocals and dark, sexy instrumentation she owns any stage she touches. Definitely not a newcomer to the west coast music scene, Anomie has toured and performed with some amazing artists, including Yppah (Ninja Tune) and the Posies. Talking to her, you can sense the confidence of a seasoned musician, and the intelligence of someone who knows exactly where she’s going. - Epic Van


Anomie Belle is the solo project of composer, producer, vocalist, and multi-instrumentalist Toby Campbell. Originally a classical violinist and songwriter, she released multiple solo records under her own name before making her way into indie, experimental, trip-hop music. A Portland, Oregon native, Campbell has performed at top venues throughout the Pacific Northwest, and has worked as a musician and producer in Madrid, Glasgow, Amsterdam, New York, Buenos Aires, and London. In 2006 she moved to Seattle to focus exclusively on Anomie Belle. Have a listen @ her sultry vocals ….





Anomie Belle features several contributing artists: Penelope Sheets supplies keys and harmony during live performances, and Anne-Lynne Williams (Trespassers William, Lotte Kestner, Chemical Brothers) is a regular guest vocalist. Other collaborators include Bryan Smith and Peter Lynch (Library Science). Sheets, Williams and Smith are all featured on the upcoming release, Sleeping Patterns.

Anomie Belle’s material grapples with social issues ranging from American political apathy to suburban alienation, passive media spectatorship, social injustice, and consumerism. Anomie Belle makes dark social issues eerily lovely; befitting the name, in this music, alienation and social unrest mingle with charm and beauty. You can catch her sultry vocals here ?Anomie Belle - Grafix Crush


Flow Friday: Anomie Belle – Crush
By rentdownstairs

Anomie is a singer/songwriter/violinist who is not only a musical artist, but is a film composer and a giant hippie. I could say she’s an activist, which she is, but really she’s a big ol’ hippie. Anti-consumerism, with a focus on human spirituality and sexuality. Call it what you want, I call it hippie. It has a strong influence on her musical lyrics, as you might imagine, but that doesn’t change the fact she’s pretty awesome. She reminds me of a more socially conscious version of Esthero, with less of a pure hip hop influence and more of a soul influence. Also, kinda like a non-shitty Joanna Newsome.

1. Electric Lullaby
2. Inky Drips
3. Machine
4. It’s a Crush
5. Mosquito in the Closet
6. Bodies Offering
7. Picture Perfect (personal favorite)
8. Lost Horizon
9. Privilege
10. On TV
11. Lavender Days
12. Phantom

I had some issues finding all the songs, but whatcha gonna do?

The playlist as I could find it!
Anomie Belle – Crush - I am the name of your Cover Band


“Hey, you got a haircut.” I’ve known Ryan since his hair was black and his biggest concern was finals. Now his Pierce Brosnan ‘do is cropped short and peppered with the gray that age, fatherhood, and work brings. He pulled his camera from the trunk, I grabbed my notebook, and we headed for The Blue Lamp.

The Blue Lamp sits square in the taint of downtown Sacramento. To the east are streets lined with old trees and older mansions right out of a John Hughes movie; to the west is Midtown with its lofts, galleries, restaurants and hipsters on fixies. When I moved here almost twenty years ago The Blue Lamp was a strip club, and the Motel 6 next door had that “meth lab and hooker” patina. Now there’s a Starbucks across the street, and the motel appears to be cleaned up.

“I need your ID’s and eight bucks each.”

“We should be on the list.” I peeked past the bouncer. The only people in the place were the bartender and four people frantically setting up gear.

“I don’t have a list yet,” he said and then added “you cheap bastard.” Fortunately he was kind enough to toss in this last clause with his eyes. He turned toward the stage. “Hey, this guy says he’s on the list.”

“What’s his name?”

“James Stafford.”

“Yeah, he’s good.”

I never entered The Blue Lamp in its previous incarnation, and in fact this was my first time in the place at all. The club is a long, narrow rectangle maybe 50' x 150' with painted brick walls and a fully stocked bar. At the end nearest the door rests the stage and at the back is a lounge-type area lined with couches and decorated with local art. Whatever it looked like as a strip club this is a vast improvement.

Ryan and I grabbed a table against one of the brick walls so that he could shoot and I could scribble notes. We babbled while the band ran through their sound check. Ryan took some test shots and I wrestled with the impulse to gather mind numbing minutiae more to stay busy than anything. As a kid I glazed over when the guitar magazines launched into granular detail about Eric Clapton’s guitar rig or whatever, so the last thing I wanted was to turn this into a gear porn piece. I will say this, though: For three musicians it was a pretty impressive collection of computers, keyboards, and analog instruments. Kathryn Calder and her band lingered near the merch table back by the couches, waiting to headline the empty room.

(c) Ryan Wilkerson

One beautiful voice filled the empty rectangle, Anomie Belle wringing the emotion out of Bill Withers’s “Ain’t No Sunshine,” transforming it from broken heart to a spiritual. The hair on my arms stood up; a tingle literally moved down my spine. I wasn’t sitting in a club, I was graveside and these were the last moments before they lowered –

“That’s good. Same level for the other mic, please.”

Sound check, witherus interruptus. I’d never hear whether that house is just a home anytime she goes away. It was like having to pull out in the back seat of the primer gray Camaro because the prom queen had a sudden fit of conscience. But man, for those few seconds it was so good.

About forty minutes later they were officially on, opening with “Phantom” off of The Crush. I’d been struggling for weeks to find a corollary for her voice, which cuts through me so easily. It hit me before the chorus: Sinead O’Connor. This isn’t so much a question of tone or phrasing as one of character. Anomie Belle has that same combination of power, vulnerability, and emotion. And while she tears up fewer Pope photos (Sinead: 1, Anomie: 0), she certainly shares with Sinead a desire to blend music and social consciousness. The difference? Anomie’s concerns are rooted in the American dream, suburban lifestyles, events like the recent Occupy movement.

Next up comes “Lost Horizon” off of the same album. I’m embarrassed to reach for the hackneyed adjective “atmospheric,” but later she agrees with me so I don’t feel quite so bad.
- James Stafford


You’re not familiar with Anomie Belle? I’d much rather light a candle than curse your darkness. She is one of the most interesting indies out there right now — no allegiance to genres, instruments (acoustic or electronic), or even to her own voice. Her only loyalty appears to be to the songs, and each one is a perfect little snow globe of a world ranging from the ethereal and moody to some of the most challenging experimental (yet melodic) stuff I’ve heard in years.

For example, ”How Can I Be Sure” from Sleeping Patterns has all the moody sexiness you’ll ever need:

So you’ve got her pegged, right? She’s some kind of contemporary Sade, laying down the tasty seduction groove. But then she offers up what should be the theme song to the Occupy Wall Street movement (though it predates it). Here she demonstrates what a bright and prescient lyricist she is, but doesn’t forget that it’s all about the song. Listen closely — goosebump music.

Okay, now you have a bead on her, right? Luscious voice, sleepy melody, razor-sharp lyrics. Well, while you were zigging she was zagging. Here come the beats along with an extended use of that big voice to create new characters. The video itself is pretty damned amazing, too.

“But James, I don’t like all that electronicky wockawoll these kids today listen to,” you say. “Whatever happened to talented people playing real instruments?” Wow, you just never learn, do you, Chumpfrey?

I haven’t been this excited about a new artist in years. I’m thinking back to my days in Los Angeles, seeing bands like Jane’s Addiction and the Red Hot Chili Peppers in clubs and knowing that someday I’d be telling the tale (which I just did, I guess. Yeah, that’s right — I was there).

If you’re in the Sacramento area you need to come out for this show and grab yourself an “I saw her back when…” story. There might not be a music industry as we once knew it, but when Anomie Belle manages to find a foothold in the new world order she’s going to break out; and if she doesn’t, we can all be in on the best kept secret in the indie music world.

Tickets are only 8 bucks and are available at the door. See you Sunday, October 30 at:

Blue Lamp
1400 Alhambra Boulevard
Sacramento, CA 95816-6509
(916) 455-3400

Wait! Wait! Don’t leave without your freebies! You can download a couple of free tracks here:
http://soundcloud.com/anomie-belle/aint-no-sunshine
http://soundcloud.com/anomie-belle/inky-drips-damiak-remix - James Stafford


Posted 07 November 2011 | Tracks / Mixes

Anomie Belle’s Inky Drips drops on 17 Oct. This 4-song EP centers around the track “Inky Drips” off her upcoming record The Crush, which releases on Nov 7.

It didn’t take long for critics and filmmakers to notice Anomie Belle’s music. Her music has been featured in Xbox’s Alan Wake, Showtime’s United States of Tara, and MTV’s Jersey Shore. Anomie Belle has also toured and collaborated with an impressive roster of folks including Tricky, The Album Leaf, Mr. Lif (The Perceptionists), Jon Auer (The Posies, Big Star), Little Dragon, and Bajofondo. She also shared the stage with Bonobo, Phantogram, Kid Koala, Azure Ray, The Heavy, Efterklang, Emily Wells, Grieves & Budo, Sea Wolf, Asobi Seksu, Kimya Dawson, Mirah, Tristeza, Yppah and others.

URB Magazine has called her music “sultry, smoky, seductive, sexy and dark.” Performer Magazine called her songs “beautiful symphonies,” “melancholy with sensual beats, lush strings and layered vocals.” Innocent Words magazine went as far as to call Anomie Belle “a musical mastermind.” Decide for yourself. Her music is a mix of electronic and organic instrumentation, fiercely sensual vocals, and thickly layered, ethereal soundscapes. The more you listen, the more you’ll find.

The deep layers in Anomie Belle music are accompanied equally complex emotions. “Piecing her name together from words meaning social unrest and a beautiful and charming woman, Seattle trip-hopper Anomie Belle has lofty aims echoing her view of music as a more powerful vehicle for education and enlightenment than classroom teachings. Meshing sultry vocals and moody instrumental programming, with a healthy amount of layering added to both, Anomie Belle tackles spectacle and alienation both lyrically and sonically,” writes Seattle Weekly. “Beautiful Desocialization and is a moniker quite apropos for Anomie Belle,” writes Hellbomb. “Her songs are critical of blind adherence to consumerism. They’re swanky and sexy, but they also champion individuality and critical thinking.”

“I grew up in your prototypical American suburb,” Anomie Belle explains. “The manicured lawns, strip mall parking lots, chain stores, and massive expanses of cement and housing developments depressed me. I chose the moniker Anomie Belle to speak to the decadent alienation of the American dream. Growing up, music became my outlet. Bored by video games and dollhouses, I plunked away on my parent’s piano for hours at a time, teaching myself to play blues riffs and writing little pop songs.”

From there she was off. Once Anomie Belle figured out how to multi-track record she studied guitar, drums, voice, and audio engineering, and continued to play classical violin in orchestras throughout. She spent four years working as a studio musician, chamber violinist and producer in Madrid, New York, Buenos Aires, Glasgow and Amsterdam. When she returned to the United States, Anomie began concocting her eloquently sultry, sexy style, drawing upon the multitude of genres that had surrounded her. Anomie Belle’s dark, introspective and sensual electronic music has been garnering much attention since her debut in 2008, and she is back with the provocative new single Inky Drips. Listen for yourself.

www.facebook.com/anomiebellemusic - Noise Porn


Much fancied, self proclaimed 'anti consumerist queer' survives the sophomore slump.
7/10

Atmospherically dense, female fronted pop is as common-place these days as lager driven guitar pop was in the mid 90's but that doesn't mean there isn't still room on the bandwagon for a rebel. Portland born musician, composer and 'activist' Anomie Belle might be just that rebel with her androgynous good looks, peerlessly strange, intoxicating and beguiling voice and (most importantly) her keen melodic sense and experimental spirit.

Musically it feels like well-worn ground at first as wispy, atonal synths and sharp beats fight for focus against Belle's seductive vocals, icy cool guitars and a sense of cinematic drama. In essence I could just as easily be describing the first Portishead album as it can't be denied 'The Crush' shares a similar aesthetic to that noted genre classic. However despite Belle's defiantly anti-consumerist stance there are genuine moments of pop immediacy here. 'Inky Drips' for example could almost be a Lady Gaga song if it was remixed as such and there's a modern hip-hop edge the the industrial beats of 'Machine'. 'Privilege' meanwhile is as immediate as a Dido single. Don't let that put you off mind, this is after-all far more credible and (crucially) far more interesting.

Take the treated synths in 'Mosquito In The Closer' that actually SOUND like 'mosquito's in the closet' or the way post-rock string arrangements strike up against dirty, overdriven guitars and dramatic, Bjork indebted electronica on the daring 'It's A Crush'. These are songs which might seem slight and undernourished at first, in fact if you took them apart and pared them back to simple voice and piano tracks they would probably seem quite generic. It's the way Belle and her cohorts manage to make so many disparate elements work together though that keeps listener fatigue from setting in.

The album falls short occasionally, generally when Belle either loses track of her own ambition such as on the listless 'Lost Horizon' (which sounds more like backing music for a mobile phone commercial than a fully fledged song) or starts preaching to the converted with her limited vocabulary (the otherwise quite lovely 'On TV' reads like bad 6th form poetry). But at least half of the tracks here reveal an artist as willing to push herself as she is her audience and for that Anomie Belle deserves vindication.

http://anomiebelle.tumblr.com/

Benjamin Hiorns - Subba Cultcha


Saturday, 17 September 2011 Written by Rob Sleigh
Anomie Belle Announces New Album and Single – Watch Video Now

Seattle-based neo-soul artist Anomie Belle has released the video for her new single ‘Inky Drips’, which is due for release on 17th October. The track is the latest to be taken from her forthcoming second album ‘The Crush’, which will be released on 7th November. See below to watch the video for ‘Inky Drips’.

‘The Crush’ is the follow-up to Anomie Belles’ 2008 debut album ‘Sleeping Patterns’. She has previously toured and worked with the likes of Tricky, Little Dragon and Jon Auer (The Posies/Big Star), who also features on ‘The Crush’.

Anomie Belle - real name Toby Campbell - began her musical career as a classical violinist before starting work on her own solo material. Speaking about her music, she said: “I grew up in your prototypical American suburb. The manicured lawns, strip mall parking lots, chain stores and massive expanses of cement and housing developments depressed me. I chose the moniker Anomie Belle to speak to the decadent alienation of the American dream. Growing up, music became my outlet. Bored by video games and dollhouses, I plunked away on my parent’s piano for hours at a time, teaching myself to play blues riffs and writing little pop songs.” - Stereoboard


Anomie Belle

November11

Seattle-based songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer and film composer, Anomie Belle, releases her new EP, Machine, on December 5th, featuring collaborations with members of the Sneaker Pimps, Mr Lif, and Big Spider’s Back. Many have already heralded Belle’s music as a soundtrack for the Occupy movement, and once again her potent music speaks out against the Machine.

Her new EP kicks off with “Slither,” a dark, sinister, sexy track written in collaboration with Ian Pickering of the Sneaker Pimps. “I was in Europe for a festival and decided to stop through London to visit Ian on my way home,” Anomie explains. “We shut ourselves in a smoky little room for four days and just wrote music together. Ian and I connected musically right away. I love the darkness in Ian’s lyrics… they strike an intriguing balance with his genuine and compassionate demeanor as a person.”

The dark themes of greed and suffering in “Slither” are followed by “Machine,” a collaboration between Belle and hip-hop emcee, Mr Lif (The Perceptionists, Thievery Corporation). In “Machine,” Lif and Anomie dish out harsh criticism of the enormous discrepancies in wealth, avarice, oppression and poverty that characterize modern society.

Lif and Anomie first teamed up in 2009 to perform at Bumbershoot and have continued to perform together since. The two immediately connected around their shared values and musical sensibilities. Lif has long been noted for his socially conscious lyrics, and Belle is known for tackling critiques of greed, oppression, mass media, corporate power, inequality, and alienation in her music.

“I grew up in your prototypical American suburb,” Anomie Belle explains. “The manicured lawns, strip mall parking lots, chain stores, and massive expanses of cement and housing developments depressed me. I chose the moniker Anomie Belle to speak to the decadent alienation of the American dream.”

“Beautiful Desocialization and is a moniker quite apropos for Anomie Belle,” writes Hellbomb. “Her songs are critical of blind adherence to consumerism. They’re swanky and sexy, but they also champion individuality and critical thinking.”

Machine (feat. Mr Lif) is followed by three remixes of tracks from Anomie Belle’s recent LP, The Crush, including an infectious dance remix of “Machine” by Big Spider’s Back.

Anomie’s love of collaborations is no secret. Her work as a producer has recently led her to collaborate with members of The Posies, Trespassers William, and Ninjatune’s Yppah. She has also recently toured with Tricky, Little Dragon, The Album Leaf, Bajofondo, and Kathryn Calder (of the New Pornographers). “I have been fortunate to get to perform and collaborate with so many talented folks,” Belle comments. “There is so much to learn, and I am thrilled to have been given so many opportunities to grow as a musician through collaboration.”

Soundcloud: http://soundcloud.com/anomie-belle/machine-feat-mr-lif
- Just A Wee Music Blog


Anomie Belle’s Inky Drips drops on 17 October 2011. This 4-song EP centers around the track “Inky Drips” off her upcoming record The Crush, which releases on 7 November 2011.

It didn’t take long for critics and filmmakers to notice Anomie Belle’s music. Her music has been featured in Xbox’s Alan Wake, Showtime’s United States of Tara, and MTV’s Jersey Shore. Anomie Belle has also toured and collaborated with an impressive roster of folks including Tricky, The Album Leaf, Mr. Lif (The Perceptionists), Jon Auer (The Posies, Big Star), Little Dragon, and Bajofondo. She also shared the stage with Bonobo, Phantogram, Kid Koala, Azure Ray, The Heavy, Efterklang, Emily Wells, Grieves & Budo, Sea Wolf, Asobi Seksu, Kimya Dawson, Mirah, Tristeza, Yppah and others.

URB Magazine has called her music “sultry, smoky, seductive, sexy and dark.” Performer Magazine called her songs “beautiful symphonies,” “melancholy with sensual beats, lush strings and layered vocals.” Innocent Words magazine went as far as to call Anomie Belle “a musical mastermind.” Decide for yourself. Her music is a mix of electronic and organic instrumentation, fiercely sensual vocals, and thickly layered, ethereal soundscapes. The more you listen, the more you’ll find.

The deep layers in Anomie Belle music are accompanied equally complex emotions. “Piecing her name together from words meaning social unrest and a beautiful and charming woman, Seattle trip-hopper Anomie Belle has lofty aims echoing her view of music as a more powerful vehicle for education and enlightenment than classroom teachings. Meshing sultry vocals and moody instrumental programming, with a healthy amount of layering added to both, Anomie Belle tackles spectacle and alienation both lyrically and sonically,” writes Seattle Weekly. “Beautiful Desocialization and is a moniker quite apropos for Anomie Belle,” writes Hellbomb. “Her songs are critical of blind adherence to consumerism. They’re swanky and sexy, but they also champion individuality and critical thinking.”

“I grew up in your prototypical American suburb,” Anomie Belle explains. “The manicured lawns, strip mall parking lots, chain stores, and massive expanses of cement and housing developments depressed me. I chose the moniker Anomie Belle to speak to the decadent alienation of the American dream. Growing up, music became my outlet. Bored by video games and dollhouses, I plunked away on my parent’s piano for hours at a time, teaching myself to play blues riffs and writing little pop songs.”

From there she was off. Once Anomie Belle figured out how to multi-track record she studied guitar, drums, voice, and audio engineering, and continued to play classical violin in orchestras throughout. She spent four years working as a studio musician, chamber violinist and producer in Madrid, New York, Buenos Aires, Glasgow and Amsterdam. When she returned to the United States, Anomie began concocting her eloquently sultry, sexy style, drawing upon the multitude of genres that had surrounded her. Anomie Belle's dark, introspective and sensual electronic music has been garnering much attention since her debut in 2008, and she is back with the provocative new single Inky Drips. Listen for yourself.

Stream here: http://bit.ly/p7lmVn - I House U


Posted by Salad Days On November - 27 - 2011

Anomie Belle – Machine EP

Many have already heralded Belle’s music as a soundtrack for the Occupy movement, and once again her potent music speaks out against the ‘Machine’. Seattle-based songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer and film composer, Anomie Belle, releases her new EP, ‘Machine’, on December 5th, featuring collaborations with members of the Sneaker Pimps, Mr Lif, and Big Spider’s Back. Her new EP kicks off with ‘Slither’ a dark, sinister, sexy track written in collaboration with Ian Pickering of the Sneaker Pimps. “I was in Europe for a festival and decided to stop through London to visit Ian on my way home,” Anomie explains. “We shut ourselves in a smoky little room for four days and just wrote music together. Ian and I connected musically right away. I love the darkness in Ian’s lyrics… they strike an intriguing balance with his genuine and compassionate demeanor as a person.”

The dark themes of greed and suffering in ‘Slither’ are followed by ‘Machine’ a collaboration between Belle and hip-hop emcee, Mr Lif (The Perceptionists, Thievery Corporation). In ‘Machine’ Lif and Anomie dish out harsh criticism of the enormous discrepancies in wealth, avarice, oppression and poverty that characterize modern society.

Machine (feat. Mr Lif) by Anomie Belle

Lif and Anomie first teamed up in 2009 to perform at Bumbershoot and have continued to perform together since. The two immediately connected around their shared values and musical sensibilities. Lif has long been noted for his socially conscious lyrics, and Belle is known for tackling critiques of greed, oppression, mass media, corporate power, inequality, and alienation in her music. “I grew up in your prototypical American suburb,” Anomie Belle explains. “The manicured lawns, strip mall parking lots, chain stores, and massive expanses of cement and housing developments depressed me. I chose the moniker Anomie Belle to speak to the decadent alienation of the American dream.” “Beautiful Desocialization and is a moniker quite apropos for Anomie Belle,” writes Hellbomb. “Her songs are critical of blind adherence to consumerism. They’re swanky and sexy, but they also champion individuality and critical thinking.” ‘Machine’ (feat. Mr Lif) is followed by three remixes of tracks from Anomie Belle’s recent LP, ‘The Crush’, including an infectious dance remix of ‘Machine’ by Big Spider’s Back.

Anomie’s love of collaborations is no secret. Her work as a producer has recently led her to collaborate with members of The Posies, Trespassers William, and Ninjatune’s Yppah. She has also recently toured with Tricky, Little Dragon, The Album Leaf, Bajofondo, and Kathryn Calder (of the New Pornographers). “I have been fortunate to get to perform and collaborate with so many talented folks,” Belle comments. “There is so much to learn, and I am thrilled to have been given so many opportunities to grow as a musician through collaboration.”

http://anomiebelle.tumblr.com/ - Salad Days


ANOMIE BELLE
NEW SINGLE – MACHINE FEAT. MR. LIF
RELEASED 14 NOVEMBER 2011

Seattle-based songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer and film composer Anomie Belle teams up with hip-hop emcee Mr Lif (The Perceptionists, Thievery Corporation) to release her new music video for “Machine.”

Lif and Anomie first teamed up in 2009 to perform at Bumbershoot in Seattle and immediately connected around their shared values and musical sensibilities. These days, the two find that they are not alone. “A bright and prescient lyricist, [Anomie Belle’s music] should be the theme song to the Occupy Wall Street movement,” writes James Stafford. “I’m elated so many are mobilizing with “Occupy” protests in many cities,” Lif writes. “Without these types of movements, corporate greed will continue to run amok & destroy everything in it’s path unchecked. [My music] is made in the spirit of sparking & supporting these types of efforts… musical ammo for the movement.”

In “Machine,” Lif and Anomie dish out harsh criticism of the enormous discrepancies in wealth, avarice, oppression and poverty that characterize modern society. “We create systems that justify our greed, embody culture that makes it easy to believe that hollow pleasures and the lassitude of wealth are not days squandered on fixation with yourself,” Belle sings.

In “Machine,” the two are quick to point fingers inward as well as outward, donning the attire of both the perpetrators and the victims of economic inequality in their new music video. “I have done unconscionable things in pursuit of dreams fed to me on the screen, and how is my life so much more precious than anybody else?” The chorus rings.

“Piecing her name together from words meaning social unrest and a beautiful and charming woman, Seattle trip-hopper Anomie Belle has lofty aims echoing her view of music as a powerful vehicle for education and enlightenment. Meshing sultry vocals and moody instrumental programming, with a healthy amount of layering added to both, Anomie Belle tackles spectacle and alienation both lyrically and sonically,” writes Seattle Weekly. “Beautiful Desocialization and is a moniker quite apropos for Anomie Belle,” writes Hellbomb. “Her songs are critical of blind adherence to consumerism. They’re swanky and sexy, but they also champion individuality and critical thinking.”

Lif has long been noted for his socially conscious and critical lyrics, and is currently touring with Thievery Corporation in support of his appearance on the title track of their new album, Culture of Fear. “Mr. Lif’s lyrics often have a sharp political edge and a strong message of uplift and community,” writes NPR.

“I grew up in your prototypical American suburb,” Anomie Belle explains. “The manicured lawns, strip mall parking lots, chain stores, and massive expanses of cement and housing developments depressed me. I chose the moniker Anomie Belle to speak to the decadent alienation of the American dream.”

www.facebook.com/pages/Anomie-Belle - Music Vita


12/07/2011 by admin

Anomie Belle – Slither (Taken from Machine EP)
featuring members of the
Sneaker Pimps, Mr Lif
& Big Spider’s Back

Many have already heralded Belle’s music as a soundtrack for the Occupy movement, and once again her potent music speaks out against the Machine. Seattle-based songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer and film composer, Anomie Belle, releases her new EP, Machine, on December 5th, featuring collaborations with members of the Sneaker Pimps, Mr Lif, and Big Spider’s Back.

Her new EP kicks off with “Slither,” a dark, sinister, sexy track written in collaboration with Ian Pickering of the Sneaker Pimps. “I was in Europe for a festival and decided to stop through London to visit Ian on my way home,” Anomie explains. “We shut ourselves in a smoky little room for four days and just wrote music together. Ian and I connected musically right away. I love the darkness in Ian’s lyrics… they strike an intriguing balance with his genuine and compassionate demeanor as a person.”

The dark themes of greed and suffering in “Slither” are followed by “Machine,” a collaboration between Belle and hip-hop emcee, Mr Lif (The Perceptionists, Thievery Corporation). In “Machine,” Lif and Anomie dish out harsh criticism of the enormous discrepancies in wealth, avarice, oppression and poverty that characterize modern society. (Check out the music video here: http://youtu.be/bwqKCkr6IDc)

Lif and Anomie first teamed up in 2009 to perform at Bumbershoot and have continued to perform together since. The two immediately connected around their shared values and musical sensibilities. Lif has long been noted for his socially conscious lyrics, and Belle is known for tackling critiques of greed, oppression, mass media, corporate power, inequality, and alienation in her music.

“I grew up in your prototypical American suburb,” Anomie Belle explains. “The manicured lawns, strip mall parking lots, chain stores, and massive expanses of cement and housing developments depressed me. I chose the moniker Anomie Belle to speak to the decadent alienation of the American dream.”

“Beautiful Desocialization and is a moniker quite apropos for Anomie Belle,” writes Hellbomb. “Her songs are critical of blind adherence to consumerism. They’re swanky and sexy, but they also champion individuality and critical thinking.”

Machine (feat. Mr Lif) is followed by three remixes of tracks from Anomie Belle’s recent LP, The Crush, including an infectious dance remix of “Machine” by Big Spider’s Back.

Anomie’s love of collaborations is no secret. Her work as a producer has recently led her to collaborate with members of The Posies, Trespassers William, and Ninjatune’s Yppah. She has also recently toured with Tricky, Little Dragon, The Album Leaf, Bajofondo, and Kathryn Calder (of the New Pornographers). “I have been fortunate to get to perform and collaborate with so many talented folks,” Belle comments. “There is so much to learn, and I am thrilled to have been given so many opportunities to grow as a musician through collaboration.”

https://www.facebook.com/Anomie-Belle - Nerdy Frames


09/26/2011 by admin

Tracklisting: 1. Inky Drips. 2. Inky Drips (Atropolis Remix). 3. Inky Drips (Damiak Remix). 4. Ain’t No Sunshine

Anomie Belle’s Inky Drips drops on 17 October 2011. This 4-song EP centers around the track “Inky Drips” off her upcoming record The Crush, which releases on 7 November 2011.

It didn’t take long for critics and filmmakers to notice Anomie Belle’s music. Her music has been featured in Xbox’s Alan Wake, Showtime’s United States of Tara, and MTV’s Jersey Shore. Anomie Belle has also toured and collaborated with an impressive roster of folks including Tricky, The Album Leaf, Mr. Lif (The Perceptionists), Jon Auer (The Posies, Big Star), Little Dragon, and Bajofondo. She also shared the stage with Bonobo, Phantogram, Kid Koala, Azure Ray, The Heavy, Efterklang, Emily Wells, Grieves & Budo, Sea Wolf, Asobi Seksu, Kimya Dawson, Mirah, Tristeza, Yppah and others.

URB Magazine has called her music “sultry, smoky, seductive, sexy and dark.” Performer Magazine called her songs “beautiful symphonies,” “melancholy with sensual beats, lush strings and layered vocals.” Innocent Words magazine went as far as to call Anomie Belle “a musical mastermind.” Decide for yourself. Her music is a mix of electronic and organic instrumentation, fiercely sensual vocals, and thickly layered, ethereal soundscapes. The more you listen, the more you’ll find.

The deep layers in Anomie Belle music are accompanied equally complex emotions. “Piecing her name together from words meaning social unrest and a beautiful and charming woman, Seattle trip-hopper Anomie Belle has lofty aims echoing her view of music as a more powerful vehicle for education and enlightenment than classroom teachings. Meshing sultry vocals and moody instrumental programming, with a healthy amount of layering added to both, Anomie Belle tackles spectacle and alienation both lyrically and sonically,” writes Seattle Weekly. “Beautiful Desocialization and is a moniker quite apropos for Anomie Belle,” writes Hellbomb. “Her songs are critical of blind adherence to consumerism. They’re swanky and sexy, but they also champion individuality and critical thinking.”

“I grew up in your prototypical American suburb,” Anomie Belle explains. “The manicured lawns, strip mall parking lots, chain stores, and massive expanses of cement and housing developments depressed me. I chose the moniker Anomie Belle to speak to the decadent alienation of the American dream. Growing up, music became my outlet. Bored by video games and dollhouses, I plunked away on my parent’s piano for hours at a time, teaching myself to play blues riffs and writing little pop songs.”

From there she was off. Once Anomie Belle figured out how to multi-track record she studied guitar, drums, voice, and audio engineering, and continued to play classical violin in orchestras throughout. She spent four years working as a studio musician, chamber violinist and producer in Madrid, New York, Buenos Aires, Glasgow and Amsterdam. When she returned to the United States, Anomie began concocting her eloquently sultry, sexy style, drawing upon the multitude of genres that had surrounded her. Anomie Belle’s dark, introspective and sensual electronic music has been garnering much attention since her debut in 2008, and she is back with the provocative new single Inky Drips. Listen for yourself.

www.facebook.com/anomiebelle - Nerdy Frames


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WMSE Song of the Day (Tune In Turn Up): Anomie Belle “Inky Drips”

It seems appropriate that Seattle’s Toby Campbell should have chosen a stage name which loosely translates to ‘a restless charming woman’ (Anomie Belle) — her music delves into a darker spirit for an unsettling but beautiful balance of classical strings, trip hop beats and icy vocals. Also, Campbell, a bit of a globetrotter, originally called Portland, Oregon her home before skipping off to New York, Glasgow, London, Amsterdam, Glasgow and Buenos Aires, staying put in Seattle in 2006 only to focus on her music. Occasionally Anomie Belle curbs her restless spirit to settle down and work with her full band and guest hip hop artist, Mr. Lif. Campbell will surely have both by her side for her release of The Crush next week in Seattle. Check out the single, “Inky Drips”, above. - WMSE Music News


Seattle-based songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer and film composer Anomie Belle returns, teaming up with hip-hop MC Mr Lif (The Perceptionists, Thievery Corporation) for her new single “Machine” which will be released November 14th on her own label; Anomie Belle Records.

The third track off new album “The Crush” released on September 13th of this year is an enticing piece of work. Toby Campbell’s (Anomie Belle) vocals are reminiscent of a sensitive Cerys Matthews of Catatonia in tone, uttering lyrics that bare high relevance to the contemporary economic climate and furor. In “Machine,” Anomie and musical partner Mr Lif dish out harsh criticism of the enormous discrepancies in wealth, avarice, oppression and poverty that characterise modern society. “We create systems that justify our greed, embody culture that makes it easy to believe that hollow pleasures and the lassitude of wealth are not days squandered on fixation with yourself,” Toby sings. This is a stirring song, fantastically produced and dressed in an outfit of elegance surrounding two critical and conscious individuals.

Nick Otter - Grapevine


Seattle-based songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer and film composer Anomie Belle teams up with hip-hop emcee Mr Lif (The Perceptionists, Thievery Corporation) to release her new music video for “Machine.”

Lif and Anomie first teamed up in 2009 to perform at Bumbershoot in Seattle and immediately connected around their shared values and musical sensibilities. These days, the two find that they are not alone. “A bright and prescient lyricist, [Anomie Belle’s music] should be the theme song to the Occupy Wall Street movement,” writes James Stafford. “I’m elated so many are mobilizing with “Occupy” protests in many cities,” Lif writes. “Without these types of movements, corporate greed will continue to run amok & destroy everything in it’s path unchecked. [My music] is made in the spirit of sparking & supporting these types of efforts… musical ammo for the movement.”

In “Machine,” Lif and Anomie dish out harsh criticism of the enormous discrepancies in wealth, avarice, oppression and poverty that characterize modern society. “We create systems that justify our greed, embody culture that makes it easy to believe that hollow pleasures and the lassitude of wealth are not days squandered on fixation with yourself,” Belle sings.

In “Machine,” the two are quick to point fingers inward as well as outward, donning the attire of both the perpetrators and the victims of economic inequality in their new music video. “I have done unconscionable things in pursuit of dreams fed to me on the screen, and how is my life so much more precious than anybody else?” The chorus rings.

“Piecing her name together from words meaning social unrest and a beautiful and charming woman, Seattle trip-hopper Anomie Belle has lofty aims echoing her view of music as a powerful vehicle for education and enlightenment. Meshing sultry vocals and moody instrumental programming, with a healthy amount of layering added to both, Anomie Belle tackles spectacle and alienation both lyrically and sonically,” writes Seattle Weekly. “Beautiful Desocialization and is a moniker quite apropos for Anomie Belle,” writes Hellbomb. “Her songs are critical of blind adherence to consumerism. They’re swanky and sexy, but they also champion individuality and critical thinking.”

Lif has long been noted for his socially conscious and critical lyrics, and is currently touring with Thievery Corporation in support of his appearance on the title track of their new album, Culture of Fear. “Mr. Lif’s lyrics often have a sharp political edge and a strong message of uplift and community,” writes NPR.

“I grew up in your prototypical American suburb,” Anomie Belle explains. “The manicured lawns, strip mall parking lots, chain stores, and massive expanses of cement and housing developments depressed me. I chose the moniker Anomie Belle to speak to the decadent alienation of the American dream.” - God is in the TV


Neo-soul and trip-hop artist Anomie Belle is back with her fourth release of 2011, Machine. The opening cut, “Slither,” features soft, minimalistic drums and magical synths, which augment Belle’s strong voice. Opting for a funkier beat, “Machine” focuses on how self-absorbed people are today. Boston’s own Mr. Lif spits tight rhymes that just add an extra bit of flavor to the title track.

Anomie Belle returns to a more serene sound for “Electric Lullaby (Tapage Remix).” The intro contains light breathing, claps and feels like an outer-body experience waiting to happen. Though the direction where Anomie Belle was going with this song had me intrigued for a bit, the effects on the vocals made it seem like she was trying too hard to make it stand out. Her voice is powerful naturally and the effects are just painful to listen to.

The disappointing previous tune is redeemed by “Bodies Offering.” What truly makes it stand out is not only Belle’s voice restored to a more natural sound, but the cello. The dejected tone of the cello contrasts against the hypnotizing and catchy synth and completes the track. To close off Machine is a remix of the title track. Like most remakes, it lacks the glow of the original.

Machine started off strong but sadly lost its momentum. However, if one takes away the third track and the final one, it flows well to form a truly emotive piece of work.

—by Roz Smith, December 21, 2011 - The Aquarian Weekly


Sounds like: Zola Jesus, St Vincent, Baxter, Joanna Newsom

What's so good?

By Jessica Deeken | November 29th, 2011

Anomie Belle is a rare breed of artist that cracks into my cynicism. As indie music becomes a fragmented jigsaw of hi-fi and lo-fi, remixes and mashups, she releases The Crush with a full spectrum of whimsical electronic effects, strings, and grainy allegorical vocals. Far from recycled pop hooks, her music is ominous and theatrical, composed layer by layer, somewhat like Zola Jesus.

The album opens on “Electric Lullaby,” loops of vocals, keys and drums ever so delicately mixed behind Belle’s raspy voice. The single “Machine” strikes with an enigmatic chorus: “I have done unconscionable things/ in pursuit of dreams fed to me on the screen.” She sings like she’s back from a long journey to a dark place, distrusting her own motivations. This one gets guest support with political hip-hop artist Mr Lif, another with Posies guitarist Jon Auer. With titles like “Inky Drips,” “Bodies Offering,” and “Lost Horizon,” it’s chills and shivers, start to finish.

After her self-released debut album Sleeping Patterns in 2008 had, ahem, moderate success including tours with Little Dragon and Tricky, she’s been writing film scores like Dark Material shown at the Seattle Int’l Film Festival, appeared on Xbox game Alan Wake soundtrack alongside David Bowie and Roy Orbison, and took home a couple appearances on Jersey Shore (no kidding), besides penning The Crush.

Soon she’ll be releasing Machine as an EP, so if you’re in Seattle, you can look for her at the Tractor Tavern December 14with an all new composition for a string quartet. - Indie Shuffle


Anomie Belle Announces New EP- Machine ( Audio) (Video)
by Sacha HTF

Wow! Anomie Belle is set to hit us with a masterpiece of with new EP-‘Machine’.

This EP will feature member’s of the Sneaker Pimps, Mr. Lif, Big Spider’s Back and a FREE stream below!

Machine (feat. Mr Lif) by Anomie Belle

Anomie Belle’s Machine EP will be released on 12th December 2011 so jot that date down! for a very tasty and exciting EP indeed!

Tracklist-

1. Slither

2. Machine Feat. Mr Lif

3. Electric Lullaby (Tapage Remix)

4. Bodies Offering (Other Lovers Mix)

5. Machine (Big Spider’s Back Remix) Feat. Mr Lif

Watch track Machine (Feat Mr. Lif) here- - Hit the Floor


The best albums of 2011
J Mascis, Several Shades of Why

THE time has come for the annual round-up of the year’s best albums – but while there are plenty to choose from (such as new releases from Kasabian, Paul Simon and PJ Harvey), we’ve decided to mix in some of the hidden gems that you may have missed out on buying.

Hence, while the likes of undoubtedly (and deservedly) get a mention, what of lesser known gems such as Death Cab For Cutie, Fountains of Wayne, Ben Howard and Noah & The Whale.

Keep an eye out, too, for outstanding albums from the likes of Anomie Belle, Norman Palm, Marcus Foster, Matt And Kim and Squarehead. We’ve picked just 50 long-players to lead your life by… they’re not listed in any particular order of preference, though – just all good listens in their own right!

Anomie Belle – The Crush

What we said: Seattle-based songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer and film composer Anomie Belle is rapidly becoming a name to watch. With her distinct vocals (that sound like a mix between Bjork, Grace Jones and Morcheeba’s Skye depending on her mood), slick beats and intricate musical arrangements, she’s a captivating presence… and one that’s self-consciously difficult to pigeon-hole.

Best tracks: Mosquito In The Closet, Machine, Picture Perfect, Privilege, Lavender Days, Phantom - Indie London


Anomie Belle Gives Away Free Track – Ain’t No Sunshine – From Single Inky Drips (drops on 17th October). Ain’t No Sunshine by Anomie Belle

Anomie Belle’s dark, introspective and sensual electronic music has been garnering much attention since her debut in 2008, and she is back with the provocative new single Inky Drips. Listen for yourself.

It didn’t take long for critics and filmmakers to notice Anomie Belle’s music. Her music has been featured in Xbox’s Alan Wake, Showtime’s United States of Tara, and MTV’s Jersey Shore.

Her music is a mix of electronic and organic instrumentation, fiercely sensual vocals, and thickly layered, ethereal soundscapes. The more you listen, the more you’ll find.

“I grew up in your prototypical American suburb,” Anomie Belle explains. “The manicured lawns, strip mall parking lots, chain stores, and massive expanses of cement and housing developments depressed me. I chose the moniker Anomie Belle to speak to the decadent alienation of the American dream. Growing up, music became my outlet. Bored by video games and dollhouses, I plunked away on my parent’s piano for hours at a time, teaching myself to play blues riffs and writing little pop songs.”

This 4-song EP centers around the track “Inky Drips” off her upcoming record The Crush, which releases on 7th November.
www.facebook.com/anomiebellemusic - Fame Magazine


Anomie Belle's music has been popping up all over the place from X Box's Alan Wake to, er, MTV's Jersey Shore. She's also been on tour and collaborated with a rather impressive array of people including Tricky, Little Dragon and Bonobo.

On October 17 she releases the four track EP, Inky Drips. Below you can listen to and download the sultry and seductive Damiak remix of the title track. - Mix Mag


Anomie Belle wants your undivided attention. She’s been wooing you with her seductive single, remixes and video for “Inky Drips.” You’ll fall quickly in love when Anomie Belle drops her second full-length album, The Crush, on September 13th.

With twelve songs oozing with sultry vocals and melodies that will make your heart melt, each song tells a sensual tale that will have you anticipating the next chapter.

You can’t help be in awe of how Anomie Belle creates her layers of sound. Lush strings, electronic programming, live drums, guitars, and hypnotic synthesizers seep into your skin. All the while, Belle’s smooth and powerful voice moves through you on every track. Each song is so delicately crafted that it is hard to pick a favorite, but easy to have a crush.

The haunting and orchestral “Phantom” is striking and beautiful, while trip-hop meets hip-hop on “Machine,” which features the infamous Mr Lif. A duet with Jon Auer (of The Posies & Big Star) on “Picture Perfect” is perfectly melancholy folktronica, amidst charismatic and steamy tracks like “Bodies Offering” and “Lost Horizon.”

Critics and filmmakers have already been lured into the sexy darkness of Anomie Belle’s music. It has recently been featured in Xbox’s Alan Wake and in steamy scenes on Showtime’s United States of Tara and MTV’s Jersey Shore. Anomie Belle has toured with Tricky, Little Dragon, The Album Leaf and Bajofondo and has also shared the stage with Bonobo, Phantogram, Asobi Seksu, The Heavy, Azure Ray, Efterklang, Kid Koala, Emily Wells, Sea Wolf, and Tristeza.

Every track on The Crush brings the record closer to your heart, with a passion and sensuality that both provokes and invites you to linger... Get ready to have a crush on Anomie Belle. - Alt Sounds


November 21, 2011 | by Fred

No matter what does it for you, it’s almost certain that you could dig up an equal and opposite view, decrying your preferences as “hollow pleasures” or “false choices.” Refreshing, then, for Anomie Belle’s track “Machine” to turn the lens on the songwriter herself: “I have done unconscionable things/ in pursuit of dreams fed to me.”

The track features Mr. Lif, and the promotional clip creates a tense imbalance between audio and video: the skateboarding and the wild-eyed chanteuse in elegant dress alongside the even-pulsed trip-hop and unabashed social commentary. Even the lipsynching is jarringly unreal, as Anomie Belle makes her case that much of what we see on-screen is a lie. Look for the new EP Machine on December 6, featuring collaborations with Sneaker Pimps and Big Spider’s Back. - The Muse in Music


25th October 2011

Seattle-based songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer and film composer Anomie Belle teams up with hip-hop emcee Mr Lif (The Perceptionists, Thievery Corporation) to release her new music video for “Machine.”

Lif and Anomie first teamed up in 2009 to perform at Bumbershoot in Seattle and immediately connected around their shared values and musical sensibilities. These days, the two find that they are not alone. “A bright and prescient lyricist, [Anomie Belle’s music] should be the theme song to the Occupy Wall Street movement,” writes James Stafford. “I'm elated so many are mobilizing with "Occupy" protests in many cities,” Lif writes. “Without these types of movements, corporate greed will continue to run amok & destroy everything in it's path unchecked. [My music] is made in the spirit of sparking & supporting these types of efforts… musical ammo for the movement.”

In “Machine,” Lif and Anomie dish out harsh criticism of the enormous discrepancies in wealth, avarice, oppression and poverty that characterize modern society. “We create systems that justify our greed, embody culture that makes it easy to believe that hollow pleasures and the lassitude of wealth are not days squandered on fixation with yourself,” Belle sings.

In “Machine,” the two are quick to point fingers inward as well as outward, donning the attire of both the perpetrators and the victims of economic inequality in their new music video. “I have done unconscionable things in pursuit of dreams fed to me on the screen, and how is my life so much more precious than anybody else?” The chorus rings.

“Piecing her name together from words meaning social unrest and a beautiful and charming woman, Seattle trip-hopper Anomie Belle has lofty aims echoing her view of music as a powerful vehicle for education and enlightenment. Meshing sultry vocals and moody instrumental programming, with a healthy amount of layering added to both, Anomie Belle tackles spectacle and alienation both lyrically and sonically,” writes Seattle Weekly. “Beautiful Desocialization and is a moniker quite apropos for Anomie Belle,” writes Hellbomb. “Her songs are critical of blind adherence to consumerism. They’re swanky and sexy, but they also champion individuality and critical thinking.”

Lif has long been noted for his socially conscious and critical lyrics, and is currently touring with Thievery Corporation in support of his appearance on the title track of their new album, Culture of Fear. “Mr. Lif's lyrics often have a sharp political edge and a strong message of uplift and community,” writes NPR.

“I grew up in your prototypical American suburb,” Anomie Belle explains. “The manicured lawns, strip mall parking lots, chain stores, and massive expanses of cement and housing developments depressed me. I chose the moniker Anomie Belle to speak to the decadent alienation of the American dream.” - Safe Concerts


By Sal Christ on May 14, 2012

Otherworldly music that transports me from my own skin to somewhere other than here always garners a guaranteed future listen; when combined with decomposing trip-hop beats and pneumatic synths, my ears get weak in the knees (if they had knees that could get weak, that is.)

A serendipitous detour after hearing a Thievery Corporation track with Mr. Lif, Anomie Belle is a gorgeous curio of the Seattle scene with her Sia meets Portishead meets Björk sound. Featuring classical composition as a foundation, the Oregon native layers everything from violins to electric guitar to glitchy bleeps under a vocal style that vacillates between neo-soul and something more dramatic. The experience is definitely one for fans of English trip hop, industrial, or post-rock.

“Machine” is one of the artist’s own collaborations with Mr. Lif–a cool, Steve McQueen vibe with Lif’s spitting popping up here and there before swooping low like a vulture hovering just below the surface. Another doozy that floats light as mist in the Pacific northwest is “Phantom,” a reflective tune stripped down to the barest of elements–plucked and played strings, soft backgrounds pads, and sheer vocals. If vamping is more your style and who couldn’t use a little vamp, “Lavender Days,” creeps about with drama shades darker than would befit lavender.

Whether heavy, cobalt musical discomposure is your shtick or you just like feeling music reverberate in your ribcage, Anomie Belle is certain to take you into the twilight hours while you decompress.

Anomie Belle can be found online at Soundcloud, Facebook, Twitter, and her official site. - 303 Magazine


Thursday, August 25th, 2011

“I grew up in your prototypical American suburb. The manicured lawns, strip mall parking lots, chain stores, and massive expanses of cement and housing developments depressed me. I chose the moniker Anomie Belle to speak to the decadent alienation of the American dream,” states Anomie Belle.

The sultry singer-songwriter Anomie Belle has just released her newest video for the track “Inky Drips,” the first single off her upcoming album, The Crush. Lively and colored in with tattoo ink running down the backs of attractive bodies, the steamy and seductive video will surely be making it’s way onto many playlists soon. Anomie looks stunning as she sings the sultry tune hiding behind the bare skin of the sleek flesh in front of her. Just premiering on Baeble yesterday afternoon, the buzz is already out.

Belle’s voice is heavenly as she whisks you away into musical bliss, only leaving you to want to fly higher. If this is your first taste of Anomie, you will be wondering where she has been all of your life. Feel free to indulge.

Anomie Belle is not your typical singer-songwriter. She’s a whole new element of surprise. Starting when she was ten years old, Belle refurbished an old karaoke player to multi-track record her own songs. Already having been a classical violinist performing in an orchestra, she had self-taught herself the piano. Learning how to layer music, Belle’s musical focus carried her into college where she learned audio engineering and electronic programming. She spent the next four years working as a studio musician, chamber violinist, radio DJ and producer in Madrid, New York, Buenos Aires, Glasgow and Amsterdam. Boys, are you intimidated yet?

She’s also an active film composter, and her music has been featured in Xbox’s “Alan Wake,” the United States of Tara and MTV’s Jersey Shore. She has composed scores for award winning short films that have screened at the Seattle International Film Festival, Toronto Hot Docs, and Bumbershoot, and is currently scoring a new television pilot.

Arriving in Seattle, Belle released her debut effort in 2008 titled Sleeping Patterns, and she is set to release her newest effort, The Crush, on September 19th. - The New York Grapevine


Anomie Belle’s new single, ‘Slither’, follows November’s ‘Machine’, a single widely cited as an important part of the soundtrack to Occupy Wall Street. ‘Slither’, a collaboration with Sneaker Pimps’ Ian Pickering, is much less urgent - a new age, floating down the river kind of track. Frictionless and sleek in its dynamics, it’s both unchallenging and subtly sophisticated.

Anomie chews her words in a strange sort of way, with tones, pronunciations, and articulations the conventional singer wouldn’t go near. In a way it’s very similar to what Joanna Newsom does, but in place of Joanna’s folky innocence Anomie has a cool similar to Bajka (known for her work on Bonobo’s ‘Days To Come’).

‘Slither’ might not have the punch of protest that ‘Machines’ brandished, but its understated presence has a tender, almost otherworldly beauty. With its gentle gongs and House Of Flying Daggers strings towards the end, this is the sort of track Buddhist monks would be swaying to if they’d entered the iPod age.

Lars Donohoe - Tasty Fanzine


Anomie Belle, Machine (out now, self-released, anomiebelle.com:) On trip-hop maven Anomie Belle's new EP (her fifth release), all is not right with the world. The bleak portrait of America presented in the title track is a rallying cry for the 99 percent, and features a verse from socially conscious MC Mr. Lif. JMG (Wed., Dec. 14, Tractor Tavern) - Seattle Weekly


Submitted by Sarah Bargiela on Tue, 01/17/2012

Seattle-based songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer and film composer, Anomie Belle, releases her new EP Machine. EF had a listen and here are our thoughts.

The EP starts off with the haunting Slither and there it is straight away that sexy, fragile voice that we love about Anomie Belle taking over. The track remains haunting and almost leaves you in a haze as it stops and gives way to the title track, which sees an interesting and brilliant collaboration with Mr Lif. The track, which is also haunting but at the same time pretty darn dark with captivating vocals completely takes you by surprise. The combination of Anomie Belle and Mr Lif’s lyrics and vocals is perfect.

Next up is Tapage’s remix of Electric Lullaby and the EP descends into even darker territories. Then comes Other Lovers’ mix of Bodies Offering. Anomie Belle’s music is sexier and seductive here with some really good beats making this almost dance worthy. And just as we think about dancing Big Spider’s Back’s come to the rescue with a house remix of Machine. A great finish.

Anomie Belle’s new EP is just another perfect example as to why this artist deservers a place in the music scene. We are simply amazed and captivated by this woman. - Entertainment Focus


Wednesday, 23 November 2011
Written by Rob Sleigh

Seattle-based neo-soul artist Anomie Belle has announced the release of her new EP ‘Machine’, which is due out on 5th December. The EP features collaborations with Ian Pickering of The Sneaker Pimps and rapper Mr Lif, who appears on lead single ‘Machine’. The track, which can be heard below in an accompanying video, was included on Anomie’s recent album ‘The Crush’.

Speaking about the EP’s opening track ‘Slither’, which was written with Sneaker Pimps’ Ian Pickering, Anomie Belle said: “I was in Europe for a festival and decided to stop through London to visit Ian on my way home. We shut ourselves in a smoky little room for four days and just wrote music together. Ian and I connected musically right away. I love the darkness in Ian’s lyrics - they strike an intriguing balance with his genuine and compassionate demeanour as a person.”

‘The Crush’, which was released earlier this year, is the follow-up to Anomie Belles’ 2008 debut ‘Sleeping Patterns’. The new album also features a contribution from Jon Auer of The Posies.

“I have been fortunate to get to perform and collaborate with so many talented folks,” said Anomie. “There is so much to learn and I am thrilled to have been given so many opportunities to grow as a musician through collaboration.” - Stereoboard


Anomie Belle does not waste any of her time or talent. Less than two months ago The Crush was released (and my, what a great record that is), but instead of taking a well-deserved break, Anomie Belle dived even deeper into work and in a few days (on December 6th, to be exact) she's releasing a new EP, featuring some very exciting material. I was lucky to snatch a few moments of her time for a quick Q&A for trippin' the rift.

tipkin - First of all, congratulations on the success of The Crush and on the new EP release! You sure keep busy. How did the idea for the EP come around? The timing couldn’t be better – the Occupy movement is fighting the corporate machine as we speak.

Anomie Belle - Yea, the values and critiques that are coming out through Occupy are really exciting to me. It’s inspiring to see the general public talking about the effect of “the corporate machine” on our lives, our culture, our values and our communities. I have long admired the contributions artists have been making to the conversation (I am a huge fan of culture jamming) and am happy to be able to contribute as an artist myself. When Occupy started springing up, Lif and I felt like the match with the track and video we did for "Machine" was really striking. I’d just returned from England having written some new songs with Ian [Pickering] from Sneaker Pimps around similar issues and ideas, so it seemed like a good time to pull these songs together with some of the great remixes I’d had done for The Crush (including an awesome remix of “Machine” by Big Spider’s Back) and put them out.

t. - Most of your fans (myself included) appreciate your adventurousness in terms of genre and style, but I personally did encounter one hardcore trip-hop fan who said after listening to The Crush: “Anomie Belle is dead to me”. And you keep broadening the range with the EP – from “Slither”, which is guaranteed to please any “traditional trip-hop” fan to a bouncy dance remix of “Machine”. Do you like getting your fans out of their comfort zone?

A.B. - In general, I think getting out of our comfort zones in life is an important part of challenging ourselves to be humble, to grow, to broaden our perspectives, and to reconnect to the world outside of ourselves. We want things in life to live in boxes, to be easily identifiable, predictable… not to change. People, ideas, art, our self-identities… The truth is that nothing is fixed. Everything is always changing. For me, it’s about pushing myself where I’m most afraid, challenging myself to confront the areas where I know I have judgments, to grow… This is the spirit in which The Crush was made, so it would make sense if that came through to people in the music.

t. - Let’s talk about “Slither” more. The legendary Sneaker Pimps! Did you know Ian Pickering before? What was it like working with him? Are we going to see more collaborations with him in the future?

A.B. - I loved working with Ian. He is a delightful person – sincere, kind, positive, and with such a genuine spirit of openness in collaboration that made him a real pleasure to work with. Making music with someone can be such a great opportunity to connect. With Ian, we spent several days holed up in a little smoky room in London, bouncing music, lyrics and melodies back and forth, and came out with some material I think we’re both really excited about. "Slither" is the first thing we worked on together, and since it was written over production from Augustus Skinner (who had worked on the Sneaker Pimps Becoming X album years ago), it was easy to finish and release quickly. That said, folks can definitely anticipate more from Ian and I in the future.

t. - Where did the remixes come from? What were the criteria for choosing the right remixes for the EP?

A.B. - Choosing folks to do remixes for The Crush was a lot of fun. In general, I reached out to folks whose music I like. I think Big Spider’s Back did a fantastic job on this remix of "Machine", and - Trippin the Rift


Well, let's listen to the thing, shall we? Yes, we sure shall. Machine EP is 5 tracks packed with all kinds of electronica goodness. If you haven't heard The Crush, you're a loser you should definitely check out Machine EP, because it based around the title track (featuring Mr.Lif) that perfectly captures the dark, sexy and intense drive of the album, and the remixes are guaranteed to intrigue you enough to make you want to listen to the originals. If you heard The Crush, you should definitely check out Machine EP as well, because it features "Slither" - a brand new and absolutely gorgeous collaboration with Ian Pickering of Sneaker Pimps, and three remixes that make Anomie Belle's genius sparkle in new lights. "Machine" is my favorite track on The Crush, but on the EP it isn't the star of the show. Actually, it's just one of the show's 5 stars. I found myself completely dissolved in "Slither"'s dark atmosphere, hypnotic beat and those unearthly strings (warning! the may tear your soul apart!) and only Anomie Belle's silky vocals guided me through the darkness. It is so damn good that could easily spawn an entire album - and maybe (fingers crossed!) we will see something like that - "Slither" wasn't the only product of the collaboration. "Machine" follows, quickly getting us back to reality (maybe a bit too quickly, but I understand that on a 5-track EP there's not much room for subtleties). And Tapage's glitchy re-working of "Electric Lullaby" brings us right back to the dream world. Listening to Machine EP is sort of like swimming butterfly stroke - one moment you're underwater, you can't breathe, all you can see is bottomless deep darkness. Next moment you're above the surface, you catch the light reflecting in splashing water, you hear all the sounds of the world at once. And then you go back under. "Electric Lullaby" is definitely one of the "underwater" moments - very Radiohead-y, with Anomie Belle's digitized vocals shimmering between glitchy beats. Then you're above again - in the uptempo "Bodies Offering" (Other Lovers Mix) made by Anomie Belle herself, breathing twilight becomes an urban romance - fast, direct but tender and sensual (adding strings was such a nice touch). Big Spider's Back concludes the EP with the dance remix of "Machine". I picked the wrong word to describe it in the Q&A - it isn't bouncy, it's not fist-pumping-jump-around-in-da-club kind of dance remix. It's more like "I close my eyes and give myself to the beat" kind of dance. Definitely an "under" moment, more Moby than Fatboy Slim.

As usual, Anomie Belle provides more than a few great tunes. She (and, here on Machine EP, her talented collaborators) gives us an experience, a chance to... take chances, to open our minds after we opened our ears to her music. Machine EP comes out tomorrow, go to www.anomiebelle.com to get your copy.

R.I.Y.L. Massive Attack - "Paradise Circus", Radiohead - Kid A, swimming butterfly stroke
personal favs: "Slither", "Bodies Offering" (Other Lovers Mix) - Trippin' the Rift


Posted by Nikki Benson on December 5th, 2011 at 12:25 PM

Anomie Belle (Toby Campelle), one of Seattle’s most prolific songwriters, is at it again. This year, Anomie Belle has released two EPs, How Can I Be Sure and Inky Drips, an LP, The Crush, and is about to release yet another EP on December 14, 2011, Machine (free album release show at Seattle’s Tractor Tavern).

Machine has collaborations with Ian Pickering of Sneaker Pimps, Mr. Lif, and a remix from Big Spider’s Back—not too shabby for a five song EP.

Folks that have been following Anomie Belle for several years likely noticed that her vocal style took a drastic turn about two years ago (Anomie Belle January 2009, Anomie Belle August 2010). It took this long for me (as one follower, not speaking for SSG Music as a whole) to get on board with her new sound. If for no other reasons, her new digs sound a little too similar to CocoRosie, we already have a CocoRosie, and I liked the way she sounded before. That being said, it takes a lot of guts for a singer to change the game after he or she has already established herself as sounding a certain way. Which raises the question, “why did she change her sound?”

Anomie Belle could have morphed her sound for a number of different reasons, not the least of which being that she felt like it. The beauty of music/art is that it’s ever evolving. If she heard something and it spoke to her, more power to her if she wanted to incorporate it into her art.

There is nothing new under the sun. The mark of a forward-thinking musician is being able take an element outside of one’s self and make it their own. Anomie Belle successfully did this with Machine. She’s taken the sharp creepiness of speak-song vocals and melded it with her strong, sultry signature sound. Collaborating with Mr. Lif on the title song was a match made in heaven. Having Big Spider’s Back remix “Machine” (both versions available on the Machine EP) added warmth and a little more dance. Please enjoy a stream of the song below (also available for purchase), and be sure to support Anomie Belle at her free EP release show on December 14th at The Tractor Tavern. - Seattle Show Gal


Review by Jack Foley
IndieLondon Rating: 4 out of 5

SEATTLE-based songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer and film composer Anomie Belle is rapidly becoming a name to watch.

With her distinct vocals (that sound like a mix between Bjork, Grace Jones and Morcheeba’s Skye depending on her mood), slick beats and intricate musical arrangements, she’s a captivating presence… and one that’s self-consciously difficult to pigeon-hole.

She’s currently riding high off the buzz surrounding her single Machine, which finds her teaming up with hip-hop emcee Mr Lif (The Perceptionists, Thievery Corporation) to deliver a track that has its finger firmly on the pulse of current events (the worth of the individual over corporations).

It’s intoxicating but has a dangerous edge to it, born from the slightly sinister slant that Belle places on her vocals… tailored towards the dark lyricism. Mr Lif, meanwhile, drops a well-timed rap late on, working perfectly in tandem with the slick beats and electronics to deliver his own observations on this hottest of topics.

It is one of the standout moments on the album. But there are many more…

It’s A Crush combines a nice guitar riff with some stop-start beat structures and a somewhat more seductive vocal from Belle that’s as flirtatious as it is, once more, dangerous.

Her more sensitive side is evident in the melancholy, cinematic string arrangements that accompany Mosquito In The Closet (which veer toward the Bonobo-esque), while on Picture Perfect she employs another slick beat over a duet wiith Jon Auer and one of the best, most sultry choruses on the LP.

Another duet, Privilege, finds her uniting with Anna Lynne Williams for a slice of chillout that really wouldn’t sound out of place on a Morcheeba album, while the dark vocal style she employs over Lavender Days feels distinctly Bjork-like and oddly compelling, especially when set against the layered instrumentals.

Final track Phantom, meanwhile, draws things to a close in intimate, quietly mesmerising fashion that showcases Belle at her most haunting and yet beautiful.

Put together, this is a deeply impressive body of work.

Download picks: Mosquito In The Closet, Machine, Picture Perfect, Privilege, Lavender Days, Phantom

Track listing:

Electric Lullaby
Inky Drips
Machine feat Mr Lif
It’s A Crush
Mosquito In The Closet
Bodies Offering
Picture Perfect feat Jon Auer
Lost Horizon
Privilege feat Anna-Lynne Williams
On TV
Lavender Days
Phantom
- Indie London


14th Mar 2012 in Culture

Scheduled for release on April 2nd, Yppah's Eighty One is an album of glossy synth texture and crunching gravel percussion.

Reflecting Yppah's move to southern California to be closer to the waves he loves, the album's beachbreak beats and evocative, edge-of-consciousness aural impressions are clean, shiny, and just a little too perfect.

The perfect orthodonture of a Ventura Boulevard smile, the Euclidian spheres of Venice Beach bikini-fill, the minty-gel freshness of a Malibu curl.

Into this drops the voice of Anomie Belle, featuring on four of the tracks and bringing the grit and darkness that the album needs. A touring partner to the likes of Tricky and Little Dragon, Anomie Belle contributes the backbone of the album. Breathy and knowing, insinuating and cajoling, her vocals bring the night-time shadows of trip-hop and witch rock to balance the brightness of Yppah's sun-worship. Trebuchet Magazine caught up with her:

Trebuchet Magazine: What does Anomie Belle, the name, signify?

Anomie Belle: Beautiful alienation. The isolation of consumer capitalism, of a media-saturated culture, of an undisclosed fantasy, of the things we keep secret, of an unrequited crush...

Trebuchet Magazine: The video to your collaboration with Yppah: 'Film Burn', was available on YouTube for a little while, then suddenly became private or unavailable. What happened?

Anomie Belle: The “Film Burn” video was set to premiere on a Japanese site, so the general youtube link was deactivated for the first week while the video premiered there, and then went live again. When the initial youtube post got over 2500 views in the first 24 hours without any formal promotion, Yppah and I were delighted.

Trebuchet Magazine: What do you feel about the crowd-sourced removal of artist consent that goes with 'sharing' culture? Apologists tend to argue that they are helping the artist with promotion, but it's also perceived as something of a right. Do you think about this stuff at all, or accept it as a means to getting people to your gigs?

Anomie Belle: Times have changed. People seek out and enjoy the music I make; that is a lovely thing. And I am touched and grateful to all the fans who buy my music.

Trebuchet Magazine: Your solo work draws heavily on trip-hop influences, and you've toured with Tricky. On 'Film Burn' with Yppah, it sounds as if there's a deliberate attempt to make your voice sound like Martina Topley-Bird's work on Maxinquaye, there's quite a bit of post-processing and reverb on the vocal. Elsewhere your voice dosn't sound like that. How conscious was that reference, or is it a reference at all?

Anomie Belle: Nothing deliberate or conscious there, though a happy association. Maxinquaye is an amazing album. I recorded those vocals clean and sent them Yppah and he effected them in a way that blends well with his music. When I write vocals I try really only think about the mood and the vibe of the song, and write to that alone.

Trebuchet Magazine: Yppah sent you the album stems with the idea that you pick out a song to feature on. You ended up featuring on four. What drew you to those songs, and how did you come to work together?

Anomie Belle: Yppah and I met when we opened for Bonobo together a couple of years ago, and we connected quite naturally. He did a remix for my album The Crush, (that will come out in Japan soon!) and I offered him a trade in return. When he sent me Eighty-One, I was so impressed with the way I could hear his sound growing and evolving that it was easy to write to several of the tracks right away. As I listened through the album the first time, I used a little handheld mp3 recorder to jot down melodies that appeared in my mind. I only had two weeks, so I just started writing.

If we’d had more time, we might have done even more together. It was such a natural fit

For the four songs I ended up writing to, the melodies just sort of spilled out right away - Trebuchet Magazine


The world of Anomie Belle belies everything you’d instantly conjure when told about a classically trained violinist from Portland, Oregon. She’s played with Grieves and Mr. Lif for some hip-hop cred. She’s composed film scores and worked with Anna-Lynne Williams of Trespassers William for the folk side of things. She’s toured with Tricky, the Album Leaf and Sea Wolf and collaborated with The Posies. Forget the box at this point and just enjoy the music.

Anomie Belle’s latest, The Crush, is a downtempo masterpiece that echoes multiple comparisons here and there yet cohesively owns the entire affair. Here she tells us about her many friends and what she’s learning along the way about making resonant art.

SSv: Anna-Lynne Williams has written for us before and she’s quite talented. I saw you worked with her.

Anomie Belle: She just e-mailed me the other day and said she had some new songs and asked me to record some violin. I did some stuff for some of her songs a little while back. I don’t know if this is a Lotte Kestner or a Trespassers William or that project that she has with, I forgot the name of the project but anyway I don’t know actually. We are pretty good friends, so whatever she needs I’m happy to do. She has been one of the easiest people to work with. She’s awesome. I really like Anna-Lynne.

SSv: What’s the history there? How did you guys come together in the first place?

Anomie Belle: Well, we were actually introduced by my manager really early on. He showed me her music and I liked it right away. I have a lot of respect for her as a songwriter. She has a beautiful voice. And actually at the time, we only lived about a block from each other. We lived in the same neighborhood so we met up right away and became friends and then she ended up as a guest on my first album on a couple different tracks and joined the tour of the band for the first year and a half.

I have a feeling that this is somewhat of a shared experience but we live in this society where everything is really rational and intellectual. I don’t feel like we have great language to even talk about these things and express them and so for me it’s such a beautiful to me that art can be such a direct way to tap into that.

We slowly started working together and she’s going to be on a track on The Crush actually. I’m always happy to work on projects she has going on. I have a secret desire to produce an electronic album with her as a songwriter. But her taste these days is a little folky-er but maybe someday.

SSv: Can you talk about The Crush and what your headspace was in writing the majority of the songs here?

Anomie Belle: It was interesting record for me because like “Sleeping Patterns” was my little secret. I wasn’t working full-time at that point as a musician and it was my little closeted, pet, hobby. I’ve always made music but “The Crush” for me happened after “Sleeping Patterns” when I decided to do a series of events and kind of figure out my life as a musician full-time and really take care to really go for that. Working on this record, I’ve learned a ton.

I’ve got to work with so many amazing people over the past few years. Everybody I’ve toured with, I’ve learned so much from in how to transition electronic music from on my own into a live setting. I feel really fortunate. The Album Leaf and Tricky were really good examples of bands that have different styles but both have to figure that and have done really well with that in a live setting.

And the composer Gustavo Santaolalla’s and his band Bajofondo have influenced me to compose and that slips into the record a little bit too. It was really fun to get to know him and get to talk to him about his experience as a composer. He’s obviously done some really great songs. This record comes out of me just really coming out of my shell and deciding I’m really going to do this and find my musical voice and be a little bit more daring, coming out of that music closet. A - Stereo Subversion


December 7, 2011 By martinghewitt
Anomie Belle / Released December 2011

OK, so Seattle’s Anomie Belle arrived a little late onto the trip hop scene. Not least as most of us, including Portishead if Third was much to go off, thought the genre was all but dead years ago. Amazingly though here we’re given something that’s as outdated as an iPad 2, with the noises she makes baring little resemblance to the sound that began life filled with unease, desperation, melancholy, beauty, and passion, before adopting a place on the CD racks of mainstream Britain.

It’s probably important to note that Belle’s not going to strike a blow against middle England with this LP. Indeed, it’s difficult to imagine anyone not appreciating the contents, at least musically. Furthermore, those hoping for a return to the kind of lovely death realised through song on the early work of Beth Gibbons, Geoff Barrow and Co, will find themselves coming up short here.

That said, the same stoned, hypnotic effect ensues, and so it’s hard not to call it trip hop, though more along the lines of Morcheeba, than morbidity, albeit brought bang up to date. As Machine proves with ease, a track recently released as part of an EP package that boasts additional microphone work from Thievery Corporation and Aesop Rock collaborator Mr Lif- probably the most sun-kissed moment on here, full of lazy brass and rolling percussion.

In contrast Mosquito Coast brings on more sombre sounds, as violins deliver seemingly mournful harmonies, opening up into wider string arrangements, all the while the leading lady continues to captivate with a vocal style that sits somewhere between the Coco Rosie sisters, Bjork, and star of Agoria’s third album, Kid A. All of which will be welcomed by any fan of light, evocative and engaging lyricism that has a few otherworldly traits to its delivery and tone.

Further down the line, Bodies Offering takes things towards electronic funk, as basslines squelch and filtered melodies pan in and out atop a timelessly laid back broken beat. It’s also worth noting that this is one of the instances in which we experience something of the artist’s full vocal capacity, with her voice seeming to stretch further across the arrangement.

Meanwhile, more human, Earthier styles are present in the ‘synth blues’, smoky bar-room number, Privilege (featuring a guest appearance from fellow Seattle resident Anna Lynne Williams), and the similarly downbeat On TV, which perhaps stands out as the finest point to reference on the album. Whether you think that’s true or not is irrelevant though, as there’s quality in spades here, ensuring there are countless legitimate reasons to purchase. - Plain and Simple


It's hard for me to find inspiration these days. Between summer blowing chilly goodbye kisses, all kinds of monetary annoyances and just this never-ending inexplicable tiredness clinging to body and brain, I need something REALLY inspiring, a punch-in-the-nose, a flashlight-straight-to-the-eye kind of inspiring. I turned down a couple of submitted albums, even though they weren't bad, they just failed to wake me up from this change of seasons languidness. Luckily, there are music geniuses out there capable of just that. Anomie Belle's new release The Crush is both a great illustration to this emotionally exhausting time of the year and a great remedy for it. What I admire about Anomie Belle (among many other things) is that she openly embraces being associated with trip-hop, and trip-hop fans will listen to The Crush and nod their trip-hop heads and think "yeah, this is is totally trip-hop". But at the same time her music is so complex and versatile that people not even familiar with the term 'trip-hop' will enjoy it just because it is (ready for it?) good music. Perhaps the strangest and most wonderful thing about nearly every song on The Crush is that if you would be cruel enough to remove one of the many elements - vocals, electronic bits and pieces or live instrumental parts - the remaining components would still make a damn good track! But it's exactly that abundance of elements and nuances, composed, layered and arranged smartly but never predictably, that makes The Crush so great. Maybe 'abundance' isn't the right word, for it implies over-fullness, but there's no excess weight on the record, everything is right where it's needed and the only abundance here is of the emotion that every track emanates. In fact, on certain tracks, like the gorgeous "Picture Perfect", where the vocal duo of Anomie Belle and Jon Auer (The Posies, Big Star) is so powerful that the surrounding elements are cleverly trimmed down to the framing beat, dreamy background melody and the impactful string finale. "Mosquito In The Closet", on the other hand, is an intense audio-attack with strings galore (from droning swarm-like hum to bites of pizzicato) and (something that sounded like to my amateur ear) cymbals. Even the shorter tracks manage to carry an immense amount of energy, like the just over two minutes long "Lost Horizon" that starts out quiet but steadily escalates into cascading waves of powerful sound. "Machine" (featuring another talented guest vocalist - Mr. Lif, who had worked with Anomie Belle before) creates an image of an intelligent steam-punk-meets-cyber-punk apparatus driven by chugging beat and looping piano rhythm program, with Mr. Lif as the confident operator and Anomie Belle's echoing vocals as "ghost in the machine". Another exceptional quality of The Crush is that is able to preserve its unique style while inserting those always welcome "inspired by" moments that are like little sparks igniting great memories from music history. For instance, both "Lavender Days" and "Phantom" reminded me of different parts of Massive Attack's discography without ripping off or trying to imitate any of them. Perhaps the only track that left me a bit confused was "It's A Crush" that almost sounds like a remix of an Anomie Belle song by some British breakbeat DJ - still a great track and in line with the album's style and atmosphere, I guess it just left me wanting more (of Anomie Belle's singing mainly). I can go on forever, trying to find explanation for why is "Inky Drips" is so catchy, or how "Bodies Offering" (gloriously) enters the "nu soul" territory, but I will let you make your own fun discoveries, and there will be many of those as you listen to The Crush - the last great release of the summer, the first fantastic release of the fall.

Visit Anomie Belle's online store to purchase The Crush on CD. Digital version is available on iTunes (and in other online stores).

R.I.Y.L. Massive Attack - "Teardrop", Lamb, bonfires
persona - Trippin the Rift


ANOMIE BELLE
THE CRUSH
ALBUM SELF-RELEASED RELEASE: SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 REVIEW: SEPTEMBER 16, 2011

Having toured and played with the likes of Tricky, Little Dragon and Kid Koala, you can guess that Anomie Belle has more than a passing interest in down tempo electronic music. This American woman produces, composes, sings and is a multi-instrumentalist, has classical training yet is more prone to experimentalism. She has lived and created music in more countries than most people have been on holidays to. Unfortunately, as Anomie Belle will be a name largely unknown to most of you, comparisons have to be made - this talented musician seems to share something more in common with Bjork than the aforementioned acts.

The reason? Well, first of all, her voice - it’s very rich, very distinctive, very soulful at times, and once heard, easily identifiable (and no, I don‘t mean it sounds exactly like Bjork, it sounds like Belle). The other reason? Her playful use of electronics, used to accentuate her lyrics and vocal stylings, rather than rigid songs with words spat out over the top. The tracks seem very organic, and quite unlike anything I’ve heard recently. Listen to “Mosquito in the Closet” and you’ll see what I mean. Classical violins meet acid squiggles, with jazz-like smoky vocals seeping through the gaps where the two styles meet.

Also “Inky Drips”, recently released as a single - it builds and falls in accordance with the voice, which is at once demanding and manly, then sweet and child like - morphing between variations of tone and texture as the track moves on.

The opening track on this third album, “Electric Lullaby, ” is very weirdly sinister and I feel it could actually put off a few people if they hear this first and “On TV“ is quite monotonous - but it merits listening to the rest of the album, as Belle is a real talent. "Bodies Offering” is the winner for me; it’s jittery, complex, but also quite laid back too - the perfect oxymoron of a track to capture what I believe the artist is all about. Overall, interesting beginnings and largely a successfully diverse album. Expect her name to just grow and grow.

MIKE WHYTE - Release Magazine


Don’t be fooled by Anomie Belle’s gentle, down tempo electronica meets dark string arrangements. Despite the overall relaxed atmospheres here, Belle speaks her mind about the ills of society, never pulling any punches with her wordplay. With traces of trip-hop and synth-pop imbedded in these highly engaging and haunting arrangements, this is a very unique and creative disc of genre meshing at its finest. - In Forty


Posted Dec 12th, 2011 (2:16 pm) by Brandon Fisette

Anomie Belle - Slither

Imagine sitting in a dimly lit bar, late at night, an hour or two before last call. The air is thick with smoke from patrons' cigarettes, the crowd is relaxed, and suddenly, as if in a David Lynch film, a gorgeous femme fatale hits center stage. The lights go down, and as a spotlight of blue or red shines upon her figure, she begins to croon into a vintage microphone.

Portland’s Anomie Belle evokes such an image. Previously, Belle released two albums and two EPs. Her latest song, “Slither,” a collaboration with Ian Pickering of the Sneaker Pimps off of her 2011 EP Machine, brings her music into the noir Lynchian territory of films such as "Blue Velvet." The track opens with an ambient soundscape, which is quickly joined with a minimal but carefully constructed trip-hop beat. As soon as her voice cuts in, the song really begins to shine. Belle’s voice literally slithers around and the surrounding atmosphere. She sings with such soul, it is difficult not to be captivated.

Her voice is a perfect marriage of Beth Gibbons and Amy Winehouse. In fact, Belle nearly manages to convey the pain of emotional desolation on par with the aforementioned musicians. Along with the downtempo structure, her carefully restrained vibrato, and the dreamy backing ambiance, this track is not one to be missed for those familiar with trip hop and minimalism. - In Your Speakers


added: 5 Feb 2012 // release date: 16 Jan 2012 // label: Authority
reviewer: Jayde Samuel

Anomie Belle - Machine
Different. Very Different and I can understand why Anomie Belle is one of kind in the music scene and filmmakers just love her! What was apparent was that the title of each track was highly influenced by the connotations that the song evoked, if you have a listen you’ll know exactly what I mean.

This EP features collaboration with members of the Sneaker Pimps, Mr Lif, and Big Spider’s Back.

The first track ‘Slither’ is sultry and seductive like the slither of a snake. Anomine Belle has a quirky tone that is very dark and enticing. This song is very sensual in parts but I must admit it is in my opinion quite laboured in others.

‘Machine’ is more upbeat and alluring! The layered vocals are quite unnerving and left me feeling rather uncomfortable! Errrgh! In saying that the vocal structure compliments the melody well, it is just the layering of the vocals that is too dark and sinister for my liking. On a positive note, however, the beat and melody of the song is cheery yet calm and pleasant.

The third track on the EP is ‘Electric Lullaby (Tapage Remix)’ which takes you to another dimension as if you were visiting an electric dream world. Anomie Belle voice is understated and subtle and the eclectic and wiry instruments guide you through this dream like state.

The next is ‘Bodies Offering (Other Lovers Mix)’ and woah the musicial composition of this track cannot be faulted. ‘Bodies Offering’ is very experimental with techno and string instruments and I think this my favourite track on the EP followed by the ‘Machine (Big Spider’s Back Remix’.

Machine (Big Spider’s Back Remix): I much prefer the remix of Machine. The dynamics are much more pleasant and welcoming and there is certainly a warmth in this remix that you did not find in the original. Hints of percussion instruments are added to this track and it is obvious that Big Spider’s Back’s talents enhanced this song in leaps and bounds.

Anomie Belle is unusual and interesting and if you are looking to add a more eclectic vibe to your music collection Anomie Belle is certainly a good starting point! - Music News.com


By catonthewall On 19 January 2012

Anomie Belle: Machine EP | Review by Jo Whitby

I’m slightly embarrassed to admit that until recently I was unacquainted with the music of Anomie Belle. I have a sinking feeling that in the deep dark belly of my email account lay a discarded press release informing me of last year’s ‘The Crush’ LP unread and unloved. Shame on me because Anomie Belle is one talented woman.

The ‘Machine EP’ begins with ‘Slither’, a collaboration with Ian Pickering, a man who co-wrote many of my favourite songs by the Sneaker Pimps. Anomie Belle’s voice is effortlessly sexy, silky and slithering, drawing out the words into a breathless conclusion. ‘Slither’ is smoothly produced and is unashamedly trip-hop, a genre that has slipped out of the musical spotlight for quite some time even with the likes of Portishead and Massive Attack still producing albums.

It’s not surprising then that Belle has toured with Bristol ‘superstar’ Tricky. The next track ‘Machine’ featuring a gravelly voiced Mr. Lif could sit comfortably on the latest Tricky record but it would be unfair to suggest that Anomie is in any way regurgitating old sounds, far from it. The lyrics tackle issues concerning wealth, oppression, poverty – subject matters that many artists tend to avoid either through fear or ignorance or because it could damage their selling power. Thankfully Anomie Belle manages to avoid any preaching/condescending tones which is usually an instant put off for me when listening to songs with such focus.

The EP finishes with a selection of remixes with 2 tracks taken from ‘The Crush’ LP and a great danced up version of ‘Machine’ by Big Spider’s Back. If this is a taste of things to come from Anomie Belle then the future looks incredibly bright.

http://anomiebelle.tumblr.com/ - Cat on the Wall


Interview: Anomie Belle | by Jo Whitby & CB Lux

Anomie Belle doesn’t like shopping. “Neither do we” yell the poor husbands dragged religiously around ‘Marks & Spencer’ on a Saturday morning, their wives posing unanswerable questions like “what do you think?” and the dreaded “what do you mean I’ve already got a shirt like this?” (which is more of a statement than a question) – of course this is an obvious gender role stereotype but one we have witnessed on many occasions. Well, for Anomie it’s a bit more serious, not in a rash inducing kind of way, she is an artivist determined to alert you to the mind controlling evil that is consumerism via the communication tool known as music. She’s rather good at it too. We caught up with Anomie Belle via email for a chat about her latest EP, complicity and sexual identity…

Cat On The Wall: Bonjour Anomie Belle! Where are you at the moment? What are you up to?

Anomie Belle: I’m actually down in Los Angeles at the moment shooting a music video with my friend Yppah. He’s got a new album coming out on Ninja Tune this spring and I’m featured on several of the tracks. (http://ninjatune.net/release/yppah/eighty-one

COTW: The ‘Machine’ EP came out at the end of last year and features collaborations with Mr. Lif and Ian Pickering from Sneaker Pimps (a band that was very underrated in our opinion). How did you come to work with both of them? Will you consider doing more collaborations in the future? Is there anyone you’d particularly like to work with?

AB: With both Lif and Ian, when we met, working on music happened organically. In both cases we connected immediately around shared values. Lif and I have spent a lot of time together and become very close friends over the years. I love his ethics, his engagement with the world, and his sharp intellect. Ian and I found we shared a really visceral aesthetic sensibility around music right away, which made creating music together quite natural and a lot of fun. We spent several days holed up in a smoky room in London writing songs together over this past summer, which was great. I love collaborations; there is always so much to learn, and I absolutely intend to keep the list growing.

COTW: Your vocal style has changed considerably since ‘Sleeping Patterns’ which was only released 4 years ago. What brought the change in your vocals?

AB: I think of the voice as an instrument like any other. There is a lot of versatility and possibility for expression with the human voice. One of the awesome things about being a multi-instrumentalist songwriter/producer is that I am able to play with uniquely shaping the mood and aesthetic environments of each song and album in accordance with what feels right. In this way, the vocals may vary from song to song or album to album so that they suit what I’m feeling/expressing in that song or album.

COTW: ‘How Can I Be Sure’ is your most listened to track on Last.fm and was featured on the TV show Jersey Shore as well as the Xbox game Alan Wake. How did those two features in particular happen? In relation to your artivism what was your reaction to having your work featured in such commercial/consumer orientated entertainment products?

AB: Licensing existing music is actually nice in the sense that I don’t have to compromise my art form or message when someone approaches me to use a recording I’ve already created. In both cases, I was approached directly for use of the song. In the case of Xbox, I was flattered that so much thought had gone into requesting my music based on the aesthetic and fit with the game.

The ironic thing is that the song “How Can I Be Sure” is about our collective relationship to consumer culture and entertainment media, and when I license my music for use in commercial media, I walk the line between being critical of consumer culture and complicit in it. This is a line I think most of us walk these days, and I find that tension a provocative and complex source of inspiratio - Cat on the Wall


Review of Anomie Belle's album Crush

Composer, producer, arranger, programmer and multi-instrumentalist Anomie Belle, better known to her Ma & Pa as Toby Campbell, is a bundle of talent that is set to realise its full potential. Having travelled the world on her musical journey of discovery; writing, producing and playing, largely for the greater benefit of others, she returned to her American homeland. Not entirely enamoured with the State Of The Nation and it's ever growing consumerist culture she set about putting her point across (directly, but eloquently, aired here with 'on TV') and decided the time was right to showcase her rather individual qualities.

Anomie Belle (Translated as Beautiful Isolation apparently) released her debut solo album, 'Sleeping Patterns' back in 2008. Critics and programming soundtrackers immediately took notice and Anomie's unique vocal styling's and electronic infused music have been heard on some unlikely platforms for an activist against the consumerist society which they sometimes perpetuate. Putting that tricky conundrum aside, what matters is that her music is good enough. It's notable for its individuality, the structure of the compositions and the skilful arrangements in which Anomie's voice is allowed to shine.

'Crush', Anomie's Sophomore album, is a more accomplished follow on to its predecessor. She's still the main element tying everything together, pulling nearly all the strings and handling every tune with the care of someone who's solely responsible for their creation. She may still derive some inspiration and influence from the likes of Beck and Radiohead but her electro leanings are brought to the fore and her vocal style is somewhere, very pleasantly situated, between Bjork and Julia Stone. Crush is also where Anomie Belle graduates into musical maturity as a refined and challenging contemporary artist.

The 12 tracks that make up Crush begin with 'Electric Lullaby'. A deep bass and off set percussion caress the sensual tones of Anomie's vocals. The eerie beginnings give way to a fuller sound as the layers build and the song breaks into waves of sonic delight. 'Inky Drips', the first single taken from the album, changes the mood and character of the set altogether. The beats are up and mood is more mischievous, the voice is altered as it becomes more playful giving the song more immediacy and commerciality. The next track lifted from Crush is the most instantly accessible. 'Machine', featuring Mr Lif on vocals, pairs all its elements seamlessly. The rumbling bass line and deep voice of Lif work as a mirror opposite to Anomies angular, razor sharp, slightly warped (Just the right side of deranged) but compelling lead.

The title track shows why she's becoming somewhat of a cinematic/televisual favourite as far as producers are concerned. You can hear this ('Crush') playing out to the final credits of any angsty, left field, edgy drama you care to imagine. Mixing up the jagged guitar and over layerd ghostly atmospherics of Anomies voice creates a very effective sound, rich in mood and almost predisposed towards a celluloid partnership. However, the best track on the album is what follows. Not as immediate maybe but 'Mosquito In The Closet' shows all of Anomies considerable talents in one great song. Adding a sumptuous string section to accompany the debauched tale works wonders. From the rewound start and the unease of the slowly building instrumentation through to the delicacy of the initial strings and the ultimate flourish the song develops and blossoms into a beautiful track.

Anomie duets with Jon Auer (The Posies) in a more symbiotic way on the gentle 'Picture Perfect' as well as with previous collaborative partner Anna Lynne Williams on the brooding, troubled and tortured tale, 'Privilege'. The electro beats and occasional guitar solo play second fiddle to a vocal pairing devoid of distortion or manipulation. The close out tracks of 'Lavender' and 'Phan - Contact Music


In the music world Anomie Belle is a bit of an anomaly. She’s a talented musician, composer and producer all-in-one, a triple threat. Her music has taken her around the world and back. She has performed and collaborated with an impressive list of artists including Mr. Lif, Jon Auer, The Album Leaf and Little Dragon.

On her new album, The Crush, Anomie’s dark, sultry, sexy sound has evolved to incorporate new styles and elements. Vocals on “Electric Lullaby” take a page from Bjork. Throughout most of the rest of the album they take on the characteristics of a low-key soul singer in a smoky lounge. The production and layering flesh out the sound well. A bouncing electro hip-hop beat powers the first single “Inky Drips.”

The album features its share of guests including Mr. Lif dropping rhymes on “Machine” and Anna-Lynne Williams providing vocals on the slow-burn “Privilege.” Jon Auer of Posies fame guests on “Picture Perfect,” quite possibly the most instantly accessible song on the album. The duet is the perfect centerpiece.

The closing track, “Phantom,” is otherworldly. The floating, seemingly disembodied vocal that comes in at the beginning is as haunting as it is comforting.

Anomie Belle is so good with creating her own style. She’s grown in leaps and bounds since her first works. In the future I’d like to hear her throw something in that’s a little more musically upbeat, but that’s my opinion. This album is the perfect soundtrack to a night indoors with your crush. Add some candles, a romantic dinner and enjoy.

Review by Chris Senn - Back Beat Seattle


By Kelsey Wallace, January 6, 2009

Video interview with Mirah and Anomie Belle:
http://bitchmagazine.org/browse/results/taxonomy:1325 - Bitch Magazine


(print only) - Next Icon Magazine


By Phil Singer on Thursday, 23rd October 2008 at 8:05 pm

It’s been a while since I proclaimed my love of Trespassers William, the understated Seattle ambient gurus, and of Zero7, the London downtempo kids. So imagine my excitement when I was sent an album by Anomie Belle which features TW’s Anna-Lynne Williams on guest vocals and sounds just like Zero7 gone American with the amience of TW. Yes, I almost had a baby I was that excited.

Anomie Belle is the project of composer, producer, audio programmer, vocalist, and multi-instrumentalist, Toby Campbell. Originally a classical violinist and songwriter, she released multiple solo records before creating her own beats and making her way into electronic, experimental, trip-hop music. A Portland, Oregon native, Campbell has performed at top venues throughout the Pacific Northwest, and has worked as a musician and producer in Madrid, Glasgow, Amsterdam, New York, Buenos Aires, and London.

Dreamy like Zero 7, Anomie Belle has a smoother sound than Trespassers William, and whilst at times the subject matter is rather dark and deep (throughout the collection American political apathy, suburban alienation, passive media spectatorship, social injustice, and consumerism are all tackedled) the music just washes over you in such a gloriously smooth way you can’t help but almost fall asleep in bliss. This isn’t a insult – very few bands and artists can be as gentle and relaxing after just a few listens as Anomie Belle is to me.

Almost every track on the new album, Sleeping Patterns, features lush strings and multilayered effects, which gives you something different everytime you hear it – different instruments, different words, different meanings. My only complaint? Sometimes the vocals are a little too buried down in the mix for my liking, however that’s more of a personal preference, and I have a feeling that if they were higher up the mix they would be distracting and lose some of the dreamyness of the collection.

Although she’s based in the Pacific Northwest of the USA, make sure that if you’re over there anytime soon, or if she make it over to the UK, be sure to catch her live. Hell, if I have to, I’ll pay for your ticket!

MP3: Anomie Belle – Down

Anomie Belle’s new album, Sleeping Patterns is released on 2nd November. - There Goes the Fear


Aug 28, 2009
Story by: Emily Parliman

Some people come out of the womb knowing their path in life, and Anomie Belle's Toby Campbell is one such woman. At the age of nine, her parents gave her a karaoke machine, and rather than use it to sing along to Madonna songs, Campbell used the player to track multi-layered compositions. She even played all the instruments on the fledgling tracks - from piano to violin to vocals and guitar. In her late teens, Campbell began taking audio engineering and drum lessons. These new skills shifted her musical interest to a more rhythmically-driven style of composition, and she began experimenting with down-tempo electronic music.

Now recording as Anomie Belle, Campbell has created Sleeping Patterns, a debut of sultry dance tracks that features the vocal and synth abilities of Anna-Lynne Williams (Chemical Brothers). Exploring social issues and inequalities is a major theme of the record, which Campbell tells CMJ "reflects a lot of my own contemplation about the way that we are both shaped by social and cultural systems and structures, and the ways in which we are all complicit in supporting them."

Even the singers' stage name reflects her desire to spur social change. "I chose to use Anomie Belle as my moniker because I think the name reflects the juxtaposition of beauty and unrest inherent in the music I make," she says. "I chose the word 'anomie,' in particular, because it alludes to both broken social structures, as well as individual experiences of isolation and alienation that I think are evident in modern Western culture. We are all captivated by the beautiful spectacles of capital - advertising, media and entertainment - yet we are isolated in our experiences of them... I think there is something eerie and sobering about this way of life, and I chose to use the word 'anomie' in my moniker as a gesture toward this critique." Samples of Anomie Belle's tracks can be found on the Sonicbids website. - CMJ


In advance of her sophomore album, electro-pop musician Toby Campbell — better known as Anomie Belle — today issues a brand-new single, "Inky Drips." The four-track release includes the title track (which appears on the upcoming album) and two remixes, given a slightly worldly flavor by Atropolis and Damiak. It closes with a trip-hop rendition of "Ain't No Sunshine," the soulful Bill Withers classic.

Today we have all four tracks in their entirety. Whet your appetite now and check out Belle's next full-length, The Crush, which will be out September 13 and features guest spots by Mr. Lif and Jon Auer (The Posies, Big Star). - Alarm Press


Posted by Julie Grebenau on September 3rd, 2010

Last Wednesday, Anomie Belle brought their sophisticated trip-hop to The Triple Door and turned the venue into a swanky European-style club, which was non-representative of the rare, low ticket price of $12. Toby Campbell walked out in a red and maroon jacket that drew eyes to her right away (a friend had made it, as well as the stylin’ belt she wore). Starting the show with her flawless violin work, the whole band soon followed with their mix of sexy synth and enveloping strings (with Dana Fader’s Cello and Lauren Work’s violin to flesh out the looping Campbell did with her own violin). Keith Cushner’s bass and synth added a deep and necessary component to the mostly high-pitched sound. As he played, Cushner would do the ‘I’m-really-into-this’ dance that pulled the audience in even deeper. Drummer Chris Icasiano was actually playing his first live shows with Anomie Belle, but no one had any inkling until Campbell announced it. His drumming was varied and unique — perfect for Anomie Belle’s synth trip-hop.

Campbell sang like a child-like creature with a deep devilish streak, shaping her voice like artists Cocorosie and Joanna Newsom do in their freak-folk music. With the textures she and her band created with synth and strings, her sound felt eerily similar to Zero 7.

When Campbell wasn’t busy playing synth, keys, or violin, she would hold her hands up and move her fingers around, almost like she was signing everything she sang. Her entire body was involved in the performance. Her eyes would regularly go into an intense stare, like she was fully in the music and wanted to bring it out into the room for all to see. A kind and down-to-earth woman in person, seeing Campbell perform was like seeing a whole new side of her open up and show the rawness and intensity she has inside.

The audience reacted extremely well throughout the set. While at most Seattle shows, you can expect the audience to just stand there and clap politely between songs, the audience on this evening was loud and vocal. It was as if Anomie Belle had come back from a world tour to their supportive fans they’d grown up with for years (and Campbell herself has only lived in Seattle for four). Anomie Belle got whistles and professions of love after their set as if they were Seattle’s latest darlings. - Seattle Show Gal


Since the band Ninjasonic missed the plane, took their allotted time Anomie Belle of Seattle and played as two sets during the evening. It was pleasant intervention of providence, because it would otherwise be heard, which would be a shame. The festival guide was mention of the trip-hop, but I allowed to disagree - this was the ark of the sound and feel less dirty little hopeless. Demonstrated multi-instrumentalist fragile songs with internal dynamics. It really does not matter what it was for the genre. A bit carelessly at the end of the concert included a cover version of Everything In It `s Right Place by Radiohead, which displaced its dominance of its own, subtle melodies. She had to include it somewhere in the middle. - I Report (CZ)


The moment then trot over the bridge to the main stage, where I plan to rest at a slightly alcoholic beers in the beer tent, but you realize that, Posters placed around the area warn that the original announcement Ninjasonik, who had played in "New York" plane and will not be missed. For this Anomie Belle gives two consecutive concerts. One place those who come late to the airport, and then another time, when to officially withdraw. Then trot back and my reward is a spot of table. Relaxed so I give the lady who occasionally plays the guitar or the violin, which he then zasmyckuje in their samples, and all this charismatic singing voice. Along with her bassist and drummer played and it's all very pleasant affair. Music for a bar somewhere at three in the morning. Relaxed and peaceful mood swinging cocktail bar, which is finely mixed and some of the trip-hop temnení. And although the New York Stage reasonably done as non-smoking area, in this music and feel the smoke and odor nevyvetraný dark bar at night. - Music Zone (CZ)


(Translation) American triphopová hope for HN: Music ventilujem his sexuality (video + photo)

Dark trip hop from America. Music somewhere on the border Trickyho or Portishead. The organizers have called it a secret gem of the festival. Multi-instrumentalist, record producer with a strong voice. Anomie Belle.

Autor: Matej Duman a Lucia Franková
Videohosting od WebSupport.sk

The elevator ascend štvorclenná gang musicians, among them slender woman with curly hair. I heartily potrasie right hand, calls to the locker room and is ready for the interview ... Aside from that, behind the scenes Colours of Ostrava is a decent noise. "Let us go forth," and is directed to declare schodom. "We will do interviews on the stairs," to laugh. Why not. Sit down and hudobnícka dídžejka and which fascinated and critically acclaimed producer and musician Trickyho, the rozrozpráva.

American rapper Ninjasonik missed the plane and you are at the festival played out two concerts in a row.
I have no problem with the team. I have yet nerobila While this, but why not.

It appears that you do not have a problem with several things:. Are you a programmer, singer, pianist, violinist, composer and gitaristka. We produce music, and you will also be nurtured as dídžejka. How are you doing all this?
I do not know (laugh). It's probably because the assembly has a fun and producing. And when I hear music, hear everything that is behind it: all instruments, tones and moods. Behold, therefore, easier to express what's in my head. I think it is ultimately practical.

With music, you started as an eight-year-old already.
Yes, because I am from a musician's family. Behold, therefore I started with the violin, and then with klavírom already at an early age. Has enjoyed it and so I was fully embarked on a study of music. But I found that has more expression to generate it, so from me to become a musician, not a professional violinist.

According to critics, and you do bumptious dark trip hop. She likened it to Portishead or Massive Attack. How did you come to this genre, which is the total closer Europe?
I have several reasons. And one of them is the fact that I am from the United States, and people are more conservative there. What, for instance, and sexuality is concerned, I will endeavor to give their music themes as alienation, consumerism, human spirituality and sexuality. Here, too, will try to ventilate through my music. Tu sexual energy. Trip-hop has a strong effect.


Source: YouTube

How do you mean?
Vie provoke reactions in the community. And, behold, therefore I try to collaborate with musicians, who feel like it.

Who has inspired you thus?
When I had a fifteen years old, I met one Swede, which I presented the mix of Björk and Trickyho - and it opened up my horizons. With this music I was in the U.S. had previously entertained. And, of course, has inspired the band Radiohead.

Couple of years ago you toured with the critically recognized Trickym. Total commencing nice success for a musician ...
It was amazing. I was on tour with many personalities and I have learned a lot. Go on tour with established artist's moves and learn from them, odkukávam. We talk about the music. Learning to play live, transform a living playing music. Since I was Trickyho learned a lot.

Why are you doing this?
How do you mean?

What do you tell by their music ...
You know, I feel that as an artist I have the opportunity to say anything. And it was stupid to squander it. I am critical, for example when it comes to power. I am critical of who it is and how it develops who.

Tu feel the criticism in your texts.
I think it is important.

You are not on the young?
I'm thirty and I think that what I say to the state of society, to feminism. Several told me that my music is introspective, but is also linked to other people, so shall it be.

You're from Seattle, U.S.. It's a good place for music?
Yes, even though my music is not as popular as in Europe, but he lives there.

What?
Hip Hope, for example, I am also collaborated with many artists and it was great. And the hip is always fun. For example, it is also a popular indie rock.

Behold, therefore, you will enjoy the European tour?
Certainly, I feel that the band, which I admit are better off here. That this music means more Europe. I think even the music links that will pass sooner. Has little in the U.S. frustrujú, I come from there, but I am glad that I am now in Europe.


Source: YouTube

Why did you choose the mystical name: Anomie Belle?
I studied sociology and Anomie is a French expression that says a strategy of faith in the possibility of the company, it's something I want to speak in his music. And Belle is a kind of attractive beauty, that is something of a beautiful alienation. Because we've stolen many things:.

Where do you want to be about 10 years?
Stumper.

I do not want to ask your dreams, just want to know where you would not like m - HN Online


Anomie Belle (translation)
Since they were all on Tatácích, we got on the NY stage in front of which were often long queues, very calm, even as we occupied a table with a perfect view of the stage absolutely perfect. Anomie Belle, I took to it before the festival. Girl, which was inspired by Portishead, I was intrigued from the festival program after Grinderman. Since it was quite an advanced hour, I was a little worried that the psychedelia me sleep, but it was quite idle concern. Fragile blonde with long, which rather looked like a little devil. And certainly played like the devil. Not only do they sing and catered for the computer, but still played keyboards and violin. The dyadic entourage then appeared to be nearly enough, but with great complemented, supported and constantly communicate with each other. And - you could see that it's fun kua, which I received in the knees. Performance also definitely not slow and boring. Initial gloom soon turned into a slightly brisker and dance tunes, but they still have in themselves a darker side, which is reflected in the gestures Anomie. At times I could not resist the comparison to Björk, but it was only a small problesky. Anomie Belle definitely deserve some similar stereotyping. The enthusiasm of the band, which is still not very famous, I just ucurávala welfare. Personally, I think it's pretty much tightened. In September, their new album comes out, hopefully will appear in Prague. For me personally the best concert of the festival (Grinderman outside over all). - Silence is not Sexy at All


American Toby Campbell is the one-woman show behind Anomie Belle. Originally a classical violinist, Campbell eventually found her niche in producing and fronting her own experimental downtempo band. The layering of her vocals, instrumentals, and looping tracks speaks to her abilities as a creative artist. Her entire debut album “Sleeping Patterns” is wonderfully crafted, but the single “American View” stands out as one of the compilation’s strongest endeavors. The quality and depth of the song is so rich (even a few echoes of Duran Duran in there) that it leaves listeners without a doubt as to the sheer artistry of the musician. If you’re looking for something fresh and gorgeously produced, be sure to take a listen to this woman’s work – amazing. - Single for a Day


“I grew up in your prototypical American suburb. The manicured lawns, strip mall parking lots, chain stores, and massive expanses of cement and housing developments depressed me. I chose the moniker Anomie Belle to speak to the decadent alienation of the American dream,” states Anomie Belle.

The sultry singer-songwriter Anomie Belle has just released her newest video for the track “Inky Drips,” the first single off her upcoming album, The Crush. Lively and colored in with tattoo ink running down the backs of attractive bodies, the steamy and seductive video will surely be making it’s way onto many playlists soon. Anomie looks stunning as she sings the sultry tune hiding behind the bare skin of the sleek flesh in front of her. Just premiering on Baeble yesterday afternoon, the buzz is already out. - Skope Magazine


Seattle’s Anomie Belle just released a new video for Inky Drips – the song will be included on her upcoming album The Crush. Check out the clip below and let’s just say you’re in for a visual treat….we dare you not to try and bob your head to this one.

The singer who has shared the stage with the likes of Tricky, Azure Ray, Kimya Dawson, and Efterklang among others, will release her new LP on September 13th and we can’t wait to hear it. For more on Anomie Belle, go and visit her website. - The Indie Machine


A globe tripper who used formal education in percussion, audio engineering, and electronic programming to wrangle studio, radio, and producing gigs in exotic locales (New York, Madrid, Buenos Aires, Glasgow, Barcelona) to inform her eclectic sound, Seattlite Anomie Belle is an absolute wild card in the music scene. She's toured, collaborated, and most likely found herself utterly inspired by the likes of Tricky, Little Dragon, Azure Ray, Emily Wells, Mirah and Grieves/Budo (to name a few). Her haunting melodies, cinematic soundscapes (that's because she's a fairly accomplished film composer as well), and provocative lyrics are all nicely bundled on her album The Crush, though the video we're premiering for "Inky Drips" is pretty representative of her unique craft. Check it out below.

Read more: Music Video Premiere: Anomie Belle http://www.baeblemusic.com/musicblog/8-15-2011/Music-Video-Premiere--Anomie-Belle.html#ixzz1VyieMeSo
Live Music, Right Now - Baeble Music


“It takes a lot of work,” a dreads-free Mr. Lif said to an enthusiastic audience as he closed his opening set at Grieves and Budo’s Together/Apart release party Monday at Neumos. The indie rap OG, startlingly sporting a clean-cut look of shaved head, fedora, and dress vest, was referring to what lay before him: his mentee’s loyal and eager fanbase, one cultivated through incessant national touring.

Travel and its toll inspired much of T/A, officially released the next day on seminal underground label Rhymesayers, but the night was more a celebration of the fruits of those labors and a homecoming for the former Seattlites. Grieves’ hip-hop is of the emo-rap sort, in line with labelmates Atmosphere, but the positivity in the building was remarkable. Though first opener Type performed to a scattered and distracted crowd, Portland’s Sapient was well-received with steady hands in the air and cheerful applause despite his relative obscurity and that his set was decent at best; the young crowd simply wanted to enjoy music. It was refreshing considering how too many audiences, albeit mostly ones skewing older, display indifferent attitudes to earnest performances.

Still, the large floor crowd wanted the headliners, so Mr. Lif kept his set short. Backed by local singer Anomie Belle and her band, the now sometime-Seattle resident ran through a skit in which he kills his boss (played by bassist Keith Cushner) after being reprimanded for smoking weed at work. He then performed new, mellow numbers befitting his recently upstanding exterior.

Lif, who Grieves repeatedly called his mentor in hip-hop, would reappear later in the headliners’ set, which began with single “Bloody Poetry.” Budo, who crafted T/A and 2008’s collaboration 88 Keys and Counting using entirely original production, added live trumpet to the song. Switching between trumpet, guitar, and keys throughout the set while doing his trademark “Budo bounce,” as an on-looking Sol called it, his live instrumentation underscored the warmth and hopefulness in Grieves’ energetic rhymes about heartbreak and loss.

Both performers are not physically impressive but their outsized energy was. The crowd matched it through a nearly 90-minute long set, MC and producer gasping for breath between only a few cuts. The new LP was well-represented and the audience’s most fervid members already knew the words to highlights “Sunny Side of Hell” and “Heartbreak Hotel.”

“We fly out to Minneapolis at 7 a.m. to do this sh*t all over again,” Grieves said between tracks to cheers. “And then to New York and Dallas … It’s crazy y’all.” That was little more than half-way their set. The veritable road warriors soldiered on. The crowd thinned before the concert’s 12:30 closing but was louder and more energetic than at its earlier apex, relishing the duo’s last local date before embarking on the 44-show Warped Tour for the summer. Yes, it most certainly does take non-stop hard work, but the end result was one of the most enthused and devoted crowds witnessed locally in a long time. - Seattle Show Gal


There are few things I love more than Seattle and Hip-Hop. And last night at Neumos I definitely got my fix of both, when Grieves threw his album release party at the Capital Hill venue. Teaming up with longtime friend and fellow Seattleite, Budo, Grieves has released his debut album on Rhymesayers Ent. A label known for their all-star roster of independent artists like Atmosphere and Brother Ali.

There wasn’t a direction you could look in, without seeing a figure of the local hip hop scene. It truly was a who’s-who of Seattle rappers; Macklemore, Grynch, Sol, and others all their to support release of Together Apart. The all ages show was definitely not what you would expect for a Monday night. Backed by his newly formed band Worst Animal, another local MC, Type got the party started with his comical lyrics and entertaining delivery. Type was followed by Sapient, a Portland native who handed the mic off to Mr. Lif. Who’s set was highlighted by DJ Swerve1 and a collaboration with local artist Anomie Belle. (Blair Says she deserves a more time on stage. This song belongs in a gangster movie…listen [How Can I Be Sure])

With great support from fans and artists Grieves shared a mix of songs from his latest work as well as some of his better known songs from his earlier release “88 Keys and Counting.” Together Apart explores the perils of life on the road and the empending return home. It follows a plot of self-discovery and is complemented by the sounds of soul and jazz. Grab a copy of the Together Apart on iTunes, Best Buy, or Fifth Element. Out now. - Seattle in Hi Def


Anomie Belle is a musical mastermind, creating layered, ethereal music completely on her own. The beauty is in the layering of electronic and acoustic instruments, weaving an engrossing musical tapestry. How Can I Be Sure is a four-song EP by the Seattle-based multi-instrumentalist. Belle is in complete control of her music, handling all the performing as well as the recording and engineering. Her Renaissance woman take is so refreshing in this day and age of auto-tuned singers dominating the music charts.

Ethereal like Loreena McKennitt but with driving electronic grooves, one also hears nods to Kate Bush and Laurie Anderson in the fascinating musical web she weaves. The EP features two versions of the title track: the beautiful layered and driving studio version and then a live version of the song performed on a Seattle radio station. The live version is a surprising performance, as with just the addition of a drummer, Belle is able to bring much of the musical wall of sound from the studio version to the live performance. One nice contrast with the live version is the ability to really hear what an amazing voice Belle has. Though it is very present in the studio recordings, the massive layering of her music uses her voice as just one element of many in her songs. In the live presentation, that voice really steps into the forefront.

Belle pays homage to the obvious influence of Radiohead with a cover of “Everything in its Right Place.” She stays very true to the original yet takes liberties with her own soundscapes in the musical breaks of the song.

The final cut “Cascade” is the most electronic and percussive of the EP. The driving composition strictly uses vocals as sound with no lyrics needed. The song is a feat of layering and mood setting.

How Can I Be Sure is a showcase of Anomie Belle’s versatility and amazing musical multi-tasking. It wets the appetite for a long-form album, which hopefully will be forthcoming soon from this artist. - Innocent Words Magazine


Last night I was fortunate enough to watch a couple of unique and talented acts open up for The Album Leaf. The first being San Diego’s own Black Mamba. The music itself is as the name suggests, dark, smooth, and will not hesitate to strike with deadly precision. Lead vocalist Aimee Sanchez comes off like a corner pianist in a crowded saloon not noticing the noise around her, yet still being able to pierce through it all. While the songs themselves are very delicate, they come off immense in spirit.

The second act to impress me last night was Seattle’s Anomie Belle. The composer, producer, audio programmer, vocalist, and multi-instrumentalist Toby Campbell has created perfect downtempo rainy Sunday music. Similar to Boards of Canada and Under Byen, Anomie Belle sounds marvelously supernatural and mysteriously beautiful.

Both acts are currently on tour with The Album Leaf. Do yourself a favor and have a listen or two. - Kata Rokkar


an·o·mie [an-uh-me] n social unrest or normlessness; malaise, alienation and purposelessness.
belle [bel] n a popular and charming woman; especially: a woman whose charm and beauty make her a favorite.

Anomie Belle is the work of classical violinist Toby Campbell and is some darn fine work if you don't mind my saying so. My favorite track is John Q Public, and if you check out the words throughout her album you'll find them deep to ponder yet sweet on delivery. A nice acoustic track is track 09, February Sun. Ear along now. - Ear it Now


We'd like to tell you the name of the magazine for which Kimya Dawson, Anomie Belle and Mirah are playing Friday. But this is a family publication, so how about we just say it, um, rhymes with witch? (Or you can click the link to its website.)

The magazine-that-must-not-be-named bills itself as a feminist critique of pop culture, which makes these three artists a particular fit for this benefit show. (The magazine, like many in the publishing industry, is having financial problems. It's also a nonprofit.) Each artist has set aside the restrictions of genre conventions in search of distinct identities, not so much about being women musicians as being excellent ones.

Dawson had a devoted fan base, thanks to her time in the Moldy Peaches and as a pioneer of the anti-folk movement, but was never a chart-topper. Then her simple, moving music found a broader audience with the 2007 movie "Juno," which included six of her songs on the soundtrack. The Olympia singer-songwriter makes gentle acoustic music, which cracks life open not so much with a sledgehammer as with careful targeting at the human heart.

Dawson treads a careful line between precious and potent; sometimes she negotiates that difference well, sometimes not. But there's a sincerity to her -- she often ends her shows with group audience hugs -- that makes it easy to forgive her when she falls on the twee side. Even then, something touching remains.
Mirah

Mirah, in contrast, has an inner power that gives her music fierceness. That's not the same thing as aggression; she's a lo-fi electro-acoustic artist, one interested in exploring the boundaries of structure, not, say, a drum'n 'bass or dubstep artist. Mirah came up through the Olympia music scene playing with bands, though it's as a solo artist that she's since made her name.

Her voice has an innocence and a clarity to it, but she often envelops that sweetness in fuzziness, murkiness -- music laden with the anxieties of darkness. The balance is complex and nuanced. It could be tiresome in less skilled hands, but Mirah also knows how to write a good song, period, and that keeps her music listenable and enjoyable, levels of meaning and all.

Trip-hop as a genre has largely gone the way of the dodo ... except that no one's seen a dodo walking around lately. For an extinct genre, there are still solid practitioners out there, among them Seattle's Anomie Belle, a project of Toby Campbell (other musicians round out the band for live performances).

The music has the genre's usual layering of slow, gauzy beats and electronics, but there's a sexuality present, too, largely from Campbell's vocals, and the lyrics are more preoccupied with broad social and political issues. The fit is sometimes uneasy; the music's density can overwhelm the lyrical content sometimes. But there's an ambition and a self-awareness that make for a constant sense of discovery. - The Oregonian


Bonobo, Yppah, Anomie Belle, Surrealized
The Showbox At The Market . Seattle, WA

I noticed colored stage lights framed by the club ceiling like a constellation as I arrived to The Showbox just as Surrealized finished playing their last few songs. The crowd in the bar was filled with a fair amount of Seattle folk rock stalwarts and veteran trip-hoppers, anxious for the evening's music to resume.

Anomie Belle, flanked by her minstrels, continued the evening with an arrangement of piano melodies. The intimate red lights heightened the atmosphere for Toby Campbell and her stoic troubadours. In the audience, college kids swayed attentively, stealing sidelong glances at each other during the quiet breaks. The crowd listened reverently as Campbell sang with carefully exacted string instrument pulls, suspending her voice above audience like dust motes in mid-air. The first half of the performance felt a bit stifled; maybe it was the stage, overflowing with musical instruments and backlined amplifiers, or the way the back bar was buzzing with conversation. The group seemed to perform almost too cautiously at first, but the players all fell into sync to reproduce the effortlessly perfect feeling of the recorded sound.

Whereas Anomie Belle were fettered by masterful reproduction, in contrast, Yppah ('happy' spelled backwards) delivered the kind of live performance that feels alive with spirit and bombast. The group's more free-form song structures and distortions left listeners in the audience electrified. Joe Corrales Jr. led the club across the frontiers of post-rock and psychedelic landscapes. Most of the set was dominated by Texas-sized drumming from the leader. Those fans of more twee and indie rock were treated with interludes of jangly, shimmering guitar loops. The younger members of the crowd seemed to bounce, a rare occurence for Seattle on a Sunday night. The meticulous attention to detail, and the ability to blend a variety of shoegaze and electronica and recreate it into a breathing incarnation of energy is what defines being a Ninja Tune musician. By far, Yppah were the most fun and engaging performance to come through in a while.

The Showbox at the Market books the biggest acts of any rock club in Seattle, so it's fitting that Bonobo, aka Simon Green, should return to Seattle to play here in support of their new album, Black Sands. I caught the first few songs before retiring early. Patrons drifted down from the bar and onto the floor as Bonobo took the stage. After watching a few of their songs, there was no doubt in my mind as to the deftness and skill that Bonobo has in his songwriting and performance- but there is some merit to being cavalier in new and exciting styles of music. For as much as writers want to box Bonobo into chill and downtempo music, there's an equal part of the music that is belabored in the minutiae of a style of music that seems to be falling to the wayside. I left after only a few songs to retire after a long night of musical performances. - Redefine Magazine


I usually hear about artist collaborations that accidentally happened at bigger festivals; but Bumbershoot has always seemed pretty straight forward to me. Through the bleakness, I’ll at least be looking forward to a surprise Northeast/ Northwest collaboration of Anomie Belle w/ guest emcee (and Def Jux alum) Mr. Lif, from Boston. If you like underground hip hop and haven’t heard of Mr. Lif (or Def Jux) then, go back, and do your homework. Start with “I Phantom”. Smart lyrics and good beats.

We interviewed Anomie Belle in January and she was already excited about possible future projects with hip hop artists. Since then, she’s been all over the Northwest scene from Noise for the Needy, to the Photosynthesis Festival, and now Bumbershoot. (Keep it up!)

I expect Mr. Lif’s charged political lyrics should be a great match for Anomie Belle’s material, which often deals with social issues. Beyond that, Anomie Belle plays and records all the instruments for her music and it has always been interesting to see who will help her perform the one person act at live shows. So, if you were hoping to see something at Bumbershoot, which you wouldn’t normally get to see, maybe you should start here. (Any other collaborations going on?)

Monday, September 7th
Anomie Belle w/ Special Guest Mr. Lif
Bumbershoot – Northwest Court Stage
12pm

www.myspace.com/anomiebelle
www.anomiebelle.com
www.myspace.com/mrlif - Seattle Subsonic


One listen to music by Anomie Belle and you’ll know why she was selected to tour with Tricky. That same dark trip-hop vibe is prevalent and accented with almost whispered vocals. If you’re headed to Bumbershoot in September, be sure to check her out!

Members/Instruments:
Anomie Belle – everything

Year Formed: 2008

1. Past: What is your musical background? What has led you to this point?
As I child, I was trained as a classical violinist and taught myself to play the piano. Through my teen years, I took voice, guitar, drums, composition, and audio engineering lessons, and I released several solo albums. After college, I left the states to work as a studio musician and producer in Europe and Latin America. After several years recording music abroad, I returned to the U.S. an electronic musician and began making music as Anomie Belle.

2. Present: Where are you at now in your career? What are you currently working on?
I released my first record as Anomie Belle in November of 2008 and toured with Tricky, the Album Leaf and Little Dragon during the months that followed. I am now working on an EP, my sophomore release, and composing more music for film.

3. Future: What’s coming up for you? Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
I hope to continue to release music that helps people connect to authenticity and raw human experience. I have had the pleasure of collaborating and touring with some amazing musicians from all over the world. My music is always evolving, and I look forward to collaborating with other remarkable musicians and filmmakers, releasing more records, and reaching wider audiences across the globe.

4. Where can people find more of your music?
www.anomiebelle.com
www.myspace.com/anomiebelle

5. Anything you’d like to plug?
I’ll be playing a number of festivals this summer and fall, including Bumbershoot. Look for new releases and more tours in late 2009 and early 2010. - Two Groove


The time has finally come! Ever since Bonobo‘s “Eyes Down (Preview Edit)” was published on SSG March 4, 2010, I for one have been looking forward to this show, and I’m sure many others have been too. One month and twenty days of anticipation later, today is the day for Seattleites to be blissfully happy or disappointed. Based on the reviews coming in from Bonobo’s Black Sands release, tonight’s show should be amazing. Anomie Belle will be starting off the show giving Seattle’s faithful show-goers double imputes to go to the show, and strong reason to be there no later than 9pm. If Anomie Belle is guest singer on “Eyes Down,” we might all shutter and quake into a euphoric comatose state–ummmmm. Here are a few things we’ve said on the artists in the past. Get ready for tonight’s show–this is one you do not want to miss.

Ninja Tune is celebrating their 20 year anniversary, and what better way to celebrate then putting out an LP of one of their all time favorites, Bonobo. [Released] on March 29th around the world, Black Sands is sure to be a credit to Ninja Tune’s name sake. Bonobo has been a pioneer in the realm of down-temp, chill producers. Bonobo together with Andreya Triana give Massive Attack’s signature allure with Elizabeth Fraser a run for it’s money. Andreya Triana, who just signed to Ninja Tune, guests on Black Sands, and lights up the featured song, “Eyes Down.”

“Eyes Down” leads in with calm keys accented with gentle drum kit pops. As the listener is eased into the track, Andreya Triana adds a soulful flirtation. As multiple tracks of Triana’s vocal harmonies wrap the listeners ear, horns add a new dimension. More layers build adding soft tension followed by a delicate release. “Eyes Down” is relaxed perfection.

It was quite and experience being in the presence of Toby Campbell aka Anomie Belle. Campbell has a very warm seductive voice that lures her audience into her reality. Her music was about so much more than words and sounds; Cambell uses the beauty of music to share about things that are critical and relevant. Her ideas and thoughts come with a well choreographed pulse, beat, and flow in such a paradoxical way that, the listener can literally feel the musical pulse dancing through their body.

Please enjoy clips from Anomie Belle’s song American View captured February 1, 2009 - Seattle Show Gal


In 1938, left-leaning nightlife impresario Barney Josephson opened a nightclub called Café Society in New York's Greenwich Village. Josephson was not only seeking to recreate the adventurous, pre–World War I political cabarets he had seen in Europe, but to launch America's first racially integrated music venue. At that time, spaces such as the Cotton Club featured big-name black artists onstage but refused to admit black patrons as audience members. The forward-thinking ethos in which Café Society was forged was reflected in the art that would eventually grace its stages. The iconic Billie Holiday first performed her legendary lynching allegory "Strange Fruit" at the club, while comedienne Carol Channing was reportedly ejected for performing a racial caricature.

Though that club subsequently folded in New York City more than 60 years ago, its impact is still felt locally today. Inspired by Josephson's vision and bravery, Sportn' Life partner Jennifer Peterson (in conjunction with Sarah Walczyk, development director for local mentoring agency Powerful Voices) held the first Café Society event at Capitol Hill's Sole Repair in April. Conceived as a monthly salon focusing on female artists of all racial backgrounds and genres, the inaugural Café Society featured sultry-yet-cerebral songwriter and emcee Dice, as well as Sportn' Life's own R&B artist Marissa.

Peterson and Walczyk are definitely not alone. In a manner reminiscent of the riot grrl movement of the early '90s and the coalition-building energy that drove local third-wave feminist activism-meets-art endeavors like Home Alive, a new generation of women are making noise and carving out their own space within Seattle's hip-hop, electronica, and dance-music scenes. Just as Peterson and Walczyk were plotting their modern, feminist-minded reimagining of Café Society, ambitious party-starter and budding dance-music artist Lisa Dank was booking her first all-female showcase, simply titled Ladies' Night, at Neumos on Capitol Hill.

"I was just back from my first tour. I was homeless, jobless, and I had nothing," recalls Dank. She's sitting at the center of a long communal table at the Saint, wearing an YSL T-shirt, an ornately brocaded vintage coat, and her trademark irrepressible smile. "But all my friends were doing [interesting] music. It was really underground, but they all had followings, so I pitched it to Neumos, and they said yes the next day." Dank's bill, featuring THEESatisfaction, Canary Sing, Katie Kate, and her own brand of aesthetically flamboyant and sexually brazen dance pop, was an impressive success for a Tuesday night, with nearly 300 paid attendees. "It went so smoothly and did so well that I asked them for a Thursday night for the next one."

She got it. On this Memorial Day evening at the Capitol Hill tequila bar, Dank is flanked by several of the artists participating in Ladies' Night 2.0 at Neumos on Thurs., June 10, including silky-voiced, self-assured R&B singer Chokolate, tender/tough and tomboyish MC and songwriter Dice, shy but obviously hyperintelligent electronica producer/performer Anomie Belle, and club DJ veteran (and founder of Seattle's first all-female DJ collective, Hit Girl) L.A. Kendall (who now fronts dance-driven duo Luxury A.K.). Peterson herself shows up a few minutes into our conversation, apologizing breathlessly for her tardiness, but immediately inserting herself gracefully into the spirited conversation about gender, hip-hop, and Dank's galvanizing spirit within the Seattle music community. "When I first met her, her energy totally pulled me in," says Peterson, smiling and nodding at Dank.

"I want to put Seattle women ON, because fools don't be knowing!", says Dank with a laugh, her fists balling with passion. "It's such a sausage-fest out there, and I feel like what is coming out of Seattle women is so important."

Dice, who grew up in California and later in Thurston County, is only one year into her tenure in the Seattle scene, but definitely feels there's a female-friendly network she didn't initially expect. "I did find that there were a lot of beautiful women out here who were supportive of each other without the usual cattiness that can happen."

Kendall is obviously pleased to see that the groundwork she laid with her original DJ collective has been built upon. "I started Hit Girl back then as a way to pull in and showcase female talent, because it wasn't [being done]," says Kendall. It's really exciting seeing this happening and watching it come into its own."

rocketqueen@seattleweekly.com - Seattle Weekly


I was fortunate enough to get a video of one of the musical highlights of Bumbershoot 2009. The clip is the last song of Anomie Belle‘s set. It was raining most of the show but that only added to the ambiance of a wonderful performance. Check out Anomie Belle with Mr. Lif.

Btw. Anomie Belle has an upcoming show in Seattle on 9/22 @ Neumos with Bajofondo. - The Blog Blog


Last weekend, I was at the Showbox at the Market to see trip-hop pioneer Tricky, on tour with Seattle artist Anomie Belle. KEXP’s own DJ Kid Hops spun a cool mix of reggae, dub, trip-hop, and breakbeat before and between the sets.

Anomie Belle is the solo project of vocalist/musician/producer Toby Campbell. Backed by a drummer and two vocalist/keyboardists, she sang and played keyboards, violin, and guitar during her set of trip-hop and downtempo music. Her soulful vocals reminded me of another local artist, Emilia Sosa, though by adding violin loops Campbell is more akin to Andrew Bird. As a violinist myself, I was happy to see violin played in a rock context, and I felt it added some much-needed color to her music, which suffered a bit from an overall sameness among the songs. She ended her set with a cover of Radiohead’s “Everything in Its Right Place,” which I thought on the one hand was more interesting than much of her own music and on the other was a missed opportunity for her to make it her own by adding violin to it. Campbell is clearly a talented musician, and I feel she just needs to experiment some more with diversifying the style of Anomie Belle.

Tricky is no stranger to diversity. As one of the founders of the trip-hop genre, he combined hip-hop with downtempo, ambient, and breakbeat electronica. In this show, Tricky demonstrated that he has continued to experiment with combining musical genres. His backing band — guitar, bass, keyboards, and drums, as well as a female singer handling lead vocals on many songs — opened with a heavy rock instrumental, and in fact much of the show had a surprisingly heavy rock sound, not what I had expected. Early in the set he played two covers that were featured on his 2003 album Vulnerable. First was The Cure’s “The Lovecats”, transformed from its playful quirkiness into a mysterious, even vaguely threatening mood piece that built to a hard-rock finish. Then, he teased the beginning verse of “Black Steel” — itself a cover of a Public Enemy song — from his 1995 debut Maxinquaye before segueing into a fairly straightforward cover of XTC’s “Dear God”. Of course, Tricky played plenty of his own songs as well, touching most of his albums from Maxinquaye to his latest release, 2008's Knowle West Boy. Again, these varied in style from sultry and mysterious grooves to heavy rockers to grand and expansive anthems. After playing close to an hour and finishing with “Overcome,” Tricky said goodnight, only to come back and play another seven long songs, extending the show to nearly two hours in total. The audience stayed with him the whole time, even when he left a second time as the band played “Black Steel” in full, which seemed like it might be the finale. Instead, he came back out for three more songs, finally concluding with one more cover, the driving rock of Motörhead’s “Ace of Spades.” In all, it was a strong set of compelling music, and I really enjoyed the show. - KEXP Blog


Back in November, Asobi Seksu released ReWolf, an album of acoustic versions of their music recorded in one long day at the now-closed Olympic Studios in London. They brought what lead singer Yuki Chikudate laughingly called their “classy” acoustic act to the Triple Door on Wednesday the 20th. Opening for them was local artist Anomie Belle.

This was my third time in the past year seeing Anomie Belle, a singer and musician whose instruments include violin, guitar, keyboards, and samplers. For this live performance, she included a cellist and a drummer throughout, with an additional violinist and a violist guesting on a few songs. Anomie Belle’s music is largely a mid-tempo blend of r&b and trip-hop, with some classical chamber music influence. There’s no question of her talents as a singer and musician: she has a fine voice, she plays well on her various instruments, and she’s steady on the beat defined by her samples. However, as with the previous times I’ve seen her, I was left feeling that her songs never seem to go anywhere: they lack development, or even much in the way of strong hooks. I also wanted her to make more inventive use, or maybe just more extensive use, of her violin. That said, I did like her songs “Greenhouse” and “Amy’s Song”, and some of my dissatisfaction with the rest comes down simply to differences in musical taste.

The quartet of Asobi Seksu — including Chikudate on vocals, piano, toy piano, and glockenspiel, James Hanna and Billy Pavone on acoustic guitars, and Larry Gorman on drums and backing vocals — professed amazement at the grand surroundings of the Triple Door, commenting how different it was from their usual rock shows. But they fit right in, delivering a set of beautiful songs from all of their past albums, most but not all featured on ReWolf. The spare, clean sound of these acoustic versions contrasted strongly with Asobi Seksu’s usual dense and fuzzy shoegaze style, and demonstrated that beneath the shimmer and noise lies some strong songwriting. They couldn’t quite leave their roots behind, as a few songs such as “Goodbye” featured rock-style drumming. On the other hand, “Thursday” sounded much like the French pop of François Hardy that Chikudate explained had been its inspiration, rather than like the rock version they originally recorded. The acoustic style of the music — and the theater acoustics — showcased Chikudate’s gorgeous clear voice, and revealed surprisingly good backing harmonies from Gorman, the drummer. Although the music sounded great and the band seemed happy with the performance, they reassured the audience that they’d be rocking out next time they’re back in Seattle. As for me, I enjoyed this experiment with a different style, and look forward to hearing how Asobi Seksu adapt it into their future music. - KEXP Blog


Overview

On May 14, Remedy Entertainment's Alan Wake was at last released by Microsoft Game Studios for the Xbox 360. The eagerly anticipated action thriller video game has been described as the successor to Max Payne and already looks set to top sales charts. The game's score featured a selection of intimate orchestral music composed by newcomer Petri Alanko and recorded in Germany. The music of several indie artists was also carefully licensed for the game, most notably Poets of the Fall, who contributed three pieces. One of the bonuses with the limited edition version of the game was a soundtrack featuring ten of the most substantial original and licensed entries on the score. Is it worth the pricetag?

Body

The first tracks that I would like to point out are a selection of semi-licensed additions. In game music, when licensed music is involved, it's too often they are thrown together to create non-descriptive and disappointing mash-up soundtracks. In Alan Wake, though, you'll find that the contributions from the semi-licensed artists are especially well-selected, and different to what you would expect to hear in any other game. The first featured are a couple of neo-psychedelic tracks from The Black Angels and Anomie Belle. "Young Men Dead" from The Black Angels is a fantastic example of a mind warping track. Dominated by Alex Maas's dry vocals and a bizarre guitar riff, it excels through its simplicity. Less rock-centred, Anomie Belle's politically inspired "How Can I Be Sure" rather takes upon a hypnotic downtempo style, concentrating on a trippy electronica beat and provocative vocals.

With these two tracks setting up a nice taster of what to expect from the rest of the licensed artists, you won't be surprised to hear the similarly hallucinogenic and jazzy "The Beaten Side of Town" from Barry Adamson. With a walking double bass sequence, warm jazz vocals, and steady drum and hi-hat accompaniment, the track is the most prominent easy listening track on the album. The best contribution from the semi-licensed artists though comes in the form of "The Poet and The Muse," from Poets of the Fall. The intricate guitar accompaniment, soaring vocals, and gentle flute accompaniment all combine to create a fantastic image, highlighted by a beautiful, harmonious chorus, first presented at 0:54. In all, the licensed music featured on this album is very impressive and exemplifies how licensed soundtracks should be done.

Although some of the credit can be attributed to the outside contributing artists, the main success of this soundtrack comes down to the touching and inspiring orchestral original score from Petri Alanko. Orchestrated by Tilman Sillescu's Dynamedion and performed by the Staatskapelle Halle alongside a gorgeous piano backdrop, the four tracks from the original score featured on this disc are stunning. The first track, "A Writer's Dream" starts off sweetly and delicately with a clear and crisp piano introduction and yearning strings. The dramatic and explosive transition into a fully orchestrated section at 0:30 brings about so much power in the theme, but only for a short moment, since it soon dies down and turns into an ominous, foreboding section.

The same sense of power touched upon at 0:30 in the first track is revisited in the more elaborate "Welcome to Bright Falls." The orchestra yields a fantastic melody in the opening stages, and soon we are greeted with a rousing flute part and suspense-filled piano segment. What really makes this track is the gracious piano section from 3:26, which leads out to its end; reverberating, resonating, and delicately breaking (and working with) the silence, Alanko creates a remarkable atmosphere here. Similarly, the piano is just as inviting in the similarly melancholy "The Clicker". However, its emotive power is shared among the accompanying string sections which it accompanies, which are beautifully performed by Staatskapelle Halle. Few orchestral pieces in a video game are as intimate as this one and the crystal clear recording quality only enhances the effect.

The two most powerful tracks on the album, however, come in the form of "Tom The Diver," and the collector's edition remix of the theme. Something about these two tracks is just so tragic and mournful. Though the original version features a larger array of instruments, "Tom The Diver (Collector's Edition Exclusive Mix" is the most touching of the two; a spurring affair between piano and violin, it is amongst the most simple yet elegant tracks in game music.
Summary

Recently, we have seen the release of a large number of beautiful scores from both the Eastern and Western game music worlds. Amongst these, the music from Alan Wake falls into the realm of soundtracks which I find truly captivating on a stand-alone basis, both because of its licensed tracks and its original orchestrations. In addition, it absolutely complements the game play and takes the whole experience to the next - Square Enix Music


My favorite new section to have created on Game People this year is most likely our Soundtrack reviews. It made me appreciate what else is going on while I’m ploughing through the latest game.

Not only that but it gave me a thirst for collecting Game Soundtrack CD’s. There is some great music to be found out there. But also it is a great way to bring those video game memories with you in your day.

This week Catherine (Soundtrack Gamer) reviewed the Alan Wake CD. Although currently you have to buy the Limited Edition version of the game to get this, after reading her review I really hope it gets a standalone release:

Alan Wake has a soundtrack that mixes alt-rock, psychedelia and pulp-twang with Petri Alanko’s haunting orchestral landscapes. Although more noticeably uneven than when in game, it actually creates a more pleasurable and less earnest listen.

It made me go back to play the game again and appreciate the work that had gone into the atmospheric orchestral backing to my favorite set pieces.

Alanko creates a musical grammar that reminds me of those sad unfolding dramas of the late 90’s. The solitary piano and shivering violins avoid becoming too stereotyped though. There is a light touch and brooding development through each of these original pieces.

Like Catherine, the most memorable theme for me is that of the opening moments:

Welcome to Bright Falls is most iconic of his pieces, and is used most often in the game – as well as plenty of trailers over the last few years. The strings take a lead throughout but are book-ended by piano and woodwind to create some movement moments.

But this Alan Wake CD isn’t just about those orchestral moments, there are also band focused tracks too:

Nestled amongst these orchestral pieces are some hard-found modern tracks. It would have been easy for Remedy to reach for familiar or well known pieces to punctuate their game, but instead there has been considerable work tracking down some happily rare and underrated songs.

Young Men Dead from Black Angels is real neo-psychedelia with an energy that makes you want to reach for the controller again. We move from this back to Alanko’s work, but not before being stopped short with the amiably droopy vocals of Anomie Belle and How Can I Be Sure.

While keeping the minor theme, both these tracks create a real sense of blues and soul. Where the grand motifs of Alanko touch on something disturbing, the modern songs keep that feeling rooted in reality.

Barry Adamson is case in point, with a gravely lyric and blues lick. The Beaten Side of Town’s half spoken half sung narration brings to mind men jamming on their porch step before going in for supper. We go straight into Barry Adamson’s The Beaten Side of Town, which takes us from the porch to a much more glam setting. This is the work of the rock-opus, a story told within a story for us, and a break from Wake’s concerns about the night.

Dead Combo’s Pulp Fiction sounding plucked guitar melody easily stands out in this company. This makes the hairs on your neck bristle as its staccato strumming and electric lead guitar call us into a world of mystery not far from 70’s James Bond.

Almost without meaning to I had pretty much replayed the whole game. Only this time through I had noticed every song along the way. I think I enjoyed the game all the more for it.

Wired: Excellent mix of orchestral and contemporary styles.

Tired: No stand alone release yet. - Wired Magazine


“Anomie Belle has proven herself to be a legitimate quintuple threat as a masterful composer, producer, programmer, vocalist, and multi-instrumentalist. Her sultry, smoky vocals combine with her slithery, seductive programming for the perfect balance of sexiness and darkness. Having toured with the likes of electronica stalwarts Tricky and Little Dragon, Anomie Belle is poised to find itself among the most revered names of the genre.” – URB Magazine

On Thursday, May 26 Anomie Belle will headline Chop Suey for the release of her EP, How Can I Be Sure, along with Hi-Life Soundsystem & Cars and Trains on the bill. I was instantly interested in picking her brain, so I tracked her down for an interview.

April Swaine: So first off, I love your name. Anomie Belle. Be honest – is this your real name? It’s perfectly unique if you ask me.

Anomie Belle: Thanks! It’s a moniker, actually. If you load www.anomiebelle.com, the first thing that pops up is a definition.

AS: Clearly I should have done my research better!

AB: Oh, no worries at all! People ask me that all the time. It was kind of you to start with an easy question.

AS: I can appreciate the thought in your moniker. The meaning transcribes to your music. Clearly you’ve been a creator of music since you were a little girl. Can you tell me about some of the first influences you can remember?

AB: I tried to pick a moniker that would be a good reflection of the music, both aesthetically and artistically – and also in its meaning. Influences? I have to give credit to my family. There were always musical instruments around, and we sang four-part harmony together at family reunions; so that was just sort of the environment I grew up in. I remember my dad tucking me into bed as a small child and singing with me. He’d sing a note and then say: “Now sing a minor third above that note… now sing a fifth above that note…” I thought it was a fun game. When I got older, I realized that people take classes for that stuff! They were even nice when I took a hammer to the ivory keys of their piano at age two. To this day, all the fronts of the keys are chipped!

AS: I can appreciate a strong woman, especially one with a close family bond. So you produce all this music? That is incredible; do you start from the engineering side or the vocal side?

AB: Thanks. I do produce all the music myself, and I love that part of the process. I guess since a recorded track includes songwriting, composition, production, and engineering, I often approach writing from multiple angles at once. I am actually intentional about starting my process from different points to mix things up and keep myself flexible and on my toes – so, there’s really no one way I start something, and I’m often attending to multiple aspects of the track at once as I go.

AS: What can we expect to see at your EP release show? Can I see you smash any pianos, or do I settle for your intoxicating voice only…

AB: No smashing of pianos. Electronics are way less fun to smash than ivory, anyway! You can expect to hear a lot of new music! My live band is comprised of some truly phenomenal musicians. I think our chemistry is really coming together in a way that I’m excited to share with the crowd.

AS: Okay, last question… musically, what is one goal you have for 2011?

AB: That’s a fun question. I got a grant from the City of Seattle to compose a string quartet for my live band to debut towards the end of the year. I’m also a film composer, so I am drawing on that palate to create something more epic and cinematic. I’ve composed the first six or seven minutes of it so far, and am thrilled to flesh it out and share it with my Seattle fans for the first time.

AS: That’s amazing, I look forward to keeping track of all your endeavors and seeing you live at your show!

May 26, 2011
Chop Suey
1325 E. Madison Street, Seattle, WA
8pm doors, 21+
$8 adv / $10 DOS - Culture Mob


Anomie Belle (Toby Campbell) is aware of all aspects of the production and creation of her music, and is quite an intelligent woman. The team she works with (her band and management) consists of people of the same talent and caliber. Her music involves lots of layers, like electronics and violin, which she produces herself with the help of a loop pedal.

Anomie Belle’s music takes you into a new world with her sexy breathy layered vocals on top of irresistible synth hooks and drum beats that go from simple to complex. The title song off her upcoming EP, (to be released at the show), “How Can I Be Sure,” feels ahead of its time, yet comfortable, drawing on similar synth lines to her song “Cascade,” off of her 2008 debut, Sleeping Patterns. Later this year, she plans to release a full length as well, entitled The Crush. If that doesn’t keep her busy enough, she is also currently running a Kickstarter Campaign to raise enough money to work with local director Bogdan Derev to make a music video for her song “Inky Drips.”

Also using a loop pedal will be cars & trains, who was just featured on music software company Ableton’s site for using their Live performance software. Tom Filepp is the sole member of cars & trains, playing a plethora of instruments like glockenspiel, melodica, guitar, viola, and more, as well as programming his own beats. Much in the way tUnE-yArDs would perform when Merrill Garbus was the sole member, he takes simple parts and layers them on top of each other, creating a complex and unfamiliar soundscape, which comes together as a great song that could stand on its own, even without any production.

Expect to hear unfamiliar sounds this Thursday that you’ll totally dig. - Seattle Show Gal


Chop Suey plays host to Seattle mood musician Anomie Belle‘s How Can I Be Sure EP release Thursday. The singer/songwriter and her band make sultry kind-of-electronic music a la Portishead with longing, loving female vocals over subdued samples. It’d be too easy to call her music the soundtrack for somber and sensuous moments because, well, it’s already been used that way — ”How Can I Be Sure” has found its way into an episode of The United States of Tara and the video game Alan Wake.

Opening at the release is Hi-Life Soundsystem, who could not be more different from the headliner in the best way possible. The rap trio’s self-titled release contains the best local party raps of 2011 without sacrificing any hip-hop artistry; it’s smart-dumb rap featuring emcee Khingz in complete beast mode on singles “Death of the Party” and “Bounce.” Also performing is cars & trains, the folksy-electronic stylings of multi-instrumentalist Tom Filepp.

Doors are at 8 pm and the show is 21 and up. Tickets are $8 advance and can be found here. Stream Anomie Belle’s How Can I Be Sure EP right about…. here. - DList Magazine


Just because Sasquatch! is just around the bend doesn't mean there's any shortage of local music to catch in town. From this week's Short List:

Piecing her name together from words meaning social unrest and a beautiful and charming woman, Seattle trip-hopper Anomie Belle has lofty aims echoing her view of music as a more powerful vehicle for education and enlightenment than classroom teachings. She's not one to sit still either; after beginning her musical training as a violinist in Portland, the woman born Toby Campbell traveled throughout the US, Europe and South America before returning to the Pacific Northwest to focus on her downtempo persona. Meshing sultry vocals and moody instrumental programming, with a healthy amount of layering added to both, Anomie Belle tackles spectacle and alienation both lyrically and sonically. Following the selection of her song "How Can I Be Sure" for Xbox video game Alan Wake and HBO dramedy United States of Tara, Belle is celebrating the release of an EP by the same name--set to be quickly followed by her sophomore full-length The Crush this summer.

Tickets are $10 at the door, which opens at 8, and support comes from Cars and Trains and Hi-Life Soundsystem. - Seattle Weekly


Anomie Belle ” Update… “ 2011 Title [ How Can I Be Sure ] added. This album is set to be released on the 29th of March 2011. Anomie Belle has recently toured with [ Tricky ] ~ [ Little Dragon # ~ [ The Album Leaf ] and [ Bajofondo ]. The title track ” How Can I Be Sure ” has garnered significant attention after being featured on Xbox’s Alan Wake, the award-winning short film Dark Material, and Showtime’s United States of Tara.

This release features a cover of [ Radiohead’s ] ” Everything In Its Right Place ” a remix by Azeda Booth, and serves as a preview for Anomie Belle’s highly anticipated second album, which is set to drop Summer 2011 and will feature Jon Auer [ The Posies, Big Star ] and Mr Lif [ The Perceptionists, Def Jux ].

Anomie Belle has also performed with [ The Heavy ] ~ [ Phantogram ] ~ [ Bonobo ] ~ [ Kid Koala ] ~ [ Efterklang ] ~ [ Sea Wolf ] ~ [ Asobi Seksu ] ~ [ Azure Ray ] and many others. - The Sirens Sound


The layering of vocals and instruments in this song is so captivating, and perfectly balances one another out. On top of composing all of her songs, this artist is one of the few females who produces all her own music as well. - Indie Shuffle


Anomie Belle has recently toured with Little Dragon, Tricky, The Album Leaf and Bajofondo. The Seattle musician’s newest release is the song “How Can I Be Sure”, which has been featured on Xbox’s Alan Wake, the award-winning short film “Dark Material”, and Showtime’s United States of Tara.

Belle’s latest release includes a cover of Radiohead’s “Everything In Its Right Place” as well as an Azeda Booth remix of the song “Cascade”. The three tracks pave the way for Belle’s second album The Crush, which is scheduled for a summer 2011 release, and which includes guests Jon Auer (The Posies, Big Star) and Mr Lif (The Perceptioist, Def Jux).

“How Can I Be Sure” is chilled-out, spacey, dream-pop reminiscent of the moody, sensual sounds of Zero 7 or Massive Attack. The title track is a great example of Belle’s wonderful use of soulful whispery vocals, textured samples and down-tempo rhythms. The remixed track “Cascade” by Azeda Booth brings a more glitch-y noise element to her music that will please electronic music fans. - Guttersnipe


De single ‘How Can I Be Sure’ van Anomie Belle komt uit op 29 maart 2011. Dat is zeker iets om in de gaten te houden, haar muziek is namelijk donker, intens en indrukwekkend zoals je hier zelf kunt constateren!

De single bevat ook een cover van Radiohead’s ‘Everything In Its Right Place’ die zeer de moeite waard is! Het schijfje met in totaal vier songs dient als een soort preview voor wat komen gaat. In mei 2011 komt namelijk het 2e album uit van Anomie Belle waarop niemand minder dan Jon Auer (The Posies, Big Star), Mr Lif (The Perceptionists, Def Jux) en Anna-Lynne Williams (Trespassers William) mee doen.

Natuurlijk houden wij je op de hoogte! - Ekaya Music Magazine


“How can I be sure?” is a question I ask myself almost daily. How can I be sure my soybeans are not GMO? How can I be sure the Mayan calendar didn’t really mean 2112? How Can I Be Sure begs the rhetoric surely identifiable with most young listeners and I can say this in response: of Anomie Belle you can be sure. Why, you might ask? Because she kicks ass.

Being mildly familiar with the tongue of my elders, I knew belle meant beautiful but wasn’t quite sure about anomie. It was a welcome discovery that Beautiful Desocialization and is a moniker quite apropos for the identity donned by the multitalented Toby Campbell. This translates generously to the juxtaposition of devolution and utopia; a dichotomy I love to debate. Her songs are critical of blind adherence to consumerism. They’re swanky and sexy, but they also champion individuality and critical thinking. Belle’s not adverse to railing against prior selfish generations with lyrics such as these from “Bedtime Stories” on her debut release Sleeping Patterns:

I can't be held responsible
for all the mistakes my parents made
'cause it's their generation
that has left us a nation
of waste and complacence and apathy

Her latest EP release, How Can I Be Sure, opens with the title track, a down-tempo trip-hop vibe with soothing vocals. The song builds adding electronic and organic layers as the beat becomes insistent, eclectic, and increasingly complex. Arpeggiators, fuzzy guitars and a Fender Rhodes piano swirls around the listener’s head fabricating a mood steeped in Cowboy Junkies sultriness and Tricky “trippiness”. One can understand why even though this song was previously featured in the award-winning short film Dark Material, in 2011 ‘How Can I Be Sure’ will be a mood setter for a steamy scene on Showtime's United States of Tara.

A native of Portland, Oregon, Belle’s interest in music began with classical violin. At 10 years old, this ingénue received the karaoke machine that she converted into an electronica forge. Unsatisfied with her abilities to produce music, she taught herself piano, drums, guitar, synthesizer, audio engineering, and electronic programming. She also sought musical inspiration by traveling to Madrid, New York, Buenos Aires, Glasgow, and Amsterdam. Her experiences abroad enabled her to amass the unique threads of influence that weave and shape the texture of her music today.

The second track on her EP is a smart interpretation of Radiohead’s ‘Everything In Its Right Place’. A faithful reproduction of the Rhodes-laden riff and depth and Thom Yorke’s unmistakable vocal stylings, Belle has taken a song that needed little renovation or deviation and made it her own. I must say that I’ve been truly impressed lately with the renewed interest in analog sounds from the monophonic abilities of the early synths such as Moogs and ARPs to the polyphonic and iconic sounds of the Fender Rhodes. They possess a depth and texture hardly matched by modern technology. These instruments aren’t just for hipsters. Amazing music has been written and produced on these early synths over the years with everything from ‘Just the Way You Are’ by Billy Joel to ‘Whip It’ by Devo to ‘Tom Sawyer’ by Rush. The Fender Rhodes was the favorite compositional instrument for Donald Fagen of Steely Dan as well as for Stevie Wonder. It’s a welcome development to it quietly stealing its way back into popular music through bands like Sloan and artists like Alicia Keys. I think Harold Rhodes would be proud. The Fender Rhodes is definitely a distinguishing feature of Anomie Belle’s music.

Another gem on How Can I Be Sure is Belle’s composition ‘Cascade (Azeda Booth Daylight Mix)’ remixed by Morgan Greenwood of the Calgary, AB band Azeda Booth. In true Indietronica manner, this song ebbs and flows electronic rhythms, modulations, peaks and textures. Sampled sounds of Toby breathing, whispering and smacking her lips loop over humanized drum patterns adding a smart tension between pure electronica and a more organic feel. She attributes her electronica influences to her time in Amsterdam, learning looping and engaging in experimental jamming. While in Scotland, she worked and met many famous musicians such as The Proclaimers, Marianne Faithful’s band, and the Breeder’s producer from the album Last Splash, further adding to her sphere of influence and interests.

The anchor of the EP is a live, more organic sounding version of ‘How Can I Be Sure’, this time led by guitar, acoustic drums and Rhodes. The seductive and moving vocals are clear and stylized, showcasing her true vocal prowess. I’m having a difficult time discerning which version I enjoy more. The live version approaches Pink Floyd-heights, building a facade of angst then fading, painting emotional soundscapes and leaving a wake of melancholy. Live performance is always the hallmark of an accomplished artist and Anomie Belle is the mistress of her music and it shows.

What’s in the works for Anomie B - Hellbomb - Music, Art, This & That


Actualité chargée pour la chanteuse et musicienne multi-instrumentiste Anomie Belle. Retenons d'abord la date du 29 mars 2011. C'est ce jour-là que sera disponible en version uniquement digitale le single "How Can I Be Sure" (qu'on avait pu entendre sur son très beau premier album, "Sleeping Patterns", sorti en 2008). Comme Anomie Belle est une fille très gentille, la dite version digitale comportera trois autres morceaux : "How Can I Be Sure (Live at KEXP)", une reprise du titre "Everything in its Right Place" de Radiohead (qu'elle a déjà interprété en concert) et un remix de "Cascade" (qui figurait également sur "Sleeping Patterns") concocté par Azeda Booth. Bonne nouvelle : un clic sur l'image ci-dessus suffit pour streamer les quatre pépites (courez-y, c'est du tout bon).

Bien sûr, tout ceci n'est qu'une petite entrée bien sympathique en attendant ce qui va se produire cet été, à savoir : la sortie de "The Crush", très attendu second opus dans lequel nous aurons le plaisir de goûter à nouveau au trip-hop/folktronica de cette artiste remarquable. - My Car is Full of Plums


Seattle-based electro-pop musician Anomie Belle, a.k.a. Toby Campbell, released her debut album of soulful trip hop, a record entitled Sleeping Patterns, in 2008. One track in particular from that record, the sauntering, sultry, down-tempo "How Can I Be Sure," has proved its staying power. It was featured on the soundtrack for Alan Wake, a dark-thriller video game from Xbox. The song was also featured in the award-winning short film Dark Material. And now, it's the title track of Belle's new single.

With a new album called The Crush due out this summer (guest musicians include Mr. Lif and Jon Auer [The Posies, Big Star]), Belle is dropping How Can I Be Sure as a teaser. Along with the aforementioned title track, the four-song release also sports a live version, a Björk-esque cover of Radiohead's "Everything In Its Right Place," and an Azeda Booth remix of the song "Cascade." - Alarm Press


Anomie Belle originally hails from Portland, Oregon. She has shared the stage with the likes of Tricky, Little Dragon, The Album Leaf, Asobi Seksu and Azure Ray to name a few. On March 29th she will release How Can I Be Sure. Head over to her website to stream the EP, which features a live version, a cover of Radiohead’s Everything In Its Right Place and a remix by Azeda Booth. Anomie is set to release her sophomore effort, The Crush, this coming summer. For more info, check her out on Myspace. - The Indie Machine


The newest release “How Can I Be Sure” from multi-intrumentalist Anomie Belle is filled with soft-spoken trip-hop and sun-washed electronics. Anomie Belle broke onto the scene in 2008 to rave reviews, opening for a span of different acts including the Album Leaf and Tricky. Anomie Belle is a classically trained violinist, and approaches drums, synths and guitars with similar attention to detail. The 4 track album is looped and layered delicately, swirling soulful vocals together with percussion that carries a moody sadness. These soundscapes don’t bring you down though; the melancholia is light, swiftly fading in and out as you move through the short EP which includes two versions of the single “How Can I Be Sure”, a Postal Service-like remix of Cascade and a spot-on cover of Radiohead’s “Everything in Its Right Place”. How Can I Be Sure will be available March 29th, while a full-length effort is expected to drop Summer 2011 and feature Jon Auer (The Posies, Big Star) and Mr Lif (The Perceptionist, Def Jux). - Tom Tom Magazine


You know that playlist you always throw on right before bed with your favorite songs from artists like The Album Leaf, Zero 7, and Asobi Seksu? Let’s add another artist to that list. Anomie Belle has toured with the likes of The Album Leaf, Phantogram, Asobi Seksu, Little Dragon, and the list continues to grow. With her latest release How Can I Be Sure dropping March 29th and a highly anticipated second album coming out Summer 2011, this dark ambient artist has a lot to look forward to.

The first track off How Can I Be Sure I took a listen to was “Everything In It’s Right Place,” a Radiohead cover. Now usually I’m not one for artists trying to cover Radiohead because let’s face it, no one does it better than Radiohead. But, this particular version is actually great. It’s a beautifully re-done ambient version of this fantastic song.

Following the listen of this tune, “How Can I Be Sure” is the next track that took me by surprise. This track felt like I was listening to Zero 7 or a highly influenced version of it. It actually took me some time to write this considering every time I listened it just relaxed me beyond belief.

This release was definitely a great start to what I believe will be a great album in the summer. With beautiful vocals and a mix of dark sounding ambience/trip hop, there’s no doubt this artist will be featured in countless shows and movies. Already being featured in United States Of Tyra, Anomie Belle isn’t far off from being ambient music’s next big thing. - Back Pocket Letters


An-o-mie : n Social unrest or normlessness; individual malaise; alienation or purposelessness.

Belle : n A popular and charming woman; especially: a woman whose charm and beauty make her a favorite.

She first got my attention with the fact that she has toured with acts such as Sea Wolf, Azure Ray, and Efterklang. Of course anyone can pull some strings and get on a couple of good tours but it was enough to make it worth checking out. Needless to say I wasn’t disapointed… her music is moody and electronic. And while it may not be something you put on the playlist for your grandma’s birthday party it certainly could suit certain musical moods.

Suggested If you like Oh Land or have loved any of Radiohead‘s albums released in the last decade then this sultry-sally with her accentuated social oddities will be right up your alley. She even has a fantastic cover of Everything In Its Right Place… and I do love a good Radiohead cover.

She originally hails from the great city of Portland but it seems that her career has placed her in various cities around the world, such as Madrid, Glasgow, Amsterdam, New York, Buenos Aires, London and now to Seattle.

The EP is due out on March 29th but you can stream it on her web page (link below). Then the full length album The Crush will be out this summer. Until then, her debut album Sleeping Patterns from 2008 is certainly one worth checking out! - Predictably Me


The million dollar question is answered, my friends. The North Pole is discovered. The Eagle has landed. What is trip-hop? Trip-hop is music that's dark and sexy. That's it. Genius lies in simplicity. Genius also lies in lots of hard work and insane skills required to produce something that is dark and sexy. Am I calling Anomie Belle a genius? Yes I am. She recorded her first trip-hop song when she was ten years old. I'm sure it was pretty dark (it was inspired by the soundtrack to Child's Play) but it was a love song! More about that - in the upcoming exclusive interview with Anomie Belle (yep, that's right), now let's get to the new release. How Can I Be Sure is a little 4-track EP that is full of big surprises. I like surprises. Even when they aren't pleasant, they make life less boring. And when they are pleasant, they make life worth living. Every one of the four tracks on How Can I Be Sure is a surprise. The opening title track knocks the socks right off of any trip-hop fan. Whatever you like about trip-hop - it's all there: the fattest slowly progressing beat, amazing vocals, instrumental parts that are appropriate and organic, a bit of static noise and an eerie sample. Call it old-school or nostalgic if you want, I call it good music. You can pick up your socks, but don't put them back on - the following live version of "How Can I Be Sure" is just as awesome. The spotlight is naturally on Anomie's vocals and they shine and sparkle under it. Minus eerie sample - plus spacey keyboard and sweetly aggressive live drums and talking guitar. The next track is yet another surprise that took some major guts to produce. A cover of Radiohead's "Everything In Its Right Place", no less. Don't hate before listening - this is a really respectful cover, not one of those that try to strip the original off everything that made it so good. Anomie Belle leaves everything... in its right place (I know, I know) and then adds some of her sexiness to it. And then comes a playful glitchy remix of "Cascade" by Azeda Booth, that breaks down the trip-hop pattern but leaves the seductive whispers. I'm going to save the star ratings and the excitement for the LP release, because I feel that I will need lots of both. Feel it too - preview How Can I Be Sure on Anomie Belle's website now and buy it when it comes out on March 29th. - Trippin' The Rift


Twinkle twinkle little star. The star of Anomie Belle started twinkling back in 2008 when her debut album Sleeping Patterns came out and touched many souls of music fans, and probably broke a few hearts. Today this star is shining bright with the new beautiful single "How Can I Be Sure" getting well-deserved media attention and the new album being eagerly awaited by thousands of fans. Singer, composer, songwriter, producer and multi-instrumentalist Anomie Belle shines not only as a studio musician but as amazing live performer, continuously touring alongside such artists as Tricky and Bonobo. Today Anomie Belle answers trippin' the rift's questions about inspiration for her music, the upcoming album and being a genius.

tipkin - You wrote your first song when you were ten? That's pretty impressive! Can you tell us a bit about it? It was inspired by a horror movie soundtrack, right? This darkness remains in your music. Why do you find darkness inspiring?

Anomie Belle - My parents gave me a karaoke machine when I was ten, and as soon as I realized that I could record back and forth from tape to tape to stack instruments and layers in my songs, my world was altered forever. I didn’t really know what multi-track recording was, but I was drawn to layering from the start. One of the first songs I recorded was called "Revenge", and was inspired by my recent exposure to the eerie soundtrack for the movie, Child’s Play. (I was also reading a string of teen thriller novels at the time and so felt amply qualified to write this creepy little love-song.)

First I recorded a simple piano line in a minor key, then a bass line, a few violin parts, a vibraphone, and a few vocal lines. As I recorded each instrument, tape distortion was created by recording back and forth from tape to tape, and the original piano line became more and more garbled and wobbly. This made the recording even creepier sounding. These days I create the distortion on purpose.

I guess the inspiration in darkness comes from the mystery in it. The experience of walking into new unknown spaces can be really powerful. It is often the things that we don’t know that are most exciting to us. The shadows leave room for imagination; they are alluring and inspiring. Darkness can be frightening, but it can also be still, quiet, beautiful and sexy.

t. - Do movies (or their soundtracks) still inspire you? What are sources for inspiration in general?

A.B. - I am always inspired by art, film, music, and life in general. Film soundtracks are particularly appealing because the marriage between narrative, visual art, and music can evoke such emotion. I got to tour with Gustavo Santaolalla recently and he is a pretty inspiring film composer. I also really admire Jon Brion as a film composer.

t. - A question I ask all my interviewees: what is trip-hop to you? And how do you feel about Anomie Belle being classified as a trip-hop artist?

A.B. - I suppose “trip-hop” is a label people use to identify a particular genre of music, and it also refers to a general sound with a specific history. Most people refer to music as “trip-hop” when its sexy or trippy, and that is the mood in which I most often write music, so I’m cool with it. Any label is both useful and meaningless.

t. - You toured with (among others) Tricky and shared stage with such acts as Bonobo, Azure Ray and Asobi Seksu. What are some of the best concert experiences?

A.B. - I’ve toured with some really amazing musicians, and each tour has been different. Touring with Tricky was a lot of fun. Bonobo’s live band is really tight. I learned a lot from touring with the Album Leaf because Jimmy LaValle was really open with me about the technical stuff he has done over the years to improve their live show.

Some of the best experiences I’ve had on tour have also been with my own live band. I feel lucky to get to play and tour with such awesome musicians and amazing people.

t. - You play like a gazillion instruments, write, sing and produce all your material. What part(s) of creative process are more interesting/pleasant and what (if any) tedious?

A.B. - The inception of an idea is the most thrilling part of the process. I’ve learned to play so many instruments because it’s the easiest way for me to express the ideas I come up with. I really enjoy recording, producing and writing music. Lyrics just come when they want to.

I suppose mixing is the thing I find most tedious, but I continue to learn more and more about engineering and better utilizing the technology I’ve got at my disposal. The whole process is empowering, especially the first time I get to listen to something that’s finished.

t. - "How Can I Be Sure" is featured on Alan Wake soundtrack AND going to be on Showtime's United States of Tara. Congratulations! How did this happen and what does it mean for you?

A.B. - Inclusion in Xbox’s Alan Wake last year helped expose a lot of new people to my music, which was awesom - Trippin' The Rift


Seattle: independent mecca, birthplace of grunge and the world famous Seattle’s Best coffee. From Seattle come many a band, the good, the bad, and the hipster (who exist in their own universe categorically). Out of this melting pot of eclectic musical styles comes Anomie Belle, a singer, writer and multi-instrumentalist with a moody voice that channels the hushed atmosphere of an early 20th century speakeasy, wrapped up in an unassuming edginess that begs to be heard.

Belle’s first album, Sleeping Patterns, released way back in 2008, put on display her wide vocal range and moody nature, showing a darker side of lounge with feet firmly planted in trip-hop. It was her unique ability to perform in a classic voice while being every bit modern that prompted touring gigs with Little Dragon, Tricky, and The Album Leaf.

But for many fans, for whom the Seattle indie scene might be a bit out of reach, their first listen to Anomie Belle was in 2010's hit video game Alan Wake. Her single, How Can I Be Sure, was featured on the soundtrack and in the game, prompting some to dabble in the witchcraft of independent music for the first time.

“Who connects to what music and to what extent is out of my control,” she said, speaking to us over the phone from her home in Seattle. “ It’s great when people connect with some of the work I do and they find it meaningful and it’s compelling to them”

She spoke passionately about her work with young girls in rock ‘n’ roll camps, her impressive multi-country touring history, and what it means to be an independent artist in the age of crumbling labels.

Now, Anomie Belle has returned to the studio and released How Can I Be Sure as a single, alongside a remix by Azeba Booth and a cover of Radiohead’s Everything In It’s Right Place. For her next album, due out this Summer, she’s collaborated with Jon Auer of The Posies and renowned hip-hop artist Mr. Lif.

WideEye: Thanks for taking the time to speak with me! My first question: how do you get noticed as an independent artist?

Anomie Belle: It’s hard at first. People haven’t heard of you, and it’s a hustle. I spent a while writing about the music industry. I have a weird fascination with it, the commercialization of art and making money. It both intimidated and fascinated me. It’s hard when you’re starting out because you’re starting a business and branding a name and all that , so when people have seen me live and have really seen the record, responses have been overwhelmingly positive and affirming. It’s a lot of work. But now I’ve been active enough and a lot of people have gotten back to me, it’s getting easier as there’s more momentum.

For the first album, Anna-Lynne Williams of Trespassers William out of L.A. collaborated with me. She and I met just before I put up anything, before I played any shows in Seattle. She was an original touring member of my band and she’s on a couple of tracks. She’ll be on my next record as well. I had a lot of support from other friends as well who aren’t prominent names or anything, but a lot of my success is thanks in part to their help.

WideEye: Getting into the music business requires a lot of helping hands, right?

AB: It’s the way you gotta do it. The cool thing is that you end up connecting to really cool people. Jeff, Mr. Lif, has become one of my best friends. He’s an awesome guy. People help each other out. It’s how you learn and it beats staying in a PhD program.

WideEye: Who would you say are your biggest influences?

AB: Radiohead is definitely one of them, I’ve been listening to them for years, I really admire what they’ve done. They’ve pioneered things that have paved the way for a lot of us who are producing music independently so I really appreciate them. There are so many amazing musicians who are doing all kinds of stuff who are good at different things, the list is huge, it’s hard to narrow down just a few…

WideEye: I apologize, that was a very general question…

AB: No worries! Producing music and writing is an intuitive process. I probably absorb influence from everything I come across and it comes out. I grew up playing classical violin and listening to symphonies. I’ve never been an avid listener of classical music, but I grew up playing it, and I know it comes out when I’m playing. I couldn’t trace the genealogy back to some classical source but it’s in there.

WideEye: On your single, there’s a remix of Cascade, which was also on your first album. It’s very much a vocal experiment, more on the electronic side, whereas Sleeping Patterns was definitely a bit moodier. With the remix, and your cover of Everything in it’s Right Place, is this signaling a transition in style for the next album?

AB: That’s a perceptive observation. I do think that Anthon (her manager) and I were talking about this. I think it would be good to put this out there and give people a bit of an idea that this record might be a little different than the last one, and - Wide Eye


February 24, 2009

The classic story of yet another violinist turned experimental trip-hop artist…WAIT….How often does that happen!!? Toby Campbell IS the band, Anomie Belle. And if you’ve listened to the complexity of her enchanting debut album, Sleeping Patterns, you would know that making such music solo is probably as easy as running a factory by yourself. Her business card could boast, “Violinist, keyboardist, guitarist, drummer, singer, songwriter, producer, and audio engineer” but I hope it just says Musician/Composer, so that it remains wallet size and readable.

The multi-instrumentalist samples her own recordings and blends them with down-tempo electronic beats to form intricate music, which serves as a platform for her rich and engaging lyrics. A Portland-born world traveler, who moved to Seattle to pursue a PHD, in studying culture and media; Toby also hopes to use her medium to promote open discussion of social and political issues.

Seattle Subsonic caught up with Toby and her manager, Anthon Smith, for a graciously long interview at the end of their west coast tour with San Diego band, the Album Leaf. Anomie Belle’s live show included guest vocalists, Aileen Paron and Anne-Lynn Willams, both skilled in the keyboard, so Toby could rotate through her arsenal of instruments. We had some questions about the tour, the music, the issues, and what’s next for this multi-talented Seattle resident:


[On playing live and touring with Album Leaf]

S.S: What does the presence of the live band bring to the stage that you can’t do on your own?

Toby:

I do all the recording by myself and bring in guests because I think it would be fun to have this person sing with me. People really like it. Playing by yourself isn’t as fun. I like the dynamic of singing in harmony with other female vocalists. Anne-Lynne Williams has done great work in the music industry herself and has a unique voice. It’s like having a new instrument at my disposal and I think about that when composing, “Anne-Lynne could sing something ethereal in this part.” As in classical music, I’m a composer and producer. I see the whole big picture, as I write the string part which will dovetail over the melody, along with the bass line which will go over the beat, all at the same time. The singing follows the composition and the people play their parts. It’s nice to have them up there. We sometimes have other guests, like a sax player who is a local grad student in music. But, usually it’s just the three of us on tour.

I had to play a show in New Orleans by myself and thought, “How can I get people to play onstage with me?” I called two dozen Baptist churches and found two different Baptist choirs that were willing to combine forces and back me up for the show. One choir was all white and the other choir was all black and they were totally into it. They were like, “we would have never met these other people.” It was amazing. I had to physically write out the parts in sheet music, which I don’t usually do for people and it was a challenge. There’s a lot of syncopated parts and I didn’t know the exact range of say..a tenor. They had great energy. I do shows like that when I can.

Everyone in the choir had their own CD. It was sweet of them to come out and we couldn’t pay them very well, so the least I could do was buy their CDs and support them. It was a cool to learn some of the culture of the south at the same time. I worked primarily with the directors of each choir and when the directors met they realized that they had gone to grade school together. They were excited to collaborate again in the future, with each other, and that’s inspiring!

S.S: Is that performance available on video?

Toby:

The show needs to be edited together, as the video and audio were captured separately for more clarity.

S.S: How was your experience touring with the Album Leaf?

Toby:

I really liked touring with Jimmy LaValle and he’s really got some great musicians playing with him. Jimmy’s been successful at doing this for a long time. It’s been fun to get to know him, as we record similarly. So, I pick at his brain about the technical stuff; about how he does his looping and how he plays sets alone or with musicians.


[On the creative process, sampling, and influences]

S.S: Where does your creative process start?

Toby:

With music and beats. Lyrics are secondary, not that they aren’t important, but I am more focused on the music. I learned to play the drums 9 years ago and when that happened I started to write different and started with trip hop. Now I begin with the beats. I really like the repetitive syncopated feel of hip hop drums and so I slow them down a little bit and then add melody and harmony.

S.S: Do you use drum machines or play the drums and sample them?

Toby:

Mostly samples. But I’ll play drum pads and I have an electronic drumkit. For a previous band, I learned to play the drums, so that I could - Seattle Subsonic: Seattle's Music Blog


Anomie Belle writes poetic songs about societal issues in American culture.

By Ashley Breeding

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Anomie Belle first realized she had the power to move people with her music at the tender age of 12 when she brought a crowd of 400 Unitarian summer campers to tears with a performance of a song she’d written about the loss of a loved one.

“At the time, I felt guilty for making them cry,” she said. “At first I felt like I’d done something wrong, but that experience is what inspired me to write music about issues that are more personal to me.”

In those days, the Portland, Ore., native was known by her real name, Toby Campbell, an angst-ridden teenage girl whose poetic songwriting was inspired by musician Ani DiFranco and Christopher Pike suspense novels.

Today, Anomie Belle, a name that represents “beautiful isolation” is known for her sultry Joss Stone-like voice and profound lyrics about the issues that exist in American culture.

She is also a multi-instrumentalist, composer, producer and programmer, which sets her far apart from many other female artists.

“I’m motivated to talk about social issues that really matter,” she said. “Americans have become so wrapped up in creating identities through materialism, that we’re not focused on who we really are, or on the community as a whole — we are fragmented and it’s really sad.”

“I’ve studied these [societal] issues and planned to be a PhD in media and culture, but ultimately decided music was a better way for me to reach people than through academia.”

Her latest album, “Sleeping Patterns,” released Nov. 2, reflects the culture shock she experienced upon her return to the states after living in Europe for three years.

“I came back and everything — the cars and houses — seemed so big. What I hope to accomplish through this album is that people will step back and ponder the way we live in our culture, and whether or not it is necessary or fair, and what we can do to have more societal justice.”

Campbell’s interest in music and songwriting existed for as long as she can remember. She began playing the violin when she was 8 years old, and taught herself piano soon after. The young musician who once belted the lyrics of other pop stars into a toy karaoke machine, released two of her own albums in 1998 and 2001, before moving abroad to work with various artists.

“I didn’t release anything during that time because I was undergoing a big stylistic shift,” she said. “I had to learn a lot around technology to get proficient in the type of music I am doing now.”

She said her biggest influences are music producers, as well as artists like Radiohead and Beck.

“I am inspired by artists who have the whole picture in mind and create it themselves,” she said.

When she’s not performing solo, Anomie Belle is an electronic, trip-hop trio with Anna-Lynn Williams (who’s recorded a track with the Chemical Brothers among other artists) and Aileen Paron. They are occasionally joined by Saxophonist, Bryan Smith.

Anomie Belle will play at Detroit Bar during her West Coast album tour Nov. 25, with Little Dragon and United by Sound.

“This is my first time performing at Detroit Bar, and I’m really excited to play with Little Dragon. It’s always fun to play with bands you respect and admire,” she said.

IF YOU GO

WHAT: Anomie Belle

WHEN: 9 p.m. Tuesday

WHERE: Detroit Bar, 843 W. 19th St., Costa Mesa.

INFORMATION: $15 cover charge, call (949) 642-0600 or visit www.detroitbar.com or www.anomiebelle.com for information. - Daily Pilot - November 19, 2008


Seattle trip hop artist Anomie Belle kicks off her debut album with a show at the Tractor Tavern Nov. 2.

By Marian Liu
Seattle Times staff reporter

Seattle trip hop artist Anomie Belle kicks off her debut album with a show at the Tractor Tavern on Sunday, Nov. 2. She's an intriguing mix — a political and social consciousness set to a down tempo trip hop, heavily layered with strings and vocal textures. To listen to her album, "Sleeping Patterns," go to — www.myspace.com/anomiebelle.

Her music is also sprinkled with sounds from her travels, from Amsterdam to Argentina. In fact, her album was mastered in Argentina. She also fuses the contemporary and the traditional, fusing her classically trained violinist skills with influences from Radiohead to Portishead.

Music for Anomie Belle — aka 28-year-old Wallingford resident Toby Campbell — is a "social critique," engaging in economic and political ideologies with themes of consumerism, alienation and media spectacle.

Her artist name "anomie" literally means social unrest, with "belle" defined as a charming and popular woman.

"Music is a more powerful venue than academics," said Campbell, who plans to do a rendition of Obama's "Yes, We Can" speech at her album release show.

Both Campbell and her manager Anthon Smith work for nonprofits. Campbells works for Puget Sound Off, a training program that engages and empowers Seattle-area youth. And, Smith heads Seattle Education Access which helps low-income youth get into college.

Tickets for her 8 p.m. Sunday show are $8 at ticketweb.com. For more information, check out — http://tractortavern.ypguides.net/page/ntqa/CALENDAR.html.

Marian Liu: 206-464-3825 or mliu@seattletimes.com - Seattle Times - October 28, 2008


Anomie Belle is the moniker of Portland composer, multi-instrumentalist and producer Toby Campbell. Performing here with her band, she blends old-school trip-hop beats, live violin and socially conscious lyrics into a potent but chilled concoction well suited to late-night listening. -M. Ogaz

(Click link to listen to performance)

- KEXP 90.3FM


Local singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist Anomie Belle layers electronics and live instruments into haunting and sultry down-tempo soul. She performs live in this exclusive KEXP performance. - W. Myers

(Click link to listen to live performance) - KEXP 90.3FM


Whether you're a classical music aficionado or a hip–hop head, you might not have any reason to explore other musical genres. But local musician Anomie Belle looks for music that blurs boundaries. She shares two songs that blend genres, and in doing so might break us out of our everyday routines.

(Click link to listen to interview) - KUOW 94.9FM


I have historically skipped the short films portions of SIFF for many (most-likely unfair) reasons but there is (at least) one showing at SIFF this year that I am very intrigued by. It's a seven-minute documentary called Dark Material, and was made locally by the Reel Grrls team of Lane Stroud and Maile Martinez. It's bio on the SIFF website is one sentence: "An exploration of shadows and light in art."

The short film had just won two jury awards from the International Documentary Competition in Toronto last night for Best Editing and Best Use of a Theme, but what I find most intriguing is that the film is scored by Seattle trip hop artist Anomie Belle.

Anomie Belle is the project of musician Toby Campbell, who does a gorgeous job of creating atmospheric electronica. The song below, "How Can I Be Sure?" is lush and seductive with its slow, drawn-out, whispered harmonies. I haven't seen Dark Material yet or heard the score yet, but am curious to hear how he music compliments the short film.

The next Anomie Belle show is Thursday night at Nectar with Carmen Rizzo and Lal Meri Govinda. Dark Material screens at SIFF as part of the "Sensory Overload" shorts package on Sunday, May 31 at 11:00 am at SIFF Cinema.

By: Chris Burlingame - Three Imaginary Girls


The one, two, three punch of Anomie Belle, Sea Wolf and The Album Leaf at Neumo’s Saturday night was something to behold. Each group contributed to an evening of extravagant yet subtle soundscapes the audience was only too happy to indulge in.

I was pleased to see the place packed on a Saturday night. I arrived as everyone seemed to be enjoying drinks, striking up casual conversation and eagerly anticipating the start of the show. Neumo’s main floor was more than two-thirds full, and the upstairs bar was near capacity by the time Anomie Belle (aka Toby Campbell) took the stage to deliver a set that was thought provoking, intimate, and beautiful. Playing this show with a string trio (quartet when she joined in on violin) added a welcome additional layer to the already lush, complex, and textured compositions. Drummer Eric “Quick Hits” Otteson expertly balanced his drumming to complement but not overpower any of the other music or Anomie’s vocals, a very tough feat to accomplish with music this lush and subtle. He made it look easy.

Backed by drums, strings and electronic accompaniment, Anomie provided the rest of the instrumentation and all vocals herself. Depending on the song, she effortlessly switched to keyboards, violin, or guitar all while projecting her smoky, sultry, soulful vocals throughout Neumo’s.

The set opened with “Down,” a soulful number off Anomie’s debut release, Sleeping Patterns, released in 2008. “Amy Song” is a bit more electronic than most of her others, and was second in the set. This song was possibly influenced by her work in Amsterdam at an experimental electronic recording studio. During this song, Anomie was on keyboards.

She switched to violin for the most captivating performance of the night, the socially conscious and thought provoking “John Q Public.” Already rich with Anomie’s violin skills, adding the string trio elevated the performance to quite another level. The electronic beat bordered on hip-hop, and the vocals were straight out of a vintage jazz club. The myriad of different sounds and styles collided to create a truly original composition.

The next couple of songs were from Anomie Belle’s forthcoming album, The Crush. First was “Privilege” and second was “Picture Perfect.” “Picture Perfect” focused on Anomie’s vocals as she got behind the guitar. The track provided another lush soundscape for the audience to process and take in. Anomie mentioned that on the album, “Picture Perfect” would be a duet with her friend Jon Auer, of Posies fame. Very cool! She is collaborating with MC Mr. Lif on the album as well.

The set ended with a couple more selections from Sleeping Patterns, including the down tempo “How Can I Be Sure?” and the dense, humid atmosphere of “Greenhouse.” Another socially conscious song, “On TV,” closed out the set to rave reviews from the crowd. The audience started a chant of “Encore!” that grew and grew but unfortunately could not be accommodated by Neumo’s precise time schedule.

Fortunately, the crowd was treated to the encore performance they craved when Anomie Belle and the string section returned later to play strings with headliner, The Album Leaf!

When the second act, Sea Wolf, took the stage and broke into their first song, I could see why they are often compared to Bright Eyes. Sea Wolf is largely the project of singer-songwriter Alex Brown Church, whose influences span throughout Americana and to authors such as Steinbeck and London, whose novel gave Sea Wolf its name. Church, along with his live band, provided a nice bit of indie pop escapism that was at once unique and very accessible and catchy.

Two of the best Sea Wolf performances were of the semi-acoustic rocker “You’re A Wolf” and the accordion-inflected “Winter Windows.” They are definitely a group to keep an eye on as these songs sound along the same lines as The Shins and Fleet Foxes.

Headlining was Sub Pop artist The Album Leaf. This performance was in support of their new album, A Chorus of Storytellers, out on Groundhog Day. Like I said before, the Anomie Belle string quartet joined them onstage for their set, perfectly complementing their already atmospheric compositions. The floating vocals and soaring progressions stopped the audience in its tracks and captured its attention. Some of the instrumentation and vocals are reminiscent of the best of the Beta Band.

“There Is A Wind” featured vocals that were delivered to the audience riding a slight musical breeze with occasional gusts. The audience was hanging on every note right to the end. This show was a warm-up for The Album Leaf as they look to conquer the world, starting in Lisbon at the end of February all the way through Taipei in April before they return to the States. After this short run of US shows they’ll be more than ready, best of luck to them.

I feel privileged to have attended these three amazing performances. I definitely recommend you catch any of these performers when you have - Melophobe


September 1st, 2010

Last weeks show at the Triple Door featuring artists Anomie Belle and Emily Wells was a fantastic pairing; both amazing female multi-instrumentalists, violinists, and electronic producers with different styles (trip hop versus hip hop would be a real narrow comparison as they are both eclectic).
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Seattle musician Anomie Belle, fit perfectly in the dark, candle lit room of the Triple Door. Anomie’s trip-hop style, downtempo eletronic music, was at its best when deep and darker, as her voice goes low and is perfectly shadowed by the heavy bass; this was very moving in the cold ambient theater. She performed her solo act onstage with a live band including a cellist, violinist, drummer, and bassist; she switched off between the mic, keyboard, violin and guitar. I’ll be looking forward to the newly completed album.
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In contrast to Anomie’s set, it was different to see so much come out of Emily’s two person ensemble, rather than a full band and she worked it well, at one point quickly joining on the drums. Now I’ve been wondering what an Anomie Belle solo performance is like (I know she does it) and to date I’ve only seen her with the full band. Awesome set from both artists. Check them out.
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And the next time you go to the Triple Door wear a coat and make sure they don’t seat you on the side with a partial view and adjacent to the subwoofer. Other than that, love to the Triple Door!

http://www.anomiebelle.com/
http://www.myspace.com/emilywells - Seattle Subsonic


“I am beautiful, I will rock the stage, I can do this no matter what!” Normally kids get in trouble for sprawling messages on school property, but for six days in July, Billings Middle School in Greenlake is being commandeered by fledgling rock goddesses participating in the second Girls Rock! Seattle camp. Other messages like “Only Girls Allowed” and “I love rock!” are criss-crossed in Sharpie over a vast paper graffiti wall that the campers have continually added to throughout the week so that by today, the last day of camp, it’s difficult to decipher the many layered self-empowerment affirmations.

Girls Rock! began in Portland nine years ago, a natural progression of the riot grrrl movement, in an effort to promote self-esteem and confidence in young girls through music. Inspired by the success of the Portland camps, Girls Rock! programs have spread throughout the country, and the Seattle camp is in its second year, increasing the number of campers from forty last year to over eighty enrolled in this session. By offering workshops in everything from zine making to self defense, the camp is about more than just learning guitar chords. But since rock is the vehicle guiding the pervasive message of empowerment, the girls also attend instrument classes, songwriting workshops and afternoon band practices. The girls form their own bands – coming up with a band name, creating a logo, collectively writing a song, and finally performing together on stage at Neumos during the band showcase at the end of the week.

Without co-founders Natalie Walker, Holly Houser, Jenn Johnson and a team of volunteers, Girls Rock! Seattle wouldn’t be possible. Many of the women behind the scenes, coaching the bands and teaching workshops, are taking their vacation time to be here during the camp session. Natalie sat down with us to discuss their mission and what direction the camp may go in the future.

melophobe: What does the camp application involve, and as more girls become interested, how do you determine who is wait listed?

Natalie: We have multiple parts of the application asking basic information and instrument choice. They choose between bass, vocals, guitar, or percussion giving them a ranking. And then the other part of the application is called an “express yourself” piece, and they can write us a letter, a poem, they can submit a story or a song. Just something that tells us about why they want to come to camp or something about them. So the first thing we look at if we need to wait list someone is if they turned that in, if it is a complete application. That tells us if the girl really wants to come to camp. It isn’t based on one submission being better than another. Also, did they turn the application in on time? Then we have to look at instrument choice. This year we had an over abundance of eight- to nine-year-olds who wanted vocals, and in some cases they didn’t rank any other instruments. If vocals were full already and they crossed out everything else, then we had to wait list them. It turned out to be forty girls who were wait listed who turned the application in on time.

melophobe: How do you go about promoting the camp so that the largest audience of girls can find out about it?

Natalie: We have a board of directors, and one of the committees is community outreach, so they spend their entire year bringing us volunteers and campers. They do presentations in schools; we went to the Bush School this year where they had a camp day. We do farmers markets. For volunteers, we go to shows; we had a table at Sasquatch. We also got a lot of campers this year through word of mouth from campers who attended last year.

melophobe: One thing you offer is conflict resolution, which I don’t think many other programs include.

Natalie: I think one of the things that separates our camp is that we aren’t a music camp; we are more of a self esteem camp. It’s about teaching the girls how to treat each other. That’s why having camp counselors is so important, because the girls are learning new things, learning how to collaborate, so there is conflict. Having people in those positions helps facilitate those conversations, helps prevent any bullying or rumors being spread, all that stuff that maybe if we were just about teaching girls how to play guitar and that stuff were happening, it wouldn’t be resolved.

melophobe: One very cool aspect of Girls Rock! is that the girls don’t need to have any previous training or a certain level of musicianship. But how do you balance the girls who are picking up an instrument for the first time with those that have some experience already?

Natalie: It’s all about presenting to the girls in this short amount of time things that we feel in the real world they aren’t really exposed to as girls. Like the workshop that Toby (Anomie Belle) taught. Where else are they going to see a woman teaching audio engineering? We sort of offer a crash course in women doing all of these th - Melophobe


Musicians from around the world have graced the Neumos stage, and many more will only ever dream of it. This Saturday, a group of teenage girls from across the state will get to live out that dream and rock out for their friends and family in the Girls Rock! Seattle Showcase.

Saturday’s show is the culminating performance for the Girls Rock! Seattle Summer Camp, a weeklong day camp for girls ages 8-16. Throughout the week, the girls get a “crash course” in playing instruments, songwriting, audio engineering and stage performance. They attend courses in life-building and self-esteem, addressing issues like self defense and body image. The girls form bands on the first day of camp and work on original material throughout the week, culminating in a final performance for their families and friends on the Neumos stage.

It’s a great opportunity for young women without any music background to try out an industry perhaps otherwise unavailable to them, and, Girls Rock! hopes, bring more women into the sound production and music industry.

“It’s all about girls becoming familiar with what goes on behind the scenes. You go to a show and see the performance, but then you can go to camp and see how the house sound is run, how to sound check […] you learn how important all that is to running a concert,” said Girls Rock! instructor and local artist Anomie Belle. “For people who aren’t interested in being the center of attention on stage, or who want to work behind the scenes, there are lots of opportunities, and this is a chance for the girls to see what interests them most.”

Anomie Belle is a local music powerhouse – she’s a performer, producer, vocalist and multi-instrumentalist. When she’s not in the studio, Belle collaborates with the VERA Project on youth advocacy projects, mentors film composing at Reel Grrls and is a Girls Rock! Seattle grantwriter.

Her introductory class is an hour and a half long, called “Audio Recording and Electronic Music Production,” which received funding from the Seattle Office of Arts and Cultural Affairs this year. Belle hopes that the program will inspire young women to enter the field of audio engineering and production, or record their own electronic music.

“It feels like it’s a boy’s game, and has been for a long time […] less than 5 percent of audio engineers are female,” said Belle. “I feel like encouraging the next generation of female artists and musicians to take electronic music in their own hands would certainly help close that divide.”

Girls Rock! Seattle is a non-profit organization fiscally sponsored by Reel Grrls. It’s modeled after Portland’s nine-year old Rock ‘n’ Roll Camp for Girls, which serves over 300 girls a year and has year-round events and projects. As Girls Rock! Seattle grows, they hope to add year-round projects, more summer camps and workshops to their roster, too.

This year’s Girls Rock! Summer Camp is already exponentially larger than last year’s– they had to turn some girls away when they reached capacity. 80 girls are scheduled to attend.

The Saturday Showcase event is open to the public and starts at 1 p.m. Tickets are $10, available online, and at Moe Bar.

And if you’re a lady rocker over 16, well, there’s a Ladies Rock Camp for you. It runs August 27 – 29th at 7th Ave. South’s Theater off Jackson. Contact Girls Rock! for more information, to volunteer or let them borrow your gear for their projects.
- Capitol Hill Blog


By: Troy Michael

Anomie (pronounced an-uh-me) Belle is not a person like I foolishly thought, but the moniker for songwriter Toby Campbell. The classically trained violinist has had an intriguing music career before self-releasing her debut album Sleeping Patterns.

The young violinist has worked with musicians and producers across the globe from New York to London, Amsterdam to Glasgow, and Madrid to Buenos Aires. In 2006, the multi-instrumentalist settled down in the Northwest to concentrate on her solo album. The end result was a layered electronic down-tempo jewel of 10 tracks featuring socially and politically-charged lyrics.

Drawing comparrisons to Little Dragon, The Album Leaf and Tricky, Campbell’s vocals are beautfiully haunting with dark melodies. Backed by her love for lush string artragements and sensual electronic beats, the tracks swim in and out of your consciousness and stay with you long after they end.

Anomie Belle’s Sleeping Patterns has everything you want in this kind of album and some things you might not have even expected. It is dark, beautiful, sexy and passionate. Sleeping Patterns is one of those perfect albums in which people can’t quite puit a finger on when describing it, but they know it is a perfect match of singer and her talented orchestration. - Innocent Words Magazine


Up-and-coming Washington musician and '02 Whitman alumna Toby Campbell uses both her musical talent and her prior sociological studies at Whitman to create the experimental electronica group Anomie Belle, which synchronizes electronic and natural sound and textures to create densely-layered and original sound.

"What Anomie Belle tends to sound like is kind of [an] electronic and cinematic hybrid," Campbell said. "I tend to use a lot of organic sounds like guitar, keyboards, violin... It has a lot of acoustic elements but I do a lot of electronic recording on top of it."

The name of Campbell's group derives from the sociology term anomie, which means "social unrest or normlessness; individual malaise, alienation and purposelessness" and belle, the old term for a charming, beautiful and popular woman. These terms largely reflect what Campbell's music is about.

"The name Anomie Belle, especially in my first record, offers a lot of social critique of American culture, a culture that needs some critique and re-visioning," she said. "It gets at both the state of society .. and the experience of individuals living inside that society and the spectacle of media."

Campbell also attempts to address generational issues in her music.

"Our community is fractured to where we don't necessarily know our neighbors and our generation... we're not involved with social movements like other generations have been," said Campbell. "The name of the band was a way to gesture at a way to face and crituqe those issues through the music itself."

As the creator and main composer of the group, Campbell records all of the instruments and vocals for her soundtracks and has a band for live performances as well.

Campbell, who writes and records all the parts to her songs, began writing and recording songs when she was about nine years old. She recorded her first album when she was 11 with the help of her father's a cappella group cronies who had access to a recording studio.

Although she had an early start with the music business, learning multiple instruments as well as how to record at an early age, it was not until recently that Campbell decided to pursue music as a career.

"I think I was really disillusioned at that being a real possibility, because it's really hard to make a living in the music business," said Campbell. "I actually considered being a professor of sociology for along time, writing papers about sociology and music, which is what I wrote most of my sociology papers on [at Whitman]."

Campbell took various instrument classes as well as one of Whitman's first audio recording classes, which helped build her knowledge and skill at music composition. However, her social science classes also helped her focus on the heart of her music.

"Keith Farrington [professor of sociology and chair of social science] helped me write my thesis, which was on music and sociology, so I think my sociology and philosophy classes also helped me wrap my head around all the aspects of the music industry, particularly the commercialization of art and its exploitation for commercial purposes, which is obviously how you make a living doing it," she said.

After Whitman, Campbell worked in various recording studios and even attended graduate school at the University of Washington, where she studied the influence of sociology and media, entertainment and culture. However, upon meeting her manager she discovered her desire to jump headfirst into her career.

"I got a lot of time to explore the music business, and as I got older I felt like I had my wits about me a little more and understood what I was getting into," she said. "The biggest marker for me was meeting my manager [Anthon Smith], he really helped me with all the logistics and business of music."

Shorty after this, Campbell gave up her previous jobs in order to pursue music full time.

Campbell's success as a musician has led her to tour with electronica groups such as Bristol trip-hop band Tricky and a group directed by Gustavo Santaolalla, who composed music for "The Motorcycle Diaries" and "Brokeback Mountain," among others. She has also produced several CDs, performed at Bumbershoot and other Washington-area concerts and worked as an avid composer for films and even video games.

"Film and video games... allow me to explore different sound than what Anomie Belle normally produces," said Campbell. "What I compose tends to cross several genres."

Campbell combines fresh style of musicianship, intelligence with her prior experiences at Whitman and as a child, her inner conflict with her passion and her distress over society and the new generation. For more information about Campbell and Anomie Belle, visit her website, facebook and myspace pages. - Whitman College Pioneer


Album Reviews • Thursday October 23rd, 2008 • 12:00 am

Anomie is a sociological term that describes a feeling of purposelessness and alienation resulting from a lack or breakdown of values. In some ways it’s a perfect word to use in connection with trip-hop as a genre and Anomie Belle as an artist with its brooding electronic music and her languid vocal delivery. Likewise, Sleeping Patterns is a great descriptive title that is both a comment on the ways that we as individuals and a society are asleep and of Toby Campbell’s voice which has a whispered lullaby quality throughout the album.

Not surprisingly, Massive Attack and Portishead are listed as influences on her Myspace page. There’s also more than a little bit of Sneaker Pimps and Esthero in the mix as well. Peaking in the mid ’90s, I’m somewhat surprised to note the current resurgence in trip-hop’s popularity. With more than a decade between the initial wave and the current one there should be some obvious evolution. While Toby puts her own mark on the music there is little that propels it into the present, a likely unintentional projection of the purposelessness and malaise of anomie. This is not a condemnation as this album is every bit as enjoyable as its predecessors, merely an observation.

Toby is a classically trained violinist and she uses this skill to good effect throughout the album, most notably in the violin solo of “John Q Public” and the instrumental “Cascade.” There is both a longing and a distance within the violin pieces; the cold nature of the mostly electronic music provides a perfect backdrop for both the music and the concept. Again, true to the nature of the form, the drumming comes from a machine and only occasionally lapses in what could be considered canned. Then, from out of nowhere, a sultry saxophone sings smooth jazz in “Dox Amsterdam,” another instrumental piece.

In “Bedtime Stories” she sings “I can’t be held responsible for all the mistakes my parents made cause it’s their generation that has left us a nation of waste and complacence and apathy… time goes by and I become less than I could ever dream than I had ever known I could have done.” Boy, when she picks a theme she sticks with it. The flip side of the breakdown of values is that there is space and freedom to create a new set of values, which she points out in “How Can I Be Sure,” as she sings “my hope my apathy/ you know it ain’t easy maintaining my belief that we are free.” Sociology becomes political in Toby’s indictment of American culture in “American View.” Lest she become too philosophical, she ventures into love and its breakdown in “Greenhouse” and “Before You Leave Me.” Despite the dripping anomie, Sleeping Patterns is self-produced and released so Toby can’t be too apathetic.

“Belle” is defined as a charming, attractive, young woman. In the end, that is exactly what Anomie Belle and Sleeping Patterns is, charming and attractive music that deals with themes of apathy and social and relational breakdown. I don’t recommend playing the album at a party (unless you’ve got really depressing friends.) But, if you feel like walking around aimlessly at dusk past neighbors that are sitting on their porches staring at nothing, this would make a great soundtrack.

By Mark Mansfield - Stereo Subversion


Thursday October 23rd, 2008

Anomie is a sociological term that describes a feeling of purposelessness and alienation resulting from a lack or breakdown of values. In some ways it’s a perfect word to use in connection with trip-hop as a genre and Anomie Belle as an artist with its brooding electronic music and her languid vocal delivery. Likewise, Sleeping Patterns is a great descriptive title that is both a comment on the ways that we as individuals and a society are asleep and of Toby Campbell’s voice which has a whispered lullaby quality throughout the album.

Not surprisingly, Massive Attack and Portishead are listed as influences on her Myspace page. There’s also more than a little bit of Sneaker Pimps and Esthero in the mix as well. Peaking in the mid ’90s, I’m somewhat surprised to note the current resurgence in trip-hop’s popularity. With more than a decade between the initial wave and the current one there should be some obvious evolution. While Toby puts her own mark on the music there is little that propels it into the present, a likely unintentional projection of the purposelessness and malaise of anomie. This is not a condemnation as this album is every bit as enjoyable as its predecessors, merely an observation.

Toby is a classically trained violinist and she uses this skill to good effect throughout the album, most notably in the violin solo of “John Q Public” and the instrumental “Cascade.” There is both a longing and a distance within the violin pieces; the cold nature of the mostly electronic music provides a perfect backdrop for both the music and the concept. Again, true to the nature of the form, the drumming comes from a machine and only occasionally lapses in what could be considered canned. Then, from out of nowhere, a sultry saxophone sings smooth jazz in “Dox Amsterdam,” another instrumental piece.

In “Bedtime Stories” she sings “I can’t be held responsible for all the mistakes my parents made cause it’s their generation that has left us a nation of waste and complacence and apathy… time goes by and I become less than I could ever dream than I had ever known I could have done.” Boy, when she picks a theme she sticks with it. The flip side of the breakdown of values is that there is space and freedom to create a new set of values, which she points out in “How Can I Be Sure,” as she sings “my hope my apathy/ you know it ain’t easy maintaining my belief that we are free.” Sociology becomes political in Toby’s indictment of American culture in “American View.” Lest she become too philosophical, she ventures into love and its breakdown in “Greenhouse” and “Before You Leave Me.” Despite the dripping anomie, Sleeping Patterns is self-produced and released so Toby can’t be too apathetic.

“Belle” is defined as a charming, attractive, young woman. In the end, that is exactly what Anomie Belle and Sleeping Patterns is, charming and attractive music that deals with themes of apathy and social and relational breakdown. I don’t recommend playing the album at a party (unless you’ve got really depressing friends.) But, if you feel like walking around aimlessly at dusk past neighbors that are sitting on their porches staring at nothing, this would make a great soundtrack.

By Mark Mansfield - Stereo Subversion


Thursday October 23rd, 2008

Anomie is a sociological term that describes a feeling of purposelessness and alienation resulting from a lack or breakdown of values. In some ways it’s a perfect word to use in connection with trip-hop as a genre and Anomie Belle as an artist with its brooding electronic music and her languid vocal delivery. Likewise, Sleeping Patterns is a great descriptive title that is both a comment on the ways that we as individuals and a society are asleep and of Toby Campbell’s voice which has a whispered lullaby quality throughout the album.

Not surprisingly, Massive Attack and Portishead are listed as influences on her Myspace page. There’s also more than a little bit of Sneaker Pimps and Esthero in the mix as well. Peaking in the mid ’90s, I’m somewhat surprised to note the current resurgence in trip-hop’s popularity. With more than a decade between the initial wave and the current one there should be some obvious evolution. While Toby puts her own mark on the music there is little that propels it into the present, a likely unintentional projection of the purposelessness and malaise of anomie. This is not a condemnation as this album is every bit as enjoyable as its predecessors, merely an observation.

Toby is a classically trained violinist and she uses this skill to good effect throughout the album, most notably in the violin solo of “John Q Public” and the instrumental “Cascade.” There is both a longing and a distance within the violin pieces; the cold nature of the mostly electronic music provides a perfect backdrop for both the music and the concept. Again, true to the nature of the form, the drumming comes from a machine and only occasionally lapses in what could be considered canned. Then, from out of nowhere, a sultry saxophone sings smooth jazz in “Dox Amsterdam,” another instrumental piece.

In “Bedtime Stories” she sings “I can’t be held responsible for all the mistakes my parents made cause it’s their generation that has left us a nation of waste and complacence and apathy… time goes by and I become less than I could ever dream than I had ever known I could have done.” Boy, when she picks a theme she sticks with it. The flip side of the breakdown of values is that there is space and freedom to create a new set of values, which she points out in “How Can I Be Sure,” as she sings “my hope my apathy/ you know it ain’t easy maintaining my belief that we are free.” Sociology becomes political in Toby’s indictment of American culture in “American View.” Lest she become too philosophical, she ventures into love and its breakdown in “Greenhouse” and “Before You Leave Me.” Despite the dripping anomie, Sleeping Patterns is self-produced and released so Toby can’t be too apathetic.

“Belle” is defined as a charming, attractive, young woman. In the end, that is exactly what Anomie Belle and Sleeping Patterns is, charming and attractive music that deals with themes of apathy and social and relational breakdown. I don’t recommend playing the album at a party (unless you’ve got really depressing friends.) But, if you feel like walking around aimlessly at dusk past neighbors that are sitting on their porches staring at nothing, this would make a great soundtrack. - Stereo Subversion


The last few years have been fallow ones for trip-hop. The repurposed elements that made the genre so unique--the hip-hop-inflected drums, the soul-standard voicing, the glitched-out experimentation, the 80s synth beds--got reclaimed, leaving practitioners to chase after fans. But the giants have returned: Portishead and Massive Attack dropped new material this year, and Seattle-based Anomie Belle is pushing new life into the form.

Anomie Belle is Toby Campbell, a classical violinist and film composer from Portland-way. As you might expect, she produces songs full of whistfully subtle texture, never anything that feels fussy, though it must have been obsessed over. She makes beds of sirens and desire and you'll never feel as comfortable as you do when curled up in them.

Suffice to say, her set was perfectly complimented by the rain; Campbell's voice offering just the right amount of restorative to make you forget about thicker socks. And while I get the feeling that Campbell mostly writes alone, her backing band was aces--Erik Otteson on the drums, Dana Feder on cello, Aileen Paron on keys and vox--and the special guest a true and generous surprise: The Perceptionists' Mr. Lif.

Anomie Belle performs tomorrow at Neumo's with Bajofundo. I suggest you go. - Seattle Post Intelligencer


The taunting yet soulful words of Toby Campbell, a.k.a. Anomie Belle, are a true symbol of constructive rhythm and melancholy blues. Her album Sleeping Patterns is 11 songs that are nothing short of keyboard-infused goodness. The entirety of this album will run through your heart like a 2 a.m. subway ride through an empty of city of dust and desire.

Though not every tracks is a sad sort of memento to the giving youth, it surely is the general perception. There are kindly-thought gestures of indie rock, ambient, as well as a bit of trip hop sporadically engineered into the general atmosphere of Sleeping Patterns. The instrumental “Dox Amersterdam” is a bit out of place on the record; it’s a jazz-inspired gem of a track. And a close listen to a few other key songs will reveal wonderful additional vocals from Anna-Lynne Williams (the estrogen half of Trespassers William). “American View” and “Green House” disseminate these artistic battles most beautifully.

It may be possible that Toby Campbell’s success with Anomie Belle (which, for those who were wondering, is a combination of malaise and woman of charm… alright) could very well draw from her original gig as what some might call a “real musician” — a trained violinist. But, having a burning candle of social unrest that must have burst forth through her lips was surely tough, and she needed a new outlet of expression. And now we have Sleeping Patterns. The concert halls may miss her, but the beat down stages will surely embrace her and her spirited charisma. - FensePost


I wasn’t going to do Bumbershoot this year. Initially I had planned to be out of town, and then I let myself be influenced by the complaints of my friends and my own reluctance. I wasn’t too jazzed about the prospect of hanging out with a million (give or take) people in the hot sun/pouring rain all day long, or paying three times the ticket price than when I first began attending. And I wasn’t overly enthralled with the headlining talent they selected (though I do love Michael Franti and Spearhead). But then I ran into someone I went to college with who was performing, and a few weeks later I found myself in the short line to claim a photo pass.

Starting my day off at the fittingly titled NW stage, I eagerly awaited the set of Anomie Belle, the performing moniker of Toby Campbell (and friends.) I’d known Toby back in college as she was transitioning from more folky music into the indie rock, and she was a noted performer at our small college and local events. Jump forward 7(?!) years of working with musicians throughout the world, and Toby has now progressed into another genre altogether: producing, writing and performing luscious trip-hop sounds. Though clearly a centerpiece of her music, I hesitate to say that her gently soulful voice is the focal point; she uses violin, guitar, keys and her laptop to create a delicately layered sound. Deftly balancing these instruments Anomie Belle is joined live by several others, who fill out the sound with drums, additional keys, vocals, cello and even saxophone (Bryan Smith---he mentioned they’d been friends since childhood.) All of this combines for one pleasant, yet not too gentle mix of downbeat sounds. I can’t say enough how much I appreciate it when a musician knows how to use a variety of sources without beating them into the ground. Fortunately Anomie Belle is quite adept at knowing how to mix it up. She smartly draws from varying sources, using everything from a clip from a phone message in “Amy Song,” saxophone on “Dox Amsterdam,” and showcasing her classical violin skills on “John Q Public.”

On track with an hour-long set, Anomie Belle kept the banter to a minimum. She thanked everyone for joining them and expressed sympathy as the dark clouds that had been threatening all morning began to unleash a downpour a few songs into the set. Though this sent most listeners scrambling to put up their own bumbershoots or find refuge under the trees, I didn’t find that it affected my response to the music. Anomie Belle is equally suited for both a cozy day inside or cool relief from frantic heat. The rain also allowed Cambell to inject a bit of humor into the set, as she breathlessly joked that her (quite faithful) rendition of the Bill Withers’ classic “Ain’t No Sunshine” seemed appropriate. The group tackled another ambitious cover in Radiohead’s “Everything in its Right Place,” keeping the droning electronic beat but allowing Anomie Belle’s vocals to playfully draw out the minimal lyrics. Cambell seemed to employ a slight accent on the words “lemon” and “colors,” reminding me of Emiliana Torrini’s Love in the Time of Science or even Bjork’s breathy delivery. Beyond these two covers, Anomie Belle drew heavily from Bedtime Stories (released in 2008), although she mentioned after the set she was working on new material, including collaborations The Posies’ Jon Auer and the surprise guest artist for this show, Mr. Lif!

Anomie Belle was obviously excited to welcome a dread-less Mr. Lif to the stage to join her on the final track of the set, “Bedtime Stories.” Mr Lif’s calm demeanor and riffs about the struggles of everyday people fit in perfectly with the socially conscious themes of Anomie Belle. I certainly look forward to hearing further collaboration. (There is video footage from this here, but unfortunately you’ll have to turn the volume down as the bass blows out a bit)*

By: Nicole Kristek - Melophobe


Anomie Belle are a Seattle act, led by violinist and vocalist Toby Campbell, that take up the odd challenge of attempting to reanimate a genre, triphop, that was a ghost of a thing to begin with - a wispy memory of hiphop (itself a genre built on the samples/specters of other musics) floated over a haze of orchestral strings and disembodied diva vocals. This phantom of a phantom is as insubstantial as one might expect, but Anomie Belle tackle the stuff with undeniable chops. Campbell's voice is polished and just a little jazzy, alternating between low murmurs and high falsettos, and her scores are sophisticated noirish stuff. Triphop is still dead, but it can continue to haunt. ERIC GRANDY - Seattle Stranger


Get ready to kick yourself for not finding this sooner. I know that’s what I did. This is a fantastic album that combines the best elements of trip hop, down tempo, and piano-based songwriting. With exquisite, sensual production, this album truly captivates your imagination and explores some gorgeous territory. These songs are sly and dark and may affect your ability to operate machinery, and thank god for that. Fans of Martina Topley-Bird, Goldfrapp, Imogen Heap will love this album, while electronic fans will appreciate the beats and thought provoking production elements. It seems that other people have noticed her talent, too, as she’s toured and collaborateed with the likes of Tricky, The Album Leaf, Mr. Lif (The Perceptionists), and Jon Auer (The Posies, Big Star). Highlights include the moody electric piano-based “How Can I Be Sure” (which was featured in the Xbox 360 game Alan Wake), the Portishead-y groove of “Bedtime Stories”, and the epic electro-waltz of “John Q Public”. Be sure to pick up this album at CD Baby right here.

Here’s a nice live video of Anomie Belle with Mr. Lif, recorded live at Bumbershoot last year: - CD Baby Music Discovery Podcast


Anomie Belle is the project of multi-instrumentalist musician/composer Toby Campbell, whose music is often combining elements of classical, jazz, rock, pop and down tempo trip hop beats. It is often jarring and thought-provoking as she writes and sings about issues of social justice, political alienation and facing prejudices.

Campbell has managed to make a career out of being a musician by being able to do almost everything herself, including audio engineering but still enjoys getting the opportunity to play with other musicians when possible. Anomie Belle has played shows with such diverse artists as Tricky, The Album Leave, Azure Ray and will play in Portland next month with Kid Koala, before returning to Seattle to play Bumbershoot on Monday, September 7.

I met up with Campbell at a bar on Capitol Hill to talk about Anomie Belle, the state of the music business and the contrast between making music by yourself and collaborating with other artists.

How did you decide you wanted to become a musician?

I don’t feel like I decided to become a musician, I just feel like “I am a musician”. As a small child, I was always writing songs and as soon as my parents gave me a karaoke player, I started making multi-track recording, without knowing what I was doing, laying down a vocal part and a violin part. When I was ten or eleven, one of the men in my father’s a capella, barbershop quartet heard what I had been doing and asked if I was interested in coming into a recording studio. That was when I made my first record. I don’t feel like there ever was a time when I chose to be a musician.

But you were in a PhD program before working on music full-time, right?

I think I entered that because I felt like I needed to have a “real job” and I didn’t know how I was going to make a living as a musician, so I felt really scared about that but I also went that route because I do feel a strong commitment to social justice. I think there are issues like environmental degradation, racism and prejudice and consumerism that I always felt strongly about and there’s the commercialization of art in the music industry, so I went to school to study that kind of stuff and I realized that although I feel strongly about that and want to talk about that stuff in my music, as a career I wanted to be a musician.

You are a musician full-time then?

I am.

You also make a lot of film scores, in addition to the work in Anomie Belle. When you’re scoring a film, is it already made and the director hands you a DVD and says “I need some music here, here and here” or do you give your music to the filmmaker and have him or her insert it where it’s appropriate?

Usually the former, that’s usually the case. But in the case of the documentary film challenge I did with Reel Grrls, the filmmakers and I worked in creating the film and the music at the same time during that short timeframe we had to make that film. That was really fun because I got to have a feeling like I was a part of the team. I’ve been doing a lot of film scoring and a lot of original music for television shows. I’ve been able to write rock music and classical music and electronic music. It’s a wider array of music styles that I can write composing than I could for Anomie Belle.

You also make a lot of film scores, in addition to the work in Anomie Belle. When you’re scoring a film, is it already made and the director hands you a DVD and says “I need some music here, here and here” or do you give your music to the filmmaker and have him or her insert it where it’s appropriate?

I also try to stay involved with the local community by volunteering with nonprofits. I’ve been working a lot with Girls Rock Seattle and I was working with Girls Rock in Portland, the Girls Rock Camp in Portland, Reel Grrls, the Vera Project and other youth-oriented nonprofits. It’s a fun way of staying connected to the local community.

You’ve played shows with artists like Tricky and The Album Leaf. What have you learned from artists like that?

I think Tricky is one of the pioneering folks in the genre of trip hop and has done an amazing job of integrating his own take on trip hop/hip hop with using female singers in a very sexy and beautiful way. He also has a live band, so it’s interesting to see him take electronic beats, the down-tempo beats, and translate that into a live performance. I think it was cool to tour with him and talk to him about that and how he does that.

With someone like Jimmy (LaValle) from The Album Leaf, who identifies himself, like I do, as a composer, and plays with a live band, it was awesome to talk to him about how he completes his live band and how he works with musicians in that process, as a composer. Also, how he has adapted his touring setup depending on the situation. When he was touring with Sigur Ros, he toured by himself and had to use a lot of looping and that is something that I’ve gotten into so I can play guitar or violin and sing - Three Imaginary Girls


July 23rd, 2010

Great music all summer long in Seattle is a given, and, as of 2008, we are also home to a fantastic and praiseworthy summer camp, Girls Rock! Seattle. Seattle’s talented female artists are volunteering their time and musical expertise so that 80 girls from ages 8-16 will get a chance to express themselves, make noise, build self-esteem, and learn the whole gamut of the music process. The mission of the organizations is to, “provide girls with an opportunity to participate in an environment that fosters leadership, encourages social change, and cultivates a supportive community of female peers and mentors.”
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The goal of the camp is to demonstrate that, “every genre of music, every technical job, and every creative endeavor in the music industry is available to any girl or woman who wants to explore it.” The week long camp covers a lot, from playing an instrument, songwriting, zine making, self-defense, the history of women in music, and it even has a dj workshop.
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One interesting class hopes to make up for a big gap in the music industry, as the audio engineering field remains underrepresented with less than 5% of the field being female. Local musician and female producer, Anomie Belle, will be bringing awareness to the field in her class, Recording and Production Workshop, which will cover how to take recording into your own hands. She’ll be teaching, “how the pros make records with digital audio recording and virtual instruments through software programs like Protools, Reason, and Ableton Live.”
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Now that you’re caught on to another thing we are doing right in Seattle for music, make sure to show your support for this awesome non-profit. The week long camp, from July 26-July 31, culminates with a showcase at Neumos on July 31 at 1pm. Get tickets here.
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Keep up the great work. Seattle Subsonic applauds you! - Seattle Subsonic


Toby Campbell, the woman behind Anomie Belle, is a dynamic singer/songwriter, producer and multi-instrumentalist with a gift for writing down-tempo, jewel-like songs. In a similar cross-genre way to artists like Emiliana Torrini, her compositions meld cool, trip-hop electronica and warm organic sounds that instantly entrance; no wonder she’s toured with artists from Album Leaf to Tricky. On “American View”, her violin adds intrigue to a song already rife with texture, appearing again as delicate, neo-baroque intro to “John Q Public”. Campbell’s voice is just as textured as her compositions, with sinewy melodies and floating refrains that curl their way into your mind. Though Sleeping Patterns was released almost a year ago, it’s an album worth revisiting time and time again. (Self-Release)–Cleo - Sentimentalist Magazine


When Toby Campbell was a little girl, her family predicted that she would become a professional musician - and the young artist wasted little time fulfilling their prophecy. While simultaneously teaching herself how to play the piano, eight-year-old Campbell took violin lessons from a prestigious instructor who, Campbell notes with a laugh, "was 99-years-old and charged a dollar a minute." Before long she was performing with chamber orchestras, writing her own music and, eventually, opting out of her instructor's request that she enroll in half-time high school in order to practice violin more than six hours a day. Campbell then dropped the lessons, only to fill her extra time with more music-related activities. "Where most kids would just watch television or pay Nintendo, I played with my karaoke machine," Campbell says, although she rarely used it just to sing other people's music.

Give to her on her 10th birthday, this karaoke machine quickly became a vehicle for Campbell's early experimentation with music production. "The way it was set up, you had two tapes, so you could record to one and then record to another as many times as you wanted. It was how I started multi-track recording as a kid without knowing I was doing it, " she says. By 13, Campbell had already recorded an album in a studio belonging to a member of her father's barbershop quartet. Since then, Campbell has recorded more albums, added more instruments to her repertoire, and worked abroad in different musical communities through a two-year Thomas J. Watson fellowship. Returning stateside to Seattle, the multi-instrumentalist composer, producer and audio programmer threw herself head-long into her current experimental electronic project, Anomie Belle.

As Anomie Belle (a name suggesting "beautiful social unrest"), Campbell finds possibilities for creativity and social change in the art of participation, both on and offstage. Who will end up in the studio or on stage with Campbell varies greatly. In addition to, and often in lieu of, her usual cast of characters - two back-up vocalists, a saxophonist and a new drummer - Anomie Belle is likely to share the stage with anyone from an upcoming Seattle emcee to The Album Leaf to her own sister. Last year, Campbell performed at The Howlin' Wolf in New Orleans with gospel choirs from two different local churches. "Any creative endeavor doesn't happen in a vacuum," she says. "It happens within the context of a community of people who are all moving in a certain direction together. I enjoy the energy of other people when I'm playing music. I think that's why we make a point of collaborating with so many other people."

Off stage, Campbell volunteers at music-centric nonprofits like Girls Rock! and The Vera Project, an organization that uses an all-ages music venue and recording studio to promote youth civic engagement in Seattle. She recently scored a short documentary created for an international competition by a group of women from Reel Grrls, an all-female media and technology-training program. As an avid "culture jammer," Campbell meets with a multi-talented group of renegade artists to occasionally "subvert advertisements," have fun in creative ways, and generally "awaken people out of the stupor of their everyday routinized existence" using provocative public art.

In many ways the punk aspect of Campbell's culture jamming experience reappears in the tone of the debut Anomie Belle album, Sleeping Patterns, with lyrics that oscillate between critique and the voice of the everyday person. "If I'm going to bother to put something out there, I'm going to talk about stuff that matters," Campbell says. Her subjects range from love to issues of inequality, injustice and poverty. "John Q Public," for instance, criticizes the commercialization of resistance; meanwhile, "Amy Song" addresses the objectification of women.

Campbell hopes that her music will put listeners in a "really raw, honest, authentic place," but acknowledges that many will probably miss the important messages she has tucked into sweeping strings, layered synths, trip-hop percussion and gentle washes of harmonized vocals. "If people just enjoy that the music is beautiful or sexy and never really contemplate excessive American consumerism - that's okay too," Campbell says. It's a beautiful fist that this belle shakes at the public.

By Lulu McAllister - Performer Magazine


Under the moniker of Anomie Belle, Seattle trip hop chanteuse/composer Toby Campbell is bearing the torch for those who have left the genre by the wayside. Her sultry, smoky vocals combine with her slithery, seductive programming for the perfect balance of the two key ingredients of good trip hop: sexiness and darkness. Campbell has proven herself to be a legitimate quintuple threat as the masterful composer, producer, programmer, vocalist, and multi-instrumentalist behind the project. Having toured with the likes of electronica stalwarts Tricky and Little Dragon, Anomie Belle is poised to find itself among the most revered names of the genre. Down is rainy day blues filtered through the sounds of sampled drums, swelling strings, and Campbell's contemplative melodies.

Reviewed by: Amorn Bholsangngam - URB Magazine


By Aiden Landman
Published: April 9th, 2009 | 1:55pm

WHO IS IT:Producer, vocalist, and multi-instrumentalist Toby Campbell and a rotating cast of musicians and vocalists.

LOCATION:
Seattle, WA

FILE UNDER:
Haunting trip-hop with a touch of ambient vocal tendencies and rainy day sensibilities.

IN A NUTSHELL:
There is a leap of faith involved in eschewing the organic for the mechanical. Setting aside, even momentarily, something once held dear to join the ranks of the adopters, the controllers, trailblazers of the electro-age. For Toby Campbell, the producer behind Seattle's Anomie Bell, techno-organic wizardry and computerized song structures are less an abandonment of her classical roots and more of a stylistic sea change.

Originally a violist and vocalist focusing her energies on classical music, Campbell released a few records, played some shows, and kept writing. Then in 2006, she packed her bags, and moved from her native Portland, OR to Seattle, WA to focus her energies on a new direction.

Since moving to Seattle, Campbell has been heavily involved with programs that help young girls start rocking. She has worked with or performed for the Rock ‘n’ Roll Camp for Girls in Portland, Girls Rock Seattle, Reel Grrls, the Seattle Girls’ School, and AWSEM. She says her decision to do this was based upon her desire “to help young women pursue music and become critical thinkers.” She continues, “As a female electronic musician, producer and multi-instrumentalist, I find often myself confronting gender stereotypes in the music industry.”

The rainy day lethargy and dark isolation is evident in Campbell's alter ego, Anomie Bell. Her music exists in a realm of desolation and cautious nihilism. “My music deals broadly with power and the ways that we all find ourselves complicit in perpetuating ideologies that are oppressive to particular groups of people.”

The word heavy comes to mind, as does dark, but these adjectives, modifiers, and descriptive phrases miss the point. Anomie Bell doesn't make music that’s easily lumped into a pile, filed, and given to public consumption. Her sound, direction, and singular vision begs questions and demands their answers. Her music, both sonically and thematically, seems the product of hours of studying, reading, and learning. Something Campbell admits saying, “The content of my music is informed by graduate studies in Media and Cultural Studies and Feminist Theory. I write about the objectification of women in popular media, performance and entertainment, and the ways that such oppression becomes normative and accepted.”

Don't get the wrong idea however, Anomie Bell is not necessarily music for those bent toward the macabre. Her music is as fit to be a soundtrack to a hazy late night drive as it is a lonely night spent in quiet solitude.

Depression this is not, a cautious and eerie look at our current state of affairs, maybe. Her mixture of organic instrumentation – guitar, piano, violin and other strings – with inhuman drumbeats and synthesized textures suggests a dualism between guards old and new. She walks a balance, and the results speak volumes. - Venus Zine


The last few years have been fallow ones for trip-hop. The repurposed elements that made the genre so unique -- the hip-hop-inflected drums, the soul-standard voicing, the glitched-out experimentation, the 80s synth beds -- got reclaimed, leaving practitioners to chase after fans. But the giants have returned: Portishead and Massive Attack just dropped new material, and Seattle-based Anomie Belle is pushing new life into the form. Anomie Belle is Toby Campbell, a classical violinist and film composer from Portland-way. As you might expect, she produces songs full of whistfully subtle texture, never anything that feels fussy, though it must have been obsessed over. We are obsessing a little bit right now. Saturday 8:00pm // Neumos // Tickets: $13 - Seattlest


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Anomie Belle – Sleeping Patterns

Sleeping Patterns is the sophisticated debut album of Seattle-based Anomie Belle, the project of talented songwriter and classically-trained violinist Toby Campbell. In this work, she combines electronic and experimental elements with sensual beats, lush strings and layered vocals, dropping the listener into the melancholy heart of her beautiful trip-hop symphonies.

Amid sweeping melodies, Campbell tucks in thoughtful commentary on social issues and American culture. Her observant lyrics play off each other, echoing distantly and reappearing with honey-coated clarity among a complex rhythm in “American View”: “It’s the myopy of the American View / Cascading hills of barren land / Meet waters gray with silt and sand / And there’s a chemical breeze that runs through.”

Campbell’s voice recalls that of Portishead’s Beth Gibbons and Sia – growling and moody at times and sweetly atonal at others. In most cases, she prefers to take a bluesier turn, as with the downtempo, acoustic-driven “February Sun,” soulful “Before You Leave Me” and the hexatonic, organ-dappled “How Can I Be Sure.” “Down” places low-key drums over introspective guitar and strings, which run into a distinctive electronic edge midway and recede into a warmly harmonized chorus line that repeats blissfully until fading with the close of the song.

Campbell also has a knack for creating a different kind of jazz. In “Dox Amsterdam,” sultry brass lingers across mid-‘90s era embellished downbeats and picks up playfully, ripping the entire song like a disturbed pool of water. Meanwhile, the addition of saxophone in “Greenhouse” generates a sexier kind of gloom. “Cascade” is a dinner party of staccato, Nintendo-sounding synths grounded by Campbell’s eerie, deep melodic sighs.

Whether pairing satiny instrumentals with contrasting beats, re-imagining the blues or delivering political commentary with darkly angelic vocals, Anomie Belle will dissolve you. (Self-released)

-Lulu McAllister
www.anomiebelle.com
- Performer Magazine - January 2009


Sleeping Patterns wastes no time introducing Anomie Belle's haunting voice, beautiful and lingering. Anomie Belle is Portland native Toby Campbell, who has traveled all over the world working with music and is now back in the Northwest living in Seattle. This self-released album is her first with her experimental trip-hop project Anomie Belle. The music approach is simple, minimal, yet at times seemingly complex, with looping vocals and electronic sounds intricately laced throughout tracks for a hypnotizing and relaxing result. The song "Greenhouse" focuses on her soft wistful vocals, almost a whisper at times while "Before You Leave Me" is bursting with sound and one of the few on the album that pushes outside the mellow disposition. With influences like Zero 7 and Air, Anomie Belle obviously draws from that style of music, but makes it her own with socially relevant lyrics and instrumental talents, along with a background composing and producing music.

Jessica Harbert

Standout Tracks: “How Can I Be Sure,” “Bedtimes Stories” - Sound Magazine - November 2008


October 23, 2008

It’s been a while since I proclaimed my love of Trespassers William, the understated Seattle ambient gurus, and of Zero7, the London downtempo kids. So imagine my excitement when I was sent an album by Anomie Belle which features TW’s Anna-Lynne Williams on guest vocals and sounds just like Zero7 gone American with the amience of TW. Yes, I almost had a baby I was that excited.

Anomie Belle is the project of composer, producer, audio programmer, vocalist, and multi-instrumentalist, Toby Campbell. Originally a classical violinist and songwriter, she released multiple solo records before creating her own beats and making her way into electronic, experimental, trip-hop music. A Portland, Oregon native, Campbell has performed at top venues throughout the Pacific Northwest, and has worked as a musician and producer in Madrid, Glasgow, Amsterdam, New York, Buenos Aires, and London.

Dreamy like Zero 7, Anomie Belle has a smoother sound than Trespassers William, and whilst at times the subject matter is rather dark and deep (throughout the collection American political apathy, suburban alienation, passive media spectatorship, social injustice, and consumerism are all tackedled) the music just washes over you in such a gloriously smooth way you can’t help but almost fall asleep in bliss. This isn’t a insult - very few bands and artists can be as gentle and relaxing after just a few listens as Anomie Belle is to me.

Almost every track on the new album, Sleeping Patterns, features lush strings and multilayered effects, which gives you something different everytime you hear it - different instruments, different words, different meanings. My only complaint? Sometimes the vocals are a little too buried down in the mix for my liking, however that’s more of a personal preference, and I have a feeling that if they were higher up the mix they would be distracting and lose some of the dreamyness of the collection.

Although she’s based in the Pacific Northwest of the USA, make sure that if you’re over there anytime soon, or if she make it over to the UK, be sure to catch her live. Hell, if I have to, I’ll pay for your ticket!

MP3: Anomie Belle - Down

Anomie Belle’s new album, Sleeping Patterns is released on 2nd November. - There Goes The Fear Music Blog


February 1, 2009

Anomie Belle
The Album Leaf, Black Mamba,
(Neumos) Anomie Belle achieve noirish triphop textures. Singer, composer, and multi-instrumentalist Toby Campbell creates eerie auras of dislocated symphonic elements, effects, and muffled hiphop beats, at the center of which is always Campbell's highly capable and slightly jazzy singing voice, which easily ranges from low, subdued moans to whispery falsettos. The lyrics are apparently politically/socially conscious, but the message never really interferes with the medium.
ERIC GRANDY
- The Seattle Stranger


February 10, 2009

On Jan 15, 2009 I had the pleasure of seeing Anomie Belle live at Neumos. What stood out to me about her music is that it has a very significant message, and a call for self examination. I really like approach of a poignant message wrapped in an nonabrasive little package. Anomie Belle really creates the space where you can be confertable reflecting on what’s going on in the world and your place in it without feeling judged.

Having your music be a platform for social change can be quite and undertaking, to the point where it effects your life in ways that you could not have predicted.
I asked Anomie Belle, ” How has music shaped who you are as a person?”
She commented, “It’s just been a blessing to have a means of personal expression that I feel capable with - that I am able to articulate abstract, emotional, conceptual and poetic thoughts that aren’t as expressable through writing or other forms of communication. The capacity to do that has opened me up to many parts of myself, to be honest. I’m kind of an introvert too, so it gives me a meaningful way to interact with lots of people in the world, which might not happen otherwise.”

There are lots of ways to attempt making a difference in this day and age, some passive, some aggressive, some passive aggressive, but how effective? Determining ones own effectiveness on changing a person’s viewpoint is arguably something that can not be measured. What you can measure is what you are up to. What are you doing to make a difference weather it is effective or not? How are you leaving your mark? With these questions in mind, I took a closer look. Please enjoy this thought provoking interview with Anomie Belle back stage at Neumos captured February 1, 2009.

For interview and live show videos, see:

http://www.seattleshowgal.com/?p=377 - Seattle Show Gal


It has been a bit of a “off centre” Slowcoustic Weekend. This isn’t a bad thing, just taking some time to listen to some music that isn’t just an acoustic guitar and accompanying voice. With that in mind, I bring you the next installment of the growth of the site - Anomie Belle - not your standard indie songstress.

an·o·mie [an-uh-me] n social unrest or normlessness; malaise, alienation and purposelessness.

belle [bel] n a popular and charming woman; especially: a woman whose charm and beauty make her a favorite.

Anomie Belle is really Toby Campbell, classical violinist cum trip-hop diva (didn’t expect that now did you?) and she is releasing her most recent “experiment” into electronic/acoustic/fusion album “Sleeping Patterns” due this November 2nd. While I do not extensively listen to the more electronic side of the spectrum (see below post on Firekites as well) - this is another project you can get into. There is a fair share of Campbell’s eerie beats covered by her purposefully slow delivery of lyrics. These lyrics in particular can be seen often as commentary on many social issues around us, but seem to be more observation instead of outright protest. I can also say with her delivery and soundscapes, the messages are ones that can actually be pondered while being soothed by the medium.

As expected there is vocal sampling alongside the occasional “keyboard frequency tuning”, but kept in line with the sound and feel of the album. Among the 11 track album you find gems in songs like “Down” and “February Sun” which may be the tracks to incorporate a more acoustic influence (see below). You might just also hear some accents via Ms. Anna-Lynne Williams (Lotte Kestner, Trespassers William and all around Slowcoustic favourite) who contributes to the album.

So get in line now to pick up a copy upon its release, in order to convince you to get a copy, listen below!

~Smansmith - Slowcoustic


Anomie Belle – Flux

URL: http://www.anomiebelle.com/

Few releases this year, indie or otherwise, will resonate with its intended audience like Anomie Belle’s debut Flux. The dozen songs compromising its running order cover a gamut of musical sounds. The predominant influences dominating her songwriting are trip hop, electronica, and dance with a dollop of classical added for good measure. Her lyrical content is sometimes merely functional, but more often than note, Belle’s lyrics look to explicate important themes and fulfill their mandate spectacularly well. Despite the artier inclinations of some songwriting, Belle’s music always escapes pretension and, instead, remains resolutely accessible thanks to its willingness to engage those aforementioned universal themes. She has a wonderfully musical, deeply emotive voice that never overshadows the instrumentation, but even a cursory listen will convince her audience that she’s the central star in this firmament of sound.

There’s tremendous style on display from the outset. “Saturday Gives” has a lightly landing, but improbably dense swirl of sound propelled by three pivotal styles. The song opens with a wall of strings before segueing into a light trip hop beat and an tastefully layered cloud of electronica. She moves on from there to shedding the classical influences entirely on “Right Way”, but the remaining trip hop and electronica textures gain in prominence as a result and are more than enough to draw listeners’ into its web. “Unwind” moves the album’s focus, once again, in another subtler direction. This is much more of a mood piece, putting its attention towards both entertaining the potential audience and constructing an unselfconsciously theatrical air. “Lovers” is much less conventional in comparison but, oddly, shows off sides of normalcy in how its pursues a groove-centered approach much more than the earlier songs. Theirs is no such focus on the groove in “As Summer Bleeds Daylight” – instead, Belle goes to great efforts to strengthen the cinematic and theatrical qualities inherent to the song while still actively seeking to entertain the audience.

“Tumult” is musically dynamic, rising and falling at various point, and has a restrained mid-tempo pace that Belle milks for maximum drama. Despite her efforts to exploit the song’s potential, she never overplays her talent and risks heavy-handedness. “Beneath” offers the same object lesson in tastefulness, but this time Belle takes on a funk/soul mantle with considerable success. The performance has a credible touch that listeners will expect to hear from top flight acts in the genre, but perhaps not necessarily expect from Belle. The piano driven showcase “The Good Life” gives her audience a chance to hear Belle at her most unvarnished, free of post-production trickery, and hitting a starkly emotive note lacking from the earlier songs. The final number “We Let Ourselves In” has an exuberant edge that listeners haven’t encountered in the album’s final songs, but it isn’t aggressive. Instead, it plays to bring the album to a rousing finish and succeeds well. It’s the right note to strike ending this release and covers all of the album’s various stylistic bases in one spectacular ending.

9 out of 10 stars.

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/anomiebellemusic

David Shouse - Gas House Radio


The release of Anomie Belle’s debut album Flux and its accompanying art book marks the emergence of a major new songwriting and performing talent. She does a fantastic job juggling multiple styles without ever betraying a preference for one or failing to excel with these idiosyncrasies. There is a surprising amount of instrumentation employed on the album and it is always employed in an inventive, tasteful fashion.

Reactionary music listeners might believe electronica incapable of producing substantive musical art, but writers like Anomie Belle prove such ideas to be conclusive devoid of value. The production balances the competing elements without ever prioritizing one over the others and the running order shows real consideration for the thematic, if not outright conceptual, development of the album. Belle, as well, proves that it is quite possible to make serious personal and artistic statements while still providing an ample entertainment factor to draw in the casual fan.

Saturday Gives gives listeners an early example of her ability to bring classical and electronica music together into a compelling package. The vocals are evocative and emotional, yet they come at listeners with enough musical weight to compete with the instrumentation.

Right Way and As We Are open the album up to its considerable dance influences cut with a healthy dose of trip hop sounds. The lyrical message and, to a certain extent, the vocals take backseats here to the groove, but it’s really Belle just using her voice in a different fashion than before. On songs like these, Belle’s voice isn’t a separate musical force working alongside; yet separate, from the backing track. Instead, she’s part of the instrumentation and responds superbly to the different role.

As Summer Bleeds Daylight represents the album’s artistic zenith. This is artsy while still pursuing an entertaining, accessible electronica sound full of color and melody. The vocal is particularly alluring.

She turns back to unbridled electronica on the song Tumult and produces a stormy, impassioned track with considerable commercial appeal. Beneath hails from the same general pedigree, but if anything, Belle’s focus is even tighter here and the result is a track that truly gets beneath the skin and fearlessly explores its themes.

Perhaps the most naked performance on the entire album comes with the third from final song, The Good Life. Her emotional impact on this song is total and she gives herself over to the moment completely.

Flux ends with the superb and energetic swirl of We Let Ourselves In. It’s a celebratory end of sorts to the album that returns the musical focus to a multi-faceted approach – there’s trip hop, dance textures, and electronica working in concert together to form an impressive conclusion.

Few artists working today, veteran or otherwise, are intent on making a lasting impression like Anomie Belle. Her unusual intensity, diversity, and failure to obey stylistic rules cast her in the role of iconoclast when the artistic world, on every front, clamors for one. Dear Diving Bell Recording Company, please send us more Anomie Belle’s to clear away the bullshit.

9 out of 10 stars

If you enjoyed a sample from Flux, give Anomie Belle a like on Facebook by clicking here & a follow on Twitter by clicking here. - Indie Music Review


"Anomie Belle: Flux Album," Modern Eden

The addition of music takes this art exhibit to the next level—and beyond. Haunting, dark and sexy, Anomie Belle's new album "Flux" has inspired all of the visual art displayed in this exhibit. The public is invited to view the work while listening to the album, enhancing the overall artistic experience. Sounds pretty cool to us. Through September 10, Modern Eden, 403 Francisco Street, SF. - Time Out San Francisco


Posted on July 27, 2016 by Section 8 Squad

Who are you and where are you from?

Hi! My name is Anomie Belle. I am from Seattle.

Can you tell us about “Flux” ?

Flux is a very personal album that captures a chapter of my life – my experiences of intimacy, the arc of my creative process, and observations about the world around me. Flux is also an interdisciplinary art project. I collaborated with 14 different international visual artists to create a body of work – culminating in an art book and gallery exhibition that accompanies the album. In this sense, each artist created a portrait of me and my music, exploring disillusionment and the search for identity. The music videos also feel like a part of this, and reflect meaningful and intimate collaborations as well.

What feeling and message do you want people to receive from the album and the “Flux” exhibition?

I hope people will connect to Flux from an intuitive and authentic place. Making art and music is a process of capturing emotions and thoughts. So, releasing it out into the world feels like sharing a vulnerable place, sometimes sexual, sometimes peaceful and reflective, other times intensely critical. Art and music have empathetic, intuitive dimensions, and my hope is that people will connect to Flux in whichever ways most resonate with them. The organic unfolding of what feelings and messages stick with people is part of what is beautiful about putting art out into the world.

Do you remember your first creative work, the moment you knew that you where an artist?

Being creative and spending time in my imagination were always a big part of my experience. As a child, creativity and art-making were central to my most meaningful friendships. Even early on, music was an outlet for me to express my experience of the world and of exploring intimacy and identity.

The first time I multi-track recorded a song I’d written that I felt really proud of, I was eleven years old. I recorded it on a little cassette player my parents gave me. The experience was intoxicating and incredibly gratifying. I spent the entire weekend tinkering and tracking, forgetting even to take breaks to eat. I started with a layer of piano, then a couple layers of vocals, xylophone and a couple layers of violin and some bits of percussion. What I remember most was how in love I felt with the whole process, and that feeling of being completely and utterly immersed in creating something from nothing. There was prescience in that feeling, and it’s never left.

Who are your favorite artist, musicians and inspirations?

In this chapter of my life, I have been particularly inspired by artists across genres. I draw much of my inspiration from those I am closest to. Anthon Smith and Roxanna Walitzki have been my collaborators through this whole process; together, we curated the Flux art show, and created the music videos and photography to accompany the album. Their voices are even present as a part of the production textures throughout the music.

With each artist, I had a conversation about inspiration, themes, ideas and process, and it was thrilling to learn how much we have in common. This project means a lot to me because it is the culmination of a lot of rich and inspiring collaborations with other artists (Marco Mazzoni, Redd Walitzki, Mark Demsteader, Kari-Lise Alexander, Casey Weldon, Meredith Marsone, Alessandra Maria, Alex Garant, Alpay Efe, Januz Miralles, Maria Teicher, Antonio Velfín, Alexandra Becker-Black and Zin Lim).Scanned by Bellevue Fine Art Reproduction, LLC.

Where can we see more of your work?

WWW.ANOMIEBELLE.COM

What do you see yourself doing in 20 years?

I see myself continuing to make a lot of music and art. More of it, with increased efficiency, artistry and a lot of collaboration. Collaborators I can go deep with. Being challenged, inspired, and living a full and rich life that is constantly changing but filled with creative adventures. Hopefully with a bit more wisdom and a sense of humor so I don’t take myself too seriously – because life will always be absurd and imperfect.

If you could work on the next creative project with anyone in the world from any period in time who would it be? Radiohead.

Any last words you would like to say to the Section 8 Magazine readers worldwide?

I’ll leave you with some lyrics from my new album…

Oh I can see what you’ve set your mind to
But be careful what you wish for
And be careful what you do
Make your mark
Pretty lady
Are you satisfied
With your day job
If you immerse yourself
So completely
Then you can lose yourself in seeking
Though you know not what you’re looking for - Section 8 Magazine


13 Sep 2016 — Filed Under: Indie Music Reviews

Anomie Belle – Flux

Seattle born Anomie Belle has earned considerable respect from her peers during her short career. She’s opened in support of various top shelf indie bands, among them The Posies, and that respect is sure to translate into greater commercial opportunities for Belle as she moves on with her career. The twelve song release Flux might seem, on a first spin, to be relatively inaccessible to casual music fans. Closer listens, however, reveal that this is a nominally straight forward singer/songwriter effort adorned with artistic and cerebral touches going far beyond the ken of your typical pop album. There’s a strong sense of melody guiding the songs that keeps them tethered to earth, but Belle is unafraid to infuse the songs with various strains of color. The color primarily comes from the vast array of electronica at Belle’s disposal, but her command of tempo and groove are equally important to the album’s ultimate success.

“Saturday Gives” brims over with multiple influences, but Belle expertly juggles them without dropping her focus on a single component. The transformation from a neo-classical beginning into a more trip hop/electronica influenced body is smoothly handled and the strings never drop out of the mix entirely. “Right Way” ramps up the electronica influence while the classical touches fade, but as elsewhere throughout the album’s duration, Belle arranges the song’s in such a way that its separate elements never clash and, instead, strengthen each other through their complementary placement. “As We Are”, however, is much bigger trip hop/dance/electronica confection and has a confident edge not heard on the earlier song.

The album’s creative highpoint comes with the songs “Lovers” and “As Summer Bleeds Daylight”. The first of these two tracks is a much more experimental song, in some ways, and an unlikely choice for the first single. Multiple listens, however, reveal the reasons. The song never abandons its melodic constructs, though Belle’s quite happy to twist conventional melodies in unexpected ways. The other reason becomes equally obvious after multiple listens. Despite any unusual turns in tempo, “Lovers” follows a clear groove and it insinuates itself into listener’s consciousness from the outset. The second of the two songs concentrates more on creating an atmospheric setting, but like any of the album’s other songs, it never opts for entirely deserting songwriting fundamentals. “As Summer Bleeds Daylight” features, arguably, the album’s most developed lyric.

“Beneath” gives Belle a chance to explore her R&B/soul/funk side and it has enough distinctive flair to make it one of the album’s greater songs. Guitar drops infrequently into the album’s max but, when it does like here, lays some enriching color into the composition. The album’s tenth song “The Good Life” is an eloquently phrased piano ballad, plain and largely unadorned by the glitz and gloss making so many of the earlier songs vivid, and further set apart by Belle’s best vocal on the release. It provides the album’s best possible ending – a mix of the personal songwriting that powers much of the release while showing an unusual side of herself that earlier songs do not reveal. Flux is a work of rare imagination and musical uplift with vibrant creativity and full freedom

9 out of 10 stars.

Scott Wigley - Indiemunity


Anomie Belle - Flux
Published: August 24, 2016

She's toured with Tricky and collaborated with the Sneaker Pimps, but there's a good chance you haven't heard of Anomie Belle. Since bursting onto the scene in 2008 with Sleeping Patterns, the Seattle songstress has only released a handful of EPs, singles and another album, 2011's The Crush. Flux is the first new album from Anomie in five years.

The talented multi-instrumentalist and vocalist is among the most creative of her class. According to Anomie, Flux is about our "disillusionment and the search for identity" and what she calls the "beautiful alienation" of modern isolation. As one can no doubt surmise, her work extends well beyond the aural. She uses her music, which ranges from trip-hop to art-pop, to create sonic landscapes that explore complex emotions.

Flux is an ambitious album that not only includes beautiful vocal tracks like the pared down "The Good Life," but also instrumental standalone tracks like "As Summer Bleeds Daylight." It spans an impressive range of genres and styles, clearly showcasing Anomie's musical prowess. The album also comes with an art book that includes 14 visual art pieces by various international artists. Each piece accompanies a song and is being displayed at the Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco until September 10.

If you didn't know Anomie Belle before, Flux is a great entry point to her discography, a great example of truly immersive, emotive electronic music. Flux signals the welcome return of Seattle's siren to the forefront of modern electronica. - Exclaim!


Anomie Belle - Flux
9/14/2016
Flux
Diving Bell Recording Co.; 2016
​By Matt Jensen

Anomie Belle is an artist who released an album entitled Flux that is one of the fews albums that feels every bit relevant to 2016. I say this mostly in terms to production. The beats, splices, synths and everything else feels contemporary and I say that in a good way. Let's face facts, production has jumped leaps and bounds in the last fifteen years. You can do so much in the digital domain these days so why not stretch it to its limits. For me the sounds of Flux run somewhere between FKA Twigs and Bjork. Yeah so you can say I was impressed.

One of the highlights and my personal favorite track was “Saturday Gives.” l couldn’t get enough of the warm orchestral strings against the intricate production which provided an emotional resonant vibe. The juxtaposition hits the bullseye. Her vocals are crisp, subdued but interestingly enough quite sparse. This is a trend I noticed on the album (the hooks aren’t necessarily glaring). Belle seems to favor a focus on the instrumentation rather than the hook.

​Some songs are a little more straightforward and destined for a late night lounge such as “Right Way” or “As We Are.” One song that does have a hook that stuck out to me was “Lovers.” There is no denying that vocal melody will get stuck in your head.

“As Summer Bleeds Daylight” is an short yet effective instrumental track while “Tumult” is a slower moving song but has so many things happening my mind didn’t know what to listen to.

Flux is an album you can easily make a case for being overproduced. If you strip back the clicks, vocal effects etc. what would be left of these songs? Is it possible for a traditional band of bass, guitar and drums to cover these songs and find the emotional center? And does it matter? These are important questions to ask in this day and age for Belle and like minded artists.

I have to admit I wanted to hear Belle’s natural vocals a bit more rather than the production. That being said the production is so ahead of the curve of most artists it can serve them as an example of how advanced the art has become. If you want to hear a contemporary sounding artist then look no further than Anomie Belle. - No More Division


“What use is intimacy if it is wasted? Spend the moments you have with abandon. Love well! Be vulnerable, be strong, and be honest. When we empower each other, the possibilities of life grow.”

Sian

I am mesmerized by your #ARTMEETSMUSIC project, “Flux”, that you are about to release in collaboration with 14 international artists. It is a very personal and haunting portrait on the search for identity. What inspired you to create such an introspective album and what do you hope to communicate through this journey?

Anomie

This album and art project originated from a very personal and authentic place. “Flux” is about the complexities of intimacy and my emotional experiences in our modern world. I got to explore these inspirations with the visual artists involved in the show. It has been amazing working with and having conversations with all of them. My experiences of intimacy and creativity have been intertwined throughout the process of making this music and art project – and I think the music and art reflect this. I hope people will connect to Flux in a way that is personal and meaningful to them, drawing inspiration from the music in a way that connects them to the landscapes of their own imaginations, thoughts and emotions.

Sian

The artists you have chosen to represent your art book seemed to be a perfect fit for this hauntingly, sexy project. How did you go about choosing those particular artists? Were you familiar with all of their work already?

Anomie

The whole project started with Marco Mazzoni and Redd Walitzki. A few years ago, Marco and I discovered we were fans of each other’s work. We spent a week musing about life and drinking negroni in Milan. During that time, we connected about uncovering the hidden parts of human experience, myths and crows, urban scavengers living among humans. Around the same time, I met and became friends with Redd Walitzki, and we were similarly inspired by each others work and ideas. This sparked the idea for the whole show!

I worked with Anthon Smith and Roxanna Walitzki to curate the visual art show and music videos around this album, and I sampled both of their voices so they are woven into the textures of my music in abstract, layered and emotional ways. I got to connect with each artist on a personal level, musing about concepts, taking reference photos, communicating and getting to know them all throughout the process. At the end of the day, most of us who choose to live as artists have some things in common – and I find visual artists to be largely introspective and thoughtful people too.

Sian

You are not new to collaborations across genres but connecting with 14 different artists in a very personal way had to have its challenges. With each artist you had to explore common themes and inspirations so the art would feel deeply connected to your music. What was this experience like?

Anomie

The conversations I had with each of the artists were very different, in that each person had their very distinct personality and ideas, and I connected with different artists about different things. But the experience actually also felt strangely intimate – like dancing with strangers. I felt like I had a meaningful exchange with each of them, resulting in a body of artwork that will always represent this album and this time period in my life. So again, the project circles back to that intensely vulnerable undercurrent of the album, and in the context of intimacy and collaboration.

Sian

Your “Lovers” video that accompanies this project is both spiritually and sexually moving and a true work of art in itself. What was the process like to create such an intimate presentation?

Anomie

With “Lovers”, I wanted to create an authentic representation of intimacy as I experience it in my life. For me it is a representation of desire, which embodies the feelings of tension and beauty that are inherent in the complexity of intimacy. The making of this video was a personal, collaborative, intimate creative process. I worked again with my close collaborators, Anthon and Roxanna on the concept and creative direction, and with the tremendously talented Paco Li Calzi. The process was challenging, and also a lot of fun, ultimately unlike anything I’d ever done before

Sian

“Flux” opens with an album preview at Modern Eden Gallery in San Fracisco on Friday, August 5th, featuring new work from artists: Marco Mazzoni, Redd Walitzki, Mark Demsteader, Kari-Lise Alexander, Casey Weldon, Meredith Marsone, Alessandra Maria, Alex Garant, Alpay Efe, Januz Miralles, Maria Teicher, Antonio Velfín, Alexandra Becker-Black and Zin Lim. How did your partnership with Modern Eden grow? Why were they a perfect place to reveal your album listening event?

Anomie

Redd Walitzki had a show at Modern Eden last year. I met Kim and Bradley that weekend and found it easy to connect to them. The conversation came up pretty naturally and it was a really smooth and enjoyable process putting the show together with them. They are lovely people. San Francisco has also always been one of my favorite cities to perform in. I have some really loyal fans there, and it’s always great to get down there, so the whole thing seemed like a pretty great fit. - Stylabl


By xavier_lopez_jr on August 6, 2016 at 1:28 AM

Xavier: First, here is the Facebook invite for the show: https://www.facebook.com/events/1765576387023233/ Please, introduce yourself to our readers, Anomie. Your music seems to cross genres – with a sound that ranges from influences of glitchy art pop to classical music and beyond. How do you think about yourself as an artist?

Anomie Belle: Expressing myself creatively has always just been a big part of who I am. I feel most authentically myself when I am expressing myself as an artist, whether that’s during the creative process or while performing. I grew up studying classical violin, but I also always wrote songs. I have developed an organic musical style as a producer that stems from being a multi-instrumentalist, composer and vocalist. I grapple with a wide range of themes in my music, and I find music to be a really honest place to express my experiences.

Xavier: Please tell us all about Flux, the new album and artbook you are set to release. What issues are you dealing with and what do you hope the audience will come away with?

Anomie Belle: Flux is about disillusionment and the search for identity, highlighting the consonance and dissonance of our modern isolation – what I like to think of as “beautiful alienation.” It also expresses my experiences of intimacy, passion and sexuality. I explored the inspirations from my album with the 14 visual artists involved. Each piece of art is a portrait of those themes, of me, and this new music. Both the music and art convey deeply honest, surreal, imaginative and complex emotions. I hope people will connect to Flux in a way that is personal and meaningful to them, drawing inspiration from the music in a way that connects them to the landscapes of their own imaginations, thoughts and emotions.

Xavier: You have released a couple of other albums prior to this one, and seem to collaborate with a wide range of people including Yppah, Mr. Lif and even the Yes Men. How does this fit in with the other works, and in your expanding series of collaborations?

Anomie Belle: I process the world around me and my own thoughts and feelings by creating, and in doing so each album evolves as I evolve. I really love to collaborate with other artists, because I get to go through that process with someone else. Collaboration is such a unique and special way to connect, and the result and experience can’t be predicted. With this album I got to connect with each artist on a personal level, musing about concepts and creating the reference photos for them. It was a really meaningful getting to know each of them.

Intimacy and creativity have been intertwined throughout the process of making this music and art, and my main collaborators during this time period were Roxanna Walitzki and Anthon Smith (who you will remember from this interview). Capturing the illusive nature of the way that the three of us connect and collaborate in the Lovers video was an inspiring challenge.

Anomie Belle: The three of us really align in so many ways. Together our aesthetic sensibilities extend well across genres, and the combination of energies and ideas made the process of creating all this music and art really enjoyable, special and meaningful. The three of us took the reference photos for the artists, curated the art show, and collaborated on creative direction. I also sampled their voices so they are woven into the textures of my music in abstract, layered and emotional ways too.

Xavier: Could you give us more details about the art pieces, where we can see them and how we can listen to the new album?

Anomie Belle: Seattle fans can hear the new music live the day it comes out. I’ll be headlining the Crocodile on Friday, August 26th. The artbook will go on sale starting on August 5th, and will come with a pre-order of the album: https://anomiebelle.bandcamp.com/ The first single, Lovers is already available!

There is an art show at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco that opens on August 5th. It will serve as a preview of the album and showcase the 14 visual art pieces, and I’ll be there with a little treat for fans. People will be able to pre-order the album and buy an art book at the opening, and the show will stay up at Modern Eden until September 10th. Artists include Marco Mazzoni, Redd Walitzki, Mark Demsteader, Kari-Lise Alexander, Casey Weldon, Meredith Marsone, Alessandra Maria, Alex Garant, Alpay Efe, Januz Miralles, Maria Teicher, Antonio Velfin, Alexandra Becker-Black and Zin Lim.

Xavier: Do you have a website?
www.anomiebelle.com - Seattle PI


Anomie Belle – ‘Flux’
by Skope • September 13, 2016

Seattle native and multi-discipline artist Anomie Belle’s album release Flux will likely garner her considerable attention as one of the most innovative artists on the indie music scene. Belle, likewise, demonstrates enough accessibility to suggest her stay in the indie world may be brief – despite any odd textures or arrangements she explores over the course of Flux’s ten songs, her focus invariably returns to the hallmarks of melody setting her far apart from many of her peers. Her lyrical content, likewise, pushes far beyond the boundaries established in typical pop songs and the thoughtful explorations of theme she presents are conveyed with a deeply musical and emotive voice with a talent for dramatization. Despite its trip hop and electronica trappings, Anomie Belle’s Flux will appeal to a broad based audience capable of appreciating diversity and honest, genuine craft. There’s technique a plenty on Flux, but it’s all underlined with the beating heart responsible for the experiences contained within.

URL: http://www.anomiebelle.com/

The opener “Saturday Gives” has resplendent, almost ornate beauty that betrays Belle’s training as a classical musician. Bringing these elements together with modern production and instrumentation is a striking move and her vocal works in great consort to impressively begin the album. “Right Way” has a seductive tempo scooping up listeners from the outset and imaginative electronica overdubs that give the song a bit of added pizzazz. Belle’s voice bobs and weaves through the mix with a great attention to detail. “As We Are” picks up with a similar tempo, but this is a much more funky, soulful outing than the preceding songs thanks to shimmering funk guitar fills dropped into the mix. There’s a strong quality of melancholy pervading the song “Unwind” than what we’ve heard so far and the quasi-phasing of Belle’s vocal only heightens the feeling that something here, a life, someone’s emotions, have been turned askew. There’s little question, despite any artier intent, Belle means these songs to be entertaining and they never fail in that regard.

The restless electronica and slinking tempo of the album’s first single, “Lovers”, sets up another heavily treated Belle vocal that, nonetheless, never fails to convey its message. There’s a lot of sex rising up from these grooves, but like elsewhere on the album, one of Belle’s defining traits is her consistent ability to avoid technology dominating her songs. Instead, the synthesizer and other electronic effects inform the songwriting process rather consuming it. Belle moves away from the dance tempos of the last few tracks on “As Summer Bleeds Daylight” and weaves one of the album’s most atmospheric spells. It isn’t all sonic theater, however – every element serves a clear purpose in the mix and coalesce to form a whole greater than the sum of its parts. “The Good Life” has a rare delicacy for music in any genre, but all of the trip hop and IDM impulses guiding earlier songs falls away here for one of the purest balladic moments on the release. Flux is a work of rare beauty, discernment, and depth. The deep well of musicality Belle draws from apparently has no bottom and she is able to synthesize its disparate elements into something truly unique and individual.

9 out of 10 stars

YOU TUBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXJmS0lxcr17-x9SYf32vZA

Jason Hillenburg - Skope Mag


Anomie Belle – Flux
Mindy McCall September 13, 2016
Primary URL: http://www.anomiebelle.com/

The naysayers about popular music’s future never account for artists like this. They bandy declining sales figures around, the resulting dearth of new artist development and label support, and studies about an across the board decline in substantive quality, but they fail to mention that the mavericks and visionaries still inhabit the same realms as before. Artists like Anomie Belle are not poising themselves for future Billboard glories on anyone else’s terms but their own and there’s a real hunger out there for something different coming from a popular music audience completely desensitized to formula. The dozen songs on her debut album Flux have mastered their fundamentals, but they are far from formulaic. Instead, these compositions challenge those fundamentals while still reaffirming their lasting value. Her vocals are not cut to a mold either – while she proves herself capable of great soulfulness, no one will mistake her vocal musings for the bucket of blood passion of wailers like Joplin, Grace Slick, et al. Nor will anyone confuse her with the higher register longing of Mitchell, Carole King, or other female songwriters. Belle occupies her own niche and no one is her neighbor or natural antecedent

“Saturday Gives” immediately reveals the extent of that niche to listeners. Her sure-handed blending of electronica, classical, and tip hop forms is seamlessly pulled off, but she tops it all with a theatrical and emotive vocal. “Right Way” narrows the stylistic focus some as the classical strains fall away in favor of a stricter electronica approach. The narrowed focus doesn’t diminish the track in any way and, instead, simply illustrates its sharp edge honed for a particular purpose. She turns to a more commercial, trip hop oriented direction on “As We Are”, but the increased emphasis on tempo doesn’t detract any from her vocal. Instead, she performs as part of an entire unit on this track and, unlike later and earlier songs, her voice doesn’t necessarily lead the way but, rather, is a compelling part of a much greater whole. “Unwind” represents another stylistic shift. Belle begins reining in her commercial instincts some here and, instead, concentrates much more on building musically substantive and highly atmospheric soundscapes further developed with her strong lyrics.

The real fruits of this stylistic shift, however, come with “As Summer Bleeds Daylight”. This is the ambition in “Unwind” and the groove oriented “Lovers” brought to its fullest realization. Belle’s voice is positively unearthly as it moves through a highly suggestive electronica landscape. The more omnipresent of commercial influences, like dance and trip-hop textures, fall away once again in favor of something much more calculated. “Maria”, the penultimate track, embraces the sort of gradual build you expect to hear in rock music, but the dynamics here give “Maria” a vivid cinematic allure. The lyrics, likewise, do an attractive job of saying just enough, but leaving enough question marks that the listeners are allowed to form their own interpretations. The finale, “We Let Ourselves In”, returns the release sonically to its earlier template, but never loses any of its artistic weight in the process. In some ways, the running order of this album is akin to a diary of its creation.

9 out of 10 stars.

Wayne Toole - Music Existence


Anomie Belle – Flux
URL: http://www.anomiebelle.com/

The dozen songs on Anomie Belle’s album Flux are quite unlike anything you’ve heard. This sort of statement is typically hyperbole. Public relations people, record companies, this is their language. Every once in a while, however, it isn’t just hype. It’s easy to view the modern era as diminished times. Articles emerge about studies citing the decline of melody in popular music, our cinemas are glutted with remakes and reboots, iconic artists rely on their back catalogs to remain relevant and no longer break new ground or overturn convention. Artists like Anomie Belle, in this world, immediately stand out. Her gloriously emotive and otherwise unique vocals are the key point setting everything off on Flux, but they are far from the only attraction. These are songs with varied worth and a broad based sound capable of surprising listeners at every turn.

The album opens with “Saturday Gives”. Strings open the song, showing off Belle’s classical training, before the quasi-classical sound meets a lightly defined trip hop approach colored with equally tasteful electronica. Belle’s voice has an unearthly quality with effects laid on in post production that bring added atmosphere, but never overwhelm melody or performance. The trip hop colors in her palette widen with the next two songs. The first, “Right Way”, has a bubbling tempo that’s spaced out at a good pace without ever overwhelming the listener with an accompanying vocal that leans more towards sensitivity than it does ostentatious displays of vocal prowess. The tempo is a little more intense and cluttered on the second song, “As We Are”, but the vocal is much more pronounced than on the earlier track. Belle’s voice is never overly theatrical, but she does know how to dramatize the lyrical content without ever succumbing to self-defeating melodrama.

The middle of the album moves into a much artier vein than the earlier songs. There’s nothing on this album that’s pure commercial pop, but the Flux’s earlier tracks don’t take bead on the same goals that emerge here in the middle. “Unwind” ushers listeners into this new approach and there’s a much more pensive, considered quality infusing the song compared to previous efforts. The first single from Flux, “Lovers”, has a jarring, slightly disjointed groove, but it’s undeniable pattern that moves the listener in unusual ways. One expects certain patterns and beats, but Belle challenges that. Instead, she lays down inventive new grooves, idiosyncratically her own, and anyone giving the album a spin will likely be compelled to follow. “As Summer Bleeds Daylight” is the album’s artistic summit. The lyrical content here shows an added depth not found on earlier tracks and the atmospherics are real without ever being too artificially cinematic or theatrical.

The final incandescent moment on the album, “The Good Life”, is the only example on Flux of a straight ahead solo performance, Belle accompanied by only piano, but the winding melody line takes unusual turns that aren’t so far removed from listener’s lexicons that it won’t connect with its potential audience. There is great feeling and technique alike on Anomie Belle’s Flux, but the musicality is natural and never feels too constructed. There is a sure hand guiding these songs and her spirit charges them with life quite unlike anyone.

9 out of 10 stars.

Joshua Stryde - Band Blurb


Released by Diving Bell Records, Anomie Belle’s full length debut Flux marks the introduction of a possibly paradigm shifting artist. Her ten song effort marries a wide variety of musical elements, including trip hop, electronica, and classical, with pop song structures and an unshakable ear for melody. The production, tasked with the job of capturing a pletheroa of varying musical elements, does a fantastic job of rendering her material in a spectacularly balanced fashion – no single element, even Belle’s voice, is highlight over the others at the ultimate expense of the whole composition. Instead, there’s a cinematic quality presiding over the material that’s hard to ignore.
“Saturday Gives” opens Flux on a compelling, quasi-classical note. It isn’t every composer or performer who can bring strings and electronica together with such seamless success, but Belle makes it sound easy here. It’s a great curtain opener to the album. “Right Way” dives headlong into the album’s strongest trip hop/dance characteristics. It brings an attention grabbing tempo together with inventive electronica and a suggestive, groove-oriented vocal that underscores the song’s late night atmospherics. The percolating “As We Are” comes from a similar place sonically and its pulsing electronica sheen, gurgling beats, and solid construction. Everything here fits tightly together/ The album’s lead off release, “Lovers”, swells and regresses with the listener with flourishes of electronica bubbling out of the mix before retreating again. It creates a mood of rising and falling emotions and a heated late night feel it shares with the earlier song “As We Are”.
Another high point comes with the song “As Summer Bleeds Daylight”. This returns Belle to a more consciously artistic pose, less concerned with beats and physically provoking listeners, instead opting for a more considered and nuanced development. The track “Tumult” goes full bore into electronica territory, retaining strong melodic value throughout, but avoids lapsing into the trip hop and dance music inclinations of earlier songs. “Beneath” confronts issues of identity that form much of the album’s thematic basis and the musical treatment continues pursuing electronica ends while showing a much more expansive vision than on the preceding track. The vocal and electronica strengths of “Merla” are perfectly orchestrated and create great tension bristling against one another as they do. Belle’s vocal here is particularly satisfying. “We Let Ourselves In” returns the album to the principles embodied in its second and third songs without ever immersing itself completely in trip hop tropes. The lightly soulful edge in the song helps make it an ideal closer for the album and Belle accentuates it with his wonderfully emotive vocal. Few albums are more focused on breaking through barriers to find a new voice than this one. The most impressive thing about Belle’s creativity is its fearlessness – she is absolutely willing to try anything once and never sounds uncertain at all about the outcomes. This gambler’s attitude results in a release full of sincerity but, perhaps most importantly, a fierce and uncompromising spirit. Flux is one of the year’s most interesting releases.

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/anomiebellemusic

by Lydia Hillenburg - Vents Magazine


Anomie Belle - Lovers

Anomie Belle is a multi-instrumentalist, vocalist and producer who writes, records and produces her solo work. Originally a classically trained violinist and songwriter, Anomie began recording her own music as a child. Her material grapples with issues ranging from suburban alienation to the human condition, sexuality, and critiques of corporate power.

http://www.anomiebelle.com/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anomie_Belle/
https://www.facebook.com/anomiebellemusic/

“Lovers” is the first single from her new album “Flux” out on August 26th. “Lovers is about queer sexuality and intimacy that challenges normative conceptions of relationships,” says Anomie. “As an artistic representation of desire, ‘Lovers’ embodies feelings of both tension and beauty that are inherent in the complexity of intimacy.” Anomie is openly queer and throughout her work she blurs typical representations of sexuality. The video is directed by Paco Li Calzi and created in collaboration with Anthon Smith and Roxanna Walitzki.

A haunting and darkly sexy portrait of beautiful alienation, Flux is an interdisciplinary art project exploring disillusionment and the search for identity. Accompanying the album, an art book comprised of 14 visual art pieces features new works from Marco Mazzoni, Redd Walitzki, Mark Demsteader, Kari-Lise Alexander, Casey Weldon, Meredith Marsone, Alessandra Maria, Alex Garant, Alpay Efe, Januz Miralles, Maria Teicher, Antonio Velfin, Alexandra Becker-Black and Zin Lim. Each piece is a portrait of Anomie and her music. Provocative and immersive, both the music and art convey a deeply honest, sensual, imaginative and complex set of surreal landscapes. Anomie says, “Through music and art, we can uncover the more complicated, intuitive, vulnerable, or unresolved parts of human experience that we don’t always express on the surface. Through constantly evolving, dreamlike and intimate musical landscapes, I try to juxtapose fragility with desire, struggle with self-knowledge, and complacence with wisdom.”

With each artist, Anomie explored common themes and inspirations so the visual art would feel deeply connected to the music. If music and art can act as an avenue for uncovering hidden parts of human experience, Anomie uncovers the dark and sinister, the vulnerable, contradictory, spiritual and sexual. Her music grapples with intimacy and queerness, our emotional experiences of a culture that values profit over people, and the passive guilt of an unsustainable lifestyle that is destructive to our natural environment.

The exhibition opening and album preview will be on August 5th at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco, and runs until September 10th. - Slippery Edge


Review
Anomie Belle: FLUX (Diving Bell Recording Co)
UK release date 20.01.2017

Probably the most unique album to arrive on my desk this year so far. Part way through first listen I was not sure if it was a fit for this magazine or not. Then I got it….

This Seattle-based experimental electronica artist and classically trained multi-instrumentalist, is a bit of a genius. Can you have a “bit of” a genius? Well if you can; she’s it.

Often for me, when a project is ambiguously labeled electronica, it can just be noise and little in the way of decent material or melody. But here we have real songs; crafted writing as well as a mind numbing amount of technological challenges. A voice like no other too. Quirky like the entire record. Likely to indelibly etch itself into your brain.

It may well be a Marmite moment for many. I cannot stand Marmite, but I have grown to really dig this. Acres of loops and layers that sweep you along. Experimental Electronica, IDM, Glitch Hop, Down-tempo, Trip-Hop …whatever it is, there’s nothing else like it out there.

The third album since her debut in 2008, this has a spiritual depth to it, a sensuality, and a dream like quality, ethereal chilled out factor and even a yearning. Melancholic at times, but it can groove too.

She was 11-years-old when she first discovered what multi-tracked music sounded like; using a basic cassette player her parents gave her. It was a song she had written, recorded on the cassette player, starting with a layer of piano, then a couple of vocal layers, xylophone, violin and percussion. That was the magic moment, when she fell in love with the whole creative process; that feeling of being completely and utterly immersed in creating something from nothing. That feeling has never left her.

Anomie has had many collaborators since then; Sneaker Pimps, Posies, Mr Lif and was most recently featured on Yppah's album "Eighty-One" on Ninja Tune. She has toured with such diverse talents as Bonobo, Tricky, Little Dragon, Emancipator, Bajofondo and Ott, and formed her own string quartet to perform alongside The Album Leaf.

Her debut album “Sleeping Patterns,” was released in December 2008. “The Crush,” in September 2011. She has also released EPs and singles. So a five year wait for the new album.

Her style is due in equal parts to a life dedicated to refining classical technique, most notably on violin, shaped through her meticulous studio production that pushes the boundaries of granular synthesis and vocal processing.

The PR blurb for this record claims it is “electronic, classical, moving, sensual, glitchy, emotive and pure. Her music is quite of a world all its own, and in Flux we experience her most impressive work to date.” I have no reason to argue with that statement.

The opener, “Saturday Gives,” sits on a moody classical string foundation, before “Right Way,” changes the pace with a funky, almost drum and bass vibe, vocoder breaks up the vocal. “As We Are,” keeps up the groove and gives Anomie the chance to change her vocal style. The dozen cuts fit together tightly, but nothing is samey.

Often you will read the word “beautiful” in a review of a new album, and quite possibly it is just lazy writing and doesn’t actually mean much. Here it does. In my mind I conjure up images of the ocean, wild and untamed one minute, tranquil and inviting the next. Her music the perfect soundtrack to daydreaming. It has that elbow in the back element to it too, so you cannot drift off too far from the reality, the here and the now. Mahler is my favourite classical composer and I found myself thinking that should he still be alive today, what a sound he and Anomie could make together.

Flux is an album and art project. An art book comprised of 14 visual art pieces, each by a highly revered international artist, accompanies the album; portraits of Anomie inspired by the music. With each artist, Anomie explored common themes and inspirations so the visual art would feel deeply connected to the music. Artists include Seattle based visual artist, Redd Walitzki, Milan based Marco Mazzoni. Her music has been used on TV and game soundtracks. Anomie really should be scoring entire movies.

The songs here explore disillusionment and the search for identity. I doubt Anomie has an issue with the latter; this is her own sound and who she is for sure. That phrase; think outside the box. I suspect Anomie threw that box in the trash when she was 11…………….

Words SIMON REDLEY - Blues and Soul


Art Pop Gets Redefined with Anomie Belle’s ‘Flux’
Daniel Barron
August 27, 2016
ART, MUSIC, PAINTING & ILLUSTRATION

“You know you’ll never have to look back now,” sings Anomie Belle on the hopeful opening of her latest release ‘Flux’. Across multiple EPs and now three full-lengths, the versatile multi-instrumentalist hasn’t been afraid to get eclectic or outré as she explores concepts of identity and alienation. She is who she is. True to the album’s title, Belle and her collaborators (among them opera singer Roxanna Walitzki and artist Marco Mazzoni) have crafted a rich slice of art pop that moves fluidly across its twelve tracks between classical composition, soul, and electronica, often within the same song.

It’s an admirable balancing act. The early energetic beats of “Right Way” and “As We Are” smoothly transmute into the distorted sonic collage of the album’s centerpiece “Lovers,” in which Belle sensuously pants and exhales as she pontificates on the hollowness of consumerist values. Later, she decelerates for the quieter, contemplative “Good Life.” Occasionally lyrically spare, the album remains compositionally dense and transporting throughout.

“For all that you want it/you feel like you’re on your own” closes the album. Confronted with an artistic voice so singular, Flux is an aural landscape worth spending some alone time in.

Beautiful.bizarre is proud to premiere the track “As Summer Bleeds Daylight”

Flux was conceived as a multimedia project involving international visual artists and has been complemented by a 32-page art book (included with the album) and companion exhibition that opened earlier this month at San Francisco’s Modern Eden Gallery. Each of these pieces are portraits of Belle that represent the themes that form the bones of her music. The full lineup of artists includes Marco Mazzoni, Redd Walitzki, Mark Demsteader, Kari-Lise Alexander, Casey Weldon, Meredith Marsone, Alessandra Maria, Alex Garant, Alpay Efe, Januz Miralles, Maria Teicher, Antonio Velfin, Alexandra Becker-Black and Zin Lim. - Beautiful Bizarre


Anomie Belle - Flux
September 13, 2016

When they close the book, in the far flung future, on Anomie Belle’s career, her latest full length release Flux will likely still rank high among her recorded efforts. The twelve songs are an impressive array of varying sounds and approaches with common denominators uniting the running order in sound and theme. She flawlessly maneuvers from style to style with a light-footed grace that belies the often dense sound collages she summons and manages to maintain outstanding vocal control despite the risk for the backing tracks to clutter her messages. Her vocals are some pyrotechnic display of lung firepower but, instead, intensely dramatic while remaining understated throughout. Piano, synthesizer, and drum machines dominate the recording, but other instruments peek their way into the mix and the production deftly deals with these introductions.

It’s the style juggling, however, that’s most impressive. “Saturday Gives” is the sonic equivalent of a man juggling a variety of objects, varying in size and weight, fluidly and without breaking a sweat. The change from the quasi-classical string opening into a seductive tempo augmented by electronica doesn’t cause the track to miss a beat and her accompanying vocal performance likewise demonstrates the same certain ear for performance. “As We Are” is, arguably, the album’s best example of out and out trip hop, but there’s enough physicality here to power this track for any night club evening and it engages its audience from the first notes onward.

The album moves into new territory beginning with the song “Unwind”. It’s a thoughtful electronica track with in-depth lyrics and another stunning vocal from Belle. The music and vocal alike manage to invoke the deconstruction of a personality in mid crumble, but it always retains a strong musicality that never fades. “As Summer Bleeds Daylight” has a darker air, lyrically and musically, than any preceding song and her moody singing underscores that feeling. “Beneath” conjures up a very different slant. This is a truly idiosyncratic, but nevertheless quite believable, riff on the soul/funk genre that crackles from the beginning and never stops sparking. The sharp guitar fills dropping into the mix give the track added bite. “Salt Spring” and “The Good Life” are twin pillars of sensitivity, musically and lyrically, on an album renowned for this virtues by this point. Of the two, the second is perhaps most affecting thanks to the spartan quality surrounding the performance. The meditative beauty of “Merla” is a great accompaniment to another of Belle’s fine lyrics and the balance maintained between the music and textual performance really hits the mark.

Diving Bell Recording Company has really scored high with the acquisition of this major new creative force. Few artists are as audacious enough to release an album such as this and an accompanying art book, but Belle operates by her own rules and Flux will be the first example of many in her sure to be long career.

9 out of 10 stars.

Cyrus Rhodes - No Depression


Anomie Belle
Flux
(Diving Bell)

Anomie Belle is a prolific multi-instrumentalist who is proficient on violin, guitar, bass, drums, synths, samples and looping. The Seattle-based songstress is also a classically trained violinist and songwriter who handles the majority of the production on her albums.

With that many titles next to her name and an abundance of varied instruments at her disposal, Belle not only blurs the lines of genres and subgenres, she erases them completely. The girl has soul running through her veins, trip hop emitting from her brain and creative samples dancing off her fingertips.

It’s been five years since Belle has released an album of her own material, although she’s kept plenty busy contributing and touring with other acts. Her third album ‘Flux,’ continues where 2011’s ‘The Crush’ left off, with Belle doing her thing. The dozen tracks can best be described as an art project. There are many layers here, both musically and lyrically. Belle heavily explores with the synths and samples, building the songs from the ground up as her vocals sporadically come in to make a point. I could do without the Auto-Tune style vocals, but I can hear where it fits nicely into the pocket of these songs. “Breathe” finds Belle at her best when she adds in her uncompromised violin playing and sings from her soul. It is a song with less layering and more groove. “Salt Spring” is also a song which feels like less is more for the listener.

Not only is ‘Flux’ ambitious musically, but artistically as well. The album is accompanied by 14 beautiful pieces of art from varied artists depicting Belle and her music. In a world of digital downloads were music has seemingly become disposable, this packaging should be much-admired. It is how music should be presented. It gives one a lot to take in both visually and musically. - Innocent Words


Yppah Eighty One Review
Album. Released 2012.
BBC Review

A fantastically optimistic antidote to these bleak ‘days of austerity’.

Ian Roullier 2012

Joe Corrales Jr’s 2009 album, They Know What Ghost Know, displayed a maturing and deepening of the sound presented on his occasionally brilliant debut, You Are Beautiful at All Times. Now with Eighty One, the Texan’s third outing as Yppah (pronounced ‘yippah’), that early promise seems to have come to fruition.

Named after Corrales’ year of birth, Eighty One shares the same references, from shoegaze to hip hop and electronica, that peppered his previous releases. But these 11 tracks are the first time those various strands have combined to consistently come into full, glorious focus. Eighty One is where the Cocteau Twins, M83, Bent and Ulrich Schnauss conjoin for a jubilant, serotonin-soaked party.

At times, Corrales just allows fragments of these influences to seep into his expansive, almost overwhelming productions. Opener Blue Schwinn is dusted with Liz Fraser-styled vocal snatches; the buzzing synths, stylus scratches and wafting of Anomie Belle’s voice on D. Song are joined by the hint of an anthemic dancefloor hook; while R. Mullen sees the essence of raps and sampled soul croons distilled into its buoyant, larger-than-life whole.

At times these influences come closer to the fore, such as on the album’s lead single, Film Burn. Here, a light, dancing melody is joined by distorted hip hop beats before Belle’s reverb-drenched vocals reveal Yppah’s shoegazing heart in full.

The album is imbued with playfulness, from the sound of giggling children that opens the album through to every sunny melody that follows. Deceptively naive yet emotionally powerful, Corrales’ music seems to have pure joy as its main driving force – which is perhaps unsurprising, considering his choice of pseudonym that’s half ‘yippee’ and half ‘hurrah’.

Shimmering guitars, forceful, full-bodied beats and uplifting electronic interludes may have always formed the basis of Yppah’s sound, but here they merge to form what could prove to be one of the most uplifting and beautifully realised albums of the year.

If times in 2012 are tough, nobody told Joe Corrales. This set is a fantastically optimistic and life-affirming antidote to these bleak ‘days of austerity’. - BBC


The third album from the Long Beach, CA-via-Texas producer/multi-instrumentalist Yppah (aka Joe Corrales Jr.) is a transportive blend of ethereal shoegaze, moody ‘60s psych-rock, downtempo electronic, atmospheric post-rock and cosmic soul, with a warm, lush sound featuring shimmering guitars, twinkling synths, oceanic electronic textures, playful hip hop beats and nostalgic melodies along with occasional haunting guest vocals and violin from Seattle’s Anomie Belle. 3/23/2012 - Don Yates - KEXP


Yppah - Eighty One (Album Review)
Friday, 30 March 2012 Written by Ben Bland

The best electronic music is that which flows like a great bottle of wine or a perfect pint of bitter. You just cannot help but want that next sip, whether it is because you are in a free spirited party mood or because you are racked in despondency. At times during his past works, Joe Corrales Jr. (Yppah) has caused a few hiccups with his musical beverages. Not this time though, not on the superb 'Eighty One'.

ImagePart Portishead smooth trip hop, part the jubilant modern electronica of M83, Yppah’s music on this record is sweet without ever getting sickly. It is easy to see this album fulfilling many functions for its most devout listeners.

Upon first listen it may ‘just’ seem like the soundtrack to a great trip but there is a true depth to this record as well. Corrales’ ability to meld samples with dazzling shoegaze guitars and pulsating rhythms provides plenty of textural delights along the way. The tracks including the gorgeous floating vocals of Anomie Belle are particular highlights. Her delightful tones add another intoxicating layer to some of Corrales’ most delightfully arranged pieces to date.

Where in the past Yppah records could be accused of lacking a little fat trimming, 'Eighty One' is noticeably consistent. Despite its fifty-odd minute run time, 'Eighty One' flashes by in what seems like half that time. Opener 'Blue Schwinn' sucks the listener in with its relaxed vibe. Before you know it the snatched beats of 'Some Have Said' are closing the album out in equally mellow style. This compositionally marvellous record deserves to see Yppah praised; for this may well be the best record of its type you will have access to this year.

'Eighty One' is out on Monday via Ninja Tune. - Stereoboard


A suitably filmic return from Yppah in ‘FiIm Burn’ which draws heavily on the style of Underworld and other intelligent techno acts while being underpinned by Yppah’s very own discordant musical world view. Actually - that’s the Kwes remix – damn shuffle play. The title track proper is a much gentler, more traditional approach featuring the vocals of Anomie Belle and quite reminiscent in sound of Bonobo with the heavy beats and trip hop vibe. It slowly builds with an increase in skittering drum beats and emphasis on electronics. Nice works all round. 8/10
www.ninjatune.net - Tasty Fan Zine


November 4, 2016 at 1:50 pm
Anomie Belle – ‘Saturday Gives’

Theres something special about this new track from multi-instrumentalist, Anomie Belle. We really like the contrast between the classical sounding violins and the dark bassline. This is taken from her forthcoming Flux album which will be released in January via The Diving Bell Recording Company.

Stream the single in full on Spotify by clicking here. - Sound Plate


Yppah – Eighty One (Review)
Review by Jack Foley
IndieLondon Rating: 5 out of 5

WE KNEW we were going to like this. Yppah – aka Joe Corrales Jr – has previously impressed us with his albums You Are Beautiful At All Times and They Know What Ghost Know. His third LP is, quite possibly, his masterpiece.

Inspired in part by his move from Texas to Long Beach, California, where he developed a love for the ocean, this retains Yppah’s cinematic scope, his DJ Shadow-style ability to make beautiful music from beat-laden backdrops, and – new to the mix – songs that “feel like a warm wash”.

He’s also employed the services of a vocalist for some tracks, namely Anomie Belle (another of IndieLondon’s favourite new artists), whose distinct, often ethereal vocals, merely provide the icing on the cake.

Quite simply, this is a mesmerising listen – beautiful, thrilling, inspiring and consistently brilliant.

The ocean influence is evident from the beginning, even as child-like laughter serves as a precursor to some lovely electronics and a cool beat on Blue Schwinn that, like Yppah hopes, washes over you. He hopes you can feel the pull of the ocean and there is something masterful about the way the music conjures images of crowded beaches and big waves.

D Song follows, combining a strong synth pulse with some fantastic beats and the first of Belle’s backing vocals. It’s a beguiling mix.

R Mullen is a euphoric highlight, the electronics sounding crisp and providing a lively foreground to the thumping beats that crash about like waves in amongst them. It has a Moby like feel at times, especially with the mix of hummed male vocals or female backing harmonies running throughout (a mermaids’ call?).

But things keep getting better. Former single Film Burn is a lovely slice of slow-burn that fuses a wisp-ish synth loop around intricate guitar plucking and an ethereal vocal from Belle. The beats are more subtle but build into the type of offering that fellow Ninja label-mate Bonobo would be proud of.

Never Mess With Sunday is a feel-good moment that has a feel-good quality tailor-made for sun-drenched days, Happy To See You opens with a William Orbit flourish before maintaining the album’s sense of vitality, and Soon Enough slow-builds into another album favourite complete with more ethereal, even Bjork-like vocals from Belle to lend the track its distinct flavour. By the time it hits the three-minute mark it has beautifully transformed into a thrilling crescendo of layered beats and synths.

And yet there’s still time for Yppah to blow you away again with another of his intricately designed gems, Golden Braid, which excites once more with its emphatic beats and swirling electronics, and the Belle featuring Three Portraits, another beautifully composed offering that combines some fantastic electronics with more superb beats and interwoven guitar licks and more of those delicious vocals.

By the time Some Have Said rounds things off with another DJ Shadow-style fusion of hip-hop beats and subtle guitar licks you’ll be entirely smitten. The only criticism we have of the album, in fact, is that it has to end.

Download picks: Blue Schwinn, R Mullen, Film Burn, Soon Enough, Golden Braid, Three Portraits, Some Have Said

Track listing:

Blue Schwinn
D Song feat Anomie Belle
R Mullen
Film Burn feat Anomie Belle
Never Mess With Sunday
Soon Enough feat Anomie Belle
Paper Knife
Golden Braid
Three Portraits feat Anomie Belle
Some Have Said - Indie London


Yppah – Eighty One
(Ninja Tune) UK release date: 2 April 2012
by Ruth Follows | first published: 2 Apr 2012 in Albums

Yppah’s third album proper isn’t the kind we hear too much of at the moment. Mixing shoegazy guitars, electronic layers and sound effects with a pillar of hip hop-influenced rhythms, Eighty One is a creation that is both epic and injected with the signature warmth that artists from the southern, coastal slice of the USA so adeptly seem to master.

Building on his previous two LPs – You Are Beautiful At All Times and They Know What Ghost Know – Joe Corrales has taken three years to create this offering. But the album thoroughly consolidates his loose style of weaving different genres together by sticking to a background of trip hop, only with bright, almost grandiose production values, which suit the air of his music so much that the result is breathtaking.

His music bursts with a joy reminiscent of Passion Pit and Working For A Nuclear Free City, and nestles in the shoegaze of M83. But its undertones often brood in darker DJ Shadow-esque moods – none of these influences being the master of the other, nor of his own artistic style.

Blue Schwinn’s meandering shoreline guitar marries with an expansive, ’90s rave-cum-hip hop melded beat, with electronics that twinkle against a tripped-out female vocal. This gives an immediate feeling of space to Eighty One, rendering it a collection of tracks to easily become completely enveloped by. Never Mess With Sunday sees Corrales drop, then retract his beats, as if holding his cards close to his chest, before placing them back on the table in a royal flush that boasts twinkling keyboard notes, bubbles of electronic soundtracks and an emphatic Passion Pit-style hip hop close.

Anomie Belle’s vocals crop up regularly on the album, most noticeably on the brooding D Song, whose rumbling bassline changes the mood, declaring with an almost stalkerish grin and a Portishead air, “You cannot keep a secret from me”. That trip hop pace continues with lead single Film Burn, lifting the darkness by injecting woozy, sunny moods forged by loops, acoustic guitars and reverb-soaked lyrics. It’s these qualities that filter their way through the album, so that it keeps an arm’s length from shoegaze.

At times, the pace edges into breakbeat territory, with R Mullen’s Moby pulse and soul sampling. At other moments – Happy To See You and Paper Knife, among a handful of cases in point – there are distinct post rock drum beats and meandering, breezy shoegaze guitars; the end result always vast, expansive and inherently soaked in lust for life. One of Eighty One’s strengths is to refrain from tailing off into a diminished second half, instead, letting exuberant beats play the lead role reminiscent of UNKLE at their most joyous, and least introspective.

Despite the loose production, there’s a real complexity here that is easily forgotten because the album is so easy to listen to. Soon Enough floats with an off-time rhythm and soft, rhythmic folk guitars and melancholic vocals. But it’s signed off with a fuzzy drum ‘n’ bass beat, where Corrales fully shows off his aptitude for seamlessly stepping his tracks up a notch or two, to punctuate the close with fizz. And the album treats us to one last dose of this technique with Her Star Won’t Shine, using a mix of tabla drums and psychedelic guitars as the building blocks from which to drop a glitchy, trip hop beat that’s packed with samples.

Eighty One is a daydream soaked in the serotonin of morning sun, with a myriad of parts and influences that melt into one another to make one magnificent whole. A melange of ‘yippee’ and ‘hurrah’ – or ‘happy’, backwards, if you will – Yppah has created an album that is quite simply exhilarating. An ideal culmination of his work to date, it’s both epic and sensitive and deserves to be placed among this year’s cohort of exemplar albums. - Music Ohm


Yppah - Eighty One Ninja Tune
Article written by James S - Apr 12, 2012

For a country that provided many of the pioneers of the genre, the USA has never really got to grips with this 'dance music' malarkey. Texas native Joe Corrales Jr, aka Yppah, has been attempting to redress the balance for the past half decade with his uncannily Anglophile melding of trip hop, big beat, drum n bass and, rather surprisingly, more than a soupçon of shoegaze.

Sadly, 'Eighty One' is named after the year Coralles was born, rather than a premonition of Adele's difficult forty-second album at her present rate of titles. It opens with the sound of laughing children and twinkling keyboards before the beats crash in on Blue Schwinn, A few songs later, Never Mess With Sunday has an acoustic intro which heralds in some Fischerspooner synths – and then the beats crash in. You might begin to spot a theme here.

Another common thread are the intriguing but almost entirely incomprehensible vocals provided by Anomie Belle on four tracks. Her involvement on D. Song amounts to little more than an enigmatic two line refrain but Film Burn is more substantial and nods quite heavily to the Bristol cream of Portishead and Tricky back in the day. Three Portraits sees Belle provide the hitherto missing link between the Cocteau Twins, One Dove and Curve, which is undoubtedly a good thing for those of us of a certain vintage.

The comparisons keep coming thick and fast. Paper Knife quickens the pulse with some understated but driving guitar and thudding percussion before suddenly going all DJ Shadow towards the end, whilst Happy To See You is the latest in the long line of songs that will be said to sound 'a bit like My Bloody Valentine'.

Album closer Some Have Said sums it all up in many ways. It's a decent tune and well-crafted for sure, but there's a nagging sense of familiarity to it which threatens to teeter into downright derivative. 'Eighty One' is far from being a bad record – it just won't live on in the memory nearly as long as the ones which seem to have inspired it. - Sound SXP


Yppah
Eighty One
Review by Matt Wolfe EMERITUS

Review Summary: Eighty One could be the electronica record this premature summer has been shouting out for.

Last week marked the arrival of British Summer Time, an event that’s usually only significant for creating a 60 million-strong groan about a lost hour of sleep, but this year British Summer Time has done something unheard of: introduce summer time in Britain. Hypnotic ice cream van jingles are flooding kids with adrenaline, beaches are choking under the weight of thousands of not-so-long-ago Christmas dinners, and faces are turning from white to a handsome acid-burn red. This has been one of the warmest Marches in British history. And it could do with a soundtrack, really.

Joe Corrales Jr. may have provided just that. Despite being a Californian, the man behind Yppah seems to have his instincts firmly rooted in the British Isles because his latest release, Eighty One, has come out at the perfect time to introduce another premature British summer. Densely layered with bass-heavy beats, shimmering guitars and spacey glitches, Eighty One is a trip-hop record designed for rolled-down windows and backdrops of sun, sea, and sand. But unlike many other summery electronica records, Eighty One isn’t vacuous or shallow; it carries weight in its highly influenced personality. There’s a darkness, a grittiness evident in many of the songs here which elevates it to a place above the dime-a-dozen tracks usually featured at the arse-end of Ministry of Sound’s chill-out albums.

The Newsom-esque vocals of Anomie Belle, with their swagger and soul, match up perfectly with the confidence and cool delivered in the tracks she accompanies. Tracks like 'Film Burn' and 'Three Portraits' utilize her ability to blend into – and work with - the background elements of tracks, with Corrales knowing the right times to pull her onto centre stage. But even without her the artist knows how to suspend a song between the blurry posts of engaging and easy-going. The Moby-influenced 'R. Mullen' starts strong with a simple rhythm sat behind some ethereal male and female vocals, propelled in the middle by a twinkling melody section, but it dies out beautifully, if prematurely, with reverb-heavy, sun-scorched guitars soaking up those last few seconds.

The album succeeds because it knows what works, and does just that. Unfortunately, this can also be its biggest flaw. It doesn’t try to run with a good idea, and this frustrates at times – such as when 'R. Mullen' ends just as it’s hitting its stride. Corrales seems intent on fitting his songs into the same-sized box, regardless of their potential: all the songs are almost identically long – with only 61 seconds separating the shortest and longest. Greatness maybe within reach, but unrealized; evident on highlights like 'Never Mess with Sunday'. But maybe we should heed that title, and treat this album like an unspoilt Sunday: not to be messed with. Sometimes it’s better just to chill out and not work up a sweat, but for the sheen from the summer sun. Like the weather, it may not last long, but for now I don’t care; I’m happy enjoying what Yppah and Eighty One has to offer. - Suptnik Music


Joe Corrales Jr. has been working as Yppah for three whole albums now. Did you know Yppah is happy, backwards, deep man... Actually, as sarcastic as I'm being there (what, no, really?), the progression of Corrales' sound has been one of increasing depth. His moody electronica with touches of downbeat, spacey rocking and a bunch of other interesting things going on in there has just fitted together that much more compellingly each time he puts out a record. Subtlety is, I think, the key on this latest album, Eighty One. The beats are moved back in the mix, just a touch, samples are worked into the sound seamlessly and you can hear both of these things in the deliciously floating quality of opener Blue Schwinn, with it's snatches of what sounds like a lady, singing from the bottom of a swimming pool. It's pretty irresistable. Also, everything is coated with just a touch more reverb than before - not at all like the contemporary fad for drowning everything in echoes - it's more like being ever so gently and pleasantly medicated. Like I said, subtle. Another new element is Yppah's guest-vocalist Anomie Belle. Apparently they met while touring with Bonobo and hit it off enough for Ms. Belle to be appearing all over here. She sounds pretty sweet and plays the part of the triphop chanteuse perfectly. If she doesn't stand out, it's only because Corrales has done a really quite splendid job with the rest of Eighty One. Listen to lead single Film Burn, her vocals are great, but, actually this is one of the few places where the beats, which are a scratchy combination of downbeat and drum'n'bass, overwhelm the vocals, and those beats are so finely wrought you can't fault Corrales for doing it. Their prominence is a bit of a throwback to the sound of Yppah's previous record, They Know What Ghost Know. While that happens a few times on Eighty One, it is always balanced against the much smoother texture of space-rocking numbers like Never Mess With Sunday, and which have everyone reaching for comparisons to m83, in the best possible way. Everything here works, by itself and in conjunction with everything else, in such a nuanced manner as to be really quite special. Joe Corrales Jr. has been quietly polishing Yppah to a fine sheen with each passing record. If this is how good it sounds now, I can only imagine what we'll be treated to in a couple of years. Let's not get ahead of ourselves though, check out that single, Film Burn, below.

- Chris Cobcroft. - 4zzz FM


Song of the Day: Anomie Belle – Lovers
By Casey Dunau | Published: September 30, 2016

Every Monday through Friday, we deliver a different song as part of our Song of the Day podcast subscription. This podcast features exclusive KEXP in-studio performances, unreleased songs, and recordings from independent artists that our DJs think you should hear. Today’s song, selected by Midday Show host Cheryl Waters, is “Lovers” by Seattle’s Anomie Belle from her 2016 album, Flux, on Diving Bell Recording Company.

Anomie Belle – Lovers (MP3)

Writing songs about love is one pop music’s greatest traditions, and yet Anomie Belle’s “Lovers” is anything but traditional. From glitched out electronics to alternatively airy and powerful vocals, the track is an exhibition in tension and release. As the song weaves its way through its own smoldering sections, Belle offers endless twists and varieties to the pulsating rhythm, creating an experience as cyclical as nature itself. The biggest accomplishment of “Lovers” lies not within its lofty production, but within the tactile sensuality every digitized note emboldens.

Catch Anomie Belle on November 16th at The Neptune opening for The Posies, and follow the Northwest artist’s website and facebook for more news and show announcements. Plus, check out the hypnotizing video for “Lovers” here: (video) - KEXP


Yppah – Eighty One album review
April 12, 2012 Lauren Espina

Joe Corrales Jr. realized the full potential of a mixed genre sound with his 2012 album and third release under the moniker Yppah, Eighty One. Having named the album after his year of birth, Corrales (who was 31 when the album dropped earlier this year) seems to be more fascinated with life, or perhaps less jaded by reality, the older he gets. Packed full of playful instrumentation and dreamy vocals, Eighty One is an invigorating celebration of being alive. The album is an exhibit of Corrales’ style, and as a music listener who has grown tired of the monotonous indie electronic pop/rock sound of the past few years, the album is a refreshing display of a electronic, shoegazing trip hop sound.

Opening with children’s laughter that is reminiscent of MGMT’s “Kids,” the first track “Blue Shwinn,” slowly unfolds into an orchestra of percussion. The syncopated instruments play smoothly with floating synthesizers, and just before the music becomes to computer-based for my taste, the machines are replaced by electric guitar. It’s because of this gift, of knowing when to switch it up, that Yppah’s music remains without boundaries.

Dream/neo pop artist Anomie Belle lends her vocals to four of Eighty One‘s eleven tracks, and her contributions fit organically within the atmosphere of the album. Though her performance on “D. Song,” perhaps the darkest moment of the album, is eery enough to give the track a menacing quality, the song suggests transcendence over adversity and the overall tone of the album remains hopeful. Within the layered beats of “Three Portraits,” Belle’s heavily reverbed vocals weave delicately and sometimes incoherently within the synthesized soundscape, blending in with Corrales’ shoegaze-inspired tune.

My favorite moment of the album is in “Paper Knife,” a song that sums up Yppah’s perfect ratio of acoustic and electronic sounds. When an earthy section of tribal beats is suddenly accompanied by sleigh bells, followed by synthy “doo doo doo’s” and then smashing symbols, chaos is bound to ensue. But Corrales takes these elements, harnessing the best parts of hip hop, electronica and rock and roll, and somehow creates one cohesive and unequivocally wild anthem.

Eighty One accomplishes what Corrales set out but failed to do in Yppah’s first two albums. The record flows from one song to the next with frantic riffs, pensive silences, synthesized intervals and glorified beats. The album is soaked in optimism but doesn’t come across as naive. Eighty One revels in the mystery, ultimately offering listeners a hopeful take on the chaos of life. - MV Remix


Yppah feat. Anomie Belle was the first truly engaging set of the day. A gentle looking man with a face that appears to always rest with a carefree smile, Yppah is center stage, playing bass along to his dreamy, pre-programmed laptop music. Though Yppah is the billed star, it is Belle’s vocals and ability to play multiple instruments flawlessly that is the true commanding force to behold. The electronic music they generate together seems to have a date to it, reminding me of when Moby was pushing out cuts like “Porcelain” and Martina Topley-Bird was contributing vocals to Tricky’s work. Regardless, the final product has a freshness to it, and came off without a hitch in this live setting. - Nada Mucho


Song of the Day: Yppah – Film Burn (feat. Anomie Belle)
By Jason Kinnard | Published: April 17, 2012

Every Monday through Friday, we deliver a different song as part our Song of the Day podcast subscription. This podcast features exclusive KEXP in-studio performances, unreleased songs, and recordings from independent artists that our DJs think you should hear. Each and every Friday we offer songs by local artists. Today’s selection, featured on the Midday Show with Cheryl Waters, is “Film Burn” (featuring Anomie Belle) by Yppah from the 2012 album Eighty One on Ninja Tune.

Yppah – Film Burn (feat. Anomie Belle) (MP3)

He’s also a founding member of the turntablist group The Truth, Joe Corrales, Jr. spent his early teen years playing guitar and bass in rock bands, then later as a scratch DJ who mixed hip hop and house in clubs sets. In November of 2006, he released his debut under the name Yppah (pronounced “Yippah”). You Are Beautiful At All Times drew the shoegaze heritage of My Bloody Valentine as with hip hop and various forms of electronic music, psychedelic soul and rock to create a lush mix of beautiful and often times melancholic electronica, breakbeat drum samples layered within an atmospheric soundscape of massive reverb and delays, keyboards and synths, live drums, and other techniques.

Since the release of You Are Beautiful At All Times, Yppah has formed a live band consisting of himself, Caliban Goodbrain (Thomas Sutherland), Nicholas Noeding, Jr. and other rotating band members. Yppah now returns with the first single from his forthcoming third album, Eighty One. A beautiful, warm and almost nostalgic piece of music-making, “Film Burn” revolves around heartbeat kick, a music box chord sequence, bubbles of electric bass and the voice of Anomie Belle, a singer, producer and classically trained violinist based in Seattle. The pair met when Yppah was touring with Bonobo in 2010, hit it off and, when Belle heard the demos which would make up Eighty One, in the words of Yppah, “it was such a natural fit she ended up doing four tracks!” Beautiful, uplifting and imbued with a natural, unaffected warmth that cuts through the most biting cold, “Film Burn” is the perfect taster for Eighty One, Yppah’s most satisfying work yet.

Yppah and Anomie Belle were just in town a few weeks ago. If you missed them, you can still listen to their in-studio session, which includes today’s featured song, here. You can also connect with the Yppah on his Facebook and Bandcamp pages. For now, here’s the official video for “Film Burn”: - KEXP


Live Video: Yppah (feat. Anomie Belle)
By Gerrit Feenstra | Published: May 22, 2012

If you caught the amazing new Yppah record Eighty One when it came out at the end of March here in the United States, you may not recognize those songs here. When Yppah stopped by the studio, they were aided by the help of a sampler or two, but for the most part, Yppah’s set was stripped down, organic, and completely incredible. Eighty One is all about mixing simple with complex, and in this form, Yppah can show off and wow anyone listening.

Yppah is the brainchild of Joe Corrales Jr. His early work mixes experimental and shoegaze with a chilled out vibe, but with his new album, Corrales went bigger with the hooks and deeper with emotional draw and lasting effect. He is aided on several tracks by Northwesterner Anomie Belle. Belle’s vocals act as a perfect balance to Corrales’s tracks. Her parts are accents, for the most part – the music is always the focus. But together, Yppah’s live setup is lush and beautiful. Like the tracks on the album, Yppah’s music is gripping and melodic, but live, the band gets to take a step back from production and just enjoy making music together. Believe me, it’s evident.

Check out Yppah’s full performance at KEXP below, featuring Anomie Belle. Eighty One is available now on Ninja Tune Records and the single, “Film Burn” is available for download through the Song of the Day. - KEXP


Charts in top 10 for 7 weeks after U.S. release - KEXP


The Posies’ Secret Show at Hilliard’s
By Mocha Charlie on June 24, 2016
by Travis Hay

The Posies triumphantly returned to Seattle on May 26, playing a set filled with fan favorites and plenty of material from their excellent new album Solid States at Hilliard’s Brewery in Ballard.

The show wasn’t just a coming out party for the wonderful songs on Solid States, it was also one of the final shows of the band’s secret pop-up shows tour where The Posies played small, intimate venues that aren’t ordinarily concert spaces. Adding to the fun, the fans who bought tickets weren’t told where the show was being held until the day of the concert. Their Seattle stop, presented by Seattle Secret Shows, found them performing in a room filled with hundreds of cases of beer, tall fermenters and brew kettles.

The evening’s festivities kicked off with sets by DJ Indica Jones and local songwriter Spencer Carlson.

Then, the Posies’ two-hour, 20-song set started with the one-two punch of “We R Power” and “Unlikely Places,” the first two tracks off Solid States. The songs aren’t just terrific introductions to the band’s new musical direction but they also proved to be the perfect choice for set openers.

The show began with faint electronic drum beats getting louder and louder leading into Ken Stringfellow ripping into “We R Power,” a song that could become a sort of mission statement for the band. When the song concluded, Stringfellow’s musical partner in crime, longtime friend and Posies co-founder Jon Auer, was stage left energetically bouncing up and down playing his guitar along to the catchy groove of “Unlikely Places.”

Unlike a lot of the band’s previous material, the songs on Solid States feature electronic soundscapes with synths, keys and drum machines providing a lot of the oomph. It’s not the sound of a band entering a midlife crisis attempting to remain relevant, nor is it a complete departure from the band’s power pop roots. This new direction is a refreshing musical evolution for The Posies, and live the songs not only gel well with the band’s already formidable canon, they excel and are given a sense of immediacy and strength not felt on the album.

Older songs like “Solar Sister,” “Please Return It,” and “Throwaway” kept their guitar-driven crunch and fuzz and sounded great sandwiched between newer songs. And more recent material like “The Glitter Prize” and “Licenses to Hide,” during which the band was accompanied by Anomie Belle, made for great transition songs that showed the sonic bridge between the band’s guitar-driven rock of the 90s and aughts to their current sound.

Along with Posies classics, one of the many standout tracks on Solid States, “Rollercoaster Zen,” was a highlight of the night. Auer dedicated the song to former Darius Minwalla who died unexpectedly in 2015 and former bassist Joe Skyward who passed away two days before the band started its European tour earlier this year.

The band performed as a trio, with Stringfellow and Auer playing guitar and sharing vocal duties and new member Frankie Siragusa on drums. For his part, Siragusa fit right in hitting the skins with precision playing along perfectly to the electronic backing tracks and bashing away to the harder-edged deep cuts from earlier in the band’s career when needed. And, forgive the wordplay here, he shined the brightest during “Burn & Shine,” when he worked up such a frenzy behind the kit during the song’s climactic bridge that he broke a stick, sending instrumental shrapnel into the crowd, and replaced with ease it while drumming along without missing a beat. All the while, local artist Jimmy Gersen was live painting three captivating pieces just to the side of the stage.

A few songs into the set Auer cheekily acknowledged the band’s ‘90s past welcoming the crowd to “The Posies Cruise.” Stringfellow the quipped they were originally going to have the show on a Ride The Ducks boat but insurance was too high, showing that while both he and Auer have moved away from Seattle to live in Europe that they still stay connected to their Northwest roots.

Prior to the encore, which started with the sugary pop-pop goodness of “Flavor of the Month,” Stringfellow encouraged fans to remove the chairs in the front rows so the crowd in the back could get closer to the stage and dance along to the final few songs. The band left the stage on a fiery high note after a raucous “Grant Hart” and promised to return to the Emerald City to play a much bigger show in a much bigger venue in November. - Seattle Music Insider


Anomie Belle "Lovers" (video)
By Sarah Murphy
Published Jul 22, 2016

Anomie Belle will release a new album and accompanying art book titled Flux this summer, but before those arrive on August 26, the Portland-based artist has shared a brand new video for LP cut "Lovers."

The clip was directed by Paco Matteo Li Calzi and pits images of human bodies against striking costuming, set decoration and visual effects.

"'Lovers' is about queer sexuality and intimacy that challenges normative conceptions of relationships," Anomie Belle tells Exclaim! "As an artistic representation of desire, 'Lovers' embodies feelings of both tension and beauty inherent in the complexity of intimacy. Through music and art, we can uncover the more complicated, intuitive, vulnerable, or unresolved parts of human experience that we don't always express on the surface. Through constantly evolving, dreamlike and intimate musical landscapes, I try to juxtapose fragility with desire, struggle with self-knowledge, and complacence with wisdom."

Watch those sentiments merge with Belle's artistic and musical vision by watching the video for "Lovers" below.

A visual art opening will also serve as an album preview with a special appearance by Anomie Belle on August 5 at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco. The show runs until September 10 and features new works from Marco Mazzoni, Redd Walitzki, Mark Demsteader, Kari-Lise Alexander, Casey Weldon, Meredith Marsone, Alessandra Maria, Alex Garant, Alpay Efe, Januz Miralles, Maria Teicher, Antonio Velfin, Alexandra Becker-Black and Zin Lim. - Exclaim!


By Cherry Catalán
Posted julio 29, 2016 In ART, MUSIC

Con el estreno del vídeo de su canción “Lovers” incluido en su cuarto álbum “Flux”, hoy Anomie Belle nos ha permitido hacerle unas preguntas para Inkult Magazine

Anomie Belle es una artista de Seattle con un sonido que va desde el trip-hop hasta el soul y que desde su álbum debut Sleeping Patterns y la aparición de la canción “How can be sure” en el videojuego Alan Wake (Xbox One) ganó popularidad comercial. Sin embargo su trabajo trasciende más allá de la búsqueda del éxito comercial: en su música cuestiona la alienación de la sociedad actual y el consumismo moderno desde una perspectiva individual y totalmente íntima.

Cherry (C): ¿Por qué el nombre de Anomie Belle?

Anomie Belle (AB): Me gusta cómo suena (e incluso es ahora mi nombre legal). Me gusta por el significado y su contenido social, en cuanto a ese sentimiento de la alienación en nuestro mundo moderno. Pero también me gusta porque habla de belleza, y para mí apunta a una sociedad llena de anuncios y una cultura formada mano a mano con el consumismo.

C: ¿Cuál fue tu primer acercamiento con la música?

AB: Empecé cantando canciones que inventé cuando era pequeña, y comencé a grabarlas en capas (tocando varios instrumentos) cuando tenía diez años. Tiempo después decidí estudiar violín, y luego guitarra, canto, batería, teclado… para posteriormente volverme ingeniera en audio.

C: ¿Quiénes te inspiran a crear música?

AB: Eso siempre cambia… Pero hay algunos que ocupan lugares especiales en mi corazón. Radiohead, por ejemplo, o Björk. En esos días estoy escuchando mucho más música electrónica, y me emociona que existen tantos músicos y productores talentosos con quienes puedo colaborar.

C: Me encanta tu música y saber que cantas, tocas todos los instrumentos y escribes tus canciones es sorprendente. Dime, a la hora de escribir ¿hay algún tema en especial que quieras hacer llegar?

AB: Honestamente, depende más que nada en lo que estoy pensando y lo que siento cuando compongo. Cuando algo (una canción nueva) llega, es cuando capturo el momento en sonido. La emoción, los pensamientos… Siento como están conectados dentro de mí, pero también al mundo, de maneras que no puedo explicarlo. Es el misterio del arte: la experiencia humana, la empatía, la introspección…

C: Tengo entendido que eres activista social, ¿de qué forma has vinculado esto con tu quehacer como artista?

AB: Trabajo como artista, pero pienso y escribo mucho. Trato de ser honesta, sobre todo en cuanto a mí, pero también en cuanto a lo que veo entre todos… Nuestro sufrimiento, nuestras mentiras, justificaciones. Como artista, creo que puedo averiguar, investigar, preguntar, sentir, compartir y es eso lo que hago: hablo de lo que veo, de los temas importantes. Cuando puedo, colaboro con otras artistas que comparten mi pensar, como los Yes Men, Mr. Lif y Redd Walitzki.

Seattle_Musician_Anomie_Belle_Eric_Krebs_Photography_6

Su cuarto álbum “Flux” es un proyecto multidisciplinario donde diversos artistas plásticos han creado una interpretación plástica a la música de Anomie Belle y que se presentará en la galería Modern Edén (San Francisco) este 5 de Agosto como parte del Artbook de su disco (el cual saldrá a la venta el próximo 26 de agosto).

C: Próximamente saldrá tu nuevo álbum “Flux”, ¿qué te inspiró a su realización? ¿qué quieres hacer sentir para quien lo escuche?

AB: Bueno… es difícil decir que quiero hacer sentir para quien lo escuche. En mi experiencia, eso es algo personal, e íntimo al individuo. Las inspiraciones detrás de este álbum son muchas para mí. Y diversas; la intimidad, la observación de nuestra cultura, etc. Sin embargo, con este álbum tuve más la experiencia de dejar el control… fui más subjetiva en cuanto a la música y el proceso, y crecí mucho como artista y persona.

C: Del álbum “flux” se desprende la canción y el vídeo “Lovers” ¿Qué tal ha sido la experiencia de grabar el vídeo?¿Cuál es la esencia que quieres transmitir con esta canción?

El proceso de grabar el video fue intenso eincreíble. Colaboré con el talentoso Paco Li Calzi (director), Anthon Smith (director creativo) y Roxanna Walitzki (directora creativa y guardarropa). Con esa canción quería explorar la sexualidad, el amor no normativo, y el poder de la intimidad, todo desde una perspectiva autentica y personal.

CI: Con el lanzamiento de tu álbum también hay un art book en el que participan varios artistas plásticos como Mazzoni y Kari-lise inspirados en éste, tu cuarto álbum… ¿cómo surgió esta idea?

AB: Empezó con Marco Mazzoni y Redd Walitzki. Marco y yo nos dimos cuenta de que nos admirábamos mutuamente y empezamos charlar. Él ofreció dibujarme, y me dio una obra increíble. Me encantó. A la vez, conocí a Redd aquí en Seattle, y ella también me pintó un retrato… Así nació la idea del proyecto en que colaboré con 14 artistas visuales para crear una serie de retratos surreales para un show en Modern Eden Gallery. Y voy a lanzar mi álbum con ese art book con todas las obras. Con cada artista, colaboré a identificar temas e inspiraciones mutuas, para conectar la música al arte. El proyecto incluye Marco Mazzoni, Redd Walitzki, Mark Demsteader, Kari-Lise Alexander, Casey Weldon, Meredith Marsone, Alessandra Maria, Alex Garant, Alpay Efe, Januz Miralles, Maria Teicher, Antonio Velfín (de Valencia), Alexandra Becker-Black y Zin Lim.

¡Gracias a Anomie Belle por la entrevista y les dejamos el video de su canción “Lovers” para que puedan disfrutarlo!

Si deseas conocer más acerca de su obra, puedes visitarla en: www.anomiebelle.com - Inkult Magazine


Interview with Anomie Belle & Redd Walitzki
Kindra Nikole
August 7, 2016

Seattle-based artists Anomie Belle and Redd Walitzki have come together to create an absolutely decadent collaboration in alignment with Anomie’s newest album, Flux. Readers are invited to experience ‘Lovers’, the first single from Flux. It is both an audial experience as well as a visual journey, in a celebration of music and personal exploration, created in tandem with a beautiful art book. Redd is one of the featured artists in this book and her piece is a vivid, dewy portrait featuring Anomie herself. We’ve asked them to share more about Flux, their process, and their creative connection.

“A haunting and darkly sexy portrait of beautiful alienation, Anomie Belle: Flux is an album listening event and visual art exhibition that explores disillusionment and the search for identity. The project features works from international visual artists inspired by Flux, the forthcoming album from multi-instrumentalist, vocalist, and producer Anomie Belle. The August 5th opening at Modern Eden Gallery will serve as a preview of the new music, which releases on August 26th.” ~ Modern Eden Gallery

Flux: Anomie Belle
Album Preview & Group Exhibition
Exhibition Dates:
August 5–September 10, 2016
Opening Reception:
Friday, August 5, 2016 | 6-9 pm

Anomie, can you tell us a little bit about your new album and art book, Flux?

A: This chapter of my life has been creatively inspiring and fueled by intimacy. I’ve been reflecting a lot about identity and the consonance and dissonance of the isolation we all experience. The result is an album of constantly evolving, dreamlike, intimate musical landscapes that express those feelings and experiences. I connected with over a dozen artists to create an art book to accompany the album that also represent that. Redd was one of the people I got really close to while making Flux, so she understands me… and the music deeply. She captured so much of what this album is about in her perfectly surreal portrait.

How did the two of you come to work together?

R: Anomie and I began collaborating a few years ago, after serendipitously connecting and realizing we had a mutual admiration and understanding of each other’s work. Flux was in its very early stages and my work was rapidly transforming. When Anomie started putting the art book together, I was delighted to have the opportunity to create a piece for her and wanted to capture both the sensitivity and strength that I relate to in her music. My hope was to create something that feels very iconic, and it’s amazing that it gets to grace the cover of her beautiful album!

Are there similarities you share that made collaborating across genres feel more natural?

A: Not only do Redd and I inspire one another, we also care about and think about similar things. We’re both enamored with the process of making art and are influenced by even the dismal, uncomfortable and grotesque aspects of our culture. We each take that and create our own bizarre worlds within our respective art. Yet aesthetically, there is an overarching attunement to beauty, and a sensibility and perfectionism in what we do.

R: We definitely share common aesthetic taste and explore similar themes in the subject matter of our work. There is an undercurrent of subversive sensuality in what we both do, and a dialogue that examines our consumer culture. We are both drawn to the spirit and the spontaneity of artists who wield their art in ways that are both critical and emotive.

Could you tell us more about how you two have connected around your creative process?

R: There’s a kinship in the ways we layer, remix and build our work in stages to create the final version. Both of our techniques allow a chance to capture spontaneous moments of beauty (a particular sound, a unique drip of paint), and then slowly refine the structure of the work around that, balancing the chaos of chance with the polished refinement of a carefully crafted final piece. Both of us also create through an elaborate technical process; the product of many years of deliberate experimentation.

A: Yeah, we each find a balance between creating the thing we originally intended and being experimental so the work can take its own life. For both of us, the process of layering is what creates the unique textures and nuances.

It sounds like technology plays an interesting role in process and layering for you both. How do you tend to use new technologies in your work?

R: It’s always seemed to me that the greatest artists of their eras used every possible tool they had at their disposal to give their work an edge – like DaVinci experimenting with “oil paint,” or Vermeer likely using camera obscura optics while painting.

A: I certainly wouldn’t be making the kind of music I am without a computer and a bunch of other electronic gadgets, and Redd is using digital tools for reference photos and between stages of her process, and a laser cutter to create ornate designs that function as the “frame” of her works. We are so fortunate to live in a time when we have so much control over what we can manipulate to create new possibilities.

R: This excitement for new technological advances is definitely something Anomie and I share, and we are both experimenting with new ways they can shape our processes all the time! It allows us to approach our work like we are mad scientists!

Awesome! So where can we get Flux and find out more about it and the art book?

A: You can buy the art book and preorder the album at from my bandcamp page and find out more at my website.

R: You can see more of my paintings and learn about my process at my website. - Beautiful Bizarre


Anomie Belle, Pezzner, Vox Mod

Crocodile (map) Belltown
Fri., Aug. 26, 8 p.m. 2016 21+
$12

They say: "Anomie Belle is a multi-instrumentalist, vocalist, producer, and artivist from Seattle. Originally a classically trained violinist and songwriter, Anomie has an eclectic, avant-garde musical style that incorporates aspects of electronic, contemporary classical, art pop, experimental, trip hop, glitch, and soul."

(Lovers video) - The Stranger


[Video] Anomie Belle – “Lovers”
Daniele Festoso
August 29, 2016

After 5 years of silence and many collaborations with trip-hop artists such as Bonobo and Yppah, Anomie Belle shared a new video for the track “Lovers” from the album Flux (out now via Diving Bell Recording Co.). Directed by Paco Li Calzi. Watch it below. - Son of Marketing


Modern Eden Gallery| Anomie Belle: Flux
By Cherry Catalán
Posted agosto 12, 2016 In ART, Eventos, EXPOSICION

El pasado viernes se estrenó la exhibición en grupo Anomie Belle – Flux en el Modern Eden gallery en San Francisco y que durará hasta el 10 de septiembre.

A unas semanas de que se estrene el disco de Anomie Belle titulado “Flux”, en Modern Eden gallery se presentó el artbook que acompañará a este disco que cuenta con los trabajos de los artistas de talla internacional: Caset Weldon, Alex Garant, Marco Mazzoni, Kari-Lise Alexander, Redd Walitzki, Meredith Marsone, Januz Mirelles, Maria techer, Antonio Velfin, Alpay Efe, Alexandra Becker Black, Mark Demsteader, Alesandra Maria y Zin Lim; muchos de los cuales han sido ya reseñados por Inkult Magazine.

Una exhibición que se complementó bajo la música de Anomie Belle y que al fin y al cabo fueron la inspiración de los artistas en la realización de sus pinturas.

A través de líneas sensuales y trazos apasionados, esta exhibición permite explorar la sutil belleza de la alienación. La exploración de un estado en donde la identidad se pierde bajo las líneas impuestas social y culturalmente y donde la búsqueda parte de un existencialismo caótico, es ahí donde cada artista ha plasmado la concepción de alienación estéticamente; claro está bajo la batuta de la sensual música de “Flux”.

Las obras están exhibidas online en la página de Modern Eden Gallery: http://www.moderneden.com/collections/flux - Inkult Magazine


Artist: Anomie Belle
Album: Flux
Genre: Trip Hop/Glitch/Downtempo
Release date: August 26
Personal rating: 8.5/10

Amazingly glitchy beats and a weird but catchy, soulful voice. These are the ingredients for Anomie Belle’s third album Flux. The whole album is a balancing act between weirdness and pumping, catchy rhythms, and it works wonderfully. - ITDjents


The Posies with Anomie Belle
Neptune Theatre
Wed., Nov. 16, 9 p.m. 2016 All Ages
$18.50/$23.50

Beset by distance and the recent deaths of two bandmates, the Posies were perhaps not the likeliest candidates to return with an exuberant, inventive album. But circumstances forced (or maybe invited) Jon Auer and Ken Stringfellow to return to their original incarnation as a two-member bedroom band—never mind that the bedrooms were on different continents (and were actually probably fairly well-equipped studios). Without the internal combustion of their rock band identity to push things along, the songwriters turned inward, and it yielded the most engaging and engaged work these guys have done in many years, together or apart. Though the whole record is gorgeous, special notice is reserved for "Squirrel vs. Snake," an urgent, epic cri de coeur in the form of a perfect power-pop diamond. If songs like this were still allowed to become hits, the world would feel a lot more just. In the absence of such a possibility, it's all the more stirring to know someone is still writing and singing them. SEAN NELSON - The Stranger


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

Seattle-based experimental electronica artist and multi-instrumentalist, Anomie Belle has developed a unique style shaped by her refinement of classical technique (most notably on violin) and meticulous studio production that pushes the boundaries of granular synthesis and vocal processing. “The first time I multi-track recorded a song I’d written that I felt really proud of, I was eleven years old,” Anomie recollects. “I started with a layer of piano, then a couple layers of vocals, xylophone, violin and some bits of percussion.  What I remember most was how in love I felt with the whole process." In the years that have followed her first multi-track romance, Anomie’s musical style has evolved into something eclectic, electronic, classical, moving, sensual, glitchy, emotive, intense and vulnerable. She has had many collaborators along the way (Sneaker Pimps, Posies, Mr Lif) and was most recently featured on Yppah's album "Eighty-One" (Ninja Tune). She has toured with such diverse talents as Bonobo, Tricky, Little Dragon, Emancipator, Bajofondo and Ott, and formed her own string quartet to perform alongside The Album Leaf. Her music has been featured in Xbox’s Alan Wake, Showtime’s United States of Tara, Catherine Hardwicke’s Plush, MTV’s Jersey Shore, All Points Bulletin, Road Trip Nation and Todo el Mundo Tiene Alguien Menos Yo.

Anomie’s material grapples with issues ranging from suburban alienation to the human condition, sexuality, and critiques of corporate power.  A hauntingly sexy portrait of beautiful alienation, Anomie newest album Flux is an interdisciplinary album and art project exploring disillusionment and the search for identity.  An art book comprised of 14 visual art pieces, each by a highly revered international artist, accompanies the album. Each is a portrait of Anomie inspired by the music and themes of the album. Flux features the artwork of Marco Mazzoni, Redd Walitzki, Mark Demsteader, Kari-Lise Alexander, Casey Weldon, Meredith Marsone, Alessandra Maria, Alex Garant, Alpay Efe, Januz Miralles, Maria Teicher, Antonio Velfin, Alexandra Becker-Black and Zin Lim.

PRESS QUOTES

"A rich slice of art pop that moves fluidly between classical, soul, and electronica, often within the same song...an admirable balancing act...an artistic voice so singular, Flux is an aural landscape worth spending some alone time in." - Beautiful Bizarre

"If you didn't know Anomie Belle before, Flux is a great entry point to her discography, a great example of truly immersive, emotive electronic music.  Flux signals the welcome return of Seattle's siren to the forefront of modern electronica." - Exclaim!

"Anomie Belle has proven herself to be a legitimate quintuple threat as a masterful composer, producer, programmer, vocalist, and multi-instrumentalist. Her sultry, smoky vocals combine with her slithery, seductive programming for the perfect balance of sexiness and darkness. Anomie Belle is poised to find herself among the most revered names of the genre." - URB Magazine

"She combines electronic and experimental elements with sensual beats, lush strings and layered vocals, dropping the listener into the melancholy heart of her beautiful symphonies. Anomie Belle will dissolve you". - Performer Magazine

"Flux is a beautiful dreamy, psyche-tinged electro pop record." - Kevin Cole/KEXP

"Anomie Belle is a musical mastermind, creating layered, ethereal music completely on her own. The beauty is in the layering of electronic and acoustic instruments, weaving an engrossing musical tapestry. Belle is in complete control of her music, handling all the performing as well as the recording and engineering." - Innocent Words Magazine

Band Members