Art Versus Industry
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Art Versus Industry

Austin, Texas, United States | SELF

Austin, Texas, United States | SELF
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"Live Music Preview: Free Week In Austin Highlights Local Acts"

Free Week has arrived in Austin again. The annual tradition dictates many Austin music venues will not charge cover during the week following the holidays. The idea is to showcase local bands while offering fans the opportunity to see their favorite artists without draining what's left in the bank. Like Austin City Limits and Fun Fun Fun Fest, you can now create a custom schedule using Do 512's Free Week schedule creator (see mine here).

Monday
There are tons of bands Examiner would like to see, but being realistic, we pared down the list to something manageable. Tonight there are a few bands we do not want to miss.

Love at Twenty ~ Red 7 ~ 10pm
Tia Carrera ~ Emo's ~ 11:45pm
100 Flowers ~ Stubb's BBQ ~ 12am

Tuesday
New Roman Times ~ The Parish ~ 10pm
100 Flowers ~ Mohawk ~ 12am

Wednesday
My Education ~ Emo's ~ 10:20pm
Danny Malone ~ Mohawk ~ 11pm
The Boxing Lesson ~ Emo's ~ 12:20am
Quiet Company ~ Emo's ~ 12:15am

Thursday
T-Bird and The Breaks ~ Mohawk ~ 10pm
Air Traffic Controllers ~ The Scoot Inn ~ 10:30pm
Ringo Deathstarr ~ Emo's ~ 12:30am

Friday
Art vs. Industry ~ Stubb's BBQ ~ 10pm
Ovenbirds ~ Emo's ~ 11:20pm
Brownout ~ Beauty Bar ~ 1am
What Made Milwaukee Famous ~ Emo's ~ 1:10am

Saturday
Wiretree ~ ND at 501 Studios ~ 10pm
Leatherbag ~ ND at 501 Studios ~ 11pm
The Pons ~ ND at 501 Studios ~ 12am

Sunday
We're going to rest, but you can go see Ginsu Knives at Red 7 on our day of relaxation. Let's us know how it went.
- Austin Examiner


"After The Event: Art Versus Industry @ Stubb's During Free Week, January 7th"

On Friday, January 7, 2011, Art Versus Industry headlined a show at Stubb's during Free Week. The line-up also included musical performances by Lauren Burton and The Pulse Electric. This was the band's first appearance at the Red River venue since rocking the Crystal Castles afterparty in August 2010.

Avi, Nick, and Matt are becoming quite well known for always giving an energetic and outstanding performance, and this time was no exception. In many ways, though, the Free Week show was full of new experiences and exciting additions to their routine. For instance, the band played 3 of their new (yet to be officially released) songs at the beginning of the set, and really rocked the house later into the show with "Let's Kill", the first single from the upcoming LP. Check out this video to see and hear the debut of "Dissipate" from the Stubb's show. The video was shot by Sean Claes from InSite Magazine.

Of course, there were plenty of the familiar Art Versus Industry songs for which their fans already adore them, all of which were just as awesome as expected. Especially "This Means Goodbye" (always a personal favorite), during which the lighting effects and up-tempo industrial electronic vibe encouraged the enthusiastic party atmosphere among audience members. One of the other new elements introduced during this particular show was the addition of photography by Blake Herman. All of the photos seen in this article and the related slide show were taken by Herman. At most of the band's past gigs, Amber Ghosh - amazing photographer and significant other of lead singer Avi Ghosh - has been in charge of immortalizing the occasion, but this time she and fellow avid supporter, Alex Morse, were shooting video. Blake got some fantastic pictures during the show, capturing beautifully the lighting and the band members in action.

With their impending album release, and an entire year of shows ahead of them, you can expect to see (and HEAR!) more about Art Versus Industry not only right here, but in media outlets all over Austin. One such example? The band was featured in The Onion's AV Club just prior to Free Week. - Austin Examiner


"Friday Pick : Art Versus Industry (Stubb's)"

Austin trio Art Versus Industry is bound to garner plenty of comparisons to Nine Inch Nails—if only because the words “art” and “industry” are in the band’s name. Expediting those comparisons are the airy synths, ghostly pianos, and aggressive beats running throughout the band’s still-growing repertoire, joined by the breathy intensity of frontman/tragic romantic Avi Ghosh. But while the echoes of The Downward Spiral get a foot in the door, the band’s strobed-out live show—the indisputable most-theatrical-bang-for-your-zero-bucks deal of Free Week 2011—and heartfelt commitment to the digital ebb-and-flow blow off the hinges. The Pulse Electric splashes some throbbing dance-rock hues on Art Versus Industry’s dimly lit dance floor, while Lauren Burton treats singer-songwriter fare to the occasional electronic makeover—but mostly keeps her strums acoustic. - The Onion A.V. Club


"Interview With Art Versus Industry"

I'm just gonna put it out there. I'm not much of a fan of the whole industrial, goth-like rock. There are some bands I enjoy like The Birthday Massacre, Dommin and of course, the obvious Nine Inch Nails but usually I don't seek out that type of music. Those that know me know what can be categorized as a "Sarah band": pretty much anything that makes me want to shake my money-maker or covered in so much sugar coated goodness that it makes people want to gag.

I stumbled onto Art Versus Industry when vocalist Avi Ghosh added me on Facebook. I'm very selective about who I friend on any social media (except Twitter, of course). So when I got the friend request, I was like "Who is this guy? What is he about? Why is he adding me?" And like what people normally do, I checked out his profile. Unfortunately, there wasn't much to see as most of it was private, but I found a link to his band's website. I took a listen and really enjoyed what I heard. It was very industrial, however, there was something more to it.

I sat down with Avi and his bandmates before one of their shows at Elysium a while back. I stuck out as I wore a pastel pink shirt with pastel polka dots in the venue with the unofficial dark tones only dress code. This band is somewhat new to Austin but I've noticed more people are starting to take notice. With the accompany light show at their performances, it's hard not to.

Instead of rehashing their background and what they sound like in this introduction, let's just get straight to the interview. And by the way, after accepting Avi's friend request, he's turned out to be more than just a dude with a band. He and his bandmates are pretty cool and HUMBLE. That's important.

You guys are a fairly new band. You formed in March '09.

Avi: Yeah technically.

So how did this line up get together?

Avi: Long story. Ok, I'm gonna let Matt explain how he got involved with this and I'll talk about how that happened.

Matt: Ok, well Avi has been doing music for about seven or eight years.

Avi: Way too long.

Matt: Releasing albums under Defy and Avi Ghosh and I first heard him back when I was in high school. I was probably a junior. I was amazed by his music and I sent him a message and we just kept in touch. Long story short, I was finishing up school. He offered me to audition for the band and I couldn't pass it up.

Avi: And you moved all the way...

Matt: And yeah, I moved here from New York Jersey, right outside of Philadelphia.

Because of the offer?

Matt: Because of this offer. Because I was such a huge fan and his art always inspired me. It's exactly everything that I've always wanted to do with my own art so it was the perfect opportunity. I couldn't pass it up.

Avi: It was one of those things that I wanted him to finish his degree. so like "You're not fucking moving out here until you get some sort of education." And after that, I was like "Fuck it. Pack your shit." I think the day after you graduated.

Matt: Literally, the last day, my last class, the following day, I moved. I even missed out on Nine Inch Nails to come down here. That's what happened

Avi: That's commitment.

That is commitment.

Nick: So then we got together. I moved to New York after I graduated from college and to be a big drummer out there. Whatever, try to make it. Didn't work. Came back. So I've been in a couple of bands and nothing was really sticking and nobody's really committed. Nothing was new so I wrote this long thing on Craigslist and this guy responds. So that's how we found each other. On Craigslist. We got together, he was still living in Arkansas?

Avi: Well technically, I was all over the place. I wasn't living in Little Rock at the time because I was living in Little Rock, Chicago, and somewhere in New York in Queens. I was traveling all over the place so I didn't have a place to live but my girlfriend lived here. She's like "Move to Austin" and I'm like fuck, I don't know what I'm gonna do. I'm not going to have a band. I don't have that. I don't know what I'm going to do. So get on Craigslist, see this kid's ad and I'm like hmm, this seems interesting. So I messaged him and we go and meet in this odd sort of Hooters-type situation.

Nick: Twin Peaks. It was awesome.

Avi: And I typically wouldn't never be found in a place like that.

You don't seem like Twin Peaks kind of guys.

Nick: I am. I kinda like it. What can I say? But yeah, so became really good friends. Actually he had me join the band and hadn't even played. Haven't even heard me play. Never. It was like done.

It was just from the ad.

Avi: When you met somebody, you have that sort of love at first sight moment and one thing lead to another, met him and it just love at first sight sort of thing. It's totally heterosexual, but we got along and before you knew it, it was magic.

Matt: I think my favorite part about having Munoz in the band aside from the fact that he's Munoz and that's awesome is that his musical influences are very drastically different from me and Avi. So it was great to have a completely different viewpoint coming in on this so that's pretty great.

Yeah. I think I read in an interview of Nick's, you said the album that made you want to be a musician was Thursday's "Full Collapse."

Nick: Yes. Oh yes.

I like that album too.

Avi: I love Thursday too.

Because obviously this music isn't Thursday...

Avi: Yeah, Not at all.

How did you get from that band to this?

Nick: It was really interesting. It was all because of (Avi). I was looking for something really different. I was really tired of playing drums with that sort of genres, looking for something new. And this was really a challenge because it's so different, so it pushed me out of my comfort zone. But I feel like I've grown a lot as a musician. And yeah, he loves keyboards so it kind of took place of guitars for the most part and it's been awesome.

And for you two, are there any bands you listen to that's different from this genre that people'd be surprised you listen to?

Avi: I personally love the Bee Gees. I'm serous but I love all kinds of music. If it's Elvis or... It's so weird because most people love the electronic stuff, but I like hip hop like old NWA records. Those are probably a bigger influence on anything out there to me. Like old Dre, old Snoop Dog, love that shit but I also like Thursday. And Green Day, one of my biggest influences growing up. I know it's scary to say that nowadays but it's kind of what they do now. The Offspring, all those punk rock spirit, like Amen, so I love music all across the board.

Matt: I'm trying to think of...

Avi: Ace of Base. Always. That's a whole influence. Don't forget Ace of Base.

Matt: I'm trying to think. I'm a very picky listener as far as what I actually have on my iPod so as far as anything that's really personally influenced me, I guess you could say... I mean this isn't too big a stretch like outside of what we do but lots of 90's alternative rock and some grunge but that's still, we have elements of that in our music.

Avi: We all like Nirvana. I like Nirvana.

Matt: But I mean Early Smashing Pumpkins when they were a grunge band. It was just the stuff I was listening to growing up. I didn't actually give this kind of music until around middle school and from there on, it will more my addiction(?). I can't really think of anything really outside of the box. Maybe old David Bowie when he was just awesome David Bowie.

Avi: Awesome.

And we'll talk about the music. I know people are set in their ways when it comes to genres and this genre has always been difficult with music fans. Not like music fans in general because those are the ones like "Whatever, I'll take it all in," but it always seems like this genres like "Eh, no."

Avi: It's definitely avant garde. It's kind of like how do you categorize a band that has wierd sort of rock and roll mixed with dirty hip hop, dirty south hip hop, mixed with I don't know industrial electronic 80's pop?

Matt: I think it's always a challenge because you don't want to be pigeonholed into something. As an avid listener of industrial music myself, I do understand that it is one scene some people may have a hard time getting into it or accepting things but that's not to put anyone down. I mean, I love it but I think one thing that really excites me about this is just certain different combinations and elements musically ranging from like he said dirty hip hop and rock and electronica all mixed also with great melodies and great vocal lines that's not always so prevalent in this type of genre. So that's one thing that I think might be able to open up to more people what would typically just look at the paper to try to find something like this.

Nick: I feel like this genre, and I'm not as experienced in it, needs like a little kick in the butt maybe. Hopefully, we'll do that.

Avi: It's weird to call that any genre because right now, everybody with a laptop is a rockstar and you need to be able to do something. How do you do something that hasn't been done? How do you do something that is engaging and creative? And with a name like Art vs. Industry, you have to do something that is outside of the norm but still is tangible and has sacren(?) enough that somebody can into it. So we want to do something interesting and innovative but at the same time, we don't want to alienate people like most industrial music. Somebody that listens to Thursday might never listen to Common Christ. They're like "What's this?" But you listen to The Birthday Massacre so you understand there's that cross genre capacity. Hopefully we'll do that.

How do get people to pay attention? You know what I mean? How do you sell it? Or how has the crowd reaction been with fans who normally don't listen to this type of genre? Have you ever had that crossover or personally?

Avi: In the past I've found that people that listen to what I was doing ranged from David Bowie fans right up to Rammstein fans so I don't know. I think the amazing thing about the Internet is that it gives everyone a chance to experience something. It's one of those things like there's so much. How do you stick out from everyone else? But I feel with the amount of effort and care we are all putting into this, we don't want to be just every band that you see with a guitar, a bass and a drum set. We wanted to do something. Our approach has been so different. Our light show is all of us, all of our production together. We don't even use any guitar amps for guitars. We use computers and run guitars through them and they sound better than any guitar amp we've ever used. So our whole approach has been hopefully showing people that you can do music in an interesting, innovative manner and still reach out.

Nick: The crowd response has been really really good. Anywhere we played I feel people have been into it. We get invited back and get bigger and better shows. It's been going really, really well so far. I'm excited to see where it goes.

Matt: I think the most interesting reaction for me was the really positive reaction we got from when we played Shreveport, Louisiana because the other bands we played with we sounded very drastically different from them. They were all really great but they were more alternative.

Avi: Metal. Southern rock.

Matt: A little southern rock influence in there and I was kind of concerned to see how the people there... Good portion of them had never heard us before but I was taken a back by such the great response we got. It was interesting to see by the third or fourth song in how many people suddenly all had video cameras up and were filming it. It was just like "Wow. This is really really interesting." - SoManyBands.Net


"Interview With Art Versus Industry"

I'm just gonna put it out there. I'm not much of a fan of the whole industrial, goth-like rock. There are some bands I enjoy like The Birthday Massacre, Dommin and of course, the obvious Nine Inch Nails but usually I don't seek out that type of music. Those that know me know what can be categorized as a "Sarah band": pretty much anything that makes me want to shake my money-maker or covered in so much sugar coated goodness that it makes people want to gag.

I stumbled onto Art Versus Industry when vocalist Avi Ghosh added me on Facebook. I'm very selective about who I friend on any social media (except Twitter, of course). So when I got the friend request, I was like "Who is this guy? What is he about? Why is he adding me?" And like what people normally do, I checked out his profile. Unfortunately, there wasn't much to see as most of it was private, but I found a link to his band's website. I took a listen and really enjoyed what I heard. It was very industrial, however, there was something more to it.

I sat down with Avi and his bandmates before one of their shows at Elysium a while back. I stuck out as I wore a pastel pink shirt with pastel polka dots in the venue with the unofficial dark tones only dress code. This band is somewhat new to Austin but I've noticed more people are starting to take notice. With the accompany light show at their performances, it's hard not to.

Instead of rehashing their background and what they sound like in this introduction, let's just get straight to the interview. And by the way, after accepting Avi's friend request, he's turned out to be more than just a dude with a band. He and his bandmates are pretty cool and HUMBLE. That's important.

You guys are a fairly new band. You formed in March '09.

Avi: Yeah technically.

So how did this line up get together?

Avi: Long story. Ok, I'm gonna let Matt explain how he got involved with this and I'll talk about how that happened.

Matt: Ok, well Avi has been doing music for about seven or eight years.

Avi: Way too long.

Matt: Releasing albums under Defy and Avi Ghosh and I first heard him back when I was in high school. I was probably a junior. I was amazed by his music and I sent him a message and we just kept in touch. Long story short, I was finishing up school. He offered me to audition for the band and I couldn't pass it up.

Avi: And you moved all the way...

Matt: And yeah, I moved here from New York Jersey, right outside of Philadelphia.

Because of the offer?

Matt: Because of this offer. Because I was such a huge fan and his art always inspired me. It's exactly everything that I've always wanted to do with my own art so it was the perfect opportunity. I couldn't pass it up.

Avi: It was one of those things that I wanted him to finish his degree. so like "You're not fucking moving out here until you get some sort of education." And after that, I was like "Fuck it. Pack your shit." I think the day after you graduated.

Matt: Literally, the last day, my last class, the following day, I moved. I even missed out on Nine Inch Nails to come down here. That's what happened

Avi: That's commitment.

That is commitment.

Nick: So then we got together. I moved to New York after I graduated from college and to be a big drummer out there. Whatever, try to make it. Didn't work. Came back. So I've been in a couple of bands and nothing was really sticking and nobody's really committed. Nothing was new so I wrote this long thing on Craigslist and this guy responds. So that's how we found each other. On Craigslist. We got together, he was still living in Arkansas?

Avi: Well technically, I was all over the place. I wasn't living in Little Rock at the time because I was living in Little Rock, Chicago, and somewhere in New York in Queens. I was traveling all over the place so I didn't have a place to live but my girlfriend lived here. She's like "Move to Austin" and I'm like fuck, I don't know what I'm gonna do. I'm not going to have a band. I don't have that. I don't know what I'm going to do. So get on Craigslist, see this kid's ad and I'm like hmm, this seems interesting. So I messaged him and we go and meet in this odd sort of Hooters-type situation.

Nick: Twin Peaks. It was awesome.

Avi: And I typically wouldn't never be found in a place like that.

You don't seem like Twin Peaks kind of guys.

Nick: I am. I kinda like it. What can I say? But yeah, so became really good friends. Actually he had me join the band and hadn't even played. Haven't even heard me play. Never. It was like done.

It was just from the ad.

Avi: When you met somebody, you have that sort of love at first sight moment and one thing lead to another, met him and it just love at first sight sort of thing. It's totally heterosexual, but we got along and before you knew it, it was magic.

Matt: I think my favorite part about having Munoz in the band aside from the fact that he's Munoz and that's awesome is that his musical influences are very drastically different from me and Avi. So it was great to have a completely different viewpoint coming in on this so that's pretty great.

Yeah. I think I read in an interview of Nick's, you said the album that made you want to be a musician was Thursday's "Full Collapse."

Nick: Yes. Oh yes.

I like that album too.

Avi: I love Thursday too.

Because obviously this music isn't Thursday...

Avi: Yeah, Not at all.

How did you get from that band to this?

Nick: It was really interesting. It was all because of (Avi). I was looking for something really different. I was really tired of playing drums with that sort of genres, looking for something new. And this was really a challenge because it's so different, so it pushed me out of my comfort zone. But I feel like I've grown a lot as a musician. And yeah, he loves keyboards so it kind of took place of guitars for the most part and it's been awesome.

And for you two, are there any bands you listen to that's different from this genre that people'd be surprised you listen to?

Avi: I personally love the Bee Gees. I'm serous but I love all kinds of music. If it's Elvis or... It's so weird because most people love the electronic stuff, but I like hip hop like old NWA records. Those are probably a bigger influence on anything out there to me. Like old Dre, old Snoop Dog, love that shit but I also like Thursday. And Green Day, one of my biggest influences growing up. I know it's scary to say that nowadays but it's kind of what they do now. The Offspring, all those punk rock spirit, like Amen, so I love music all across the board.

Matt: I'm trying to think of...

Avi: Ace of Base. Always. That's a whole influence. Don't forget Ace of Base.

Matt: I'm trying to think. I'm a very picky listener as far as what I actually have on my iPod so as far as anything that's really personally influenced me, I guess you could say... I mean this isn't too big a stretch like outside of what we do but lots of 90's alternative rock and some grunge but that's still, we have elements of that in our music.

Avi: We all like Nirvana. I like Nirvana.

Matt: But I mean Early Smashing Pumpkins when they were a grunge band. It was just the stuff I was listening to growing up. I didn't actually give this kind of music until around middle school and from there on, it will more my addiction(?). I can't really think of anything really outside of the box. Maybe old David Bowie when he was just awesome David Bowie.

Avi: Awesome.

And we'll talk about the music. I know people are set in their ways when it comes to genres and this genre has always been difficult with music fans. Not like music fans in general because those are the ones like "Whatever, I'll take it all in," but it always seems like this genres like "Eh, no."

Avi: It's definitely avant garde. It's kind of like how do you categorize a band that has wierd sort of rock and roll mixed with dirty hip hop, dirty south hip hop, mixed with I don't know industrial electronic 80's pop?

Matt: I think it's always a challenge because you don't want to be pigeonholed into something. As an avid listener of industrial music myself, I do understand that it is one scene some people may have a hard time getting into it or accepting things but that's not to put anyone down. I mean, I love it but I think one thing that really excites me about this is just certain different combinations and elements musically ranging from like he said dirty hip hop and rock and electronica all mixed also with great melodies and great vocal lines that's not always so prevalent in this type of genre. So that's one thing that I think might be able to open up to more people what would typically just look at the paper to try to find something like this.

Nick: I feel like this genre, and I'm not as experienced in it, needs like a little kick in the butt maybe. Hopefully, we'll do that.

Avi: It's weird to call that any genre because right now, everybody with a laptop is a rockstar and you need to be able to do something. How do you do something that hasn't been done? How do you do something that is engaging and creative? And with a name like Art vs. Industry, you have to do something that is outside of the norm but still is tangible and has sacren(?) enough that somebody can into it. So we want to do something interesting and innovative but at the same time, we don't want to alienate people like most industrial music. Somebody that listens to Thursday might never listen to Common Christ. They're like "What's this?" But you listen to The Birthday Massacre so you understand there's that cross genre capacity. Hopefully we'll do that.

How do get people to pay attention? You know what I mean? How do you sell it? Or how has the crowd reaction been with fans who normally don't listen to this type of genre? Have you ever had that crossover or personally?

Avi: In the past I've found that people that listen to what I was doing ranged from David Bowie fans right up to Rammstein fans so I don't know. I think the amazing thing about the Internet is that it gives everyone a chance to experience something. It's one of those things like there's so much. How do you stick out from everyone else? But I feel with the amount of effort and care we are all putting into this, we don't want to be just every band that you see with a guitar, a bass and a drum set. We wanted to do something. Our approach has been so different. Our light show is all of us, all of our production together. We don't even use any guitar amps for guitars. We use computers and run guitars through them and they sound better than any guitar amp we've ever used. So our whole approach has been hopefully showing people that you can do music in an interesting, innovative manner and still reach out.

Nick: The crowd response has been really really good. Anywhere we played I feel people have been into it. We get invited back and get bigger and better shows. It's been going really, really well so far. I'm excited to see where it goes.

Matt: I think the most interesting reaction for me was the really positive reaction we got from when we played Shreveport, Louisiana because the other bands we played with we sounded very drastically different from them. They were all really great but they were more alternative.

Avi: Metal. Southern rock.

Matt: A little southern rock influence in there and I was kind of concerned to see how the people there... Good portion of them had never heard us before but I was taken a back by such the great response we got. It was interesting to see by the third or fourth song in how many people suddenly all had video cameras up and were filming it. It was just like "Wow. This is really really interesting." - SoManyBands.Net


"Record Release Of The Week: Avi Ghosh - Severing The Tie"

By Mary Unsell
Thursday, April 03 2008

Avi, 23, resided in Oxford from age 14 until he graduated Ole Miss in 2006. Avi is currently residing in Little Rock, AR working as a computer engineer at an information technology firm. By night, Avi is submersed in his musical endeavors including writing, arranging, recording, performing, and running a record label hosting six bands from different corners of the world.

Avi began his musical journey in 2000 as a 14 year old with nothing better to do living in Oxford, MS. The music, industrial "rock with a punk attitude", if you will, wouldn’t have gone over in Oxford during a flood of jam bands and glimmers of hip-hop. Avi, recognizing this state of unmusical affairs, did not bother looking for people with which to play. Instead, he wrote and arranged his first album playing and recording each part on instruments and equipment he had been gathering and learning since age seven. Avi’s musical influences include a broad range of genres. "Depeche Mode is a good point of reference," says Avi. "I’m a huge Robert Smith [The Cure] fan, and what kid having grown up in the 90’s doesn’t love Trent Reznor [Nine Inch Nails]? I listen to everything from Sade to Nirvana to Queens of The Stone Age, as well as, Ministry, Skinny Puppy, and other old school industrial stuff. I’m into Saul Williams right now. The Inevitable Rise and Liberation of NiggyTardust is a great album."

Severing The Tie is Avi Ghosh’s latest LP released February 14th of this year through Transience Records [his own]. The LP chronicles the end of a three year long relationship, which blossomed in Oxford and endured all the way to Little Rock, where it dissipated last year. Avi explains, "I had a full-length tribute to romance entirely written, however, the break-up prevented me from releasing it. I sat down and wrote Severing The Tie within two months, ironically, releasing it on Valentine’s Day."

The 10-song composition about letting go of an addiction is the first Avi has released under his name. Predecessors, including a precursor [to STT] EP called Watch the World Burn can be found under the name Defy, which is the name Avi chose to hide behind prior to writing STT. Defy will remain as his live band under the name is still very much intact. Avi hopes to collaborate with other artists in the future, as well, using the name Defy. All of Avi Ghosh and Defy’s music is available on myspace.com/avi. An extended version of Severing The Tie hits all digital distributors in May and retailers by fall.

Avi’s live show is high energy, sometimes violent, with cinematic nuances. Avi asks himself while in the midst of pre-production, "How would this look in a movie or on a slide?" He wants the live performance to exude all the instrumental aspects including piano, cello, and violin. Avi learned piano at age 7 and moved on to violin at age 9. By age 12, Avi realized he wanted to "get girls" moving on to guitar and later drums. Avi continues to write and record all music himself, hence the electronic essence. The band members are Chris Lunsford (live drummer) and Eric Granholm (live bass). "They are very talented musical brothers. They help me bring my music to life. It would be boring to watch one guy with a couple of keyboards and a drum machine on stage", Avi insists. Avi gets to have fun onstage switching from guitar to bass to keyboards.

As for upcoming shows, Avi is planning to play Oxford in May. "I’m excited to see the Oxford music scene growing now with the much needed sense of "fuck you" back into it." - Avi. From here, he plans to head to Jackson and New Orleans. After that, he’ll head home to begin pre-production for a full-on tour, which kicks off in August and continues through the fall and winter. - Local Voice


"Avi Ghosh Feature"

Singer/songwriter Avi Ghosh offers up his first release under his own name "Severing The Tie"which is a "record about disappointment as well as the complete and utter dissolution of addiction." With a solid online following, a discogrpahy under his belt with his band dEFY, model good looks and a sound to rival Nine Inch Nails this is one artist you are sure to be hearing from a great deal in the future. MOVEMENT talked with Avi about his multiple projects, facing the world as an independent artist and the tribulations of making music in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Continued in article (on link) - Movement Magazine


"Avi Ghosh Feature"

Singer/songwriter Avi Ghosh offers up his first release under his own name "Severing The Tie"
which is a "record about disappointment as well as the complete and utter dissolution of addiction."
With a solid online following, a discogrpahy under his belt with his band dEFY,
model good looks and a sound to rival Nine Inch Nails this is one artist you are sure
to be hearing from a great deal in the future. MOVEMENT talked with Avi about his
multiple projects, facing the world as an independent artist and the tribulations of making music in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Continued in article... - Movement Magazine


"Severing The Tie LP Review (5 Out Of 5 stars)"

Brainchild of Defy's frontman, Avi Ghosh, "The Art of Feeling Low" encapsulates all fans have come to love about Defy, and then some. Raw in emotion (though not in production), Avi Ghosh has masterfully produced this full length album to center around something everyone can relate to – a tragic end to a close relationship. The entire CD is a journey from the beginning pains of a break-up to the ultimate resolution of moving on, and everything in between. The album is cathartic for both the artist and the listener, I'm sure.

Defy had already wowed me in the past with excellent song structure and production skills, and this new album surpasses the band's previous efforts. While I more closely associate Defy with industrial rock bands such as Celldweller, Avi Ghosh's solo project has a darker alternative sound, reminiscent of the best aspects of A Perfect Circle. The songs are innovative and catching, leaving this album as a top pick to be left on repeat in anyone's CD player.

Suggested Tracks:
"Art of Feeling Low"
"Don't Count On Me Anymore"

http://www.radio-active-music.com/articles/ - Radio-Active-Music


"Weekly To-Do List"

THE DREAMING/AVI GHOSH
Thursday Mar. 27th, 9 p.m., Juanita’s. $7.

Pull out the eyeliner and black shoes/shirt/pants/lipstick/fingerless gloves. It’s time to get angst-y. First up, from Hollywood, it’s the Dreaming, a new group led by Christopher Hall, the former lead singer of Stabbing Westward. The band may look like the Lost Boys, but even with lyrics like, "you’re nothing, you’re no one, you’re dead to me," the band favors less of the industrial punch of Stabbing Westward and more straightforward melodic, sing-along alt-rock. (Everyone, even the eye-shaded, likes to sing along.) In the opening slot, Avi Ghosh makes his local debut. The 23-year-old moved to Little Rock last year to work for Acxiom, all the while continuing to write, record, perform and produce new material in his bedroom. You wouldn’t guess that "Severing the Tie," Ghosh’s new album, was recorded at home. There’s a crispness, a big sound and a strong sense of melody in his music that stands out in the mix of industrial, aggro alt-rock. This marks Ghosh’s first album released under his own name — he previously recorded and released under dEFY and has sold upwards of 4,000 CDs independently. He seems to be popular in Germany. It might be time for hometown crowds to catch up. All ages welcome. - The Arkansas Times


"Avi Ghosh Interview"

TRB: I know this is a bit of a silly question, but I think I may have been completely butchering the pronunciation of your name. How is it pronounced?

Avi Ghosh: (Laughs) Well you wouldn't be the first. It's "Ahh-vee." The Ah is like Fa, in do-re-mi.

TRB: When did you fall in love with music?

Avi Ghosh: I think I was born in love with music. My mother has always told me stories of my inability to sleep before I could even form a full word unless she played Michael Jackson's "Thriller." While I did start classical training on the piano and violin at a relatively early age (around 7 or 8) I never really pictured myself being a musician until my 4th-5th grade year; right around the time I discovered Nine Inch Nails.

TRB: I can hear a hint Nine Inch Nails as an influence in your music, who are some of your other influences?

Avi Ghosh: Oh boy, considering I'm a listener of Sade to Skinny Puppy and everything in between, this question is always lengthy. I guess I'll put them into timeless and current categories. The timeless list (as limited as this is for sake of time and space) would have to include musical work from Manson, Type O Negative, Garbage, The Tea Party, Duran Duran, Fiona Apple, Stabbing Westward, Silverchair, Depeche Mode, Amen, Bryan Adams… the list could really go on, but it's best to probably stop there. I'm very fortunate to have been inspired by some incredible music, growing up in a generation where kids had very innovative musicians to look up to. I wish I could say the same for the kids nowadays. I feel like I'm stuck in the past with my record collection as I'm bored by 90% of the new music coming out.

Lately, I can't stop listening to theSTART. Their new record hasn't left my CD player for the past four months. Actually there entire body of work has been a tremendous point of reference for me. I've also rediscovered the underestimated Dandy Warhols discography. The new releases from Saul Williams, Dave Gahan, and The Birthday Massacre are must-haves as well.

TRB: I've seen comments on your page, where people are calling you the next Trent Reznor. How does it feel to be compared to such a musical icon?

Avi Ghosh: Well it's very flattering. I'll always consider Nine Inch Nails the greatest band of my time. Trent Reznor's ability to marriage incredible sound with cutting-edge visuals has always felt unmatched in my opinion to anyone else out there. He's one of the few people that has continually stayed true to his integrity and that's something very fleeting in an industry continually plummeting into the abyss.

But on the other hand, the Reznor typecast can be moderately disconcerting. In the mid-90's any band that incorporated heavier guitars with keyboards and pop hooks became an automatic "NIN" wannabe (ie: Gravity Kills, God Lives Underwater, Stabbing Westward). Throw in the fact that I'm skinny, have black hair, and do everything independently in the studio and the Trent Reznor comparison is virtually unavoidable. It is understandable to a certain degree, considering NIN has made aggressive, electronic music accessible to the masses and single handedly paved the way to develop the mindset artists such as myself adhere to, however, I do find stark musical differences with my work and Reznor's.

TRB: I recently purchased the album "Watch the Whole World Burn", and I really enjoyed it. What can fans expect from the new Avi Ghosh album?

Avi Ghosh: Thanks for the kind words regarding "Watch the World Burn." My new release is probably the most dynamic, unconventional album I've put out to date. There were really no sonic boundaries except the story I was trying to convey and certain key thematic points. As cliché as it sounds, the new album feels like the most actualized and exciting work I've ever done from both a musical and conceptual perspective.

TRB: I've noticed that you write and record virtually everything yourself. What are some of the pros and cons to being an independent artist and recording this way?

Avi Ghosh: I'd say the greatest challenge is finding the self motivation to see things through from start to finish. There are no producers, executives, engineers, managers, or lawyers telling you what to do, when to do it, or how to get it done. Resultantly, every cost imaginable ranging from production, marketing, distribution to touring and performing is self inflicted. You take on the full responsibility of how you're presented and how your product sounds when there is no outside help or intervention. With this said, it's nice not having to follow any sort of rules and the freedom for experimentation is always liberating and rewarding. Being independent makes the creative process so much more special, intimate, and worthwhile. However, there is the reality of feeding yourself and surviving doing what you love and with music there is no set guarantee. It's definitely not the most ideal career, especially now.

TRB: You also run your own record label. Are you currently searching for other bands to market?

Avi Ghosh: Transience in my eyes was envisioned to be more of a collective than a label. While as a label it has always provided a level of professionalism for every recording I've released thus far and aided in my process of distribution, I hope to really work on making the united cause a reality this year by scouting similar minded independent acts and getting them involved. I've always pictured the Transience alliance as a group of individuals who push musical boundaries collaboratively as opposed to singularly; hopefully to the benefit of everyone taking part.

TRB: You have another band called dEFY. You also write and record almost everything yourself for this band. How would you summarize the difference between your solo work and your work with dEFY?

Avi Ghosh: Essentially, for all intents and purposes dEFY and avi ghosh at the surface will appear to be the same thing. Musically, dEFY is a creative vehicle that has a much more defined sound with a specific lyrical and musical framework I've always stayed true to. I could see dEFY having much more potential of becoming an open-ended, collaborative musical outfit that isn't limited solely to my personal outlook and experience in the future.

I find myself with a lot more courage to venture out a bit more freely with the music that's being released under my name. Sonically and lyrically, I find the new work to be much more romantic and a little less scathing than the material I've written under dEFY in the past. It's still too early and premature to really determine what the end result will be though. My music evolves with the person I am at that specific point in time. It's a living, breathing extension of my being so it's constantly changing and transcending with every moment.

TRB: Do you prefer one project more than the other? If so, which one and why?

Avi Ghosh: Absolutely not. dEFY is just as close to my heart and holds equal importance to the music under my name. There just happens to be a different naming convention and thought pattern between the two.

TRB: "Pink Letters" is one of my favorite songs of yours. What inspired it?

Avi Ghosh: Without getting into too much personal detail, the song is about relationships that evolve from the sterile, digital world into much more tangible domains. The lyrics pretty much say the rest.

TRB: Your new album "Severing The Tie" is due to be released on February 14th. What made you choose Valentines Day?

Avi Ghosh: As a whole, "Severing The Tie" is a pretty romantic work. It's a labor of love that I've worked very hard on over the past two and a half years. Valentine's Day seemed to be the most fitting release date for the album's subject matter and sound.

TRB: Do you plan to tour anytime soon?

Avi Ghosh: Oh yes. I hope to spend a lot of the later part of this year touring nationally. It's about fucking time.

TRB: Do you have any tattoos? If so, which means the most to you and why?

Avi Ghosh: I actually don't. I love great ink and find it absolutely beautiful when done by the right, intelligent people, however, my skin isn't the most ideal or suitable for tattoos.

TRB: If you could pick your ideal bands to tour with, who would you choose?

Avi Ghosh: I'd love to tour with a popular current band like Mute Math or Shiny Toy Guns. I think I'd have even more fun touring with an act like theStart or Dave Gahan. Dream tour would be a supporting slot with someone like Nine Inch Nails, Duran Duran, or Marilyn Manson.

TRB: Where is your ideal city to play a show in?

Avi Ghosh: Toronto, Ontario. I love that city and the supportive musical community that exists there. Chicago and Vegas would be equally fun I'm sure.

TRB: What advice do you have for aspiring musicians?

Avi Ghosh: I'd suggest to new, up-and-coming acts to stay true to their viewpoint and vision by not falling prey to current industry trends, standards, and fads. Music is not about "getting rich quick." It's an artform that I've pretty much handed my life over to and treating it with that sort of care and respect will help achieve the best results (or so I hope).

TRB: Any final words for your fans?

Avi Ghosh: I have the best listening base anyone could ask for. I love them dearly. I'm grateful for their support for independent music. I'd be nothing without that loyalty and can't wait to see them all on tour later this year. - That's Right Bitch Magazine


"The Art Of Feeling Low Track Review"

Avi Ghosh: "The Art of Feeling Low"

As a side project of Defy, Avi Ghosh has created another album (Severing the Tie) filled with impeccably written and produced tracks, sure to ensnare the listener. One of the strongest tracks on this album, "The Art of Feeling Low" has a moody and alternative rock vibe sounding similar to artists such as A Perfect Circle, but still holding on to some of the electronic elements brought forth by Defy. There's nothing expected or complacent here; the song (as with the entire album) is a perfect blend of desperate emotion with technical perfection. - Re-Gen Magazine


"Avi Ghosh Interview/Review"

A lot of reviewers like to use references to big name artists when they review albums to give the readers an idea of what a band sounds like. I usually try to avoid the practice as much as possible, but with Avi Ghosh's Severing the Tie, I'm going to have to break my own rules. After several, (and I do mean several,) listens, I still find myself reminded of a lot of the later Nine Inch Nails albums. I mean this in a good way though… most of the time when I see a band compared to Nine Inch Nails, it's usually in a negative context, with the writer saying that a band sounds like a copycat, or tried to achieve the sound without being successful. In Avi's case however, it's the arrangements and the structure of the songs that reminded me of NIN. His attention to detail on this record is phenomenal, with very smart arrangements, and a great use of dynamics in the songs. I compared it to Nine Inch Nails when describing the sound to my friends as both Avi Ghosh and Trent Reznor have an amazing ear when putting their songs together.

Severing the Tie is a sophisticated, dynamic record with the attention to detail placed in all the right places. Unlike many artists, Avi Ghosh obviously wrote the album with the strengths of his songs in mind, and it comes out in the final product. The production of the album is great, with none of the songs being over produced… everything is just right!

While I enjoyed, and continue to enjoy the entire album, my favorite song is definitely Don't Count on me Anymore. It has a great beat and bass line that reminds me a half dozen or more of some of my favorite industrial rock groups of the late 90s. It's without a doubt the strongest track on the album and would be my personal suggestion for a radio single.

Overall, Severing the Tie is an awesome album. You can buy it online through Avi's myspace page at http://www.myspace.com/avi.

I enjoyed this album so much that I asked Avi if he'd be interested in doing a quick interview with me for Alternative Explosion. You can read it here:

Eric from Alternative Explosion Interviews Avi Ghosh

Eric: Tell me a little bit about Avi Ghosh… how did you get started?

Avi: Let's see. I just turned 23. I put out the first full length release under my name this past Valentine's Day. I'm currently balancing a full-time day job with my music career that seems to be getting more challenging everyday. I've been making records for the past six years under dEFY and just recently transitioned and transcended into releasing my work under my own name.

Eric: I've enjoyed listening to your latest record, Severing The Tie. What inspired you to put together this collection of songs?

Avi: Heartbreak was the primary sentiment that underlined and inspired the overall theme behind "STT." Even though there were several other factors that go along with the experience of that degree of loss, the majority of the album revolved around falling out of love and the addiction-like dependency you find yourself battling after-the-fact.

Eric: You've told me before that you write, record, perform and produce all your own music. I have a lot of respect for do it yourself artists as I also do the same. What kind of equipment and/or software are you working with?

Avi: At one point I owned several fantastic synthesizers such as the Korg Z1, Motif, K2K, but I've managed to ebay 90% of my gear in the past two years. I'm using the computer strictly as a tape machine this time around. The majority of the album wasn't even done in pro-tools, actually a recording program that came out in 1998 which is embarrassing to share. There were no plug-ins used aside from the standards that came with the recording program, one hardware synthesizer, a guitar, a bass, and a few nominal mics for a pretty shitty drum set I borrowed. I didn't even use a compressor on the signal chain when recording the vocals for this album and my microphone is considered consumer audio.While my good audio junkie friends found me insane for neglecting all this, it was really a conscious and purposeful decision on my part because I've found myself often surrounded by so much gear that I'd overlook the most important part of recording- the song itself. The Beatles didn't even have stereophonic recording capabilities for years and people are still listening to their entire discography because their songwriting resonated well past the production capabilities that limited them. You really don't need much to write and record a good song. You don't need to spend thousands in a recording studio. You can do it in your bedroom. That's what I did.

Eric: Severing The Tie sounds like it draws from a lot of different musical influences. Can you tell us a bit about artists who may have influenced the sound of the album?

Avi: Wow. That's a pretty open-ended question. During the time I was recording STT I was primarily listening to theSTART. "Ciao, Baby" is such an exceptional album- in fact it's still in my player. I found myself playing their entire discography though for a good while. Other band's that were rotating in my car were the Foo Fighters, Dave Gahan, Saul Williams, Black Light Burns, Idiot Pilot, The Birthday Massacre, and Queens of the Stoneage.

Eric: Many artists are utilizing the internet to sell their music these days as are you with Severing The Tie. How is this working out for you, and do you plan on eventually releasing the album on disc as well?

Avi: The internet is the single most important weapon an unsigned artist has to find exposure. Considering the fact that every major seems to be going independent now and every kid & their grandmother is a myspace rockstar- it is a bit more difficult to get noticed. However, Avi Ghosh would be nothing with the growing network of people spreading the word about the music and helping expose what I do in my bedroom to people all over the world. As for a hard copy of STT, yes, I do have something special planned for the four people left in the world who enjoy the tangibility of holding a record. It'll be on it's way in the next two-three months, right around the time the album hits iTUNES.Do you have any plans to tour in support of the new album?Fuck yes. Hopefully most of this fall and winter will be spent exploring all the cracks of this country with my best friends and going broke on the road!

Eric: Avi Ghosh has a large, growing online network. Do you have any advice you'd like to share with other bands hoping to build up their own online fanbases?

Avi: My number one thing would be to get to know your listeners. These are the people that are allowing you to do what you love and why not show them you appreciate it by responding to that message. There have been days that I didn't go to sleep just so I can make sure I got around to responding to every single comment and message that was on my myspace page. It pays off. People will value you when they feel like you're not there just to make a buck on them or treat them as a trading card on your friends list. I'm fortunate to have the coolest listening base any artist could ask for. I'm sure I'd be friends in real life with every single one of them and am grateful my music has served as a medium for our introduction.

Eric: Anything else you'd like to share with us?

Avi: Just thanks to everyone who has taken a moment out of their hectic lives to show that they care about my music. It means the absolute world to me.

Eric: Alright… thanks for talking with me. I look forward to catching you live someday!

Avi: Thank you. Keep up the great work man J We'll both be playing all over the place soon I'm sure.

http://alternativeexplosion.com/2008/04/08/avi-ghosh-severing-the-tie/ - Alternative Explosion


"Severing The Tie LP Review"

On his first solo outing, Avi Ghosh offers listeners a wonderful dose of emotional industrial rock. After releasing several albums digitally with his band dEFY, Avi Ghosh continues the practice with his debut solo album, Severing the Tie. Stylistically, it can be argued that the songs are more introspective, stemming more from dark emotions Ghosh has experienced during a tumultuous time in his life that has lead to the indefinite hiatus of dEFY. While it can be argued that this is a standard formula for good old-fashioned angst-ridden industrial rock in the tradition of Nine Inch Nail's The Downward Spiral, Ghosh does well to give his music just the right mix of adrenaline-induced rage with thoughtful lyricism, keeping it from sounding like the juvenile ranting of another poor unfortunate soul begging for attention.

Interesting to note are the subtle vocal effects Ghosh utilizes throughout, from the glitch effects that underlie "Eat Me Whole" to the slight pitch-shifting effects in the tail end of "Better Off Alone" and the chorus of the title track, demonstrating a conservative sense of the musical arrangement, never delving too far into histrionic effects for their own sake. Also noteworthy, once again in the chorus to "Severing the Tie," and in the melancholy "The Last Song," is an excellent sense of melody and its juxtaposition with crushing power chords and pummeling percussion as in "Don't Count on Me Anymore" and "Narcissistic Design" recalls the best coldwave moments of the '90s – i.e. 16volt and Chemlab.

And as if to push the Nine Inch Nails comparison just a little bit further, the sullen piano melody of "It All Makes Sense to Me" sounds like the best song Trent Reznor wishes he could've written. Few tracks exceed the four-minute mark, making each song concise enough to keep from becoming overbearing or uninteresting, and the production is top-notch, especially for an independent effort. The electronics and the acoustic elements are mixed remarkably well, with no one element taking over the other and flowing smoothly through one's ears. It's records like Severing the Tie and artists like Avi Ghosh that prove the effectiveness of producing music in the digital age and offering hope for a scene in dire need of intelligent songwriting and musicianship.

http://www.regenmag.com/Reviews-1410-Avi-Ghosh-Severing-the-Tie.html
- Re-Gen Magazine


"Disappointment Was His Muse"

Avi Ghosh recorded his deeply personal album in his apartment-turned-recording-studio

By Shea Stewart (Sync Weekly)
Wednesday, March 26, 2008

Little Rock musician Avi Ghosh vividly recalls his introduction to Trent Reznor’s music: Nine Inch Nails’ throbbing, industrialized version of Queen’s "Get Down, Make Love."

"I was in elementary school in Toronto, Ontario, when I heard ’Get Down Make Love’ at like 2 a.m.," he said. "I was alone, and it was on the radio. I guess I was in the third or fourth grade. I don’t know why I was up at two in the morning."

Engineered by Reznor and Ministry’s Al Jourgensen, the tune was released in 1990 on the "Sin" single from NIN’s debut album Pretty Hate Machine. But where Freddie Mercury and Queen stripped the lyrics of their sensuality through their mechanical rendition, Reznor enhanced the eroticism of the lyrics, adding pulsating electronica and buzz-sawing guitars.

But it wasn’t the lyrics that grabbed Ghosh’s attention, it was the sound. "I remember that it was scary and thinking, ’What is this?’," Ghosh said.

About a year later, Ghosh purchased NIN’s follow-up to Pretty Hate Machine, the acclaimed The Downward Spiral. He was in fifth grade. Reznor’s imprint is apparent on Ghosh’s newest album, the aggressive Severing the Tie, from the infuriated guitar riff of "Better Off Alone" to the electronic thrust of "Pink Letters." (The album is available for purchase through Ghosh’s MySpace site and will be on iTunes in April.)

The 10-track album was entirely created by Ghosh, with the 23-year-old writing, performing, recording and producing the album using Pro Tools in a spare apartment bedroom transformed into a recording studio. "My vocal booth is a closet that I gutted out," Ghosh said. "It works great. You don’t need to spend thousands of dollars to get into some recording studio to create music."

But housing a recording studio in an apartment building does have its drawbacks — neighbors and complaints because of the noise. "I had to find the right balance," Ghosh said. "I was looking out my window to see if my neighbor was there [during the recording of the album]. If she wasn’t, I would go to work.

"It was a battle between me and my neighbor, but now we’re friends. She has a ’thank you’ on the record." Severing the Tie is a magnificent but brutal album, exhibiting all the beauty and ugliness of the world. Recorded during the cold, wet winter months of late 2007 and early 2008, Ghosh describes Severing the Tie as an album "based around disappointment." The album also came around the time Ghosh decided to indefinitely shelve The Distance Apart, an album he had labored over for two and half years.

Dressed comfortably in a striped blue and white shirt for work at Acxiom, where he is a computer engineer, Ghosh is candid in chronicling the genesis of the album during an interview in the River Market. "I definitely felt isolated and had just gotten through with a breakup," he said. "I think the climate and the isolation definitely influenced the album. It was just me and my instruments, hitting a chord at three in the morning."

Although Ghosh has always released his work as a solo musician (selling 4,000 records independently), Severing the Tie marks the first time he has done so under his own name. All albums and EPs over the past four years were released under the name dEFY. "I think to me that dEFY was something to hide behind," he said. "But with this music, it is so personal, a snapshot of my soul."

"It was time to put myself out there and see what happens." As a resident of Little Rock for less than two years (He moved to the city after graduating from the University of Mississippi in 2006.), Ghosh is also preparing for his Little Rock debut, opening at Juanita’s for former Stabbing Westward frontman Christopher Hall’s new band The Dreaming. Ghosh’s live band includes his best friend Eric Granholm on bass, guitars, keyboards and vocals, and musical brother Chris Lunsford on drums, keyboards and vocals.

Besides NIN, Stabbing Westward was another musical influence on Ghosh, along with bands and artists such as Sade, Depeche Mode, Garbage and ... Bryan Adams. "I was 7 years old, and [Bryan Adams] was the first concert I ever went to," he said. "He wrote these great, cheesy, ’80s rock love songs. How can you not grow up in my generation and not be a fan of Bryan Adams? He is a cool guy."

Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Ghosh also spent time in Canton, Ohio, (Hometown of Marilyn Manson, Ghosh points out.) before the start of his junior year of high school in Oxford, Miss., where his father was a mechanical engineer for Caterpillar Inc. Ghosh’s mother is a homemaker, and while neither are musicians themselves, they instilled in Ghosh an appreciation of music at an early age. Ghosh began piano lessons when he was about 7, violin lessons around 10, started playing drums at 13 and guitar around 14. "They never hindered my musical pursuits," Ghosh said of his parents, who now reside in Scranton, Penn. "When I wanted to get a drum set my dad was like, ’Okay.’"

In fact, Ghosh’s parents might have started his musical path when he was still an infant. "I was born in 1984 so The Police and Michael Jackson’s Thriller were big," Ghosh said. "My parents tell me that I wouldn’t be able to sleep at night unless I heard a Police or Thriller song. Thriller is a creepy record so maybe that’s why I’ve always been into creepy music." - Sync Magazine Weekly


"AUTONA Magazine Cover Feature April 2008"

By Ilka Rowehl
Tuesday, April 01, 2008

"Irgendwo zwischen Bill Clinton, Nine Inch Nails und Marilyn Manson"

Avi Ghosh lebte in Little Rock (Arkansas), der Hometown von Bill Clinton, in Canton (Ohio), Heimat von Marilyn Manson, und wuchs mit den NIN auf, was seinen musikalischen Werdegang prägen sollte. Nachdem er seine Band dEFY, die er mit 16 Jahren gründete, weitgehend über das Internet vermarktete, hat er num mit „Severing the tie" sein erstes Album unter eigener Flagge am Start, das starke Züge der Vorbilder NIN trägt; dennoch geht Avi Ghosh seinen eigenen Weg. (Interview mit Ilka Rowehl)

Ilka Rowehl: Many of your listeners often compare your work to Nine Inch Nails, how does that make you feel?

Avi Ghosh: This is a question that I’ve had to address in almost every interview because of common comparisons and while it’s something I’ve never minded in the past, I’ve always done my part in offering clarification. It’s no mystery that I’ve always been very inspired by Nine Inch Nails, then again who really isn’t. Almost all my listeners and friends are devoted followers, fuck, even my parents are.

Reznor’s impact on provocative music is simply inescapable and significant, making his entire discography timeless, however, the typecast has the tendency to insinuate a certain nuance of imitation that I find to be a tad unsettling. Yes, I’m skinny and sport jet black hair. I also happen to perform and produce everything on my studio work. This doesn’t mean I aim to follow in any certain artist’s footsteps or model my career after theirs. Don’t get me wrong, the comparison is often meant to be a compliment and is flattering in several senses, however, there is a great divide musically and conceptually between Reznor’s work and mine. I also understand that people tend to categorize and stereotype things to help them understand, digest, consume, and compare; so I’ll just chalk to up to human nature’s innate grouping mechanism. With that being said, I think my material would be a great supporting slot on any future NIN/Trent Reznor tour. "Ghosts" is also pretty incredible.

I.R.: Why has it taken you so long to finally tour and dedicate yourself to fully pursuing your music?

Avi Ghosh: Well, I decided to get my education and complete my undergraduate computer engineering degree before jumping into the music industry. There is no guarantee in a musical career and it is limited whether it’s three months or twenty years. And while it wasn’t that I put music to the background or even considered that less important in my life, I just couldn’t justify passing up a full ride at the age of 17. I did make it a point and conscious effort to not slack off or forget my music during that time, releasing new music every consecutive year whiling honing my skills in the recording studio. It took extremely hard work since I was in the honours program, doing biochemistry/pre-med courses, immersed in every sort of extracurricular activity possible, working three simultaneous jobs, while completing my thesis within the four years my tuition was covered through scholarships. I’m surprised I’m alive still after four back-to-back semesters of 21 credit hours. If anything, it’s nice to now have a security blanket and something to build upon in the future when I return to the academic route.

I.R.: When did you graduate and what have you been doing since then?

Avi Ghosh: I got my degree during the spring of 2006. Since graduation I’ve been working in an office climbing up the ranks as a glorified button pusher. While doing my time in the industry of IT has helped me garner a greater understanding of the "real world" and the much needed reality check every young post-undergrad requires, I just turned 23 and I’m ready to take a leap of faith for once in my life and pursue my art wholeheartedly. I needed these two years to really develop a better understanding of who I was as an artist, what I wanted to do and say, and how I wanted to attempt at getting myself heard. In a world of continually dwindling attention spans, you only get once chance to execute your career correctly and I didn’t want to jeopardize my first impressions to any audience. I think I’ve finally figured out how I want my art conveyed and am doing everything in my power to have it properly reflected throughout these upcoming years.

I.R.: So why did you release the current CD under Avi Ghosh and not dEFY? Are there any reasons for this change?

Avi Ghosh: dEFY had gone on to represent something that just wasn’t me anymore. In no way is dEFY over, because I feel like I have a solid grasp in what that name will represent; however, the entire body of work as a whole just didn’t seem to provide a truthful and complete snapshot of the way I’ve been feeling currently. The idea of dEFY has evolved greatly and I’m looking forward to unleashing what that revolution exactly means in the near future, but right now the music under my own has taken ultimate precedence. It just feels more exciting and vital to me currently. dEFY fans will be excited to know that I’ve been rehearsing several songs from all three records for our upcoming tour so the music released under that name is not over by any stretch of the imagination. I’ll hopefully be spending most of this fall and winter touring non-stop throughout the country, in hopes of generating enough interest to head out overseas. I’m also putting together a remastered, extended version of "Severing The Tie" set to hit all the digital distributors like Itunes, Amazon, Napster this summer. The record is like the unrated, director’s cut to the original album that came out this Valentine’s Day. It will feature five or six new songs as well as slight changes to the original mixes. There will also be a remixed and reconstructed counterpart to STT titled "Something This Beautiful Could Never Last" that is slated for release later this year that will feature reinterpretations from several of my favourite independent artists.

I.R.: Once you’re through with your music career, you hinted on returning to future academia? What are those plans going to be like?

Avi Ghosh: I can undoubtedly see myself returning back to school for my MBA and then possibly pursue law or medical school. If I’m really bored I’ll jump in for a Phd as well (Laughing). Considering the fact that I Did put myself through all those fucking pre-med classes- I’d hate for all that work to go to total waste, though I’m already forgetting alot. It’s just very important to me to never stop my education, especially since learning is what truly keeps me motivated and interested in life. Once that yearning and pursuit for knowledge stops, you’re stuck at a stagnant state of dormancy where it’s impossible to grow anymore or improve yourself- and we all know nobody wants that. - Autona Magazine


"Watch The World Burn EP Review"

Excellent primer EP for an excellent solo outing from dEFY front man, full of passionate emotions and top-notch production.

Released some months before the full-length Severing the Tie, dEFY front man Avi Ghosh's Watch the World Burn is an excellent companion EP that offers listeners five more helpings of his excellent production and songwriting. The overall tone of these songs is not dissimilar from that of Severing the Tie, written during an emotionally trying time, leading to comparisons to Nine Inch Nails. This is especially true in the pop rock leanings of "Inside," which features a deceptively simple bass line augmented by a heavy helping of gritty guitars and powerful percussion, topped off by Ghosh's emotive vocals. With lyrics like "She makes me feel so close and satisfied / she always feeds my appetite," the song could easily have been lifted off The Downward Spiral or even The Fragile if not for Ghosh's impassioned voice, keeping melody without resorting to unnecessary screaming. The tense instrumental, "A Prologue to the End" begins the EP with discordant synth leads and intricate drum programming reminiscent of Gary Numan's more recent work. The song beckons a vocal performance that never arrives, though the listener hardly suffers for it as it leads seamlessly into "Don't Take Me Back," in which a restrained and almost gothic chorus of light guitars, melancholy pianos, and minimal electro beats give way to a shattering chorus of angst-ridden screams, thrashing power chords, and thunderous drums. While it's not entirely unpredictable, the juxtaposition of morose melody with vitriolic rage makes for a very poignant song. The same can be said for the harrowing title track, which is almost radio-friendly, although "The Distance Apart" is even more so with its major-key progression of acoustic strums and light keyboard touches. The lyrics run the fine line between being poetic and problematic, for we've all heard songs about heartbreak and rejection time and time again, but Ghosh's sincerity is quite evident throughout; this does not come across as the work of someone who hasn't felt these emotions in the most real way. Watch the World Burn proves to be not only an effective companion EP to Severing the Tie, but serves almost as prologue to the anger of that album, resulting first in the sadness giving way to healing. Throw in some top-notch production, and you've got a recipe for one of the finest artists to emerge in the modern music world. - Re-Gen Magazine


"Interview With Art Versus Industry (Spotlight Artist)"

Artist: Avi Ghosh / Art Versus Industry

1.) How did you first hear about Open Labs?
I noticed Open Labs gear for the first time on a Keyboard Magazine
with Prince. It was one of the strangest pieces of gear I’d ever seen
on a cover but undeniably stood out from anything else I had seen in
the magazine. The whole spacey, futuristic aesthetic always struck a
chord with me- so I was immediately intrigued by OL's cosmetic
appearance right from the get-go, not necessarily associating anything
more to it. One thing lead to another and before I knew it, a
good friend and excellent producer (Will Hoffman) involved with the
company invited us out to an Open Labs Q and A. The rest is history.

2.) What Production Station do you have?
Two OpenLab’s Dbeat’s.

3.) How has the gear changed your method of work?
It’s revolutionized everything. The way we tour as well as the way we
write. It’s impossible to go back to 2008.

4.) What is your production station's primary function, live or studio?
For the past six months or so, it was strictly used in the realm of
live performance. We used the units to recreate our wall of guitars
and bass, as well as piece together our complex keyboard sounds and
map out triggered samples. Right now, it has transitioned over to our
studio and is playing a major role in the writing and recording our
new album.

5.) What is your favorite software on the board?
OpenRiff, hands down.

6.) How do you use it?
It’s a powerhouse VST host that has changed the way we audition and
create new sounds in the studio, not to mention it is the exclusive
sonic vehicle for our live performances.

7.) Which kind of equipment have you owned in the past and how do
they compare to your Open Labs equipment?
Oh god, I don’t think this is a question that you’d want too many
specifics on. I am "that" guy who constantly obsessed with studio
technology and musical equipment- basically I'm the person you want
out of your local music shop (laughs). I have been notorious in using
a multitude of hardware samplers and workstation synthesizers,
multiple guitar amp/cab configurations, a bevy of signal
processors, pedals, and preamps- essentially to do what two dbeats are
currently recreating. I’ve gotten rid of two bedrooms worth of gear because of this powerful
little staple. Oddly enough though, I've ended up using the dBEAT as
a processor for the existing gear I have left; it's almost a total evolution
of what I could get out of my pre-existing equipment.

8.) Has the gear changed the way you write songs?
Essentially, it’s cleared up my workspace workflow entirely. I no longer have
to run over to the racks of guitar, keyboards, and processing
equipment lining up my studio walls. Considering the fact that
computers have always played a monumental part in my creative process,
it's just made things easier, compact, and more intuitive for me. I
love seeing less wires and minimal patch work on my floors.

9.) How different is the composition process compared to the standard
computer or laptop system?
More stream-lined and convenient. I don’t have to deal with too many
additional interfaces and background processes running when I want to
focus on creation and sound design. Just turn it on and let the
creativity flow.

10.) Do you think the quality of your production now would be
possible with another keyboard?
Nope. No way. Computer technology has pretty much allowed for the
synthesizer market to be entirely taken over and essentially replaced.
There are a few exceptions. I love my PolySix and MS20... and vintage
synths will always have a place in my heart, however, OL was smart
to take advantage of the prospective influx of audio software.

11.) Have you had any experience with our Tech Support and how does it
rate with you?
Excellent and top notch. They have become an extended part of the
band with the amount of involvement and interest they play in watching
our goals achieved. A great crew of people are at the company.

12.) What is next for you and your Production Station?
Currently, I’m in the process of writing the upcoming Art Versus
Industry debut using two dbeats in cognito. Considering that all of
our music is recreated live using the dbeats, the next logical next step
was to use heavily incorporate these units into the production of our
next album. Let's just put it this way, we can't wait to share with
the rest of the world what we've come up with. - Open Labs


"Art Versus Industry: Infiltrating the Austin Industrial Music Scene"

Tonight at Elysium there’s a band playing that any industrial music fans out there should definitely hear. They even have the word ‘art’ in their name, so it’s no surprise that up-and-coming local band Art Versus Industry is one to watch this year with the increasing public interest in creativity in Austin.

The following is from the band's official bio:

More than just a collage of ambitious sound, Art Versus Industry is an innovative movement that inspires listeners to become reacquainted with the notion of sincerity in music. The trio’s uncompromised offering is a meticulously crafted blend of crushing organic electronics, machined guitars- and introspective, personal commentary. Their challenging work will serve as a soundtrack for the future-forward progressive, pulling together just enough cinematic entropy to satiate the screen played lifestyles of the Twitter generation. Far beyond a conceptual call-to-action reserved for the avant-garde at heart, Art Versus Industry is a fitting conversational middle ground for the market-molded and post modern to meet halfway. This is punk rock rebellion for the synthetic age that breathes analogous sensibility back into an all-consuming digital world.

Even though the band is prepping for their courageous debut, this creative pursuit is by no means an overnight realization; instead it’s the ripened end result of underground darlings (dEFY 2002-
2007, Avi Ghosh) that have united forces to use their strength in numbers for meaningful impact. The buzz continues to expand at an alarming, exponential rate as the group’s devoted audience spreads the viral Art Versus Industry message to anyone open for musical change. In less than a year’s time, the three-piece’s high energy, seizure-inducing, immersive live performances have piqued interest and notoriety within their Austin surroundings, allowing them to land coveted support slots for Voltaire and Crystal Castles while headlining several reputable stages on their own.

Fall/Winter 2010 will see the release of the band’s highly anticipated freshman endeavor that will be followed by an unforgiving touring cycle that is expected to run well into the last quarter of 2011. It’s just a matter of time before you, too, will join A.V.I.’s revolutionary cause to revive art back into music.

myspace.com/artversusindustry | artvsindustry.com

Keep an eye on Austin Art Event Examiner for upcoming features about the awesome rock band, including interviews and album art, as they ascend into a busy series of shows around town.

First up, Art Versus Industry is on the line-up tonight at Elysium, located at 705 Red River. The show starts at 9:30pm and ends at 2am.

Here’s the agenda for Friday, July 16th:
Voltaire (headlining)
Automusik
Art Versus Industry
DJs Malediction & Void

$11 cash/$12 PayPal or credit card - advance
$15 - day of show
pre sale at secret-oktober.com
18+ doors at 9:30pm
RSVP, see the tentative guest list, and more at the event’s Facebook page.

Then, just down the street at Plush, they have a free show on Thursday, July 22nd. Following that, in August, the band is playing at the Scoot Inn on the 5th, Stubb’s for the Crystal Castles After Show on the 11th, and Friday the 13th during the Industrial Festival at Encore. Click the links below to visit the event page for each upcoming show.

Also, rumor has it Art Versus Industry may be playing at a Halloween-themed art opening in October! Details to come…

Art Versus Industry @ Plush FREE SHOW! – July 22, 9pm-11:30pm
Destroyed The Future, Electric Gods Are Industry. @ The Scoot Inn – August 5, 9pm-11:30pm
Art Versus Industry Crystal Castles After Show @ Stubb's (FREE) – August 11, 10pm-11:30pm
Art Versus Industry at Encore – August 13, 9pm-2am - Austin Examiner


"Free Halloween Show With Music, Art, Film, and Prizes - A Nightmare On 5th St"

Transience Presents A NIGHTMARE ON 5TH STREET - a free, all-ages event on Halloween night at the ND at 501 Studios in Austin. The party isn't just desirable because of its price and minimum age, but also for the spectacular program including 8 live music acts, themed art, truly fabulous prizes, horror films, and other fun diversions. The 1st Place winner in the costume contest gets two free passes to FunFunFun Fest, presented by Transmission Entertainment on November 6-7! Runners-up also win some pretty unique and valuable prizes, including original art by local painter and freelance writer Jennifer Cunningham and gorgeous jewelry made with vintage watch parts by dEconstructed dEsign, plus merch from the bands.

RSVP on Do512 for entry into the evening's costume contest and the chance to win the grand prize: http://do512.com/event/2010/10/31/a-nightmare-on-5th-street-10-31-10

If the fun and contest winnings weren't enough to convince you to attend A Nightmare On 5th Street, download or listen to the free compilation album featuring every artist on the bill: http://transience.bandcamp.com/

Art Versus Industry has been integral to the very existence of this show, and it comes at a pivotal point for the band following a busy time of rapid exposure and tons of work. (Read the Austin Art Events Examiner interview with Art Versus Industry published in August 2010, just before they played at Stubb's for the Crystal Castles after-party.)

This is a very important and meaningful show for the band, with a bill pieced together by them in a city that has embraced them and allowed A.V.I. to grow into what it is within a year. The show marks the band's one year anniversary and they will perform songs on a thematic set list that they'll never bring out again. Hellraiser was their complementing film selection, intended to emphasize "the visceral elements and brooding undertones of the band's concept art."

For only one night, during the October 31st masquerade and concert, party-goers will also be treated to a horror-inspired art installation including pieces by Jennifer Cunningham, Aaron de Leon, and Russell Stinnett. Photo Booth furnished by Precision Camera & Video and run by Amber Ghosh. Giveaways, drink specials, and, according to the Facebook event page, "All This Madness Goes Down at Austin's Classiest Venue, The ND @ 501."

Doors open at 7:00pm, and the party continues until 2:00am.

Here's the line-up: (The horror films are listed in parentheses following each corresponding band.):

Lauren Burton (Frankenstein) - 7:40 P.M.
Bali Yaaah (Hausu) - 8:05 P.M.
The Pulse Electric (Army of Darkness) - 8:50 P.M.
Naked Empire (Holy Mountain) - 9:35 P.M.
Art Versus Industry / Costume Party - 10:15-11:05 P.M.
Gods Are Ghosts (The Shining) - 11:15 P.M.
Refused are F*#KING Dead (Texas Chainsaw Massacre) - 12:00 A.M.
DJ Zack Highwire (Trick 'R Treat) - 12:50 A.M. - 1:45 A.M.

Drink In Hand Entertainment will be providing exclusive event (video) coverage at the event and Artstrada Magazine will photograph the night!

Do you really want to miss out on a once-in-a-lifetime bill with trick-or-treat prizes and a bloody good time? Of course you don't! It's free and fun for the whole family, and the event's organizers accept no excuses, especially since parking is easier than downtown. - Austin Examiner


"Introducing: Art Versus Industry"

Today I was introduced to a new band from Austin, TX that has essentially been around for some time in one form or another. Art Versus Industry are a three piece electronic alternative metal/art band that will immediately remind listeners of Nine Inch Nails and Vex Red/Fears. Led by Avi Ghosh, who previously performed as a solo unit under his own name as well as dEFY, he has been creating music for the better part of a decade with a dark electronic brooding, guitar manipulation, gentle piano embellishments, all very similar to The Fragile era of NIN. Ghosh has re-emerged with Art Versus Industry and they are looking to make a splash in 2010 with their debut album, split into two EPs set for release in August with the second have arriving in October. Be sure to listen to the incredible "Devour," now streaming on the band's myspace page HERE. Check out their press release and tour dates below...

More than just a collage of ambitious sound, Art Versus Industry is an innovative movement that inspires listeners to become reacquainted with the notion of sincerity in music. The trio’s uncompromised offering is a meticulously crafted blend of crushing organic electronics, machined guitars- and introspective, personal commentary. Their challenging work will serve as a soundtrack for the future-forward progressive, pulling together just enough cinematic entropy to satiate the screen played lifestyles of the twitter generation. Far beyond a conceptual call-toaction
reserved for the avant-garde at heart, Art Versus Industry is a fitting conversational middle ground for the market-molded and post modern to meet halfway. This is punk rock rebellion for the synthetic age that breathes analogous sensibility back into an all-consuming digital world.

Even though the band is prepping for their courageous debut, this creative pursuit is by no means an overnight realization; instead it’s the ripened end result of underground darlings (dEFY 2002-2007, Avi Ghosh) that have united forces to use their strength in numbers for meaningful impact. The buzz continues to expand at an alarming, exponential rate as the group’s devoted audience spreads the viral Art Versus Industry message to anyone open for musical change. In less than a year’s time, the three-piece’s high energy, seizure-inducing, immersive live performances have piqued interest and notoriety within their Austin surroundings, allowing them to land coveted support slots for Voltaire and Crystal Castles while headlining several reputable stages on their own.

Fall/Winter 2010 will see the release of the band’s highly anticipated freshman endeavor that will be followed by an unforgiving touring cycle that is expected to run well into the last quarter of 2011. It’s just a matter of time before you, too, will join A.V.I.’s revolutionary cause to revive art back into music.

Catch the band live:

Jul 16 2010 Elysium Austin, Texas
Jul 22 2010 Plush Austin, Texas
Aug 5 2010 Scoot Inn Austin, Texas
Aug 11 2010 Stubb's BBQ Austin, Texas
Aug 13 2010 Encore Club Austin, TX
Aug 14 2010 Thirsty Camel San Antonio, Texas
Aug 21 2010 Secret Show Austin, Texas - Exploding In Sound


"After The Event: Art Versus Industry At Stubb's, August 11th"

Local experimental electronic musicians Avi, Nick, and Matt took to the stage inside Stubb's after this week's Crystal Castles show, performing as Art Versus Industry. The band has been performing together under this moniker for only about a year now, so securing -- and totally rocking -- a gig like this was a dream come true for the humble and talented group. In addition to their own loyal fans, the show came with a built-in audience of lingerers still hanging out at the downtown Austin venue for the after-show party.

Art Versus Industry put on a stellar show, complete with impressive lighting effects and some seriously awesome skills. Lead vocalist, Avi Ghosh, spent much of the week leading up to the event trying to mend a lost voice. The problem seems to have worked itself out just in time, as he sounded great despite having to strain a little to keep up with their sound's typical intensity.

By the end of the show, all three band members had worked up quite a sweat and seemed to be rightfully proud of their hard work. It doesn't stop there -- Art Versus Industry is also on the bill for Friday's Industrial Fest and is playing a show in San Antonio on Saturday.

Earlier this week, Avi and Nick were kind enough to spill their guts for an Austin Art Events Examiner interview, in which the two discuss the band's name, their take on the state of the music industry, and the integral role this lovely city has played in their endeavor.

The setlist from Wednesday night's show is as follows:

"Lapse"
"Here We Go Again"
"Anything At All"
"Manner In Which We Fall"
"A Prologue To The End"
"Devour"
"All That's Left Of Us"
"This Means Goodbye"
"Eat Me Whole"

From start to finish, the performance was full of energy, special effects lighting, and great music. Judging by their reactions, the audience was into it, too.

Amber Ghosh snapped some spectacular photos from the balcony above the stage, including those featured here. To see more of Amber's photography, visit her fan page on Facebook.

Nick was amazing on the drums, and at times the pulsing lights synchronized with his beats. Matt spent the majority of his time on stage playing keyboards, but also managed to switch a few times to guitar. Avi sang, played keyboards, talked to the crowd between songs, and even pulled some genuine rock-star moves up there. All in all, they played well together and will only continue to gain momentum as more people discover their dream-like sound.

Coming this fall: Art Versus Industry will be performing at a masquerade and exhibition closing reception, scheduled for October at Starving Art Studios in East Austin. Subscribe to Austin Art Events Examiner to receive notifications of new posts so you won't miss the announcement when it comes! - Austin Examiner


"Post Crystal Castles -> Art Versus Industry"


After the awaited Crystal Castles show at Stubb's will be local band Art Versus Industry. Tickets for CC are still being sold on the Stubb's website. The band has been getting some recent buzz around town via Austinist and Austin Eavesdropper.


Frontman Avi Ghosh (did he get the name of his band from his first name, or his first name from the name of the band?) contacted me awhile back about this event, and I gave his music a listen. It really took me back. The band has been compared to Nine Inch Nails a bit, and rightfully so (I don't mean this in a tacky cover/tribute band way, but in the sincerest way possible). Their smooth & industrial sound likens them to Reznor's styling with the same dark undertones in the subject of their songs.


Their latest single, Devour, from the new AVI EP, has really got me going.

If you're going to the CC show, stick around for AVI. If not, it's a measly $8 for something worthwhile to do on a Wednesday night. - Austin Is Burning


"Before They Were Famous: Art Versus Industry"

Art vs. Industry is an experimental electronic band just beginning to get its kicks in Austin. Started in March 2009 under the direction of songwriter Avi Ghosh, the band is already well on their way to touring year round. They are nestling up to some big groups like Crystal Castles and their sound may even remind you of early Nine Inch Nails. The trio (Ghosh along with drummer Nick Munos, guitar/keyboardist Matt Gruber) offers a complex blend of crushing organic electronics, machined guitars and personal commentary. This pack is unwilling to compromise integrity and as such has placed themselves with the not-so-straightforward task of putting art and sincerity back into music. In an age when many artists have a go-to formula for money-making songs, its nice to see some guys taking a different approach. Because everything worth having is worth working really hard for, right?

Why they do it:

Each member of this trio got their musical start early on—whether it be from parent influence or extreme childhood boredom. “As a kid, I had loads of unused energy and drummed and tapped on everything,” Munos said. Ghosh said music is singlehandedly the only thing that fully satisfies him. “It's a need versus a want, right alongside water, shelter, food,” said Ghosh, who started playing piano under the influence of his parents. “As I grew up and started tinkering with guitars and drums; I realized this was more than just ‘something to do’. It was a vehicle of expression and existence.”

Gruber said he first started to get into music to escape extreme boredom and eventually found his passion to be performing in front of random strangers. Gruber hopes that listeners will find a surprise discovery in AVI’s music, which is mostly influenced by life itself. “Our particular style is a combination of all that I love about music, so it means a lot to me. Not only its sound, but the presentation, mood, and general concepts that really just grab you,” he said.


What’s in store for the future:

Ghosh hopes the music will be a breath of fresh air for everyone who encounters it in the time to come. “There really is no point of reference to what the three of us have come up with, so it's kind of exciting to see the reaction. We hope people notice are unwillingness to compromise our sincerity for what we consider art and truth,” Ghosh said.

Crystal Castles Aftershow
Wednesday, August 11
Stubbs (801 Red River)
10pm, $8, free with CC wristband
[info] | [tickets]

The band recently landed a spot at the Crystal Castles AfterShow at Stubb's on August 11 that will be free for CC attendees and $8 for general public. This show represents their biggest gig to date and they hope it will be the start of something big.
“We want every single person in America to either love or hate us. We'll start with Austin, work our way to Texas, and then attempt at our international takeover.” Munos said. “This is just our first goal. Goals two and three are secret.”

Best bets:

“Devour” : An industrial glaze of spooky vocals and moving piano parts

“Lapse” : This tune transcends from delicate synthesized beats into an orchestration of noise and rock.

Art vs. Industry: [Myspace] - The Austinist


"Art Versus Industry: The Name Says It all."

Art Versus Industry has been sonically shocking the Austin music scene for nearly a year now. I recently chatted with Avi and Matt of the electronic trio.

Lacey Lewis: How did Art v. Industry get together? How long have you been a band?

Matt: I've been a long fan of Avi's work, and had so much respect for what he was doing. He was doing everything I ever wanted to do musically, and when he asked me to audition I couldn't say no. Munos came along from a craigslist ad surprisingly enough....and of course we can all make jokes about that one.

Avi: Art versus Industry will have existed for one year this Halloween. It's been a pretty crazy inaugural year.

L: Tell me about the name

Matt: I like leaving our name open to interpretation, because regardless what I have to say about it I know people will have their minds set on it one way or the other.

Avi: While it is pretty open for interpretation, I think there is a distinct bias in the name. It's the end result of our dissatisfaction with the trendy, mass-produced nature of current popular culture. I've always been a sucker for courageous, ground-breaking art whether it be in music, film, or literature. That seems to be missing now because of industry standards and the market machines- forcing outside-of-the-box creative types to live solely in the underground. We hope to reawaken the need for art back into music and change the standard of our iTUNES generation. Music is meant to be ultra-sensory- you need to feel it, touch it, and experience it in person. It's tangible, not a bunch of binary code compressed into a file to sit on your hard drive.


L: What is the musical background/training of each of you?

Avi: I started on piano at the age of seven and jumped onto the alto saxophone in third grade- only to realize I didn't have the pipes for it. I gave violin a shot and played in orchestras until my family moved to Ohio where there was no stringed program for kids. I ended up dabbling in guitar and bass to kill the time, only to realize I wanted to really hit on things really loud (drums). One thing lead to another, I ended up playing trap kit in jazz and various percussion instruments in concert bands. Then my family moved to Mississippi where there were no worthwhile programs at all for young adults- that's when I ended up piecing together a home-based recording studio and writing/recording music. The rest is history.

Matt: Well I never started playing any instruments seriously until high school, prior to that it was just to hang out with friends/escape boredom. I could read sheet music at one point in time, played in elementary school band, but as far as what I’m doing now, I've only been playing guitars/keyboards seriously from a technical standpoint for about 3 or 4 years. Prior to that, I was in humor-based electronic/punk type bands. I dabbled in primitive electronics programming and branched out from there.

L: When did you decide that music was what you wanted to do with your life?

Matt: During this time when I was playing with my old joke garage band, really just learning about everything (basic programming etc), I realized that I didn't care nearly as much about the in-studio aspect as I did with performing. Whether it was dramatic teen relationships, or bullying, or whatever I was going through at the time, performances were a way for me to escape reality and give a big middle finger to everyone around me. It was then that I realized that the happiest place I could be was in a room in front of strangers performing. That’s what I want to do with my life.

Avi: Music kind of found me. I always loved music growing up and I never thought I'd be making it when I was toiling over piano lessons in my youth. It just seemed out of my reach at the time. Before I knew it though, I had a lot of music inside of me that was screaming to get out by the time I was 13.

L: Is there a particular song or artist that most inspired you to pursue music?

Matt: Well there was this band Defy (Avi's old band) that was pretty inspiring to me.....there is a long laundry list of bands/artists/songs that I could start mentioning, basically most of the music I listened to as a teen and in college. Seeing bands live really inspired me more to pursue my career more than just listening to them at home. Any band that was over-the-top theatrical, had an amazing light show, or at least gave a damn really made me love them.

Avi: There are far too many to list. Literally, any artist from Bryan Adams and Shania Twain to Three Six Mafia and Wu Tang Clan that has inspired me to listen or spark that special feeling you get when you hear something that changes you.

L: What are your influences? Is there a particular artist or band you are often compared to? How would you describe your music?

Matt: My influences personally are mostly 90's industrial rock bands, 90's alternative/rock, some 80's synth pop, some modern industrial/hard rock. Bands we're compared to...of course we get NIN a lot...I’ve heard some stabbing westward references as well, but for the most part, I’m still very glad we're being held in the same light as these artists. It is beyond flattering to me. I would describe our music as alternative rock electronic trip-hop industrial. I'm more interested in seeing what people come up when describing us.

Avi: My biggest influence is life and sincerity. Thought-provoking art in general. Anything that causes me to question and re-evaluate everything I know. I'd describe us as "Brutal Progressive Art." Every song is different and I'm sure everyone will have a different amalgamation of categories to stick us in.

L: How has your music evolved since you first got together as a band?

Matt: The intensity of our live presentation is the thing that has evolved the most, from the lights to song selection to outright performance; it keeps getting more and more super-energized. But most importantly to me, we have not lost an ounce of sincerity, whether it's on the new songs coming through your speakers or live at a performance.

Avi: To resonate on what Matt said- A.V.I. is undoubtedly a band to be experience in the flesh. There's where we truly shine. This music was meant to be seen and felt, viscerally. We guarantee a memorable experience because we pour every ounce of our energy to the full-on production. The palette of sound has definitely developed into an edgier, glitched out violent tendencies since we started this monster last year. It's a tad more vitriolic =)

L: What is your songwriting process? Is it generally the same every time?

Matt: I'll let Avi take this one away...but one comment I have to make. I love how a song will start out as an electronic song, but then involve to a huge rock piece, or how a song starts as a straight-up rock song and it turns into the most electronic piece we're working on at the time...

Avi: Every song is an evolution, even though they may stem from different places. I tend to write most songs on a piano or acoustic guitar and allow for a lengthy gestation period that allows the songs to find themselves. I ended up using the voice memo feature on my cell phone a lot for capturing moments on the fly and then bringing them into the studio later. This record in particular was constructed using very minimal, subdued electronics as opposed to my traditional "run to the keyboard and sketch the song out" approach. I wanted to stray away from digital audio and niche production technique; instead opting to use a computer like a glorified tape deck. Everything you hear on our record was played/manipulated live, by hand. No crazy post-audio processing inside the studio, only using hardware effects and filters done beforehand. It feels like a sonic art project to me. We all went into the studio not knowing how any of this was going to turn out- but at the end of the day we are all pleasantly surprised.

L: What is your ultimate goal in music as a band?

Matt: I hope to bring real sincerity relevant to people's lives, much like a lot of musicians did for me growing up, whether it was Trent Reznor, Kim Ljiung, or an array of other people whose words and music have saved my life, I hope to have that effect. Also, I’d like to get as many people to come see our shows as possible. It’s the perfect escape from reality.

Avi: I want our music to have a positive impact and influence in any capacity for our generation and the up-and-coming listening audience. I hope will reach out and speak to people on a larger level. Ambition and creativity go hand-in-hand even if it doesn't necessarily equate to dollars and cents. Music can be equitable- but that shouldn't be the purpose of making it. We all need to eat and survive doing what we love- but we should do it on our own accord, merits, and ideals. I hope that we can show that this is still possible and everyone can pursue what they love in any industry while maintaining their sense of self worth and not sacrificing sincerity, integrity, and ingenuity in the process. Great art simply will not go unnoticed- I still truly believe that. If this past year is any indication of what's to come- I think I'm on the road to being proven right.

Wow. All I can say is go check them out right now! - Best New Bands


"Interview With Austin Experimental Electronic Band, Art Versus Industry"

Art Versus Industry is a local industrial band that’s making a big entrance into the spotlight of the Austin live music scene as they prepare for the release of their upcoming album. Catch them tonight at Stubb’s, where they will be playing at the Crystal Castles after-party, and again on Friday for their Friday the 13th performance. You can find more information about this week’s shows in a previous Austin Art Events Examiner post.

I managed to snag an interview with two of the band’s three members, Nick and Avi, amidst their mad rush to the stage. Read on to get inside the heads of these talented guys.

Chicken or egg: Explain the relationship between and development of the band's name and your own. Which came first, or is it just a coincidence?

Nick: Well, Avi Ghosh was born with that name in November of '84 so that definitely helped set the foundation. He would have been much cooler if his first name was Art. (Laughs) However, when he decided upon making our project into a full-fledged band- he made it very clear that the music had to be released under an entirely different entity- something drastically different.

At the time, we had been having the same conversation about the state of the music industry, our various concerns, and where we thought we belonged in that big picture. The name Art Versus Industry was an attempt to both encapsulate those thoughts and feelings while reassuring the fan base Avi had already garnered with his name and dEFY that he was alive and kicking.

Avi: It definitely was a conscious decision. We wanted something tongue-in-cheek but something that really made sense in terms of my career up till that point. The name can totally stand on its own feet despite the similarities to my own name. I’ve also found that it isn’t entirely obvious at first. It’s kind of like a gift that keeps on giving when you have the eureka “Ah… it’s an acronym for his name” moment. Most importantly, it’s reflective of how we feel about the current state of entertainment.

Credit really goes to Nick because he texted me the concept and I fell in love with it immediately. I didn’t even have to question or rethink it- I was sold and resultantly repositioned everything I had done musically to allow for the transition.

Which side is winning, art or industry? Whose side are you on in said conflict, and what is your role?

Nick: That is a great question, and like I mentioned earlier this is something we talked about frequently. I think its relative however. In relation to the band, I think art is winning easily. The E.P. coming out this fall sounds like a synthesized art project after a weekend bender in Vegas. We are really proud of it and believe that we are doing something very different. It’ll be interesting to see if our tiny, 3-piece band from Austin, Texas can have the meaningful impact we hope to have on the music industry as a whole.
We really hope that our first release encourages bands and musicians to take more risks with their work, because I think that's what is missing from the music industry. In relation to the music industry, I think art is an afterthought. I think the major labels and music big wigs are grasping at straws trying to figure out what musical sound or method of promotion will save its sinking ship. So I think that the sound of 'popular" music has suffered greatly. Hopefully we can help because I feel like we will always force ourselves to be creative and to produce sounds and songs you never thought possible. Our role is to bring creativity and sincerity to the forefront of industry through artistic expression.

Avi: I totally agree with Nick. In our eyes, Art will always prevail. If we didn’t believe that, we might as well give up now. But let’s face it, we live in an era where television is ephemeral and the market machine decides upon the way we eat, sleep, and f--k. It’s all about the sensational overhype and instant gratification; very much the “If we can’t have it now, we don’t want it anymore” mindset. Our culture has been conditioned to react on impulse without any thought or empathy. Attention spans are continually dwindling by the nanosecond which makes it a tad disconcerting for people who are devoting their lives to the creation of art. Art, not the cookie-cutter bulls--t, but real f--king art, requires effort, time, and care to actualize. There are details in the layers that present themselves with repeated visitation. That’s what makes it rewarding, right?

It’s an odd sort of dichotomy, because the fact that I can think in this manner and pursue my goals in this fashion is something incredible that can’t be overlooked. It is something I can’t overlook. I truly feel there’s a change in the air and water supply. I can sense it in the underground art world as well as music and film. People are starting to see past the information force-feed and seek out their own truth. It’s exciting and equally horrifying to be a part of this new frontier and community that is unapologetic and excited to innovate and push boundaries. We have no answers so we get to be the guinea pigs for our future generations.

Ultimately, art is my savior. I will fight to the death for my right to pursue excellence, growth, understanding, and compassion through my art. My role is to never stray away from works of sincerity and truth, despite the fear of it not fitting into market trends and hot lists. Hopefully, there will be a middle ground because good art unites and does not alienate its audience. I guess the ultimate test will be the response to our upcoming releases.

Speaking of the conflict art vs. industry, can you disclose your battle strategy to me, or will I have to bribe it out of one of those conspiracy-theory military buffs like on the Simpsons?

Nick: The battle plan is pretty classified but I can tell you that our end goal is to get our CD into as many hands as possible and to ensure that everyone that comes to see our live show leaves with spots on their retinas, ringing ears, and smiles on their faces.

Avi: Global domination is the ultimate end-game; however, we’ll start with our amazing little city. We live in one of the few places in this country that embraces and does not shun the different and unique. We’ll branch off from there…

For anyone new to the Austin indie industrial music scene, what is the most important thing you think they should know about the band and what lies ahead for the fans?

Nick: Everyone must know that we are here to create and to entertain. We will not stop doing so until you have heard our names, experienced our record, or seen our live show. I honestly can't even begin to think about what lies ahead. It really depends on the fans. If they love us and support what we are doing than the possibilities are endless. I do know however that this only the beginning and we have a long road ahead of us.

Avi: It’s an upward climb, but nonetheless an exciting one. The name “Art Versus Industry” hasn’t even been around for a year (Halloween will mark our first anniversary using the moniker) yet we’ve started to see an incredible response without a single release and just a handful of shows. I’m very fortunate to have partnered up with two of my favorite people on the planet, so I see this as definitely the beginning to a very long road of music and live performances. One thing I can guarantee, we will keep you entertained with everything we do and never stop challenging ourselves to keep you, as well as us, excited in what we do. - Austin Examiner


"Experimental Band Fuses Electronica, Trip-Hop ; Event Preview: Art Versus Industry"

When aspiring drummer Nick Munos placed an ad on Craiglist searching for a band to join, he wasn’t sure who would respond. However, when Avi Ghosh — noted for his solo work and former musical project Defy — replied to the ad, Art Versus Industry was born.

“I placed the ad on Craiglist because I needed a band and wasn’t impressed with some local stuff,” Munos said. “Avi responded. I listened to his stuff, and I was really impressed.”

After recruiting guitarist Matt Gruber, a longtime Ghosh fan, Art Versus Industry booked its first show at Club Mix on Halloween.

“It wasn’t anything major. There was only, like, eight people there,” singer Ghosh said. “But it was still cool, and it was a good first show.”

While the show didn’t draw a huge crowd, it solidified Art Versus Industry as a full-fledged band.

With diverse musical backgrounds, each member has his own specialty. Ghosh started playing piano at a young age and eventually took up violin and bass guitar. Gruber took an interest in the dynamics of nu metal and industrial music in middle school. In high school, Gruber discovered Ghosh’s solo album, Twelve Degrees of Loneliness, and was certain that this was the type of music he wanted to create.

The band relies heavily on industrial aesthetics, drawing inspiration from Depeche Mode, The Cure and Nine Inch Nails. Its new single, “Devour,” sounds like a distorted adventure into the world of trip-hop with some new-wave tendencies.

Although they’ve been together for less than a year, the band members’ brotherly affection for one another shows that they’re in it for the long haul.

“We started the band because it works,” Gruber said. “And I think it’s great that Nick is in the band because you don’t really see a lot of crazy, innovative drumming in this style of music. He’s such an excellent drummer.”

Recently, Art Versus Industry has focused less on playing live shows, with the intention of writing and recording its first full-length album. The result is an EP titled Lapse, which is set to hit shelves in September, as well as an album the band members hope to have out by the end of the year.

“We kind of did two separate movements,” Ghosh said. “The first is more challenging and not easy to digest, while the second one is more minimal and definitely more hook-oriented.”

“The hardest thing about describing the sound of our EP is the fact that we take from various genres,” Gruber said. “It definitely has avant-garde electronica with punk, super-gritty industrial but also with a chill hip-hop, alternative feel to it.”

The band is set to perform at the Crystal Castles aftershow, giving Austin crowds a glimpse at an up-and-coming band that emphasizes both music and theatricality.

“It’s going to be a fun time. But if you have epilepsy, be careful,” Gruber said. “I would encourage you to face the back of the venue.”

---

WHAT: Art Versus Industry at the Crystal Castles aftershow
WHERE: Stubb’s Bar-B-Que, 801 Red River St.
WHEN: Tonight at 10
HOW MUCH: $8 - The Daily Texan


"After Crystal Castles, Art Versus Industry Brings The Pain."

Ok, fellow former teenagers of the '90s. Who here gets a little bit excited when NIN comes on the radio?

I certainly do. "Closer" is, in fact, my karaoke song of choice, even though when I look out at the audience, I see concerned faces. That's because my rendition involves a lot of growling.

So when Art Versus Industry, a local pop/goth/synth outfit known for their NIN channeling, let us know they were playing the Crystal Castles after show on Wednesday -- well, I admit I was intrigued. That's because their lyrics are very emotional, very non-ironic, which is unusual here in Austin. And, refreshing. Because sometimes I get bored with irony, you know? Sometimes I want PAIN. Not very often, but sometimes, when I fear I'm walking around with a bit too much ennui.

Ever-fabulous Eavesdropper Megan interviewed the trio, so I'll let you listen in on their conversation. Here she is, being hilarious as usual:

If Trent Reznor and Robert Smith had a baby, it would be a machine…obviously. And this baby machine would grow up and play music. Throw in a light show that rivals Ghostland Observatory’s and you have Art Versus Industry, a sophisticated, dark band that really isn’t anything like Trent Reznor or Robert Smith. If it were up to me, I would categorize their music as highbrow goth avant-garde punk pop synthesized, or HGAGPPS for short--but don’t you dare simplify it to just ‘electronic rock’. Hell, nah.

Art Versus Industry will be playing the after show at Stubb’s after Crystal Castles this Wednesday, August 11th. Their performance is something to behold. Check them out. Then get their album when it releases around September 28th (1st EP of two). (Interesting fact: it’s currently being mixed in NYC's Avatar Studios where noted notables such as the Kings Of Leon and Paul McCartney record.)

But before that, learn all their secrets:

Art Versus Industry only formed just last March, and yet you’re already opening for
Crystal Castles. Is Satan your overlord?

Avi: (Laughs) We all serve many masters, in fact, we’re all paying off our debts with interest at an APR of eternal infinity.

Matt: Nintendo is my overlord.

Nick: It turns out Satan is a sucker for sexual favors. But seriously things have happened pretty quickly for this band. I think we have managed to strike a chord with those who might have heard our music or seen us live and it has just spread by word of mouth.

Avi: We’re beyond fortunate and are excited to be a part of this show- we really don't take it for granted.

I can’t seem to find only one or two words that encapsulate Art Versus Industry. You’re like highbrow goth avant-garde punk pop synthesized, or HGAGPPS for short. How would you describe your music?

Nick: I love that description! I think that once people can find only one or two words that pigeonhole our sound, then I think it’s time we got more creative. I would definitely classify us as a rock band. I don't like getting into sub genres and sub categories when we never really set out trying to write songs that would fit a certain type of style or sound. I just describe it as ‘death by synth’.

Matt: Our music is way too hard to encapsulate. It really is song-specific really, such as trip-hop/goth, avant-garde/electronica , trance/punk, etc. So maybe just electronic rock to be simple—but that’s a grave injustice to what we’re doing.

Avi: Wow. That's single-handedly the crème de la crème of musical categorization. I don’t even think we’re worthy of such a category, but I’ll take it.

In all seriousness, there are elements of everything in what we do. I like to describe what we do as ‘the future’. What is the point of limitation when we can channel everything we love about Wu Tang Clan, The Beatles, and Rasputina in the same song without resorting to self masturbatory, pretentious snootiness? I’m a sucker for great hooks and pop sensibility, so we focus on writing good songs alongside our ambition to do something challenging, innovative, and unique.
On a sidenote, you think we can get Waterloo to put us in the "HGAGPPS" section? (Looks at Nick & Matt)

Your shows are more like performances, really, combining primal beats with theatrical lighting. Is it a collaborative effort?

Matt: Having our shows being theatrical performances, rather than the lackluster plug and play was definitely a conscious decision on our part. It not only gives our audience what they deserve, but we also get what we want. We all have great respect for bands that go above and beyond in a live setting and provide an escape from reality for their concert-goers. We hope to captivate minds at every show, presenting something that meets our standards in what we'd expect to see if we were coming from the audience's perspective.

Nick: Absolutely, we collectively decide on how each song should sound and look live. We put a lot of time and effort into our live shows and we are really proud of the end result; which is exactly why you should come see us play with Crystal Castles this Wednesday.

Avi: Just to resonate on what Nick and Matt said; this entire beast is the culmination of three people united by our love for music and all that it has to offer. We all collectively vow to ensure every body in attendance is entertained and continually push ourselves to deliver “shows” that are larger than life, despite the setting. Even coffee shops are targeted prey to our strobes.



You’re compared to NIN-a lot. Is that fair? Was that a huge influence or just one of many?

Matt: The NIN comparison is flattering, but I think often overused simply because of a general lack of awareness in this specific scene of music. There’s no possible any modern musician has not been influenced one way or another by NIN, but they are just a small part of the complex puzzle of influences to our art.

Nick: I feel that the comparison to NIN is a huge compliment but at the same time I think this comparison only happens because that is the one and only point of reference the general public has for music like this. I personally think that the two bands are tremendously different, and I think people will think the same once the Art Versus Industry record is released. I come from a completely different musical background so they weren't a huge influence for me. I do love me some Josh Freese though.

Avi: Personally, it’s endearing to be associated in the same ballpark as NIN. There’s a lot worse to be compared to. I’m just a fan of music that pushes boundaries in general and I’m fortunate to have developed a varied sonic palette and have a pretty wide range of appreciation. Reznor is undoubtedly an artist that had caused a paradigm shift in our pop culture and we hope to do the same in some impactful capacity. My primary influence has always been life and experience; hopefully that honesty shines through in what we do. - Austin Eavesdropper


Discography

Art Versus Industry : Self Titled (LP) 2012
Art Versus Industry : Movement I (EP) 2011
Avi Ghosh : Apocalypse, CA (Original Score) (LP) 2011
Art Versus Industry : "Let's Kill" (Single) 2010
Avi Ghosh : All That's Left Of Us (LP) 2009
Avi Ghosh : Severing The Tie (LP) 2008
Avi Ghosh : Watch The World Burn (EP) 2007
dEFY : Divide. Don't Multiply. (LP) 2006
dEFY : This Means Goodbye (LP) 2005
dEFY : The Twelve Degrees Of Loneliness (LP) 2004
dEFY : All Because Of You (LP) 2003
dEFY : The Last Taste Of You (EP) 2002

Photos

Bio

More than just a collage of ambitious sound, Art Versus Industry is an innovative movement that inspires listeners to become reacquainted with the notion of sincerity in music. The trio’s uncompromised offering is a meticulously crafted blend of crushing organic electronics, machined guitars- and introspective, personal commentary. Their challenging work will serve as a soundtrack for the future-forward progressive, pulling together just enough cinematic entropy to satiate the screen played lifestyles of the twitter generation. Far beyond a conceptual call-to-action reserved for the avant-garde at heart, Art Versus Industry is a fitting conversational middle ground for the market-molded and post modern to meet halfway. This is punk rock rebellion for the synthetic age that breathes analogous sensibility back into an all-consuming digital world.

Even though the band is prepping for their courageous debut, this creative pursuit is by no means an overnight realization; instead it’s the ripened end result of underground darlings (dEFY 2002-2007, Avi Ghosh) that have united forces to use their strength in numbers for meaningful impact. The buzz continues to expand at an alarming, exponential rate as the group’s devoted audience spreads the viral Art Versus Industry message to anyone open for musical change. In less than a year’s time, the three-piece’s high energy, seizure-inducing, immersive live performances have piqued interest and notoriety within their Austin surroundings, allowing them to land coveted support slots for the likes of Atari Teenage Riot, Black Veil Brides, Crystal Castles, Lords Of Acid, Android Lust, Angelspit, Voltaire, Sounds Under Radio and Assemblage 23 while headlining several reputable stages on their own.

Spring 2011 saw the release of the band’s freshman EP that was followed by an unforgiving regional touring cycle that ran well into the last quarter of the year. While on the road, the band continued to write and produce material for their highly anticipated full-length release set to release at 2012's annual SXSW festival in Austin, Texas. It’s just a matter of time before you, too, will join A.V.I.’s revolutionary cause to revive art back into music.

For touring availability and media inquiries please contact:

Matt Corner
Transience PR
TransiencePR@gmail.com
(512) 609-0171