Big Awesome

Big Awesome

 Bluffton, South Carolina, USA
BandRockPunk

In a genre that capitalizes on harsh, startling aesthetics to express itself, Big Awesome makes music that combines power with finesse. These songs are the musical embodiment of frustration and fear, rejection and rage, and often stoke the most primal responses in the listener.

Biography

Sometimes the most expressive, most emotional music is also the harshest. Often constructed out of dissonance and diagonal chords; perforated by punchy, reckless rhythms; and ushered by either shrieks or savage roars, these songs are the musical embodiment of frustration and fear, rejection and rage, and often stoke the most primal responses in the listener.

There's an exception, however, in Big Awesome, a three-piece band from Bluffton, SC whose members routinely switch off instruments when playing live. The band's smooth, melodic layers and delicate sense of dynamics verify that technical control can evoke more meaningful emotion than animalistic abandon. And on Birdfeeder, Big Awesome's self-released four-song EP, they demonstrate this with a dexterity that is both obvious and difficult to define.

Consider “Grey's Birthday”, the EP's opening track, whose crisp and clean guitars seem to squeak as they rub against the strict rhythm of Tyler Giarratano's tight, tense drumming during the verse. “Is this the night where everything goes as planned?” John Blanken croons as Colin Czeriwnski's guitar twists around him and the song's pace slows to a breezy sway. “Well, I'm just waiting to see what happens.” But, then, when the song climbs into its blistering chorus, it doesn't merely move from quiet to loud, but from delicate to dense and fully formed.

And then there's “Living with Love”, which rumbles with a kind of kinetic energy, its guitars tingling with explosive potential; instead of detonating, the chorus cuts into something that throbs, guitars clucking in syncopated clicks. After a sudden breath, though, the song bursts; guitars hanging heavy and swaying to a monstrous stomp. “I've spent too much time / Writing songs that don't mean anything,” Blanken pleads, his voice gravelly and grave. “I will waste no time / Living life and loving everything,” he concludes, twisting his words in a subtle manner that adds thought and meaning.

In a genre that capitalizes on harsh, startling aesthetics to express itself, Big Awesome makes music that combines power with finesse. No, it's not necessarily as loud, but Birdfeeder feels denser and more memorable, more dynamic and meticulous, and captures more accurately the complex nature of emotion. Sure, those harsher songs may allow the listener to express something primitive; Big Awesome's songs summon the same, but add to it something more cerebral, making these songs, perhaps, even more human than the most barbaric tracks.

Discography

'Birdfeeder'- released 6/12/2012 - Digital / CD

Recording full length to be released 2013