Big Blue Marble

Big Blue Marble

BandAlternativeRock

Biography

As with most good independent music these days, you run into a lot of "buts" when you try to classify the sound of Big Blue Marble. It is defined as much by what it isn't as by what it is, so keep the qualifiers handy if you want to talk influences. It's psychedelic, but not spacey. Punk, but not angry. Literate, but not pretentious. Alternative, but not whiney. Rock n roll, but not superficial. Bass player Sara Essex coined what might be the best description so far after listening to the band's rough mix of their first LP: this music is just so nice. (But not take-your-grandma-to-church-and-keep-your-legs-crossed nice.)

Big Blue Marble's influences are not accidental, nor is their effect: band members were handpicked based on complimentary aesthetic and style, and the seamless result has the power to perk up ears on the other side of the room and draw lengthy, involuntary aaaaaahhh's from listeners, which is exactly what the band is going for. You might start out listening to this stuff in your lawn chair, but you'll most likely end up cleaning the whole house and rearranging the living room by the time you're through. According to David Fera, BBM's music is the equivalent of an uptown Sunday afternoon, with dogs on the porches and friends in the street. The songs have a particular and perfect (but not obsessively neat) resonance you can sink into as deeply as you care to. If Big Blue Marble were a neighborhood, you'd be torn between wanting to tell everyone and wanting to keep the warm secret to yourself. But like all truly good secrets, it begs to be shared, and like all good music, it sounds even better that way.