Bill Geezy and The New Deal
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Bill Geezy and The New Deal

Band Country Folk

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Music

The best kept secret in music

Press


"Bill Geezy and The New Deal Press"

"Bill Geezy tore the place up!" Jerry Jeff Walker/Singer-songwriter

A wellspring of roots/Americana music, Bill Geezy has produced another scraggly gem: the mandolin- and dobro-heavy EP "Exit Wounds." As one might gather, it's not exactly a party album, but it confirms Geezy's growing rep as a songwriter who at his best is reminiscent of John Prine. "I've never been a hobo, but sometimes a bum," he sings on the instant country classic "100 Times a Day," which is jaunty and upbeat compared with the devastating "Sweet Evangeline," a sordid story song of child sex abuse that ends in murder.
Mpls. Star Tribune


Bill Geezy's masculine gravelly voice has the ability to deliver a song as smooth as silk. Clint Hoovers harmonica blowing is just outstanding and the songs for this album are as interesting as storytelling can get. A fascinating mixture of songs on this release that will not disappoint any type of music fan. Bill has done it with this new album. It's so real cool.
Five Stars, Roots Music Report

"One of the folk scene's underrated veterans, Bill Geezy, recalls the wit and gritty soul of John Hiatt"
Minneapolis Star Tribune

"From the country-dance jam "WM seeking WF," to the blues-tinged "Shelbyville," Bill Geezy and the Promise Breakers' songs whir and chug like a train passing through the Southern swamplands. Geezy and Co. keep the lonely country landscape interesting with rich stories, warm vocals and Hoover's exploding harmonica bursts. You can almost feel the humidity and taste the country grit."
Saint Paul Pioneer Press

Bill Geezy is the kind of poetic, storytelling songwriter whom you'd expect to find flourishing in hip Austin, Texas, or scuffling in Nashville. He's a witty wordsmith, an easy going melodist anchored in the folk tradition and an octave challenged yet charming singer who makes every lyric sound fly-on-the-wall natural. Think Butch Hancock, John Prine, Guy Clark - his best songs have that kind of depth, immediacy and clarity. Bil l Geezy's album is loaded with great roots-rock!
Minneapolis StarTribune - Mpls. Tribune


Discography

The Orchid Lounge
Can't Stop Thinking Bout My Baby
Exit Wounds

Photos

Bio

www.myspace.com/billygeezy

From his days performing on Garrison Keillor's A Prairie Home Companion as a member of Stoney Lonesome Bluegrass Ba nd to the present, Bill has been compiling a large catalogue of his handcrafted, American, countrified, folk-rock songs. On the Hoffman guitar that his mother bought him for a high school graduation present Bill has penned songs that have become the stuff that dreams are made of.

Bill's son gs have been:
Performed on Garrison Keillor's A Prairie Home Companion
Been included on an album of children's songs, which also featured Suzzy Roche of the incomparable Roches.
Recorded by Kate MacKenzie and EmmyLou Harris
Nominated for a Grammy
Published in internationally acclaimed folk magazine SING OUT!
Bills songs tap into a well of emotions that range from seriously sentimental to whimsically sarcastic. Appealing to a wide range of audiences, whether you're seven or seventy Bill's songs feel comfortable the first time you hear them and grow on you more and more with each time you listen. And there's no doubt about it these songs will stand the test of time!

The New Deal is Holle Brain, Mark Briere, Ray Barnard, John Giese and Jim Nee.

PRESS

"Bill Geezy tore the place up!" Jerry Jeff Walker/Singer-songwriter

A wellspring of roots/Americana music, Bill Geezy has produced another scraggly gem: the mandolin- and dobro-heavy EP "Exit Wounds." As one might gather, it's not exactly a party album, but it confirms Geezy's growing rep as a songwriter who at his best is reminiscent of John Prine. "I've never been a hobo, but sometimes a bum," he sings on the instant country classic "100 Times a Day," which is jaunty and upbeat compared with the devastating "Sweet Evangeline," a sordid story song of child sex abuse that ends in murder.
Mpls. Star Tribune

Bill Geezy's masculine gravelly voice has the ability to deliver a song as smooth as silk. Clint Hoovers harmonica blowing is just outstanding and the songs for this album are as interesting as storytelling can get. A fascinating mixture of songs on this release that will not disappoint any type of music fan. Bill has done it with this new album. It's so real cool.
Five Stars, Roots Music Report

"One of the folk scene's underrated veterans, Bill Geezy, recalls the wit and gritty soul of John Hiatt"
Minneapolis Star Tribune

"From the country-dance jam "WM seeking WF," to the blues-tinged "Shelbyville," Bill Geezy and the Promise Breakers' songs whir and chug like a train passing through the Southern swamplands. Geezy and Co. keep the lonely country landscape interesting with rich stories, warm vocals and Hoover's exploding harmonica bursts. You can almost feel the humidity and taste the country grit."
Saint Paul Pioneer Press

Bill Geezy is the kind of poetic, storytelling songwriter whom you'd expect to find flourishing in hip Austin, Texas, or scuffling in Nashville. He's a witty wordsmith, an easy going melodist anchored in the folk tradition and an octave challenged yet charming singer who makes every lyric sound fly-on-the-wall natural. Think Butch Hancock, John Prine, Guy Clark - his best songs have that kind of depth, immediacy and clarity. Bil l Geezy's album is loaded with great roots-rock!
Minneapolis StarTribune

CD Review - Bill Geezy - Exit Wounds/Rift Music Magazine
Posted on November 23rd, 2008 by Riftyrich

By Jeremy Anderson
The imagery, tones, and cadences in Bill Geezy’s music stand in sharp contrast to what one might expect from a current Twin Cities based singer/songwriter. The raspy drawl of his voice and rhythmic, processional folk/country instrumentation sound reminiscent of some rugged Texan troubadours from decades past. Yet, Geezy shouldn’t be discarded as merely an imitator or throwback musician. On Exit Wounds, his latest release, Geezy has delicately crafted together a collection of songs that subtly carry forward the folk traditions of the past.
Geezy appears emotionally and artistically at odds with the constant changes of modern city life, clamoring through his music for the rustic frontier that excites him. The disparity of these two worlds fuels Exit Wounds. This theme is quintessentially exempl ified with the metaphorical song, “Round Peg/Square Hole” and is more poignantly engaged in “A Hundred Times A Day,” in which Geezy describes daydreaming himself away from the city into imaginary western settings.
Geezy wants to live in a romanticized gutbucket world that no longer exists but resides in a world that is incapable of fully suiting him. His willingness to engage this conflict brings about his best songwriting attributes. Time is passing by and he is keeping up the best he can, through his music.
In “Pretty Pictures,” Geezy portrays uneasiness in which he witnesses his daughter grow into a woman. His sings, “By God, if I had it my way, I would turn back time to when you were young.” Geezy is a songwriter capable of diving into the