Blake Rainey and his Demons
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Blake Rainey and his Demons

Atlanta, GA | Established. Jan 01, 2014 | INDIE

Atlanta, GA | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2014
Band Americana Alternative

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This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

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"SONG PREMIERE: BLAKE RAINEY & HIS DEMONS GET EXPLOSIVE & EMOTIVE ON “TROUBLE ON HOLIDAY”"

The title track from Blake Rainey and His Demons’ latest album, Helicopter Rose, is about rescue, and it’s a theme that carries throughout the new record, one populated with stories of forlorn barflies, tattered relationships, and other hard-luck realities of modern life.”

Rainey has earned his share of acclaim over the past 15 years. His previous band, the Young Antiques, won Rainey critical accolades for his rollicking mix of power pop and roots rock, including high marks from SPIN, PopMatters, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and more. But it took the Antiques’ dissolution for Rainey to push his songwriting into deeper thematic waters. Citing inspiration from lyricists including Tom Waits, Elvis Costello and Paul Westerberg, Helicopter Rose is checkered with smart wordplay and sharp storytelling in the tradition of his legendary influences.

“I’ve always been drawn to people who write songs that are very unique,” Rainey says. “It takes a talent, or at least an attention to detail, to write lines that aren’t just like ‘Hey baby baby baby.’ You want to try and spin a story that you haven’t heard before. Or maybe you’ve heard it before, but there are interesting new twists in the song that make it fresh.”

Helicopter Rose also represents new territory for Rainey, musically. A native Georgian, he grew up with country music staples such as Johnny Cash, George Jones, and Waylon Jennings on the stereo. But with the Young Antique’s power-pop approach, there was little room to incorporate his love of country. After recording and touring with the band, off and on, for more than a decade, Rainey released his first record with the Demons, The Dangerous Summer, in 2007. The band’s sophomore effort, Love Don’t Cross Me, followed in 2014. “The Demons have freed me up to do different stuff,” Rainey says. “With the Antiques, we mainly did all these fast, rocking songs. I never had a chance to do crazy country licks or anything like that.”

The first two Demons records found Rainey refining his songwriting style to canvas the full scope of his tastes and influences. Helicopter Rose, though, represents a more deliberate push to find where punk rock meets country, where Merle Haggard crosses paths with The Replacements. It took his backing band of drummer Eric Young, guitarist Aaron Mason, and bassist Joe Foy—a seasoned veteran of New York City’s CBGB punk scene—to bring his eclectic vision to life. Rainey also enlisted the services of revered steel guitar player Steve Stone to give the songs some added country authenticity.

Helicopter Rose also reunited Rainey with longtime friend and producer Tim Delaney, a former intern at Southern Tracks for Brendan O'Brien. - Glide Magazine


"Notes From Left of the Dial"

Atlanta-based folk rock outfit Blake Rainey & His Demons are storytellers above all else. With every turned melody and rustic rhythm, they discover the heart of what it means to use music to pass on stories from one generation to the next. Melding classic rock's mix of bravado and vulnerability with a graceful folk veneer, they fashion a sound that's as familiar as it is affecting. The band is set to release their newest record, "Helicopter Rose," Dec. 9; and they populate these songs with tales of desperate men, lost love and the realities of modern living—really, just the basic stuff when it comes to exploring the significant moments of every day that provide us with the motivation and determination to carry on, despite a host of difficulties.

On their new single, "Trouble on Holiday," Rainey and the band find a balance between the raucous blue-collar attitude of Bruce Springsteen and the lyrical wordplay of Elvis Costello. There's a tangible twang, but it's less a distinguishing attribute and more a gentle nudge toward the bucolic back road narratives common to the landscape of Rainey's native Georgia. This track brings some muscular guitar riffs and a melodic urgency to bear on the inherent conviviality that has been built up over his past few records. "Trouble on Holiday" is what you'd get if Tom Petty and Nick Lowe sat down together to write a song steeped in the perspectives of someone who's spent their whole life in the Deep South. - Nooga Magazine


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

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Bio

The title track from Blake Rainey and His Demons’ latest album, Helicopter Rose, is about rescue, and it’s a theme that carries throughout the new record, one populated with stories of forlorn barflies, tattered relationships, and other hard-luck realities of modern life.

Rainey has earned his share of acclaim over the past 15 years. His previous band, the Young Antiques, won him critical accolades for its rollicking mix of power pop and roots rock, including high marks from SPIN, PopMatters, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and more. But it took the Antiques’ dissolution for Rainey to push his songwriting into deeper thematic waters. Citing inspiration from lyricists including Tom Waits, Elvis Costello and Paul Westerberg, Helicopter Rose is checkered with smart wordplay and sharp storytelling in the tradition of his legendary influences.

“I’ve always been drawn to people who write songs that are very unique,” Rainey says. “It takes a talent, or at least an attention to detail, to write lines that aren’t just like ‘Hey baby baby baby.’ You want to try and spin a story that you haven’t heard before. Or maybe you’ve heard it before, but there are interesting new twists in the song that make it fresh.”   

And this is exactly what Rainey pulls off with Helicopter Rose. While much of the record is rooted in sad-eyed country music fodder, Rainey displays an uncanny knack for turning otherwise painful stories into songs that are, by turns, thought-provoking and amusing.

Helicopter Rose also represents new territory for Rainey, musically. A native Georgian, he grew up with country music staples such as Johnny Cash, George Jones, and Waylon Jennings on the stereo. But with the Young Antique’s power-pop approach, there was little room to incorporate his love of country. After recording and touring with the band, off and on, for more than a decade, Rainey released his first record with the Demons, The Dangerous Summer, in 2007. The band's sophomore effort, Love Don’t Cross Me,followed in 2014. 

The first two Demons records found Rainey refining his songwriting style to canvas the full scope of his tastes and influences. Helicopter Rose, though, represents a more deliberate push to find where punk rock meets country, where Merle Haggard crosses paths with The Replacements. It took his backing band of drummer Eric Young, guitarist Aaron Mason, and bassist Joe Foy—a seasoned veteran of New York City’s CBGB punk scene—to bring his eclectic vision to life. Rainey also enlisted the services of revered steel guitar player Steve Stone to give the songs some added country authenticity.

With recording wrapped and Helicopter Rose set to drop on December 8th, Rainey and the Demons are shooting a video for the record’s first single, “Losing My Way,” which will be out in early December. He also plans to tour behind the record, both solo and with His Demons, in the months ahead.

"Much like Warren Zevon and Tom Waits before him, Rainey is the kind of guy that likes singing songs about bad guys from the bad guy's perspective ... he pivots between cabaret, jazz, and big band music all while singing about copping drugs and sneaking into people's houses." - Punk News

"Wrapped in rhythmic twang and an old school radio friendly wail. From the meaty rhythmic guitars to the cryptic chorus, Rainey has molded a track that maintains a modern urgency, while keeping its footing with the indie credibility of his legendary influences." - Glide Magazine

"Trouble on Holiday" is what you'd get if Tom Petty and Nick Lowe sat down together to write a song steeped in the perspectives of someone who's spent their whole life in the Deep South." - Nooga Magazine

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