Blk Galaga
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Blk Galaga

New York, New York, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2014 | SELF

New York, New York, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2014
Band Rock Punk

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Music

Press


"Nut House Punks - Interview"

Earlier this week, I received on of those random press e-mails one gets when they run a website such as this. And, being as how I’ve been looking for new music to throw in my ears while the office winds down for semester’s end, I was more than happy to start listening to the debut long-player from New York City’s Blk Galaga, Something for Everyone, Nothing for You.

The songs were entertaining and loud and fast — all good things. What really grabbed my attention was the series of videos the group had made for every song on the album. They were chock-full of bad movies, with blood and strange costumes. I was hooked, and immediately shot the group an e-mail to ask them some questions. Guitarist and vocalist Andrew Forbes shot back his answers about their upcoming LP, the videos, and more.

You recorded your debut album with Don Fury. Did you set out to record with him, based on his pedigree, or was it happenstance?

We wanted out first album to be a really raw punk rock record without a lot of “bell and whistles,” but there’s an art to that, and we knew that Don Fury was the guy to get that sound. Aside from being a big fan of a lot of music Don has worked on, I played bass in a hardcore band a few years ago (State of Disgrace) that recorded with Don when his studio was in Coney Island. He’s since moved to Troy, NY, and we recorded the album over 4 different weekend sessions with him. It was definitely worth the trips to and from NYC (and the nights sleeping on the studio floor) because Don is awesome to work with and we’re really happy with the way our album turned out.

Tell me more about these custom flash drives that you’re using to sell the album. What do they look like? Is there more than just the album on there?

They’re currently being manufactured and we should have them in a few days. They’re a pretty basic flash just imprinted with our band name and of course preloaded with the album. There are a couple of bonus tracks on it. We chose to do this to offer something tangible for people to buy at shows — we think it will be more “enticing” than just selling CDs or download cards. It’s tough being in a punk rock band these days — we have to find innovative ways to get our music out there!

There’s a lot of noise on Something for Everyone, Nothing for You. How does a trio sound so big?

Well, up until recently we were a 4-piece, but my good buddy Alex accepted a demanding job that doesn’t leave much time for ol’ Blk Galaga. All of the songs have at least 2 guitar parts, so we’re planning to bring someone else on board sometime soon. In the meantime, we’re doing our best as a trio!

Where’d your sound come from? It’s this interesting blend of thrash and pop-punk, especially on something like “I, Zombie.”

We love all subgenres of punk (excluding most post-90’s Fearless or Epitaph bands!). We consciously tried to represent a lot of different types of punk on the album and in our songs, which is where the album title came from. There’s basically “something for everyone” but chances are not too many people are going to like it anyways (“nothing for you”) haha.

Your only releases up to this point have been some compilation appearances. Did those appearances garner you any notice?

Nope! But that’s ok, because we are in this band because it’s fun and we love punk rock. If anyone happens to listen to and like our music, that’s just a bonus.

What are the plans once the album comes out?

We will definitely be playing shows outside of NYC in 2013 (and might do a few shows in France, where our drummer is from), but we don’t subscribe to the “you’re not a legitimate band unless you’re constantly out on tour” mentality. There are plenty of shit bands out there on tour, there’s no need for us to be one of them! So we’ll play more shows and write new songs, which I guess is what all bands do!



This is some MST3K-caliber video — they’re amazingly bizarre and yet entirely consistent with the songs. Where did the idea come from to make videos for every song on the album, and where did you source all of the material from?

Thanks! Our thought was that people would be more inclined to listen to more than 30 seconds of one song if there was something visual to keep their attention. These videos are super amateurish- I’ve never tried to do anything like this before, but it hopefully serves the purpose of entertaining whoever listens to our album. I made them by editing footage from YouTube and DVDs, and tried to inject some humor into a lot of them because sometimes our songs sound too serious!

Blk Galaga’s Something for Everyone, Nothing for You will be out Tuesday, January 1, via their Bandcamp page

- Nut House Punks


"Nut House Punks - Interview"

Earlier this week, I received on of those random press e-mails one gets when they run a website such as this. And, being as how I’ve been looking for new music to throw in my ears while the office winds down for semester’s end, I was more than happy to start listening to the debut long-player from New York City’s Blk Galaga, Something for Everyone, Nothing for You.

The songs were entertaining and loud and fast — all good things. What really grabbed my attention was the series of videos the group had made for every song on the album. They were chock-full of bad movies, with blood and strange costumes. I was hooked, and immediately shot the group an e-mail to ask them some questions. Guitarist and vocalist Andrew Forbes shot back his answers about their upcoming LP, the videos, and more.

You recorded your debut album with Don Fury. Did you set out to record with him, based on his pedigree, or was it happenstance?

We wanted out first album to be a really raw punk rock record without a lot of “bell and whistles,” but there’s an art to that, and we knew that Don Fury was the guy to get that sound. Aside from being a big fan of a lot of music Don has worked on, I played bass in a hardcore band a few years ago (State of Disgrace) that recorded with Don when his studio was in Coney Island. He’s since moved to Troy, NY, and we recorded the album over 4 different weekend sessions with him. It was definitely worth the trips to and from NYC (and the nights sleeping on the studio floor) because Don is awesome to work with and we’re really happy with the way our album turned out.

Tell me more about these custom flash drives that you’re using to sell the album. What do they look like? Is there more than just the album on there?

They’re currently being manufactured and we should have them in a few days. They’re a pretty basic flash just imprinted with our band name and of course preloaded with the album. There are a couple of bonus tracks on it. We chose to do this to offer something tangible for people to buy at shows — we think it will be more “enticing” than just selling CDs or download cards. It’s tough being in a punk rock band these days — we have to find innovative ways to get our music out there!

There’s a lot of noise on Something for Everyone, Nothing for You. How does a trio sound so big?

Well, up until recently we were a 4-piece, but my good buddy Alex accepted a demanding job that doesn’t leave much time for ol’ Blk Galaga. All of the songs have at least 2 guitar parts, so we’re planning to bring someone else on board sometime soon. In the meantime, we’re doing our best as a trio!

Where’d your sound come from? It’s this interesting blend of thrash and pop-punk, especially on something like “I, Zombie.”

We love all subgenres of punk (excluding most post-90’s Fearless or Epitaph bands!). We consciously tried to represent a lot of different types of punk on the album and in our songs, which is where the album title came from. There’s basically “something for everyone” but chances are not too many people are going to like it anyways (“nothing for you”) haha.

Your only releases up to this point have been some compilation appearances. Did those appearances garner you any notice?

Nope! But that’s ok, because we are in this band because it’s fun and we love punk rock. If anyone happens to listen to and like our music, that’s just a bonus.

What are the plans once the album comes out?

We will definitely be playing shows outside of NYC in 2013 (and might do a few shows in France, where our drummer is from), but we don’t subscribe to the “you’re not a legitimate band unless you’re constantly out on tour” mentality. There are plenty of shit bands out there on tour, there’s no need for us to be one of them! So we’ll play more shows and write new songs, which I guess is what all bands do!



This is some MST3K-caliber video — they’re amazingly bizarre and yet entirely consistent with the songs. Where did the idea come from to make videos for every song on the album, and where did you source all of the material from?

Thanks! Our thought was that people would be more inclined to listen to more than 30 seconds of one song if there was something visual to keep their attention. These videos are super amateurish- I’ve never tried to do anything like this before, but it hopefully serves the purpose of entertaining whoever listens to our album. I made them by editing footage from YouTube and DVDs, and tried to inject some humor into a lot of them because sometimes our songs sound too serious!

Blk Galaga’s Something for Everyone, Nothing for You will be out Tuesday, January 1, via their Bandcamp page

- Nut House Punks


"!Upstarter Punk Reviews - Album Review"

I am not displeased to be introduced to Blk Galaga. I will keep them, as an arrow in my quiver, for a while. They are tight, with nice harmonies. The band has a future touring in cramped quarters, and rocking the venue. What they need is a deal with fat records. I like the band and their sounds, but I expect more out of a band from east of the Rockies. You be the judge.

Jimmy Bile

- !Upstarter Punk Reviews


"!Upstarter Punk Reviews - Album Review"

I am not displeased to be introduced to Blk Galaga. I will keep them, as an arrow in my quiver, for a while. They are tight, with nice harmonies. The band has a future touring in cramped quarters, and rocking the venue. What they need is a deal with fat records. I like the band and their sounds, but I expect more out of a band from east of the Rockies. You be the judge.

Jimmy Bile

- !Upstarter Punk Reviews


"Punk Reviews - Interview"

‘BLK Galaga’ Interview
January 22, 2013
Please list the name and respective instrument of each band member.

Drew- vocals, guitar

Francis – bass

Thomas – drums
How long have you all known each other?

We met a couple of years ago but our souls have known each other since long before our first physical connection.


How did you meet?

We were all using eHarmony. A few weeks before our subscriptions ended, we were matched- Drew to Thomas and Thomas to Francis. We all exchanged IM IDs and started chatting. Then we started sexting. Eventually we formed a punk band.

When did you form your band?

When Thomas was in his early 30s.

What inspired you to make music together?

It isn’t for the money, no it isn’t for the fun

It’s a plan, a scam, a diagram

It’s for the benefit of everyone

You gotta have a little respect

Subterranean ideals

Traditional neglect

Reflect on how you think it would make you feel

The cause- we’re just doing it for the cause

What can you tell me about your instruments? (i.e., Are you subject to brand loyalty or will you play with whatever’s available? What made you choose the instruments you have now? Was it cost or was it a style/model/brand/color preference?

After conducting the appropriate SWOT, ROI and risk/benefit analysis, we select instruments that we know are fully inspected and adjusted for easy playability, accuracy in tuning, intonation and tone production.

Where have you performed?

We’ve played so many shows around NYC that now nobody will come see us play anymore. We’re starting to book more shows that will require driving.

What are your favorite and least favorite venues?

Some good NYC venues for smaller bands are Arlene’s Grocery in LES and Trash Bar in Brooklyn. There are many terrible places to play in NYC but the worst we’ve encountered so far is Alphabet Lounge. Fuck that place. Drew wants to start a blog documenting the good and bad venues in NYC, but hasn’t gotten around to that yet.

Do you have any upcoming shows?

We always have a show or two lined up in NYC and are starting to book shows out of state.

Which songs do you perform most frequently?

Most songs from our album are on our set list, but that’s starting to change as we incorporate new songs. Hopefully we’ll soon retire our really bad songs and have a full set of mediocre songs.

Do you ever play any covers?

We used to play Sam Cooke’s “Bring it on Home”. Sometimes we’ll play “Shock Treatment” by the Ramones. Sometimes people confuse our original songs as bad NOFX covers.

Do you have a set play list?

No, we just play our set list.

Who writes your songs?

Drew and Francis bring in most of the songs and we fine-tune them as a band.

What are the main themes or topics for most of your songs? Do you think these topics will change over time?

We cover all the typical “punk” topics. Basically we try to articulate some aspect of our worldview or emotional mindset in each of our songs. These topics will change over time because we don’t want to keep saying the same stuff.

Could you briefly describe the music-making process?

1. Write song
2. Practice song
3. Perform song
4. Record song
5. Repeat steps 2-3

What are your rehearsals generally like?

What we do is secret.

Do you have a set time each week in which you practice or are rehearsals more spontaneous?

See above.

How has your music evolved since you first began playing music together?

It hasn’t evolved much. We’re basically at the peak of our limited creative abilities.

What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Have you been able to overcome that challenge? If so, how?

Our biggest challenge is getting people to come out to shows. Part of the problem is competing with the plethora of nightlife options in NYC. Part of the problem is that there aren’t that many punk fans around and many of them aren’t interested in going to smaller shows. Part of the problem is that we play too many local shows. Part of the problem is that we need to write better songs. We are often hindered in our quest for all- but WE SHALL ACHIEVE ALL!

What’s your ultimate direction for your band?

North-East.

What advice do you have for people who want to form their own bands?

Don’t do it! Being in a band is emotionally and financially expensive, rarely rewarding, and almost always ends up damaging the relationships between band members. People like us who have been in bands for many years are either masochistic or just plain stupid.

Is there anyone you’d like to acknowledge for offering financial or emotional support?

Um, nobody’s ever offered us financial or emotional support, but Don Fury, who recorded our album, and Ashley Russell, who designed the album cover, were both great to work with. If anyone would like to offer us financial support, please contact us at blkgalaga@gmail.com. For emotional support, please conta - Punk Reviews


"Punk Reviews - Interview"

‘BLK Galaga’ Interview
January 22, 2013
Please list the name and respective instrument of each band member.

Drew- vocals, guitar

Francis – bass

Thomas – drums
How long have you all known each other?

We met a couple of years ago but our souls have known each other since long before our first physical connection.


How did you meet?

We were all using eHarmony. A few weeks before our subscriptions ended, we were matched- Drew to Thomas and Thomas to Francis. We all exchanged IM IDs and started chatting. Then we started sexting. Eventually we formed a punk band.

When did you form your band?

When Thomas was in his early 30s.

What inspired you to make music together?

It isn’t for the money, no it isn’t for the fun

It’s a plan, a scam, a diagram

It’s for the benefit of everyone

You gotta have a little respect

Subterranean ideals

Traditional neglect

Reflect on how you think it would make you feel

The cause- we’re just doing it for the cause

What can you tell me about your instruments? (i.e., Are you subject to brand loyalty or will you play with whatever’s available? What made you choose the instruments you have now? Was it cost or was it a style/model/brand/color preference?

After conducting the appropriate SWOT, ROI and risk/benefit analysis, we select instruments that we know are fully inspected and adjusted for easy playability, accuracy in tuning, intonation and tone production.

Where have you performed?

We’ve played so many shows around NYC that now nobody will come see us play anymore. We’re starting to book more shows that will require driving.

What are your favorite and least favorite venues?

Some good NYC venues for smaller bands are Arlene’s Grocery in LES and Trash Bar in Brooklyn. There are many terrible places to play in NYC but the worst we’ve encountered so far is Alphabet Lounge. Fuck that place. Drew wants to start a blog documenting the good and bad venues in NYC, but hasn’t gotten around to that yet.

Do you have any upcoming shows?

We always have a show or two lined up in NYC and are starting to book shows out of state.

Which songs do you perform most frequently?

Most songs from our album are on our set list, but that’s starting to change as we incorporate new songs. Hopefully we’ll soon retire our really bad songs and have a full set of mediocre songs.

Do you ever play any covers?

We used to play Sam Cooke’s “Bring it on Home”. Sometimes we’ll play “Shock Treatment” by the Ramones. Sometimes people confuse our original songs as bad NOFX covers.

Do you have a set play list?

No, we just play our set list.

Who writes your songs?

Drew and Francis bring in most of the songs and we fine-tune them as a band.

What are the main themes or topics for most of your songs? Do you think these topics will change over time?

We cover all the typical “punk” topics. Basically we try to articulate some aspect of our worldview or emotional mindset in each of our songs. These topics will change over time because we don’t want to keep saying the same stuff.

Could you briefly describe the music-making process?

1. Write song
2. Practice song
3. Perform song
4. Record song
5. Repeat steps 2-3

What are your rehearsals generally like?

What we do is secret.

Do you have a set time each week in which you practice or are rehearsals more spontaneous?

See above.

How has your music evolved since you first began playing music together?

It hasn’t evolved much. We’re basically at the peak of our limited creative abilities.

What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Have you been able to overcome that challenge? If so, how?

Our biggest challenge is getting people to come out to shows. Part of the problem is competing with the plethora of nightlife options in NYC. Part of the problem is that there aren’t that many punk fans around and many of them aren’t interested in going to smaller shows. Part of the problem is that we play too many local shows. Part of the problem is that we need to write better songs. We are often hindered in our quest for all- but WE SHALL ACHIEVE ALL!

What’s your ultimate direction for your band?

North-East.

What advice do you have for people who want to form their own bands?

Don’t do it! Being in a band is emotionally and financially expensive, rarely rewarding, and almost always ends up damaging the relationships between band members. People like us who have been in bands for many years are either masochistic or just plain stupid.

Is there anyone you’d like to acknowledge for offering financial or emotional support?

Um, nobody’s ever offered us financial or emotional support, but Don Fury, who recorded our album, and Ashley Russell, who designed the album cover, were both great to work with. If anyone would like to offer us financial support, please contact us at blkgalaga@gmail.com. For emotional support, please conta - Punk Reviews


"Review Bastard - album review"

BLK Galaga is a punk band of four New York City scene regular named Drew, Alex, Francis, and Thomas. Influenced by old-school punk-hardcore band such as NOFX, Bad Religion, and Rise Against, these guys establish not just ecletic lyrics but also compiling their own music with additional influence from motown era, age of rock, and funk season. On January 1st, 2013 BLK Galaga release their full length studio album titled Something for Everyone, Nothing for You. Produced by well-known NYC punk-hardcore band (Agnostic Front, Sick of It All, H2O, etc.) producer Don Fury. Have a listen, and you’ll find how a modern punk from underground of NYC itself being played and continue to run on its root path from early ’70s untill today.

This is a short introduction, my punk-hardcore references aren’t up to date, obviously. Looking forward to see more great music like this one coming to my inbox. Stream BLK Galaga’s Something for Everyone, Nothing for You below:
- Review Bastard


"Review Bastard - album review"

BLK Galaga is a punk band of four New York City scene regular named Drew, Alex, Francis, and Thomas. Influenced by old-school punk-hardcore band such as NOFX, Bad Religion, and Rise Against, these guys establish not just ecletic lyrics but also compiling their own music with additional influence from motown era, age of rock, and funk season. On January 1st, 2013 BLK Galaga release their full length studio album titled Something for Everyone, Nothing for You. Produced by well-known NYC punk-hardcore band (Agnostic Front, Sick of It All, H2O, etc.) producer Don Fury. Have a listen, and you’ll find how a modern punk from underground of NYC itself being played and continue to run on its root path from early ’70s untill today.

This is a short introduction, my punk-hardcore references aren’t up to date, obviously. Looking forward to see more great music like this one coming to my inbox. Stream BLK Galaga’s Something for Everyone, Nothing for You below:
- Review Bastard


"Review Bastard - album review"

BLK Galaga is a punk band of four New York City scene regular named Drew, Alex, Francis, and Thomas. Influenced by old-school punk-hardcore band such as NOFX, Bad Religion, and Rise Against, these guys establish not just ecletic lyrics but also compiling their own music with additional influence from motown era, age of rock, and funk season. On January 1st, 2013 BLK Galaga release their full length studio album titled Something for Everyone, Nothing for You. Produced by well-known NYC punk-hardcore band (Agnostic Front, Sick of It All, H2O, etc.) producer Don Fury. Have a listen, and you’ll find how a modern punk from underground of NYC itself being played and continue to run on its root path from early ’70s untill today.

This is a short introduction, my punk-hardcore references aren’t up to date, obviously. Looking forward to see more great music like this one coming to my inbox. Stream BLK Galaga’s Something for Everyone, Nothing for You below:
- Review Bastard


"Review Bastard - album review"

BLK Galaga is a punk band of four New York City scene regular named Drew, Alex, Francis, and Thomas. Influenced by old-school punk-hardcore band such as NOFX, Bad Religion, and Rise Against, these guys establish not just ecletic lyrics but also compiling their own music with additional influence from motown era, age of rock, and funk season. On January 1st, 2013 BLK Galaga release their full length studio album titled Something for Everyone, Nothing for You. Produced by well-known NYC punk-hardcore band (Agnostic Front, Sick of It All, H2O, etc.) producer Don Fury. Have a listen, and you’ll find how a modern punk from underground of NYC itself being played and continue to run on its root path from early ’70s untill today.

This is a short introduction, my punk-hardcore references aren’t up to date, obviously. Looking forward to see more great music like this one coming to my inbox. Stream BLK Galaga’s Something for Everyone, Nothing for You below:
- Review Bastard


"Blog review"

Blk Galaga, like the towering Romanian Dadaists Tristan Tzara and Marcel Janco, have created works that are both invitingly open and shrounded in mystery. Every song by Blk Galaga is no exception.

Each song, in fact, reminds me of the time – let’s call it The Post-College But Pre-Grad School Years – when I fell in love with M. Of course it didn’t – it couldn’t – last. You can blame it on our socioeconomic differences, our parents’ absolutely rigid and totally indefensible insistence that at least one of us had to earn an income, the silly squabbles over where we would live (New York for me and Papua New Guinea for her; but look, one can study seashell currency just about anywhere). God knows I’ve blamed it on all those things. In any event, it was too much to overcome. But, of course, Tzara had his own woes with Greta Knutson. I’m sure he would understand. And Blk Galaga does as well.

You can tell because they convey an almost telepathic empathy in these songs. I listen to them and think, “You know, Blk Galaga really gets it. It’s like they have walked a mile in my Kurt Geiger Solea Storm pumps with the stacked conical heels, the ones I just bought two weeks ago, and which are already scuffed.” Nothing lasts. You can’t depend on anything or anyone.

Blk Galaga makes the kind of music that reminds me of the smell of freshly mown grass on a motherfuckingly bright late spring morning, the kind of day when you’re 12 years old, and the school year is almost over, and you’ve just beaten the shit out of Bobby Morrison because he kept calling your sister a ho, and life is just about perfect except for the blood on your shirt. It’s that good, and that bad. It is beautiful and wondrous, tawdry and tragic, much like my life. I both love and hate my life, and I love and hate Blk Galaga as well. It’s all in the ambiguity.
- Copyright © 1999 – 2011 Google


"Blog review"

Blk Galaga, like the towering Romanian Dadaists Tristan Tzara and Marcel Janco, have created works that are both invitingly open and shrounded in mystery. Every song by Blk Galaga is no exception.

Each song, in fact, reminds me of the time – let’s call it The Post-College But Pre-Grad School Years – when I fell in love with M. Of course it didn’t – it couldn’t – last. You can blame it on our socioeconomic differences, our parents’ absolutely rigid and totally indefensible insistence that at least one of us had to earn an income, the silly squabbles over where we would live (New York for me and Papua New Guinea for her; but look, one can study seashell currency just about anywhere). God knows I’ve blamed it on all those things. In any event, it was too much to overcome. But, of course, Tzara had his own woes with Greta Knutson. I’m sure he would understand. And Blk Galaga does as well.

You can tell because they convey an almost telepathic empathy in these songs. I listen to them and think, “You know, Blk Galaga really gets it. It’s like they have walked a mile in my Kurt Geiger Solea Storm pumps with the stacked conical heels, the ones I just bought two weeks ago, and which are already scuffed.” Nothing lasts. You can’t depend on anything or anyone.

Blk Galaga makes the kind of music that reminds me of the smell of freshly mown grass on a motherfuckingly bright late spring morning, the kind of day when you’re 12 years old, and the school year is almost over, and you’ve just beaten the shit out of Bobby Morrison because he kept calling your sister a ho, and life is just about perfect except for the blood on your shirt. It’s that good, and that bad. It is beautiful and wondrous, tawdry and tragic, much like my life. I both love and hate my life, and I love and hate Blk Galaga as well. It’s all in the ambiguity.
- Copyright © 1999 – 2011 Google


Discography

EP: Self-titled (2014)

EP: Rail on the Top Shelf (2013)

Full-Length: Something for Everyone, Nothing for You (2013)

Amp Magazine digital comp "Unsigned Heroes"
Track: "Fall Along"

Real Punk Radio digital comp “Killing The Record Industry�
Track: "Nothing Left"

Bright & Barrow Records digital comp "No Parkin Sons"
Track: "Omega Man (Demo Version)"

Photos

Bio

NYC’s Blk Galaga wears its influences (NOFX, Bad Religion, Rise Against, Propagandhi) on its sleeve, with a sound that updates classic melodic punk without straying too far from its roots. Not content to be just another run-of-the-mill punk band, they also incorporate elements of pop, hardcore, prog rock and thrash into their eclectic songwriting. Their dynamic live shows, featuring three-part harmonies and ripping solos, have earned the band a small but loyal following. Blk Galaga has been covered by punk-oriented websites such as Dying Scene, AbsolutePunk, Punknews.org and many more, and has been played on the “Mon Festoche a Oim” program on REC Radio in France. Additionally, thanks to their devoted fans, Blk Galaga ranked in the Top Five in AMP Magazine’s “Best Unsigned Bands Contest VII”.

Their debut album, Something for Everyone, Nothing for You, was recorded with legendary producer Don Fury (Agnostic Front, Bouncing Souls, Sick of it All, H2O, World/Inferno Friendship Society) and released in January 2013. The band has appeared on compilations such as “Killing the Record Industry” for Real Punk Radio, and “No Parkin’ Sons” by Bright & Barrow Records to raise money for Parkinson’s disease research.

Discriminating punks have these kind words to say:
• “Entertaining and loud and fast — all good things!” – NuthousePunks.com
• “I love it!” – PunkNews.org commenter
• “Looking forward to more great music like this!” – ReviewBastard.org
• “What they need is a deal with Fat Wreck Chords” – Jimmy Bile, upstarter.com