Blue Epic

Blue Epic

BandAlternativeRock

Blue Epic’s music is an atmospheric blend of U2, Neil Young, and Jeff Buckley that stirs the emotions. Though the music is unclassifiable, they still sound professional, precise and clean without losing sight that they are a rock and roll band.

Biography

Awash with the voluptuous, dirty clamor of Johnny Marr-meets-Edge influenced guitar and anthemic melodies resonating with crackling, minor-key splendor, Birmingham, Alabama-based band Blue Epic proves with their debut album Good Morning Paranoia that contemporary Southern rock resonates far beyond the stale contemporaries littering radio airwaves. From the temperamental storm of “So What” to the unabashed, contemplative calm of the acoustic “Let Me Down,” Blue Epic -- vocalist/guitarist Phillip Roberson, guitarist Hadwin Brown, bassist Max Andrews and drummer Nick Falletta -- makes the most of their mercurial, closet Anglophile nature, understanding and harnessing a provocative balance between beautiful, bad-ass noise and quixotic quiet. The band’s 2003 EP Love & Hate garnered enthusiastic praise from publications like Alternative Press -- which heralded the band’s “moody, atmospheric jangle” -- and the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel which cited Blue Epic’s “atmospheric rock in the tradition of the Smashing Pumpkins at its most kinetic.” With their auspicious debut Good Morning Paranoia comes twelve of Blue Epic’s brash, beguiling gems, songs like the hopelessy catchy “Roses” -- which has already received radio play thanks to the EP -- the volatile “City Rains” and the hurtling headrush of “Waiting.” Birmingham’s most promising young rock band is finally receiving the serious attention and accolades it deserves.

Roberson’s vocals, an enigmatic, rakish blend of Neil Young’s poetic urgency with a bit of Robert Smith’s sweet sonics, suit the man’s lyrics well -- a warily-painted and deliberately ambiguous blend of bad love, showers of aliens, betrayals and sultry Southern heat. But despite Phillip’s soaring vocals, the seductive sweep of Hadwin’s quirky, orchestral chordwork and Nick’s aggressive timekeeping, Max Andrews speaks for the guys when he declares that Blue Epic is no emo-wannabe. In fact, mention the dreaded three-letter word and the band cringes. “The whole emotion thing scares me and we don’t consider ourselves emo by any means,” says Andrews. Phillip is even more adamant that “emo” is a dirty word to Blue Epic. “God no, I don’t want us to ever be thought of as emo. I don’t want to step on anybody’s toes, but I’m really sick of that term already.”

And while a driven defiance crackles through Blue Epic tracks like Roberson’s own melancholy favorite “Let Me Down” and “So What” -- a deeply personal song that Phillip says was inspired when people close to him began to question his pursuit of a music career -- the guys credit their music’s lush urgency not to fly-by-night trends or hopes of becoming the next alt-radio darling. Rather, they look to longer-lasting, even risky, influences ranging from peers like Black Rebel Motorcycle Club to established elders like U2, Radiohead and Neil Young, who the band salutes with a sensuously crafted cover of “A Man Needs a Maid.” Producer Dave Cobb, former guitarist for the Tender Idols, understood Blue Epic’s hunger to reach the full, unabridged expanse of their dreamy, yet daring sound when he took over production duties for the group after a first attempt to record Good Morning Paranoia foundered after what Andrews calls a series of missteps, including “overthinking” each track.

Literally chomping at the bit to have a second try, a rehearsal-exhausted Blue Epic went into a Los Angeles studio with Cobb for three days in the spring of 2003. With no money left in the recording budget, and originally planning to cut just 4 songs, the recharged band banged out 10 tracks live together in the same room and emerged with the crafted, yet passionate album they had envisioned. “It was just so easy,” says Andrews enthusiastically. “We did more in those three days than in the three months we spent during the first stab at it.”

“[Dave] showed us that we had the ability as a band, “ says Roberson. “He filled us with the self-confidence to know that we could sit in a room and play live and record it and be a real rock and roll band. You know, we were tired of hearing that we were a young band ‘but we can polish you up.’ But Dave said you guys are great and the bands that we admired -- that’s the way they did it. It seemed right and real and helped us develop as players together and have a better concept to what we’re about.”

....The four have not stopped writing. In addition to the 10 songs recorded in L.A., the band has since went to New York City to track an additional three songs with producer Ron Saint Germain.

The bond that exists between the four friends of Blue Epic is strong, solid. and simple. The guys - who range in age from 21 to 23 -- grew up as childhood friends in Huntsville, Alabama. Phillip and Hadwin formed a high school cover band which eventually included Nick. Max didn’t even know how to play an instrument until the classically-trained Hadwin -- who also plays cello -- taught him guitar ... and then Max switched to bass. By late 200

Lyrics

Amnesia Please

Written By: Blue Epic


This is hard as hell, this is hard as hell
This is hell
Oh- what if it’s not enough
Oh- what if it’s not enough
And this is how I feel, this is how I feel
This is feel ing
Oh - what if it’s not enough
Oh - what if it’s…

Pre

A stab in the back, I don’t want to know
If it’s a stab in the back, I don’t want to know (I don’t want to know)

Chorus

Amnesia Please
Amnesia Please
Amnesia Please
Amnesia Please

V2

This is love or leave, this is love or leave
This is hell. Love
And I said oh- what if it’s not enough
And I said oh- what if it’s…

Pre2
A stab in the back, I don’t want to know
If it’s a stab in the back, I don’t want to know
If it’s a stab, if it’s a stab
I don’t want to know (I don’t want to know)

Chorus2

Amnesia Please
Amnesia Please
Amnesia Please
Amnesia Please

Coda

Oh oh oh I don’t want to know I don’t want to know
I don’t want to know I don’t want to know (please, please)
I don’t want to know I don’t want to know (please, please)
Don’t wanna know don’t wanna know (please, please)

A stab in the back, I don‚t want to know
A stab in the back
Don’t want, don’t want I don’t want, I don’t want to know

Good Morning Paranoia

Written By: Blue Epic

Oh, I can’t fall asleep - someone on the right fucking with me
Oh, alarms the buzz and ring – it’s only whispering inside a dream
Say say say say it loud
If you’ve got something to say, my ears are always open - you will see

Chorus

Good morning paranoia
Good morning paranoia
Good morning paranoia. tick tick tock

V2

Oh, are we so naïve? All this selfish greed has history
And I said Oh, alarms they buzz and ring – it’s only whispering inside a dream
Talk talk talk talk to me

Pre

I’ll figure you out, figure you out

Chorus

Good morning paranoia
Good morning paranoia
Good morning paranoia. tick tick tock

Bridge

Figure you out, figure you out
Something in my head, something I can feel, I feel, I feel
Something in my head, something I can feel

V3

Oh, I can’t fall asleep - everywhere alarms they buzz and ring

Chorus 3

Good morning paranoia
Good morning paranoia

Discography

The Love & Hate EP 2003
Roses (Single)