Blue Lunch
Gig Seeker Pro

Blue Lunch

Beachwood, Ohio, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2014 | SELF

Beachwood, Ohio, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2014
Band Blues Jazz

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

Music

Press


"Saxophone Shootout II"

BLUE LUNCH

Saxophone Shootout II Live

Wilberts Records

Oh boy an album of Blues saxophone and Blue Lunch set the table with a nine piece outfit so I got ready to groove as the disc hit
the platter and I pressed play and I was not disappointed one bit.

They’ve been holding what they call ‘Saxophone Shootouts’ since 2004. This album was recorded at a venue called Nighttown in Cleveland, apparently a world famous Jazz Club. No less than three sax players to the fore here with leader Bob Frank on guitar and vocal duty. From the notes this sounds like a real downhome night with the audience well fed on Nighttown’s good food and really set for a good night that the band duly delivered in spades. Well laid grooves, bursting sax in layers from the terrific three of Tony Koussa Jnr., Keith McLelley and Chirs Burge, smashing rhythm section of Ray Deforest (bass) and Scott Flowers (drums) holding it all down and tying the laces while Pete London also covered vocal and harmonica, piano was tinkled by Mike Sands.

Numbers include Joe Liggins ‘Honeydripper’ which more than ably kicks off the proceedings, others include Gatemouth Brown’s ‘I Just Got Lucky’, a super original of Bob’s ‘Chinese Knock-off’ that allows everyone room to move, Sonny Rollins’ ‘Tenor Madness’ to which you cannot keep still with sax and piano vying for attention and flying through each other, takes your breath away!

An excellent and energetic album that deserves your attention and is most certainly recommended by this listener (no way can you remain seated to this!)

Frank Leigh - Blues Matters


"Saxophone Shootout II"

BLUE LUNCH

Saxophone Shootout II Live

Wilberts Records

Oh boy an album of Blues saxophone and Blue Lunch set the table with a nine piece outfit so I got ready to groove as the disc hit
the platter and I pressed play and I was not disappointed one bit.

They’ve been holding what they call ‘Saxophone Shootouts’ since 2004. This album was recorded at a venue called Nighttown in Cleveland, apparently a world famous Jazz Club. No less than three sax players to the fore here with leader Bob Frank on guitar and vocal duty. From the notes this sounds like a real downhome night with the audience well fed on Nighttown’s good food and really set for a good night that the band duly delivered in spades. Well laid grooves, bursting sax in layers from the terrific three of Tony Koussa Jnr., Keith McLelley and Chirs Burge, smashing rhythm section of Ray Deforest (bass) and Scott Flowers (drums) holding it all down and tying the laces while Pete London also covered vocal and harmonica, piano was tinkled by Mike Sands.

Numbers include Joe Liggins ‘Honeydripper’ which more than ably kicks off the proceedings, others include Gatemouth Brown’s ‘I Just Got Lucky’, a super original of Bob’s ‘Chinese Knock-off’ that allows everyone room to move, Sonny Rollins’ ‘Tenor Madness’ to which you cannot keep still with sax and piano vying for attention and flying through each other, takes your breath away!

An excellent and energetic album that deserves your attention and is most certainly recommended by this listener (no way can you remain seated to this!)

Frank Leigh - Blues Matters


"Sideswiped"

ideswiped, (04/29/10)

Well, maybe it's time to stop dissing that much-derided metropolis, Cleveland. Robert Lockwood Jr. lived there for many years before his demise in 2006; Travis Haddix has lived there for many years; Mark Hahn, Lockwood's former guitar sideman, isn't eponymously titled Cleveland Fats for nothing. Add Blue Lunch to the panoply of impressive Ohio Blues musicians. In this, their fifth album, they comport themselves with verve, style, and ample chops.

Led by dual vocalists Bob Frank and Pete London, the former on lead guitar and the latter on harmonica, Blue Lunch is probably most notable not only for its high quality musicianship but also for its versatility. How many other groups, replete with a full horn section of saxophone, trumpet, and trombone, can demonstrate skill with swing, 1940s big band jump Blues and jazz, lounge ballads, gospel, and Chicago Blues? Roomful of Blues comes to mind, but not many others. "Sideswiped" provides a taste of several subgenres of the Blues, as well as a hefty dose of sly humor in such tunes as "Monkey Hips and Rice" and "Mother-in-Law."

The album sports almost a full hour of music, apportioned into fifteen cuts; seven are composed by Frank and others by such luminaries as Doc Pomus, Allen Toussaint, Bill Doggett, and Roy Gaines. The opener, the title tune "Sideswiped," sets the stage as an instrumental highlighting horns, guitar, piano, and sax in rapid, sapid sequence. The uptempo "Which Way to Go" follows, giving nice exposure to London's harp skill and is succeeded by "Always Pickin' on Me," an R-&-B ditty flavored by piano and horn solos and even a guest clarinet spot.

The set remains at a high level throughout, with alternating tempos and styles maintaining interest and several guest musicians lending their talents to the basic eight-person combo. "The Best I Can," a Frank composition, in its horn ensemble backing recalls memories of the 1960s band Blood, Sweat and Tears, and displays fine rapport between Frank's guitar and London's harp. "Doggin' with Doggett" evokes the sound of a 1940s big band with successive solos of muted trumpet, trombone, sax, and jazzy guitar; I could envision it as the background music of a movie scene featuring WW II sailors on leave dancing with their gals.

"Every Day Will Be Like a Holiday" is the nod to gospel, with moving vocal harmonies. Roy Gaines's "Isabella" begins and ends as a 1950s rock-and-roller with Frank's guitar solo a bluesy mid-tune interlude. "Mother-in-Law" demonstrates the band's R-&-B credentials, and "My Baby Knows Lovin'" is fine Chicago blues featuring Frank on slide guitar. "Too Much Boogie" is an uptempo closing romper with adept Gordon Beadle sax contributions.

Lacking a dominant singer with raspy country intonation, urban power, or soul smoothness, Blue Lunch more than compensates with adaptability and panache. The band can swing and croon; it can be ribald and rockin'.

Steve Daniels is a contributing editor to BluesWax.Steve can be reached at www.blueswax@visnat.com.


Home | About VN | Backstage | My Page | Contact Us | Log Out

© 1999-2010 Visionation, Ltd. All rights reserved
- BluesWax


"Sideswiped"

ideswiped, (04/29/10)

Well, maybe it's time to stop dissing that much-derided metropolis, Cleveland. Robert Lockwood Jr. lived there for many years before his demise in 2006; Travis Haddix has lived there for many years; Mark Hahn, Lockwood's former guitar sideman, isn't eponymously titled Cleveland Fats for nothing. Add Blue Lunch to the panoply of impressive Ohio Blues musicians. In this, their fifth album, they comport themselves with verve, style, and ample chops.

Led by dual vocalists Bob Frank and Pete London, the former on lead guitar and the latter on harmonica, Blue Lunch is probably most notable not only for its high quality musicianship but also for its versatility. How many other groups, replete with a full horn section of saxophone, trumpet, and trombone, can demonstrate skill with swing, 1940s big band jump Blues and jazz, lounge ballads, gospel, and Chicago Blues? Roomful of Blues comes to mind, but not many others. "Sideswiped" provides a taste of several subgenres of the Blues, as well as a hefty dose of sly humor in such tunes as "Monkey Hips and Rice" and "Mother-in-Law."

The album sports almost a full hour of music, apportioned into fifteen cuts; seven are composed by Frank and others by such luminaries as Doc Pomus, Allen Toussaint, Bill Doggett, and Roy Gaines. The opener, the title tune "Sideswiped," sets the stage as an instrumental highlighting horns, guitar, piano, and sax in rapid, sapid sequence. The uptempo "Which Way to Go" follows, giving nice exposure to London's harp skill and is succeeded by "Always Pickin' on Me," an R-&-B ditty flavored by piano and horn solos and even a guest clarinet spot.

The set remains at a high level throughout, with alternating tempos and styles maintaining interest and several guest musicians lending their talents to the basic eight-person combo. "The Best I Can," a Frank composition, in its horn ensemble backing recalls memories of the 1960s band Blood, Sweat and Tears, and displays fine rapport between Frank's guitar and London's harp. "Doggin' with Doggett" evokes the sound of a 1940s big band with successive solos of muted trumpet, trombone, sax, and jazzy guitar; I could envision it as the background music of a movie scene featuring WW II sailors on leave dancing with their gals.

"Every Day Will Be Like a Holiday" is the nod to gospel, with moving vocal harmonies. Roy Gaines's "Isabella" begins and ends as a 1950s rock-and-roller with Frank's guitar solo a bluesy mid-tune interlude. "Mother-in-Law" demonstrates the band's R-&-B credentials, and "My Baby Knows Lovin'" is fine Chicago blues featuring Frank on slide guitar. "Too Much Boogie" is an uptempo closing romper with adept Gordon Beadle sax contributions.

Lacking a dominant singer with raspy country intonation, urban power, or soul smoothness, Blue Lunch more than compensates with adaptability and panache. The band can swing and croon; it can be ribald and rockin'.

Steve Daniels is a contributing editor to BluesWax.Steve can be reached at www.blueswax@visnat.com.


Home | About VN | Backstage | My Page | Contact Us | Log Out

© 1999-2010 Visionation, Ltd. All rights reserved
- BluesWax


"Sideswiped"

By Graham Clarke

Blue Lunch is a Cleveland, OH-based blues band that plays a wide range of music, ranging from blues (jump or Chicago), New Orleans R&B, soul, jazz, and classic rock & roll. The eight-piece band has just released their fifth recording, on Wilberts Records, called Sideswiped.

Guitarist/singer Bob Frank penned all the originals, including the groovy instrumental title tune that kicks off the disc. Other highlights include the horn-driven “Which Way To Go,” the ballad, “All Things Come,” a wistful tune that’s popular with their fans, and “The Best I Can,” a straight blues number. “Chinese Knock-Off” is a humorous track about con jobs and rip-offs with great lyrics, and “Don’t Point That Thing At Me” sounds like vintage Rice Miller and even features Frank on harmonica. Another fine blues number is “My Baby Knows Lovin’,” which features some killer slide guitar in the Muddy Waters tradition.

The covers are a diverse set, ranging from Crescent City R&B (“Always Pickin’ On Me” and “Mother-In-Law”) to jump blues (“Too Much Boogie” and “Doggin’ With Doggett”), doo-wop and soul (“Monkey Hips and Rice” and William Bell’s “Every Day Will Be Like A Holiday”), and the blues (Roy Gaines’ “Isabella” and Bobby Bland’s immortal “36-22-36”). Blue Lunch shows their versatility on this eclectic mix of tunes.

Though the band (Frank, Pete London – harmonica, vocals, Raymond DeForest – bass, bass vocals, Scott Flowers – drums, Mike Sands – piano, Keith McKelley – tenor sax, Bob Michael – trombone, vocals, Mike Rubin – trumpet, vocals) is in fine form, they also get a helping hand from fellow musicians “Sax” Gordon Beadle (tenor sax), Sammy DeLeon (percussion), Tim Longfellow (Hammond B3), Erwin Michael (clarinet), Ryan Pennington (vocals), Kate Brown (vocals), and Lisa Rubin (vocals).

Fans of good-time rocking blues and boogie will enjoy Blue Lunch’s latest effort. - BluesBytes


"Sideswiped"

By Graham Clarke

Blue Lunch is a Cleveland, OH-based blues band that plays a wide range of music, ranging from blues (jump or Chicago), New Orleans R&B, soul, jazz, and classic rock & roll. The eight-piece band has just released their fifth recording, on Wilberts Records, called Sideswiped.

Guitarist/singer Bob Frank penned all the originals, including the groovy instrumental title tune that kicks off the disc. Other highlights include the horn-driven “Which Way To Go,” the ballad, “All Things Come,” a wistful tune that’s popular with their fans, and “The Best I Can,” a straight blues number. “Chinese Knock-Off” is a humorous track about con jobs and rip-offs with great lyrics, and “Don’t Point That Thing At Me” sounds like vintage Rice Miller and even features Frank on harmonica. Another fine blues number is “My Baby Knows Lovin’,” which features some killer slide guitar in the Muddy Waters tradition.

The covers are a diverse set, ranging from Crescent City R&B (“Always Pickin’ On Me” and “Mother-In-Law”) to jump blues (“Too Much Boogie” and “Doggin’ With Doggett”), doo-wop and soul (“Monkey Hips and Rice” and William Bell’s “Every Day Will Be Like A Holiday”), and the blues (Roy Gaines’ “Isabella” and Bobby Bland’s immortal “36-22-36”). Blue Lunch shows their versatility on this eclectic mix of tunes.

Though the band (Frank, Pete London – harmonica, vocals, Raymond DeForest – bass, bass vocals, Scott Flowers – drums, Mike Sands – piano, Keith McKelley – tenor sax, Bob Michael – trombone, vocals, Mike Rubin – trumpet, vocals) is in fine form, they also get a helping hand from fellow musicians “Sax” Gordon Beadle (tenor sax), Sammy DeLeon (percussion), Tim Longfellow (Hammond B3), Erwin Michael (clarinet), Ryan Pennington (vocals), Kate Brown (vocals), and Lisa Rubin (vocals).

Fans of good-time rocking blues and boogie will enjoy Blue Lunch’s latest effort. - BluesBytes


"Big Sound Blues"

"Now here's a big band-Ohio's Blue Lunch is an eight piece outfit fronted by guitarist Bob Frank and harpist Peter London (both men sing). Big Sound Blues boasts a swinging batch of tunes wamed up with a winning sax/trumpet/bone section and good singing and playing. These guys are pros; listen and learn. Hot slices: the house-proud "Cleveland Ohio Blues" and a cover of T-Bone Walker's "Vida Lee". - Blues Review


"Big Sound Blues"

"Now here's a big band-Ohio's Blue Lunch is an eight piece outfit fronted by guitarist Bob Frank and harpist Peter London (both men sing). Big Sound Blues boasts a swinging batch of tunes wamed up with a winning sax/trumpet/bone section and good singing and playing. These guys are pros; listen and learn. Hot slices: the house-proud "Cleveland Ohio Blues" and a cover of T-Bone Walker's "Vida Lee". - Blues Review


"Big Sound Blues"

The hep cats of Blue Lunch have always been a diverse outfit, tapping their love of classic R&B and doo-wop in addition to "straight" blues. The band's celebrating two decades of music with the release of its fourth CD, a collection that comes hard with predictably rock-solid playing and a distinctive stylistic mix.

The iron man here is guitarist-vocalist Bob Frank, whose versatility clearly grounds the band. Not many outfits that strut their swing stuff so well can put on a country-blues face that's just as respectable -- as Blue Lunch does here on Frank's version of Robert Lockwood's "Little Boy Blue." Frank's originals stand up nicely alongside the well-chosen vintage covers; his sly Latin/lounge mash-up "You Got to Dance the Cha Cha With Me" is as good as almost anything from Roomful of Blues or Little Charlie & the Nightcats. The best track, though, is the smokin' cover of the Five Royales' "I Do," which, in an ideal world, would be Blue Lunch's radio single.

clevescene.com | originally published: June 9, 2004
- Cleveland Scene


"Big Sound Blues"

The hep cats of Blue Lunch have always been a diverse outfit, tapping their love of classic R&B and doo-wop in addition to "straight" blues. The band's celebrating two decades of music with the release of its fourth CD, a collection that comes hard with predictably rock-solid playing and a distinctive stylistic mix.

The iron man here is guitarist-vocalist Bob Frank, whose versatility clearly grounds the band. Not many outfits that strut their swing stuff so well can put on a country-blues face that's just as respectable -- as Blue Lunch does here on Frank's version of Robert Lockwood's "Little Boy Blue." Frank's originals stand up nicely alongside the well-chosen vintage covers; his sly Latin/lounge mash-up "You Got to Dance the Cha Cha With Me" is as good as almost anything from Roomful of Blues or Little Charlie & the Nightcats. The best track, though, is the smokin' cover of the Five Royales' "I Do," which, in an ideal world, would be Blue Lunch's radio single.

clevescene.com | originally published: June 9, 2004
- Cleveland Scene


"Blue Lunch From Cleveland"

I'm looking forward to their set -- never heard them, but they're supposed to have a horn-driven big-band, R&B flavor as well as a straight blues bent.

Before they start up, Moondog himself (I wonder if he'd like to meet HoneyBoy?), Ron Esser, who runs Moondog's and books the festival bands, welcomed everybody on behalf of fest sponsor First Commonweath. Nothing like a bank that's still solvent to pay the bills.
But here comes the band. They're an impressive looking group -- harp, sax, trumpet, keyboards, upright bass -- dig that!

They've got a little New Orleans rhythm, some raunchy sax -- remember "Mother In Law" by Ernie K-Doe? They're doing it a huge amount of justice as I try to type in time to the music. Next up, Professor Longhair. Then, "Barefootin'." These guys swing. If you drive really fast, maybe you can still catch a tune. Now it's Huey Piano Smith.
They're really rolling in the New Orleans music. After all, the first night of the fest was billed as Mardi Gras night, so that's cool

(BlueNotes conflict of interest note: I'm sucking down a really good and head-numbing cold red, white and blue Italian ice handed to me by Tom La Scola. Just for being BlueNotes. Thanks, Tom.)
This is a heckuva set. Kind of like Roomful of Blues, but from Cleveland. They swing, they rock, they get down and dirty with the blues. What more can a blues fan ask? No free lunch? Don't tell these guys. - Pittsburgh Post Gazette


"Blue Lunch-Sideswiped"

Bringing you a good healthy helping of all flavors of the Blues is what Blue Lunch's newest release, "Sideswiped", is all about.

"Sideswiped" is Blue Lunch's 5th Album, contains nearly one hour of music and 15 Tracks featuring a wide range of Blues Styles, from Swing to Boogie, from Soul to Chicago Blues, to name a few, all done with not only class, but also in a order that makes perfect sense for such a diverse CD. Of the 15 Tracks, 7 are original tunes and 8 covers which make for not only a great mix of music, but also shows the great range of expertise this exceptionally tight blues band has.
One thing I noticed right of the bat with "Sideswiped", is that it truly lives up to it's band name, "Blue Lunch", and is the kind of music you could see yourself listening to in an old fashioned style eatery or dinner club, not only thoroughly enjoying the food but also the great atmosphere that such great music can bring to the mix.

The players whom created the magic of "Sideswiped", are no strangers to the Cleveland Ohio music and have crafted their trade collectively for many years. The lineup for "Sideswiped", features Bob Frank, Bob Michael,Tony Koussa, Pete London, Mike Rubin, Scott Flowers, Ray DeForest, and Mike Sands all working together to bring one of the biggest and sharpest Blues Band Sounds around, especially with the exceptional horn and piano section.

Picking a couple of favorites from this deep of an Album is not easy, but I chose "Don't Point That Thing At Me" and the opening track "Sideswiped".

All in all "Sideswiped" is one heck of a good romp when it comes to the Blues and one Highly Recommended Album... Those whom love a wide variety of great blues will love "Sideswiped".

John Vermilyea (Blues Underground Network) - Vintage Guitar Magazine


"Blue Lunch-Sideswiped"

Bringing you a good healthy helping of all flavors of the Blues is what Blue Lunch's newest release, "Sideswiped", is all about.

"Sideswiped" is Blue Lunch's 5th Album, contains nearly one hour of music and 15 Tracks featuring a wide range of Blues Styles, from Swing to Boogie, from Soul to Chicago Blues, to name a few, all done with not only class, but also in a order that makes perfect sense for such a diverse CD. Of the 15 Tracks, 7 are original tunes and 8 covers which make for not only a great mix of music, but also shows the great range of expertise this exceptionally tight blues band has.
One thing I noticed right of the bat with "Sideswiped", is that it truly lives up to it's band name, "Blue Lunch", and is the kind of music you could see yourself listening to in an old fashioned style eatery or dinner club, not only thoroughly enjoying the food but also the great atmosphere that such great music can bring to the mix.

The players whom created the magic of "Sideswiped", are no strangers to the Cleveland Ohio music and have crafted their trade collectively for many years. The lineup for "Sideswiped", features Bob Frank, Bob Michael,Tony Koussa, Pete London, Mike Rubin, Scott Flowers, Ray DeForest, and Mike Sands all working together to bring one of the biggest and sharpest Blues Band Sounds around, especially with the exceptional horn and piano section.

Picking a couple of favorites from this deep of an Album is not easy, but I chose "Don't Point That Thing At Me" and the opening track "Sideswiped".

All in all "Sideswiped" is one heck of a good romp when it comes to the Blues and one Highly Recommended Album... Those whom love a wide variety of great blues will love "Sideswiped".

John Vermilyea (Blues Underground Network) - Vintage Guitar Magazine


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

Bio by Bob Frank

Blue Lunch is a blues band but a unique one in that we play a wide variety of blues styles from Chicago blues, to New Orleans R&B, jazz, proto-rock & roll, jump blues, do-wop style r&b, swing jazz and more. We have well over 100 songs in our repertoire, including a sizeable number of original songs.

Everyone contributes. Our players are all tops on their instruments, the best in town, I believe. Generally, I write the songs and when I bring them into rehearsal, everyone contributes ideas and suggestions. The songs end up being much better than if I did it on my own. It also helps that our players have experience playing all kinds of music.

Pete London started the band in 1984. It was originally a spin-off from the Cruisemasters, another band here in town. When I joined in 1995 we started re-doing the repertoire, ending up with what we have today. We made the decision to be a larger band, to use a horn section.

Band Members