Bonny  Holmes
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Bonny Holmes

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Band Americana Singer/Songwriter

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Press


"Texas Music Magazine"

Boxful of Trouble- Bonny Holmes

"It's been said that everybody has a great novel in them, but finding and writing it is the tricky part. Austin's Bonny Holmes hasn't found the novel inside her yet, but at the spry young age of 50, she's found one hell of a debut album. That Holmes' songs on 'Boxful of Trouble', mined from a lifetime's worth of lessons in the ways of love, would be lyrically mature was a given; the surprise is how damn good and refreshing they all are. Of course it doesn't hurt to have friends like producer/guitarist Scrappy Jud Newcomb hip to her wholly original and eclectic mix of noirish roots rock and old-world mystique, but the magic is all in Holmes' seductive melodies and rich voice, reminiscent of the Pretenders' Chrissie Hynde at her best. On the insanely addictive and terrific title cut, Holmes strums a sprightly melody on a mandolin and challenges a wishy-washy lover with the line, 'You say you want a reason for living/ I say how 'bout unconditional love?' Here's another reason: the promise, however long the wait and hard to find, of albums like this one." - Richard Skanse


"Austin Chronicle"

Phases and Stages

Texas platters

BY JIM CALIGIURI


Bonny Holmes

Boxful of Trouble While not quite in the same league as Don Walser, who reached his full potential and began his music career in earnest after 60, local Bonny Holmes releasing her first CD at the age of 50 is just as intriguing. Too short at just nine songs, Boxful of Trouble finds Holmes singing of love, loss, heartache, and revenge in a way that's strong, kindhearted, and brimming with life. A more accurate comparison of Holmes' music is to that of Lucinda Williams. Like Williams, Holmes possesses a catch in her voice that adds a fitting hint of emotion to her songs. She also shares Williams' fondness for rock, soul, folk, and Texas, and utilizes those influences in a way that's most appealing. In fact, that's what makes Boxful of Trouble so attractive: There's the high stepping, mandolin-fueled title track; the lazy loping "Two Windows"; the Tex-Mex spiced "From the Moon"; and "Currents of Love," Memphis soul stew. A great deal of this disc's success can be attributed to producer Scrappy Jud Newcomb, who's been making just this kind of jigsaw puzzle music on his own and with others for years. With a core band of Newcomb on guitar, Dana Myzer on drums, and Cornbread on bass, as well as guests like Walter Tragert, Chip Dolan, Eric Hisaw, and Oliver Steck, Holmes has cut one of the best Austin debuts this year. Let's hope she doesn't wait another 50 years for its follow-up.
- Jim Caligiuri


Discography

Going Down Fighting
Boxful of Trouble

Photos

Bio

New CD "Going Down Fighting" released June 10, 2008. Holmes covers miles of styles with 13 pure Americana singles ranging from the George Jones-style "She's Blonde" to the ethereal pop vibe of "Someone Like You". In between, "Rocking Chair" and "When We Were Laughing" will get you rocking and provide the text behind the cover art, and "Going Home" will take you to the darker side of things. Cheating, running, laughing, fighting, dancing, singing, and moving on--all themes found in Holmes' songs, along with horses, bridges, streetlights, and kisses. With nods to Chrissy Hynde and Lucinda Williams, and deep bows to Bob Dylan and John Prine, Holmes sings her way through the crowd. Backed by rich harmonies and mysterious guitars, this artist will definitely remind you of someone--yourself.

"...Boxful of Trouble finds Holmes singing of love, loss, heartache, and revenge in a way that's strong, kindhearted, and brimming with life. A more accurate comparison of Holmes' music is to that of Lucinda Williams. Like Williams, Holmes possesses a catch in her voice that adds a fitting hint of emotion to her songs. She also shares Williams' fondness for rock, soul, folk, and Texas, and utilizes those influences in a way that's most appealing." (Jim Caligiuri, Austin Chronicle)