Breakfast In Fur
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Breakfast In Fur

New Paltz, New York, United States | INDIE

New Paltz, New York, United States | INDIE
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"Breakfast In Fur- "Setting Stone"/ "Aurora Falls""

It’s been a while since I last heard from New Paltz’s Breakfast In Fur, so I was pretty pumped when Kaitlin and Dan’s email flew into my inbox sporting some brand new tracks. Team Love is putting out a pretty dope comp, Die Pfalz, featuring 3 new BIF songs (two of them below). All I can say is…wow. The last time I checked Breakfast In Fur played charming orchestral bedroom pop….but these songs…brought the jumper cables along for the ride soaring to a whole new level of inspiring and melodic composition. - Pasta Primavera


"Breakfast In Fur- "Setting Stone"/ "Aurora Falls""

It’s been a while since I last heard from New Paltz’s Breakfast In Fur, so I was pretty pumped when Kaitlin and Dan’s email flew into my inbox sporting some brand new tracks. Team Love is putting out a pretty dope comp, Die Pfalz, featuring 3 new BIF songs (two of them below). All I can say is…wow. The last time I checked Breakfast In Fur played charming orchestral bedroom pop….but these songs…brought the jumper cables along for the ride soaring to a whole new level of inspiring and melodic composition. - Pasta Primavera


"Breakfast In Fur Whisper"

The swelling voice in this track starts as a whisper until it’s a chorus bursting at the seams like a flock of birds startled to flight. Loud while still being quiet.

Don’t miss Conor Oberst’s label Team Love Record’s new Die Pfalz compilation that also features Shana Falana, Cycad and Bloodletters. - yvynyl


"Breakfast In Fur Whisper"

The swelling voice in this track starts as a whisper until it’s a chorus bursting at the seams like a flock of birds startled to flight. Loud while still being quiet.

Don’t miss Conor Oberst’s label Team Love Record’s new Die Pfalz compilation that also features Shana Falana, Cycad and Bloodletters. - yvynyl


"Tunes from Die Pfalz"

Team Love, a boutique record label, gallery and performance space located on Church Street in New Paltz, has been defined – probably for better and for worse – by its association with “Bright Eyes” songwriter Connor Oberst, who co-founded the formerly New York City-based label with Nate Krenkel in 2003. Oberst, in case you slept through the Aughts, came on like a millennial Dylan at the end of the ‘90s and forged what might be called the New Verbosity: a maximalist, mythic, post-beatnik lyrical grope, equal parts acute narrative detail and cosmic grandiosity sung in a compelling, quavering tenor against an Americana backdrop. Not many people try to be the poet of a new generation and pull it off; Connor Oberst actually kinda did.

My first taste of the Team Love product line – the TLS-01 compilation Music for the Ride Home – is about as diverse as one would expect a 13-act comp to be. While Oberst might be its figurehead, Team Love is hardly a one-horse show. That first compilation includes work from the ubiquitous Jenny Lewis (Rilo Kiley et cetera) and from former Shudder to Think main man Craig Wedren. But the Oberst auspices are conspicuous throughout, in the ecstatic naïveté of the performances and, of course, in the gaping, expressive scope of the lyrics.

Many releases later, Team Love offers up Die Pfalz, TL-55, a new compilation that celebrates the provincial Indie music of the label’s hometown and mine. Die Pfalz is a lovely tribute to the Deus Loci on the part of Team Love, but it is much more than that. Comparing TLS-01 to TL-55, it is the former that sounds all grass-fed and fashioned by rain-rusted Colonial farm implements. Pastoral New Paltz, on the other hand, comes off as a town dominated by electric shimmer and Indie symphonics. In a stark reversal of the Oberst modus, the music here is the spangled thing: stormy, lush and layered, rich in timbre, broad in gesture; and the lyrics for the most part are elliptical and poetically minimal – to the extent that they are audible and intelligible at all, that is.

Appropriately, the dean of the scene, Shana Falana, kicks off Die Pfalz with the previously unreleased song “Heaven” and two exquisite tracks from her EP In the Light. These sound exactly as wonderful here as they do on the EP; and if you have not seen Falana perform live, go now, fool! But for me, the big news is the next three tracks: the first formally released material by New Paltz’s beloved Breakfast in Fur since the six-song bedroom EP that kicked off that band’s journey a couple of years back. And my, how it has grown. Live staple “Setting Stone” is given a disturbed, almost Gothic treatment. The real revelation, however, is “Whisper”: a dreamy, VU/Nico-inspired sonic tableau so delicate in melody and dramatic in texture that it leaves me half-crazed for Breakfast in Fur’s first full-length recording, whenever that mythical beast might eventuate.

The Falana and Breakfast in Fur opening sequence exaggerates the stylistic coherence of the New Paltz scene somewhat, but “Side Two” of the compilation corrects this with the skittering electro beats of Cycad and the ballsy, angular garage rock of the Bloodletters. There is of course much more to be said about the current New Paltz scene, and Team Love makes no definitive claim with this release. It is more a “Here is some stuff we really like” overture, and a quite effective one at that. Here’s hoping for more local love in times ahead! - Hudson Valley Almanac Weekly


"Tunes from Die Pfalz"

Team Love, a boutique record label, gallery and performance space located on Church Street in New Paltz, has been defined – probably for better and for worse – by its association with “Bright Eyes” songwriter Connor Oberst, who co-founded the formerly New York City-based label with Nate Krenkel in 2003. Oberst, in case you slept through the Aughts, came on like a millennial Dylan at the end of the ‘90s and forged what might be called the New Verbosity: a maximalist, mythic, post-beatnik lyrical grope, equal parts acute narrative detail and cosmic grandiosity sung in a compelling, quavering tenor against an Americana backdrop. Not many people try to be the poet of a new generation and pull it off; Connor Oberst actually kinda did.

My first taste of the Team Love product line – the TLS-01 compilation Music for the Ride Home – is about as diverse as one would expect a 13-act comp to be. While Oberst might be its figurehead, Team Love is hardly a one-horse show. That first compilation includes work from the ubiquitous Jenny Lewis (Rilo Kiley et cetera) and from former Shudder to Think main man Craig Wedren. But the Oberst auspices are conspicuous throughout, in the ecstatic naïveté of the performances and, of course, in the gaping, expressive scope of the lyrics.

Many releases later, Team Love offers up Die Pfalz, TL-55, a new compilation that celebrates the provincial Indie music of the label’s hometown and mine. Die Pfalz is a lovely tribute to the Deus Loci on the part of Team Love, but it is much more than that. Comparing TLS-01 to TL-55, it is the former that sounds all grass-fed and fashioned by rain-rusted Colonial farm implements. Pastoral New Paltz, on the other hand, comes off as a town dominated by electric shimmer and Indie symphonics. In a stark reversal of the Oberst modus, the music here is the spangled thing: stormy, lush and layered, rich in timbre, broad in gesture; and the lyrics for the most part are elliptical and poetically minimal – to the extent that they are audible and intelligible at all, that is.

Appropriately, the dean of the scene, Shana Falana, kicks off Die Pfalz with the previously unreleased song “Heaven” and two exquisite tracks from her EP In the Light. These sound exactly as wonderful here as they do on the EP; and if you have not seen Falana perform live, go now, fool! But for me, the big news is the next three tracks: the first formally released material by New Paltz’s beloved Breakfast in Fur since the six-song bedroom EP that kicked off that band’s journey a couple of years back. And my, how it has grown. Live staple “Setting Stone” is given a disturbed, almost Gothic treatment. The real revelation, however, is “Whisper”: a dreamy, VU/Nico-inspired sonic tableau so delicate in melody and dramatic in texture that it leaves me half-crazed for Breakfast in Fur’s first full-length recording, whenever that mythical beast might eventuate.

The Falana and Breakfast in Fur opening sequence exaggerates the stylistic coherence of the New Paltz scene somewhat, but “Side Two” of the compilation corrects this with the skittering electro beats of Cycad and the ballsy, angular garage rock of the Bloodletters. There is of course much more to be said about the current New Paltz scene, and Team Love makes no definitive claim with this release. It is more a “Here is some stuff we really like” overture, and a quite effective one at that. Here’s hoping for more local love in times ahead! - Hudson Valley Almanac Weekly


"Furry Whispers Lush Waterfalls of Sound"

New Paltz, New York’s Breakfast in Fur is a charming dream-pop four piece that is making some of the more interesting music that the genre has to offer.

At first, I thought “Whisper” was just gong to be another shoegaze/dreampop piece of washed out blah. But, the more I listened, the more I found myself enjoying it. he track is a cascading waterfall of synths, layered vocals from Kaitlin Van Pelt, and washed out, but still prevalent bass with great guitar hooks.

This is a tricky genre for me. I often don’t find much variation between many of the artists’ sound. While this is true of many, Breakfast in Fur adds something extra. There’s decent variation between their tunes, but not so much so that the band’s signature isn’t on them. The band’s solid lineup doesn’t hurt this equation. In addition to Van Pelt (vocals, visuals, piano, synthesizer, accordion, drums), Breakfast in Fur consists of Dan Wolfe (vocals, guitar, production, and multiple other instruments), Michael Hollis (guitar), and Matt Ross (drums, bass, synths).

“Whisper” can be found on the Team Love label’s new album, Die Pfalz (the name first given to the village of New Paltz, NY when French Huguenots settled there in 1678 in search of greater religious freedom). The album, is a collection of songs by local musical acts that includes Breakfast in Fur, Shana Falana, Cycad, and Bloodletters.

Breakfast in Fur (one of the best band names ever) is one of the better representations of the dreampop world. Check out “Whisper” below. - In Your Speakers Magazine


"Furry Whispers Lush Waterfalls of Sound"

New Paltz, New York’s Breakfast in Fur is a charming dream-pop four piece that is making some of the more interesting music that the genre has to offer.

At first, I thought “Whisper” was just gong to be another shoegaze/dreampop piece of washed out blah. But, the more I listened, the more I found myself enjoying it. he track is a cascading waterfall of synths, layered vocals from Kaitlin Van Pelt, and washed out, but still prevalent bass with great guitar hooks.

This is a tricky genre for me. I often don’t find much variation between many of the artists’ sound. While this is true of many, Breakfast in Fur adds something extra. There’s decent variation between their tunes, but not so much so that the band’s signature isn’t on them. The band’s solid lineup doesn’t hurt this equation. In addition to Van Pelt (vocals, visuals, piano, synthesizer, accordion, drums), Breakfast in Fur consists of Dan Wolfe (vocals, guitar, production, and multiple other instruments), Michael Hollis (guitar), and Matt Ross (drums, bass, synths).

“Whisper” can be found on the Team Love label’s new album, Die Pfalz (the name first given to the village of New Paltz, NY when French Huguenots settled there in 1678 in search of greater religious freedom). The album, is a collection of songs by local musical acts that includes Breakfast in Fur, Shana Falana, Cycad, and Bloodletters.

Breakfast in Fur (one of the best band names ever) is one of the better representations of the dreampop world. Check out “Whisper” below. - In Your Speakers Magazine


"Breakfast In Fur @ The Daily Grind"

Breakfast in Fur is certainly not a band which I could ever associate the word “boring” with. Of course, any of the sixty-or-so folks at their show in Troy, NY this past June, as well as those who follow music in New York (and, no, I don’t mean the city), could tell you just how entertaining these New Paltz natives are. Breakfast in Fur is part of a group of immensely talented, but criminally underpraised musicians from all over The Empire State; artists which are passed over because they’re either not from the New York City music scene or don’t have the budget to launch a wide-ranging PR campaign.

One part sweet-sounding indie pop and another part synth-driven melody, Breakfast in Fur didn’t just prove that they are as talented as their downstate cousins, they outshined them. The forty-five minute set began with perhaps their most well-known track, “I Don’t Care.” Dan Wolf crooned softly, while the rest of the band laid down melodies reminiscent of a less atmospheric, more charming Phantogram. The songs that followed were chock full of quirky, yet appropriately placed percussion that sounded right at home in The Daily Grind. From time to time, Dan traded off vocal responsibilities with band mate and girlfriend, Kaitlin Van Pelt; her voice adding a sad, beautiful dimension to Breakfast in Fur’s sound. By the end of the performance, I was convinced that I’d become privy to one of indie’s best kept secrets.

Breakfast in Fur is one of those rare bands that ends up flying under the radar of most music listeners, but completely blows away anyone who digs them up. This is due, in no small part, to the fact that they hail from an area which is not particularly well-known for musical talent. And, they’re not alone. In fact, greater New York plays host to dozens of phenomenal, underpublicized acts. While it might take a bit of searching to find these upstate gems, the effort is well worth it. Take some time to listen to Breakfast in Fur (or, better yet, go see them live), and you’ll know exactly what I mean. - In Your Speakers Magazine


"Breakfast In Fur @ The Daily Grind"

Breakfast in Fur is certainly not a band which I could ever associate the word “boring” with. Of course, any of the sixty-or-so folks at their show in Troy, NY this past June, as well as those who follow music in New York (and, no, I don’t mean the city), could tell you just how entertaining these New Paltz natives are. Breakfast in Fur is part of a group of immensely talented, but criminally underpraised musicians from all over The Empire State; artists which are passed over because they’re either not from the New York City music scene or don’t have the budget to launch a wide-ranging PR campaign.

One part sweet-sounding indie pop and another part synth-driven melody, Breakfast in Fur didn’t just prove that they are as talented as their downstate cousins, they outshined them. The forty-five minute set began with perhaps their most well-known track, “I Don’t Care.” Dan Wolf crooned softly, while the rest of the band laid down melodies reminiscent of a less atmospheric, more charming Phantogram. The songs that followed were chock full of quirky, yet appropriately placed percussion that sounded right at home in The Daily Grind. From time to time, Dan traded off vocal responsibilities with band mate and girlfriend, Kaitlin Van Pelt; her voice adding a sad, beautiful dimension to Breakfast in Fur’s sound. By the end of the performance, I was convinced that I’d become privy to one of indie’s best kept secrets.

Breakfast in Fur is one of those rare bands that ends up flying under the radar of most music listeners, but completely blows away anyone who digs them up. This is due, in no small part, to the fact that they hail from an area which is not particularly well-known for musical talent. And, they’re not alone. In fact, greater New York plays host to dozens of phenomenal, underpublicized acts. While it might take a bit of searching to find these upstate gems, the effort is well worth it. Take some time to listen to Breakfast in Fur (or, better yet, go see them live), and you’ll know exactly what I mean. - In Your Speakers Magazine


"Breakfast In Fur Shine"

I love the simple pop that these folks from New Paltz, New York write. It’s pretty, pure and simple. The video is a sweet little cut-up of vintage Saturday morning cartoons and other ephemera.

This tune is from their excellent self-titled EP which has been around a bit digitally, but finally got it’s due on 10” vinyl from Analog Edition Records. Pick that sweet wax up right here. - yvynyl


"Breakfast In Fur Shine"

I love the simple pop that these folks from New Paltz, New York write. It’s pretty, pure and simple. The video is a sweet little cut-up of vintage Saturday morning cartoons and other ephemera.

This tune is from their excellent self-titled EP which has been around a bit digitally, but finally got it’s due on 10” vinyl from Analog Edition Records. Pick that sweet wax up right here. - yvynyl


"Spengin’ the Underground: Breakfast in Fur"

I asked my good buddy, Dean Engle, who co-runs the cassette record label Responsible Records, based in New Paltz, for some upcoming local releases. He turned me onto Breakfast in Fur, a five-piece ambient bedroom-pop band that is on the rise in the New Paltz scene, and who are gearing up to release their debut EP on vinyl. The release date for the physical copy is sometime in early May. However, you can already download the E.P. from their bandcamp page, which, I must say, is quite a delight.

The atmosphere that the Breakfast in Fur E.P. creates is that of a hazy, sun-spattered journey with good friends, spiraling to jubilee with upbeat acoustic guitars and ambient noise. These six songs are layered with intriguing sound, making the E.P. feel greater, much like a full-length. I think their allure has to do with the mature songwriting. Breakfast in Fur conquers what many on-the-rise bands fall short of: sounding original. Too often, young bands tend to sound too similar to their influences, disabling their own creative ability by paying too great a homage to those who inspire them. Breakfast in Fur, however, with its whispery vocals, trilly guitars and minimalist percussion, have created a sound that is all their own, but close enough to the psych-folk spectrum that they do not come off as inaccessible.

Aside from all the technical qualities of the music, I think it’s the E.P.’s hypnotic seduction that makes their sound stand out. On some tracks, the guitars get cyclic, spinning the listener round and round in a trance; ambient sound bites dip in and out; piano and synth melodies drip under the song — this is truly a merit of diverse songwriting. “Shine,” perhaps the E.P.’s standout track, has a folk-meets-orchestra feel to it, with big bass swoops under coats of crazed acoustic guitar. “Flying Saucers,” for example, showcases the band’s instrumental ability to create intertwining melodies and it introduces sound bites to add to the collection of noises used on this more-than-fulfilling E.P.

Breakfast in Fur is one of the many great local bands in New Paltz and, in the future, I hope to spotlight a few more to share. What they do well is something that any band, local or not, should strive for: they aren’t afraid to try new things. They aren’t restricted to their genre, whatever you decide that is. Instead, they let their creative energy take hold, forming a solidified sound while experimenting at the same time. So take a break from the humdrum life of college, papers and tests – keep a look out for local shows and experience the great music that’s around you. I promise it’s there. - The Little Rebeillion


"Spengin’ the Underground: Breakfast in Fur"

I asked my good buddy, Dean Engle, who co-runs the cassette record label Responsible Records, based in New Paltz, for some upcoming local releases. He turned me onto Breakfast in Fur, a five-piece ambient bedroom-pop band that is on the rise in the New Paltz scene, and who are gearing up to release their debut EP on vinyl. The release date for the physical copy is sometime in early May. However, you can already download the E.P. from their bandcamp page, which, I must say, is quite a delight.

The atmosphere that the Breakfast in Fur E.P. creates is that of a hazy, sun-spattered journey with good friends, spiraling to jubilee with upbeat acoustic guitars and ambient noise. These six songs are layered with intriguing sound, making the E.P. feel greater, much like a full-length. I think their allure has to do with the mature songwriting. Breakfast in Fur conquers what many on-the-rise bands fall short of: sounding original. Too often, young bands tend to sound too similar to their influences, disabling their own creative ability by paying too great a homage to those who inspire them. Breakfast in Fur, however, with its whispery vocals, trilly guitars and minimalist percussion, have created a sound that is all their own, but close enough to the psych-folk spectrum that they do not come off as inaccessible.

Aside from all the technical qualities of the music, I think it’s the E.P.’s hypnotic seduction that makes their sound stand out. On some tracks, the guitars get cyclic, spinning the listener round and round in a trance; ambient sound bites dip in and out; piano and synth melodies drip under the song — this is truly a merit of diverse songwriting. “Shine,” perhaps the E.P.’s standout track, has a folk-meets-orchestra feel to it, with big bass swoops under coats of crazed acoustic guitar. “Flying Saucers,” for example, showcases the band’s instrumental ability to create intertwining melodies and it introduces sound bites to add to the collection of noises used on this more-than-fulfilling E.P.

Breakfast in Fur is one of the many great local bands in New Paltz and, in the future, I hope to spotlight a few more to share. What they do well is something that any band, local or not, should strive for: they aren’t afraid to try new things. They aren’t restricted to their genre, whatever you decide that is. Instead, they let their creative energy take hold, forming a solidified sound while experimenting at the same time. So take a break from the humdrum life of college, papers and tests – keep a look out for local shows and experience the great music that’s around you. I promise it’s there. - The Little Rebeillion


"QRO Magazine: Breakfast In Fur "Shine""

Yet another winner found its way to the MMM-MMMP3s inbox (mp3@qromag.com)! Breakfast in Fur combine the intimate weirdness of Quilt with the public grandeur of Arcade Fire. The preponderance of unplugged instrumentation gives the album a real earthy feel, while the synths and samples on tracks like "A Quiet Place" and "Flying Saucers" reach for the stratosphere. Their self-titled EP is pretty flawless: a haunting essay into pine tree tremolo, sun-burned synth, forest-gaze, folk-core. I'll give a shout out to the "High Hopes" cover for being a crackerjack reinterpretation - cute without being cutesy - but I've got to put the spotlight on "Shine" for this post. The song rises like the morning sun somewhere around the middle of the EP. Quiet, purposeful, warming up the sonic landscape, burning away the dew, and delivering you into the frightful majesty of the day like a newborn baby taking its first few breaths of sweet and terrible freedom. - QRO Magazine


"QRO Magazine: Breakfast In Fur "Shine""

Yet another winner found its way to the MMM-MMMP3s inbox (mp3@qromag.com)! Breakfast in Fur combine the intimate weirdness of Quilt with the public grandeur of Arcade Fire. The preponderance of unplugged instrumentation gives the album a real earthy feel, while the synths and samples on tracks like "A Quiet Place" and "Flying Saucers" reach for the stratosphere. Their self-titled EP is pretty flawless: a haunting essay into pine tree tremolo, sun-burned synth, forest-gaze, folk-core. I'll give a shout out to the "High Hopes" cover for being a crackerjack reinterpretation - cute without being cutesy - but I've got to put the spotlight on "Shine" for this post. The song rises like the morning sun somewhere around the middle of the EP. Quiet, purposeful, warming up the sonic landscape, burning away the dew, and delivering you into the frightful majesty of the day like a newborn baby taking its first few breaths of sweet and terrible freedom. - QRO Magazine


"Cactus Mouth: Breakfast In Fur Review"

Like some sort of cute indie pop circus, Breakfast in Fur attack their indie pop sound with a sense of childlike adventure. From the cover art to the covering of “High Hopes”, everything about this EP screams “fun”. The tunes themselves are a mixture of different genres incorporating everything from twee to folk to ambient. Don’t in any way be dissuaded from the youthful glee that the EP is so obviously soaked in, however. The five tunes on this EP are actually some really well-written, infectious indie pop songs. Each song is so expertly layered that it gives the songs a sense of careful depth. - Cactus Mouth


"Cactus Mouth: Breakfast In Fur Review"

Like some sort of cute indie pop circus, Breakfast in Fur attack their indie pop sound with a sense of childlike adventure. From the cover art to the covering of “High Hopes”, everything about this EP screams “fun”. The tunes themselves are a mixture of different genres incorporating everything from twee to folk to ambient. Don’t in any way be dissuaded from the youthful glee that the EP is so obviously soaked in, however. The five tunes on this EP are actually some really well-written, infectious indie pop songs. Each song is so expertly layered that it gives the songs a sense of careful depth. - Cactus Mouth


"Holey Tonal: Breakfast in Fur"

The creative juices can flow at the worst times – I’ve irked many a neighbour at 3 in the morning perfecting a few bars of music. Maybe it’s the rush of adrenaline from the fear that an irate pyjama clad person may knock on my door and shoot my face off that can make late night music-making so effective.

Exquisite experimental folk poppers Breakfast in Fur from New Paltz, NY began life in the small hours of Dan Wolfe’s bedroom. It seems he never had any knocks on the door.

His initial recording project led to the release of a debut EP in 2009 and Breakfast in Fur now comprise 6 members – garnering attention from their live shows in local cafes and Brooklyn bars. The whole band are currently recording together for their LP The Feel – due to be released in spring 2011.

Whilst we wait for that – here are two highlights from Breakfast in Fur‘s EP. I Don’t Care is a jangly catchy pop number with impressive rhythmical layers whilst maintaining a lo-fi aesthetic – especially with the laid-back vocals. With a hint of tropicana High Hopes is another great track to smile away to. - Holey Tonal


"Holey Tonal: Breakfast in Fur"

The creative juices can flow at the worst times – I’ve irked many a neighbour at 3 in the morning perfecting a few bars of music. Maybe it’s the rush of adrenaline from the fear that an irate pyjama clad person may knock on my door and shoot my face off that can make late night music-making so effective.

Exquisite experimental folk poppers Breakfast in Fur from New Paltz, NY began life in the small hours of Dan Wolfe’s bedroom. It seems he never had any knocks on the door.

His initial recording project led to the release of a debut EP in 2009 and Breakfast in Fur now comprise 6 members – garnering attention from their live shows in local cafes and Brooklyn bars. The whole band are currently recording together for their LP The Feel – due to be released in spring 2011.

Whilst we wait for that – here are two highlights from Breakfast in Fur‘s EP. I Don’t Care is a jangly catchy pop number with impressive rhythmical layers whilst maintaining a lo-fi aesthetic – especially with the laid-back vocals. With a hint of tropicana High Hopes is another great track to smile away to. - Holey Tonal


"Suggested Listening: Breakfast In Fur"

The other day in speaking with Jimmy of Head Underwater and Katie Pierce of Heavy Percussion, he was pumping the likes of New York’s Breakfast In Fur, the codename for Dan Wolfe and his bedroom recordings. He has a free 5 track album up for grabs and Jimmy/Katie were right to praise it. Its full of well orchestrated and well written lo-fi-ish bedroom noise pop (kinda reminds me of early Folk Implosion – only less poppy). There’s a lot of pings and pangs and whizzes and plops floating around the atmosphere of these tracks – like a whimsical fog hanging over Wolfe’s whispered vocals. Combine that with some pretty amazing instrumentation (the strings on “Shine” come to mind) and you’ve got some audio dynamite on your hands (not to be confused with Big Audio Dynamite). - Pasta Primavera


"Suggested Listening: Breakfast In Fur"

The other day in speaking with Jimmy of Head Underwater and Katie Pierce of Heavy Percussion, he was pumping the likes of New York’s Breakfast In Fur, the codename for Dan Wolfe and his bedroom recordings. He has a free 5 track album up for grabs and Jimmy/Katie were right to praise it. Its full of well orchestrated and well written lo-fi-ish bedroom noise pop (kinda reminds me of early Folk Implosion – only less poppy). There’s a lot of pings and pangs and whizzes and plops floating around the atmosphere of these tracks – like a whimsical fog hanging over Wolfe’s whispered vocals. Combine that with some pretty amazing instrumentation (the strings on “Shine” come to mind) and you’ve got some audio dynamite on your hands (not to be confused with Big Audio Dynamite). - Pasta Primavera


"Breakfast In Fur: NY Band Channels Inner Wild Things"

"I Don't Care" and "Shine"—songs by New Paltz, New York band Breakfast in Fur—make me want to hide my electric guitar and bury my punk records for fear of disturbing this innocent and wildly engaging acoustic wonderland. The songs on the band's EP— in turns adventurous, mischievous, and purposely disengaged from the adult world—recall Maurice Sendak's Where The Wild Things Are as much as the EP's album cover, an illustration which features a very Max-like child fitted in an animal onesie. The line between children's entertainment and psychedelia has always been shifty and hard to pin down. On their EP, Breakfast In Fur prove there's no need to make the distinction. Whether covering the traditional bus song "High Hopes" or singing about flying saucers, what's important is delivery—and Breakfast in Fur have the goods. - Everybody Taste


"Breakfast In Fur: NY Band Channels Inner Wild Things"

"I Don't Care" and "Shine"—songs by New Paltz, New York band Breakfast in Fur—make me want to hide my electric guitar and bury my punk records for fear of disturbing this innocent and wildly engaging acoustic wonderland. The songs on the band's EP— in turns adventurous, mischievous, and purposely disengaged from the adult world—recall Maurice Sendak's Where The Wild Things Are as much as the EP's album cover, an illustration which features a very Max-like child fitted in an animal onesie. The line between children's entertainment and psychedelia has always been shifty and hard to pin down. On their EP, Breakfast In Fur prove there's no need to make the distinction. Whether covering the traditional bus song "High Hopes" or singing about flying saucers, what's important is delivery—and Breakfast in Fur have the goods. - Everybody Taste


Discography

2012 "Die Pfalz"
Team Love Records
CD/ Digital / 12" Vinyl

2011 "Breakfast In Fur EP"
Analog Edition Records
10" Vinyl

2009 "Breakfast In Fur EP" Self-Released
CD / Digital

Photos

Bio

Breakfast In Fur began in Dan Wolfe's quiet Upstate New York bedroom where he started recording the songs that would become the band's first EP. Breakfast in Fur's self titled EP is a densely textured landscape of children's toy sounds, thudding percussion and voices that float softly beneath layers of droning accordion, jangly guitar and a self-contained universe of sound effects.

Since then the band has developed into a collaboration between it's six members (Dan Wolfe, Kaitlin Van Pelt, Michael Hollis, Matt Ross, Sandy Davis and Chris Walker). This new sense of collaboration is best heard on their latest batch of songs on Team Love Records, and will come to full fruition with the release of their next album which is currently in the works.

Their eponymous EP was rereleased with one additional track on 10" vinyl via Analog Edition Records in 2011. In September 2012 the band released three new songs on Team Love Record's "Die Pfalz," a four-band compilation on 12" Vinyl and CD.