Brooks Young Band
Gig Seeker Pro

Brooks Young Band

Concord, New Hampshire, United States | INDIE

Concord, New Hampshire, United States | INDIE
Band Rock Pop

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

Music

Press


If desire and discipline were dollars, Brooks Young would be rich. Inspired by his grandfather, he picked up his first guitar at age 11. Two years later, Young heard Eric Clapton’s Unplugged and proceeded to teach himself every note. “I just used to sit in my room and practice that one book,” Young said recently from his home in Franklin. “All my friends thought I was crazy.”

Soon Young, a History Channel buff, was mining Clapton’s roots, exploring B.B. King, Albert King, Muddy Waters and other seminal blues players. “I bought all their records and books to figure out what their story was,” he says. “I think a few of them really stuck with me.”

The other day, Young arranged for Clapton to receive a copy of his first album, Counting Down. “He got it yesterday, and I’m just waiting to get that phone call to see what he says.” It’s not a lofty aspiration considering what the 28-year-old Young has done so far.

On Sept. 11, 2001, he was introduced to B.B. King at a show in Concord. “His hand basically made mine disappear when I shook his,” Young says. The two talked about the events of that tragic day. “They almost didn’t do the show, and he said, ‘We need to do this to show the people we can move on.’”

From then on, King and Young got together whenever the blues legend came to town. Last year, the Brooks Young Band opened for him in Hampton Beach, and Young received a shout-out during King’s set. “He’s up there, playing ‘The Thrill Is Gone’ and thanking me from the stage,” Young recalls, still amazed.
Playing larger rooms is part of what Young sees as a patient strategy for success.

“Hampton Casino holds 2,500 — that’s more people than a band that plays in the local bar scene will see in a whole year,” he says. “I pulled the whole band together and said, ‘This is what we’re going to focus on.’ Nothing against any club, but that’s not what’s going to make it happen. I would rather be in our studio working on stuff and rehearsing … we need to take ourselves seriously and play the higher-level shows because that’s what’s going to get you noticed.”

To that end, Young’s band headlined at the Middle Center for the Arts in his hometown of Franklin, and celebrated the album release in front of a sold-out Tupelo Music Hall crowd. He opened for Jay Geils at the Middle and the played with James Montgomery at the inaugural night of the Flying Monkey in Rochester, where the headliner invited him onstage to jam. A few days after the show, Montgomery called a friend of Young’s. “Where have you been hiding this kid?” he asked. “You’ve got to get him playing out more. He has the potential to do great things.”

With this weekend’s appearance opening for James Cotton’s Superharp band, it’s safe to say the Brooks Young Band is on a roll. Of course, career moves don’t mean much without the music to back it up. With Counting Down, Young and his band have delivered a well-rounded record that’s more than equal to his ambitions.

For all of his blues roots, the album takes more cues from hybrid blues-rockers like Robert Cray and James Hunter, as well as early Rolling Stones — indeed, it closes with a faithful cover of “Jumping Jack Flash.” What stands out most is Young’s silk-and-sandpaper singing, particularly on the up-tempo tracks “Pushing Up” and “Wake Up Molly.” Young is a fan of John Mayer (“I actually got to hang out with him a bit last October down at Berklee, and he’s a pretty nice guy … we exchanged stories about B.B. King.”), and he offers stylistic nods to Mayer’s blues/pop sweet spot on the tender ballad “By My Side.”

He waxes Claptonesque on the topical “Back on the Ground” and plays it smooth and seductive on “I Believe,” crooning, “I would walk a thousand miles just to get to you.” The record’s most straight up blues number is “Dream Away,” featuring a breathtaking guitar solo from Young. Yet even on that track, Maya Hickman’s lovely descant provides some extra sheen.

The hypnotic title cut is the record’s centerpiece for two reasons: it’s first-rate and it features a big-deal guest appearance from Johnny A. When Young went into Rocking Horse Studios to begin work on Counting Down, he sent an e-mail to the guitarist (they’d worked together before), calling him an inspiration and inviting him to play. “He replied back within five minutes. He said, I’d love to be on it, just let me know the details.’”

For Young, music is a 24/7 occupation, even when he’s not holding a guitar.
“B.B. King is close to 90 and Eric Clapton is 65, and you’ve got to take care of yourself to keep doing this,” he says. Young maintains a regular workout regimen. “I’m not obsessive about it. But if I’m up there singing and playing guitar for a couple hours a night, I have to be able to maintain a steady flow, or I’ll be on the floor panting halfway through.”

Unlike a lot of area musicians, Young doesn’t leaven his hard work with a day job. To do so, he believes, would diminish it, turn it into a hobby. “I - Hippo Press By Michael Witthaus


If desire and discipline were dollars, Brooks Young would be rich. Inspired by his grandfather, he picked up his first guitar at age 11. Two years later, Young heard Eric Clapton’s Unplugged and proceeded to teach himself every note. “I just used to sit in my room and practice that one book,” Young said recently from his home in Franklin. “All my friends thought I was crazy.”

Soon Young, a History Channel buff, was mining Clapton’s roots, exploring B.B. King, Albert King, Muddy Waters and other seminal blues players. “I bought all their records and books to figure out what their story was,” he says. “I think a few of them really stuck with me.”

The other day, Young arranged for Clapton to receive a copy of his first album, Counting Down. “He got it yesterday, and I’m just waiting to get that phone call to see what he says.” It’s not a lofty aspiration considering what the 28-year-old Young has done so far.

On Sept. 11, 2001, he was introduced to B.B. King at a show in Concord. “His hand basically made mine disappear when I shook his,” Young says. The two talked about the events of that tragic day. “They almost didn’t do the show, and he said, ‘We need to do this to show the people we can move on.’”

From then on, King and Young got together whenever the blues legend came to town. Last year, the Brooks Young Band opened for him in Hampton Beach, and Young received a shout-out during King’s set. “He’s up there, playing ‘The Thrill Is Gone’ and thanking me from the stage,” Young recalls, still amazed.
Playing larger rooms is part of what Young sees as a patient strategy for success.

“Hampton Casino holds 2,500 — that’s more people than a band that plays in the local bar scene will see in a whole year,” he says. “I pulled the whole band together and said, ‘This is what we’re going to focus on.’ Nothing against any club, but that’s not what’s going to make it happen. I would rather be in our studio working on stuff and rehearsing … we need to take ourselves seriously and play the higher-level shows because that’s what’s going to get you noticed.”

To that end, Young’s band headlined at the Middle Center for the Arts in his hometown of Franklin, and celebrated the album release in front of a sold-out Tupelo Music Hall crowd. He opened for Jay Geils at the Middle and the played with James Montgomery at the inaugural night of the Flying Monkey in Rochester, where the headliner invited him onstage to jam. A few days after the show, Montgomery called a friend of Young’s. “Where have you been hiding this kid?” he asked. “You’ve got to get him playing out more. He has the potential to do great things.”

With this weekend’s appearance opening for James Cotton’s Superharp band, it’s safe to say the Brooks Young Band is on a roll. Of course, career moves don’t mean much without the music to back it up. With Counting Down, Young and his band have delivered a well-rounded record that’s more than equal to his ambitions.

For all of his blues roots, the album takes more cues from hybrid blues-rockers like Robert Cray and James Hunter, as well as early Rolling Stones — indeed, it closes with a faithful cover of “Jumping Jack Flash.” What stands out most is Young’s silk-and-sandpaper singing, particularly on the up-tempo tracks “Pushing Up” and “Wake Up Molly.” Young is a fan of John Mayer (“I actually got to hang out with him a bit last October down at Berklee, and he’s a pretty nice guy … we exchanged stories about B.B. King.”), and he offers stylistic nods to Mayer’s blues/pop sweet spot on the tender ballad “By My Side.”

He waxes Claptonesque on the topical “Back on the Ground” and plays it smooth and seductive on “I Believe,” crooning, “I would walk a thousand miles just to get to you.” The record’s most straight up blues number is “Dream Away,” featuring a breathtaking guitar solo from Young. Yet even on that track, Maya Hickman’s lovely descant provides some extra sheen.

The hypnotic title cut is the record’s centerpiece for two reasons: it’s first-rate and it features a big-deal guest appearance from Johnny A. When Young went into Rocking Horse Studios to begin work on Counting Down, he sent an e-mail to the guitarist (they’d worked together before), calling him an inspiration and inviting him to play. “He replied back within five minutes. He said, I’d love to be on it, just let me know the details.’”

For Young, music is a 24/7 occupation, even when he’s not holding a guitar.
“B.B. King is close to 90 and Eric Clapton is 65, and you’ve got to take care of yourself to keep doing this,” he says. Young maintains a regular workout regimen. “I’m not obsessive about it. But if I’m up there singing and playing guitar for a couple hours a night, I have to be able to maintain a steady flow, or I’ll be on the floor panting halfway through.”

Unlike a lot of area musicians, Young doesn’t leaven his hard work with a day job. To do so, he believes, would diminish it, turn it into a hobby. “I - Hippo Press By Michael Witthaus


If desire and discipline were dollars, Brooks Young would be rich. Inspired by his grandfather, he picked up his first guitar at age 11. Two years later, Young heard Eric Clapton’s Unplugged and proceeded to teach himself every note. “I just used to sit in my room and practice that one book,” Young said recently from his home in Franklin. “All my friends thought I was crazy.”

Soon Young, a History Channel buff, was mining Clapton’s roots, exploring B.B. King, Albert King, Muddy Waters and other seminal blues players. “I bought all their records and books to figure out what their story was,” he says. “I think a few of them really stuck with me.”

The other day, Young arranged for Clapton to receive a copy of his first album, Counting Down. “He got it yesterday, and I’m just waiting to get that phone call to see what he says.” It’s not a lofty aspiration considering what the 28-year-old Young has done so far.

On Sept. 11, 2001, he was introduced to B.B. King at a show in Concord. “His hand basically made mine disappear when I shook his,” Young says. The two talked about the events of that tragic day. “They almost didn’t do the show, and he said, ‘We need to do this to show the people we can move on.’”

From then on, King and Young got together whenever the blues legend came to town. Last year, the Brooks Young Band opened for him in Hampton Beach, and Young received a shout-out during King’s set. “He’s up there, playing ‘The Thrill Is Gone’ and thanking me from the stage,” Young recalls, still amazed.
Playing larger rooms is part of what Young sees as a patient strategy for success.

“Hampton Casino holds 2,500 — that’s more people than a band that plays in the local bar scene will see in a whole year,” he says. “I pulled the whole band together and said, ‘This is what we’re going to focus on.’ Nothing against any club, but that’s not what’s going to make it happen. I would rather be in our studio working on stuff and rehearsing … we need to take ourselves seriously and play the higher-level shows because that’s what’s going to get you noticed.”

To that end, Young’s band headlined at the Middle Center for the Arts in his hometown of Franklin, and celebrated the album release in front of a sold-out Tupelo Music Hall crowd. He opened for Jay Geils at the Middle and the played with James Montgomery at the inaugural night of the Flying Monkey in Rochester, where the headliner invited him onstage to jam. A few days after the show, Montgomery called a friend of Young’s. “Where have you been hiding this kid?” he asked. “You’ve got to get him playing out more. He has the potential to do great things.”

With this weekend’s appearance opening for James Cotton’s Superharp band, it’s safe to say the Brooks Young Band is on a roll. Of course, career moves don’t mean much without the music to back it up. With Counting Down, Young and his band have delivered a well-rounded record that’s more than equal to his ambitions.

For all of his blues roots, the album takes more cues from hybrid blues-rockers like Robert Cray and James Hunter, as well as early Rolling Stones — indeed, it closes with a faithful cover of “Jumping Jack Flash.” What stands out most is Young’s silk-and-sandpaper singing, particularly on the up-tempo tracks “Pushing Up” and “Wake Up Molly.” Young is a fan of John Mayer (“I actually got to hang out with him a bit last October down at Berklee, and he’s a pretty nice guy … we exchanged stories about B.B. King.”), and he offers stylistic nods to Mayer’s blues/pop sweet spot on the tender ballad “By My Side.”

He waxes Claptonesque on the topical “Back on the Ground” and plays it smooth and seductive on “I Believe,” crooning, “I would walk a thousand miles just to get to you.” The record’s most straight up blues number is “Dream Away,” featuring a breathtaking guitar solo from Young. Yet even on that track, Maya Hickman’s lovely descant provides some extra sheen.

The hypnotic title cut is the record’s centerpiece for two reasons: it’s first-rate and it features a big-deal guest appearance from Johnny A. When Young went into Rocking Horse Studios to begin work on Counting Down, he sent an e-mail to the guitarist (they’d worked together before), calling him an inspiration and inviting him to play. “He replied back within five minutes. He said, I’d love to be on it, just let me know the details.’”

For Young, music is a 24/7 occupation, even when he’s not holding a guitar.
“B.B. King is close to 90 and Eric Clapton is 65, and you’ve got to take care of yourself to keep doing this,” he says. Young maintains a regular workout regimen. “I’m not obsessive about it. But if I’m up there singing and playing guitar for a couple hours a night, I have to be able to maintain a steady flow, or I’ll be on the floor panting halfway through.”

Unlike a lot of area musicians, Young doesn’t leaven his hard work with a day job. To do so, he believes, would diminish it, turn it into a hobby. “I - The Hippo


If desire and discipline were dollars, Brooks Young would be rich. Inspired by his grandfather, he picked up his first guitar at age 11. Two years later, Young heard Eric Clapton’s Unplugged and proceeded to teach himself every note. “I just used to sit in my room and practice that one book,” Young said recently from his home in Franklin. “All my friends thought I was crazy.”

Soon Young, a History Channel buff, was mining Clapton’s roots, exploring B.B. King, Albert King, Muddy Waters and other seminal blues players. “I bought all their records and books to figure out what their story was,” he says. “I think a few of them really stuck with me.”

The other day, Young arranged for Clapton to receive a copy of his first album, Counting Down. “He got it yesterday, and I’m just waiting to get that phone call to see what he says.” It’s not a lofty aspiration considering what the 28-year-old Young has done so far.

On Sept. 11, 2001, he was introduced to B.B. King at a show in Concord. “His hand basically made mine disappear when I shook his,” Young says. The two talked about the events of that tragic day. “They almost didn’t do the show, and he said, ‘We need to do this to show the people we can move on.’”

From then on, King and Young got together whenever the blues legend came to town. Last year, the Brooks Young Band opened for him in Hampton Beach, and Young received a shout-out during King’s set. “He’s up there, playing ‘The Thrill Is Gone’ and thanking me from the stage,” Young recalls, still amazed.
Playing larger rooms is part of what Young sees as a patient strategy for success.

“Hampton Casino holds 2,500 — that’s more people than a band that plays in the local bar scene will see in a whole year,” he says. “I pulled the whole band together and said, ‘This is what we’re going to focus on.’ Nothing against any club, but that’s not what’s going to make it happen. I would rather be in our studio working on stuff and rehearsing … we need to take ourselves seriously and play the higher-level shows because that’s what’s going to get you noticed.”

To that end, Young’s band headlined at the Middle Center for the Arts in his hometown of Franklin, and celebrated the album release in front of a sold-out Tupelo Music Hall crowd. He opened for Jay Geils at the Middle and the played with James Montgomery at the inaugural night of the Flying Monkey in Rochester, where the headliner invited him onstage to jam. A few days after the show, Montgomery called a friend of Young’s. “Where have you been hiding this kid?” he asked. “You’ve got to get him playing out more. He has the potential to do great things.”

With this weekend’s appearance opening for James Cotton’s Superharp band, it’s safe to say the Brooks Young Band is on a roll. Of course, career moves don’t mean much without the music to back it up. With Counting Down, Young and his band have delivered a well-rounded record that’s more than equal to his ambitions.

For all of his blues roots, the album takes more cues from hybrid blues-rockers like Robert Cray and James Hunter, as well as early Rolling Stones — indeed, it closes with a faithful cover of “Jumping Jack Flash.” What stands out most is Young’s silk-and-sandpaper singing, particularly on the up-tempo tracks “Pushing Up” and “Wake Up Molly.” Young is a fan of John Mayer (“I actually got to hang out with him a bit last October down at Berklee, and he’s a pretty nice guy … we exchanged stories about B.B. King.”), and he offers stylistic nods to Mayer’s blues/pop sweet spot on the tender ballad “By My Side.”

He waxes Claptonesque on the topical “Back on the Ground” and plays it smooth and seductive on “I Believe,” crooning, “I would walk a thousand miles just to get to you.” The record’s most straight up blues number is “Dream Away,” featuring a breathtaking guitar solo from Young. Yet even on that track, Maya Hickman’s lovely descant provides some extra sheen.

The hypnotic title cut is the record’s centerpiece for two reasons: it’s first-rate and it features a big-deal guest appearance from Johnny A. When Young went into Rocking Horse Studios to begin work on Counting Down, he sent an e-mail to the guitarist (they’d worked together before), calling him an inspiration and inviting him to play. “He replied back within five minutes. He said, I’d love to be on it, just let me know the details.’”

For Young, music is a 24/7 occupation, even when he’s not holding a guitar.
“B.B. King is close to 90 and Eric Clapton is 65, and you’ve got to take care of yourself to keep doing this,” he says. Young maintains a regular workout regimen. “I’m not obsessive about it. But if I’m up there singing and playing guitar for a couple hours a night, I have to be able to maintain a steady flow, or I’ll be on the floor panting halfway through.”

Unlike a lot of area musicians, Young doesn’t leaven his hard work with a day job. To do so, he believes, would diminish it, turn it into a hobby. “I - The Hippo


Brooks Young Band has released a satisfying debut CD called Counting Down. There are many good things that can be said it. The band manages to put out a quality sound by being tight with each other and then from there they just expand everything to make a huge, thick pleasing mix of styles into one big sound.

There is a such a smooth flow of notes in each song, indicating this band has been playing together for quite some time. Young’s smooth as silk singing voice graces each track like a pleasant guest who shows up on time and keeps the day interesting and fun. He has a charming, likable, down-home something in his timbre that makes the listener feel like he’s sitting down talking with Young in his living room.

“I Believe” opens Counting Down with an full-bodied R&B feeling from the keys and rhythm section that pulls the listener in and immediately involves him in its layered sound. Young’s voice is so honey-flow smooth you like his sound right off the bat. This breezy, melodic, swaying tune has the earmarks of Adult Alternative radio hit all over it. This is definitely the work of a band on its way up.

The tune “Here For You” has a sweet contrast from edgy guitar phrases and Young’s silky vocal taking its time unfolding this gentle love song. There’s a sincerity in his vocal that makes you believe his proclamations to his beloved, and that alone could make female listeners take note. The Brooks Young Band is also a genre-defying act. They cannot be easily pigeonholed into any one music category. They have a rock and roll backbone, an country and western heart, an R&B fullness, and a bunch of other intangible qualities that is simply their own talents.

Title track “Counting Down” with its soulful organ, grooving rhythm section, tasteful guitar playing, and Young’s softly sung chorus becomes something more than a possible hit song. It becomes very good music structurally as well as good in the catchy chorus, winsome melody of a popular song. Other musicians will dig this band as much as fans.

Young excels as a lead guitarist. “Last September” finds Young doing his thing in fine style. After a considered build up, he pays out a lead phrase that impresses for its edgy elegance. His six-string is a force to be reckoned with, one he keeps confidently understated.

“Pushing Up” gives keyboardist Dan Vitale the chore of filling sweet, washy, synths into whatever space he can find in this sweetly appealing pop-rock ditty. After Vitale’s sweet joy, the listeners get another mountainous build up from Young. “Wake Up, Molly” gets its catchiness from an R&B groove backing Young’s fast talking vocal approach, making it one cool song.

“By My Side” was written for the ladies. A slow dance vibe and earnest words of devotion will make every girl in the dancehall rest her head on her fellow’s shoulders. Young turns in an restrained emotive guitar lead that makes you feel it more because of all that‘s restrained.

Young comes right into his “Back On The Ground” with a bristling guitar line, continues to pierce with melodic phrases that remind of Brad Paisley. Young ’s influence as barely perceptible, which makes his music simultaneously recognizable and fresh. “Forever Now” reminds of late 1970s Eric Clapton. The melodic phrases are mildly bluesy but expansive enough to capture a more populated audience. Dual keyboards too remind of Clapton’s extra layers of sound from three decades ago. Yet, Young doesn’t wear his influences on his sleeve. He has forged his influences into his own individual creativity.

“Dream Away” slows the pace a little to give a breather in between rockers. Young composes these mellower pieces with as much craftsmanship.

Credit must also be given to one of New England’s best backing bands: the flexible, rangy bass from Kirk Remignanti; the adept, in the pocket drummer Blake Wayman; the dual keys attack of Jeff Leroy and Dan Vitale. Brooks will further his up and coming status with this CD. www.brooksyoungband.com


- Bill Copeland Music News


Brooks Young Band has released a satisfying debut CD called Counting Down. There are many good things that can be said it. The band manages to put out a quality sound by being tight with each other and then from there they just expand everything to make a huge, thick pleasing mix of styles into one big sound.

There is a such a smooth flow of notes in each song, indicating this band has been playing together for quite some time. Young’s smooth as silk singing voice graces each track like a pleasant guest who shows up on time and keeps the day interesting and fun. He has a charming, likable, down-home something in his timbre that makes the listener feel like he’s sitting down talking with Young in his living room.

“I Believe” opens Counting Down with an full-bodied R&B feeling from the keys and rhythm section that pulls the listener in and immediately involves him in its layered sound. Young’s voice is so honey-flow smooth you like his sound right off the bat. This breezy, melodic, swaying tune has the earmarks of Adult Alternative radio hit all over it. This is definitely the work of a band on its way up.

The tune “Here For You” has a sweet contrast from edgy guitar phrases and Young’s silky vocal taking its time unfolding this gentle love song. There’s a sincerity in his vocal that makes you believe his proclamations to his beloved, and that alone could make female listeners take note. The Brooks Young Band is also a genre-defying act. They cannot be easily pigeonholed into any one music category. They have a rock and roll backbone, an country and western heart, an R&B fullness, and a bunch of other intangible qualities that is simply their own talents.

Title track “Counting Down” with its soulful organ, grooving rhythm section, tasteful guitar playing, and Young’s softly sung chorus becomes something more than a possible hit song. It becomes very good music structurally as well as good in the catchy chorus, winsome melody of a popular song. Other musicians will dig this band as much as fans.

Young excels as a lead guitarist. “Last September” finds Young doing his thing in fine style. After a considered build up, he pays out a lead phrase that impresses for its edgy elegance. His six-string is a force to be reckoned with, one he keeps confidently understated.

“Pushing Up” gives keyboardist Dan Vitale the chore of filling sweet, washy, synths into whatever space he can find in this sweetly appealing pop-rock ditty. After Vitale’s sweet joy, the listeners get another mountainous build up from Young. “Wake Up, Molly” gets its catchiness from an R&B groove backing Young’s fast talking vocal approach, making it one cool song.

“By My Side” was written for the ladies. A slow dance vibe and earnest words of devotion will make every girl in the dancehall rest her head on her fellow’s shoulders. Young turns in an restrained emotive guitar lead that makes you feel it more because of all that‘s restrained.

Young comes right into his “Back On The Ground” with a bristling guitar line, continues to pierce with melodic phrases that remind of Brad Paisley. Young ’s influence as barely perceptible, which makes his music simultaneously recognizable and fresh. “Forever Now” reminds of late 1970s Eric Clapton. The melodic phrases are mildly bluesy but expansive enough to capture a more populated audience. Dual keyboards too remind of Clapton’s extra layers of sound from three decades ago. Yet, Young doesn’t wear his influences on his sleeve. He has forged his influences into his own individual creativity.

“Dream Away” slows the pace a little to give a breather in between rockers. Young composes these mellower pieces with as much craftsmanship.

Credit must also be given to one of New England’s best backing bands: the flexible, rangy bass from Kirk Remignanti; the adept, in the pocket drummer Blake Wayman; the dual keys attack of Jeff Leroy and Dan Vitale. Brooks will further his up and coming status with this CD. www.brooksyoungband.com


- Bill Copeland Music News


Discography

2010 - Counting Down

2013 - Time To Fly

Photos

Bio

Winter 2012 Update- Brooks Young Band is currently in the recording studio working on a new album to be released next spring.

In October 2012 the band was invited to perform at a special campaign event with Vice President Joe Biden. Vice President Biden enjoyed the band so much that he requested a signed CD and arranged a private meet and greet for the band with President Barack Obama and Bill Clinton at a later campaign event in New Hampshire.

The Band has shared the stage with:

* Pat Benatar
* The Wallflowers
* REO Speedwagon
* Huey Lewis & The News
* Styx
* Ted Nugent
* B.B. King
* Robert Randolph & The Family Band
* Brad Whitford of Aerosmith
* J. Geils
* Rick Derringer
* James Montgomery
* South Side Johnny & The Asbury Jukes

and many others...

The band consists of Brooks Young on lead vocals and lead guitar, John Condlin on bass, Andy Devine on guitar, keyboardist Jeff LeRoy and Dave Lombard on drums.

The Brooks Young Band has been featured in several newspapers and magazines such as The Concord Monitor and Music Connection. Their songs have received radio play on many local and national stations such as Boston’s 92.5 The River. The band was also featured on New Hampshire's most popular TV show New Hampshire Chronicle and on FOX 25 News in Boston several times.

The Brooks Young Band delivers a powerful and memorable performance at each show. They have played in numerous venues from Boston to New York City, Nashville and beyond.