Bruce Goldish
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Bruce Goldish

Santa Barbara, California, United States | SELF

Santa Barbara, California, United States | SELF
Band Folk Acoustic

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Music

Press


"More REVIEWS:"

CD Baby's Editor's Pick, Dec 2001
"Incredible guitar-work."
- KRVM, Eugene OR
"Lovely!"
- WJFF, NY
"It has a very warm feel too often missing from solo guitar CDs."
- WUNC, Chapel Hill, NC
"Nice!"
- National Public Radio
"Very nice work - the cut Caffeine especially!"
- KFCF, Fresno, CA
"Leo Kottke and Carlos Montoya or some flamenco guy, and maybe a little classical influence and put them in a Cuisinart. We'll continue to share it [Coast] with listeners for a long time to come."
- KUMD, Duluth, MN
"Oh my God... I've never seen fingers strum and pick and pluck so fast in my life... Song after beautiful song after incredible song, I was truly impressed... You come across someone as talented as this and you go, 'Oh my God! That was incredible...' Reminds me of Leo Kottke. ... great, blew me away... He's strumming so fast and so hard with his fingers, when I was watching his index finger - that thing was going so fast, it was like, jeez dude, some of us got turned on..."
- ROCK99, Salt Lake City, UT, Live on the Mick & Allan Show - From the Airwaves


"New England Entertainment Digest"

Excerpt NEED article, July 2002:
"Rarely-if ever-do we come across this sort of alchemy, this sense of love and admiration for an instrument, while listening to a record these days. It’s just not there anymore. Records today are made for profit, not profundity. It’s all about hooks, looks and sales. Seldom a day it is when a record scoops you up on a magic carpet in one quick motion and whisks you through all sorts of feelings and emotions. Many times, when we buy a new disc, before the third or fourth track is even over, we’re looking to skip ahead and see what else it has to offer. We’re bored. The same ole, same ole.

Guitarist Bruce Goldish’s first record, “Coast,” offers us a chance to delve into something entirely different—and here’s the great thing about this record: It is just Goldish and his guitar. Nothing more. There are no vocals or cheesy lyrics to bog it down. There’s no overdubs to make you wonder just how hell it was done. It’s just Bruce, his guitar and his soul. Unfiltered art. Pure. Uncomplicated. And in today’s market: extremely courageous.

It is an all-instrumental disc from a guy who can’t read or write music. Go figure. When one brings this sort of street mentality and raw education to a genre that is laden with Berklee graduates and protégées of the latest and greatest, it offers the modern listener, the person who doesn’t really listen to the genre, a genuine feel for the improvisation involved in a project like this... It’s the sort of music I assume heavy metal guitarist Ritchie Blackmore would be doing if he wasn’t spending his time with Deep Purple. It’s classical music, I guess one could say, with an edge; it’s instrumental guitar with cocktail sauce.

...this music would work rather swimmingly in front of three thousand suits and bow ties at a classy band shell during a warm summer evening in Greenwich, Connecticut. But one has to understand something about good music, regardless of the genre: It can also work in the confines of a 1987 Datsun B-210 while one is perhaps going off to the factory in the morning. It’s simple pleasures, that’s all. One doesn’t need a PhD. to enjoy something; one only needs to give it a chance.

In fact, Bruce Goldish’s “Coast” will sweep you away and actually force you to think about things in your life—instead of allowing you just get by with mumbling along to the latest disposable pop song that you’ll hear three or four times that same day anyway.

Catch Bruce Goldish now while you can still afford it. Soon he’ll be playing the likes of Carnegie Hall, and you’ll be forced to take out a small loan just to buy tickets in the nosebleed section."
- M. William Phelps, New England Entertainment Digest, July, 2002

- M. William Phelps


"New England Entertainment Digest"

Excerpt NEED article, July 2002:
"Rarely-if ever-do we come across this sort of alchemy, this sense of love and admiration for an instrument, while listening to a record these days. It’s just not there anymore. Records today are made for profit, not profundity. It’s all about hooks, looks and sales. Seldom a day it is when a record scoops you up on a magic carpet in one quick motion and whisks you through all sorts of feelings and emotions. Many times, when we buy a new disc, before the third or fourth track is even over, we’re looking to skip ahead and see what else it has to offer. We’re bored. The same ole, same ole.

Guitarist Bruce Goldish’s first record, “Coast,” offers us a chance to delve into something entirely different—and here’s the great thing about this record: It is just Goldish and his guitar. Nothing more. There are no vocals or cheesy lyrics to bog it down. There’s no overdubs to make you wonder just how hell it was done. It’s just Bruce, his guitar and his soul. Unfiltered art. Pure. Uncomplicated. And in today’s market: extremely courageous.

It is an all-instrumental disc from a guy who can’t read or write music. Go figure. When one brings this sort of street mentality and raw education to a genre that is laden with Berklee graduates and protégées of the latest and greatest, it offers the modern listener, the person who doesn’t really listen to the genre, a genuine feel for the improvisation involved in a project like this... It’s the sort of music I assume heavy metal guitarist Ritchie Blackmore would be doing if he wasn’t spending his time with Deep Purple. It’s classical music, I guess one could say, with an edge; it’s instrumental guitar with cocktail sauce.

...this music would work rather swimmingly in front of three thousand suits and bow ties at a classy band shell during a warm summer evening in Greenwich, Connecticut. But one has to understand something about good music, regardless of the genre: It can also work in the confines of a 1987 Datsun B-210 while one is perhaps going off to the factory in the morning. It’s simple pleasures, that’s all. One doesn’t need a PhD. to enjoy something; one only needs to give it a chance.

In fact, Bruce Goldish’s “Coast” will sweep you away and actually force you to think about things in your life—instead of allowing you just get by with mumbling along to the latest disposable pop song that you’ll hear three or four times that same day anyway.

Catch Bruce Goldish now while you can still afford it. Soon he’ll be playing the likes of Carnegie Hall, and you’ll be forced to take out a small loan just to buy tickets in the nosebleed section."
- M. William Phelps, New England Entertainment Digest, July, 2002

- M. William Phelps


Discography

MERLIN'S LEAP ~Once Upon a Fingerstyle Guitar~ (2004)
Dynamic fingerflogging to blow your socks off like a musical triple latte, with contrasting serene, melodic fingerstyle to soothe you, and deep solo vocals to transport you.

COAST (2000)
All instrumental, thirteen originals, plus an arrangement of Greensleeves, all solo acoustic guitar.

Photos

Bio

Goldish’s self-taught fingerstyle guitar, akin to Kottke: Flashes of new age, echoes of Americana... slack key addict,  farmer chord fan...Flamenco flourishes, classical twists, hypnotic harmonics, caffeinated percussives...

Vocals like a young Tom Waits.