Buck Page and the Riders of the Purple Sage

Buck Page and the Riders of the Purple Sage

BandCountryAmericana

I'd like to re-inspire you with Buck's first solo musical endeavor & one of the finest collections of Western music available. It's already proving to be a classic, tracking old favorites side by side with several never before recorded tracks likely to become classics themselves.

Biography

Buck’s first solo effort is also the first Western album Joe DiBlasi ever produced, although DiBlasi loves Western music. He is a studio musician of the “A-Team” variety, who happens to have played on the Dukes of Hazzard for years and who also plays guitar, dobro, mandolin, and drums on Buck’s project. Joe and Buck’s personal manager, Gary Bright, have been friends for twenty five years and it was Bright who first introduced Joe to Buck. Don Sundstrom and John Vestman also worked on the project, using an innovative new mastering technique which contributed to the overall warm purity of the cd’s finished sound.

I had the pleasure of interviewing Buck prior to his June performance at Hollywood’s famed Whisky A Go-Go nightclub. Buck‘s appearance at the Whisky that Monday evening signaled a radical turnabout for the California rock club known to many as the world’s first discothèque. He is a gentle, sweet-spirited, unassuming man, who sort of “held court” in the corner of the Whisky, as a steady stream of fans, friends and well wishers came by his table to chat with him or to ask for his autograph. He had a ready smile and warm words of gratitude and appreciation for each and every one. He easily won the hearts of the Whisky’s eclectic audience that night when he opened his set with a fun confession of love, “You Pop My Corn(You melt my butter),” which is also the opening track on Right Place to Start. Other artists who shared the marquee with Buck at the Whisky’s new “Rockin Country Nights” were Mark Sellers, Jeffrey Steele, Junior Brown, and James Inveld

While Buck Page may have been born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, he’s been a true Cowboy all his life, beginning with his singing Cowboy career at age eleven. Although he was not born in the west, Buck knows “the West was born in him.” His grandfather owned a spread of seventy-five square miles in Texas and his Cowboy dad owned a ranch too. He recalls that he has punched cattle in Colorado, Montana, Oklahoma, and Wyoming, on nine different ranches in his Cowboy lifetime, including buckaroo work on two of Walt Disney’s ranches. He’s been in the race horse business too, led there by his habit of singing to horses as a kid. Thanks in part to his love of the Cowboy culture, he recently became one of the first official members of the National Day of the Cowboy organization.

Buck told me he had been a songwriter all his life as well, writing his first songs before he formed his now legendary band, Riders of the Purple Sage, as a young teenager. His early musical influence came from his immediate family, where one older brother played violin and one played bass. Buck also started in radio when he was eleven, playing upright bass and rhythm guitar with The Valley Ranch Boys until he was thirteen. Then he formed Riders of the Purple Sage, and his group immediately became staff members at KDKA radio in Pittsburgh, a gig they worked for three years. The Riders performed “Colorado Memories” on KDKA in three-part Western harmony on the first ever, coast to coast radio broadcast. KDKA, the world’s first commercial radio station, was owned by the Westinghouse Electric Company and began broadcasting in 1920. Buck recalled how all the DJs loved “Colorado Memories.”

Except for his military break, Buck has held onto the reins of the Riders of the Purple Sage, for the past sixty-nine years. Talk about longevity and consistency! He has remained the lead guitarist for The Riders for over sixty-five years as well. Buck has always been involved in music, even when he owned ten percent of the Valley View Lounge, a nightclub in Riverton, Wyoming, complete with a race track, a steak house and a sixteen lane bowling ally.

Although Buck Page is primarily a vocalist and lead guitarist, his musical talent certainly doesn’t end there. He plays twenty-one instruments in all, including rhythm guitar, mandolin, tenor banjo, plectrum banjo, 5-string banjo, steel guitar and drums. He is a member of the Screen Actors’ Guild and became a lifetime member of the American Federation of Musicians at seventeen. Buck Page has studied with guitarists George Smith and Barney Kessel, and worked recording sessions with Spade Cooley, Glen Miller, Buck Owens, Lefty Frizzell, Stewart Hamblen, Leon McAuliffe, and many more of America’s most beloved music icons. Buck is playing the guitar on the original recording of "Bonanza," (the song, prior to it becoming the theme track for the TV show) he is on the guitar in the "Seventy-Seven Sunset Strip" theme song, and he played on "Tales of Wells Fargo," "Wagon Train," "Laramie," and "Checkmate," TV shows, giving him an insider’s view of the entire evolution of television.
Buck Page has spent his life recording with many more of America’s brightest musical luminaries, such as Benny Goodman, Wynn Stewart, Leon McAuliffe, and Bobby Bare. His saddle pals include most of our best singing “Cowboys,” including Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, Tex Ritter, Monty Mo

Discography

BUCK PAGE is a legend in the music industry. He is the founding member of his* “Riders of the Purple Sage”* est. 1936. Buck and the music he loves represent a cherished era unique to the History of America that will endure forever.

Buck was determined to share his love of Cowboy Western Music. His memories & legacy continue to be dedicated to help ensure that this powerful style of “American Music’ is sent out with the class that has been Western Music’s timeless signature.

Buck had recently completed a “Historic” first solo recording that continues in the fine tradition that he has dedicated his life to. As anticipated, the new CD is already capturing World Wide popularity and exciting reviews.

Listen for the “Award Winning” vocals of R.W. Hampton as he joined Buck on “Ridin on the Last Trail Home” & “Quiet Times”. Buck was also joined by the “Daughters of the Purple Sage” as they added their beautiful harmonies to “Lay it on the Line”.

We will soon be releasing our latest film. Bucks story of “One mans life-time ride down the Western Music Trail”. You will be led by R.W. Hampton through Buck’s seven decades of Western Music. From Buck’s early days in the 1930’s when Western Music reached out and touched the hearts of all Americans. Through WWII, “Rock & Roll” and right up into the 21st Century when the same music reaches out and touches the hearts of all Americans in the exact same way. Don Edwards shares his unsurpassed knowledge of Western Music’s History and Ginny Mac, at 19 talks about her discovery of Cowboy Western Music and continued love for the style as an award winning artist. “The Lost Canyon Rangers” join in the documentary and share there long time love of Cowboy Western Music and their thoughts of Buck.

Buck was always available for special appearances and performances. His Classic Style and Western wit continue to entertain even today through his music
And many fond memories
***Watch for Buck’s three up and coming music videos***.

*Historic Note: Foy Willings “Riders of the Purple Sage” were active and enjoyed from 1943 -1952. During this time period, Buck Page was not a part of Foy's "Riders". We recognize and thank Foy and his "Riders of the Purple Sage" for there many contributions to Western Music & Film. Buck started the “Riders of the Purple Sage” in 1936 in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania and was active on “Coast to Coast” radio and extensive touring through 1942 at which time he and the other members joined the armed forces to serve our Country during WWII. Buck continued on with his “Riders” only after Foy disbanded in 1952. Buck Page enjoyed an active life as a Western Entertainer that has spanned over 7 decades. He was 84 when he passed in the summer of 2006

Set List

I'd love to display the set list of Buck Page
Over 70 years as an entertainer would make a very handsome list
But, Just too much for me to type