Bulletproof Messenger
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Bulletproof Messenger

New York City, New York, United States | SELF

New York City, New York, United States | SELF
Band Rock Alternative

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

May
02
Bulletproof Messenger @ Club Soda

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Mar
23
Bulletproof Messenger @ Blender Theater @ Gramercy

New York, New York, USA

New York, New York, USA

Mar
14
Bulletproof Messenger @ Northern Lights

Clifton Park, New York, USA

Clifton Park, New York, USA

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This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


Most bands don't get to open for Incubus.

Members of Gone to Earth have been living out their dream since learning they'd be opening tonight at Binghamton University for one of their favorite bands.

"Everyone's freaking ecstatic," says Matt Litwin, 20, of Jericho. "They're all like, 'How the hell did we pull this off?'"

"In between a break in one of my classes, I was outside of Lecture Hall, and I was going up to people," says Josh Reiger, 21, of Syosset. "I was actually saying, 'Yeah, that's right,' [while] pointing in their faces, screaming at them. People were just looking at me. I was jumping up and down."


The guys posted ads, hoping to find someone who could keep up with their electronic beats. To their chagrin, few drummers fulfilled their expectations.

"We tried out a bunch of drummers who were always off," Litwin says. "They couldn't keep time. They weren't good."

Finally, they enlisted Voley Martin, 22, of Hicksville.

"We needed a drummer who could play to electronics, someone who was dead on and could play like a machine," Litwin says. "That's what Voley is -- he's a machine when it comes to it."

Finding the perfect vocalist proved even more daunting. After scouring tons of ads and listening to numerous demo tapes and countless auditions, they finally made their choice. But, as Litwin recalls, things didn't quite work out as the band expected.

"The first song he did blew us away," Litwin says. "It kind of went downhill from there because he wasn't really committed. He showed up late all the time."

But, despite lacking a lead singer, the band played on, performed at well-known New York City venues such as CBGB's and the Continental and even opening for former Dream Theater keyboardist Derek Sherinian.

"I thought it was cool when we played at CBGB's. I'm not going to lie," Rieger says. "It's cool going into the bathrooms of CBGB's and looking around at all the stickers and stuff."

Finally, in early 2004, the band's grueling search for a singer ended when Marcus Klavan, 22, of Germantown, Md., became the final piece of Gone to Earth's musical puzzle. Klavan relocated to Long Island for the summer, where the band wrote some songs and played a couple of gigs.

"We played two shows just to get out there and relieve frustration," Litwin says. "It's kind of ironic that [Klavan's] third show with us has to be with Incubus. Lucky kid."

Because all of the guys attend different colleges, it's difficult to practice as a band and squeeze music in between classes and extracurriculars. Rieger and Litwin attend Binghamton University while Martin is at SUC-Cortland, Maisel is in Florida and Klavan is in Maryland.

"It's not like the summer where we get to practice all the time," Rieger says. "Now we don't really get to play together."

"Our year is divided up between writing and playing," Litwin says. "Summer is playing and school is writing."

The guys of Gone to Earth may be lacking practice time, but they're still getting psyched up to take the stage next week at BU's new Events Center -- and they're also looking ahead.

"This is 6,500 people, or whatever -- more than we've ever played for," Litwin says. "At the same time, we're thinking, 'Is this the biggest show we're ever going to get?' Everybody likes to enjoy the moment. We got to do this show perfectly, but once the show's over, we can't sit on it. We can use it for our leverage, but where's the next one?"Gold is a freelance writer from Binghamton University. - Press & Sun


Being in a rock band and making it big is often a pipe dream. For the Long Island-based band Gone to Earth it is becoming reality. The group, which was formed in 2001 by Syosset resident Josh Rieger, may finally be getting their big break when they open for the group Incubus on Oct. 28.

Comprised of five members, including Rieger and fellow Syosset native Jon Maisel, along with Voley Martin of Hicksville, Matt Litwin of Jericho and Marcus Klavan of Maryland, the group has a new demo out and hopes to release their first full-length album by the summer of 2005.

After forming during the summer of 2001, the members of Gone to Earth began the difficult task of creating a unique sound that would blur the lines between various genres. The group experimented with many styles of music before finally finding their niche. On their website, the group describes the composition of their music as a "tempestuous collection of divergent styles. While the melodic guitar riffs resemble that of alternative rock, the programming and electronics add a completely new dynamic."

Martin, who plays the drums and writes songs for the group, describes the band's music as electronic rock with influences all over the spectrum. Although their songs originally did not possess vocals, Gone to Earth has since been working on that area specifically. In early 2004, after a grueling search for a singer, vocalist Marcus Klavan joined the band. "Music is all I ever dreamed of doing, and these guys offer the best opportunity to do what I love for the rest of my life," stated Klavan on the GonetoEarthMusic.com website.

As a result, the band incorporates elements of hard rock, metal and electronica to create their unique sound. Based on melodic vocal hooks, catchy instrumental lines and the desire to succeed, they have received spots performing at prestigious New York and Long Island venues including CBGB's, Lamours, The Dublin Pub, Continental and The Downtown, and opened for such national acts as former Dream Theater keyboard player Derek Sherinian.

Recently, after three years of struggling, Gone to Earth caught their big break when Incubus chose the band to perform as their opening act after consideration of countless applicants. "We are so excited and can't wait," said drummer and song writer Martin. "This is the biggest thing to happen to us yet, but hopefully not the biggest thing to happen."

A lifelong resident of Hicksville, 22-year-old Martin attended the Old Country Road School and Hicksville Middle and High School. Upon graduating in 2000, he attended Stetson University in Florida for about two years before moving back to New York and enrolling at SUNY Cortland where he is majoring in social philosophy and will graduate in May 2005.

"It was hard to find people to play with while I was down in Florida so I came up to change schools and start over," he said. "I got fed up one day with not having people to play with so I went out [on Long Island] one day and posted flyers at local music stores and venues, picked up numbers and just started calling people. Gone to Earth was the third number I called and it just sort of worked out."

According to Martin, juggling school and the band has been difficult. "Generally, our writing and recording time is done over the school year when we are apart because that's really the only thing we can do," he said. "When we get together for the summer we are still writing and recording but its more about practice because it's the only time we have. When we get together for long weekends or breaks we will get together and rehearse or try and do a show."

He added, "I love being in front of people, playing. The shows are a big release. You get to put everything that you have worked so hard for out in front of people. It's been really rewarding for us because people are enjoying it."

Litwin, who band mates call "DJ Skuba," added, "You put 100 percent into each one. You sacrifice other things sometimes, like going out, to take care of either your [school] work or to finish up a song. The two priorities are school and music and you give them both your full attention." A lifelong resident of Jericho, Litwin attended Jackson Elementary School and is a 2002 graduate of Jericho High School. He is currently majoring in accounting at Binghamton University.

When asked about the upcoming show, Litwin said he is confident the band will do just fine. "We've played these songs so many times, so we are just going to go out there and do what we do," he said, adding, however, that the band hopes opening for Incubus will make more people aware of Gone to Earth. "There will be 6,500 people so hopefully we will get some fans out of it and show everybody what we are all about," Litwin said.

Maisel, the group's guitarist who along with Rieger started the band back in 2001, said, "We are very excited that Incubus chose us to open up for them and we see it as a big opportunity to become more well known - Anton Newspaper


Creative control, pure raw power and heart pounding rhythms, with a perfect vocal touch equals Bulletproof Messenger. Their self titled CD is nothing less than a great listening experience and you will not believe the powerful clean sound coming from your speakers when you play this disc. Each spin will allow you to discover more than just excellent music, but perhaps more importantly, the messages put forth. The pace of the music will raise your pulse far above a resting heartbeat with a tightly woven tapestry of sound. - 525 Power Tracks


“Regional act BulletProof Messenger seems to be on the verge of breaking national”

- Good Times


“BulletProof Messenger is not just your average rock band. These guys have this dynamic that ignites an audience and draws the attention of the crowd solely towards them.”
– Dana Berkowitz, Susan Blonde Inc.
- Dana Berkowitz, Susan Blonde Inc.


Overview: From the heart of New York City (Long Island to be exact) comes BulletProof Messenger. Originally calling themselves Gone to Earth, the chose to abandon their former name and adopt the moniker BulletProof Messenger to coincide with frontman Marcus’ union with the group back in 2004. Not long after the band found its newest piece, Incubus came knocking at their door, inviting the group to open for them. After the Incubus performance, the BulletProof Messenger headed into 2005 and made a significant amount of noise; a Clear Channel Battle of the Bands win, an enviable gig opening for Collective Soul’s CD release party, and a selection to open for Trapt and Blindside’s nationwide fall tour are only a few of the band’s highlights from that year. BulletProof Messenger went into the studio in 2006, fresh off their year of successes, and arrived that fall with a full length, entitled ‘The Crucial Line‘. The band is currently wrapping up the finishing touches on its new record, expected to hit the public this summer.

The Good: ‘The Crucial Line‘ is a fourteen song goliath of a rock album that has enough Aces under the table and rabbits in its hat to make Criss Angel cry to mommy. You quickly figure this out, thanks in part to the album’s leadoff song “Wake Up Call”. Living up to its billing, the bustling, energized “Wake Up Call” reveals what BulletProof Messenger is all about-easy to swallow vocals, surging guitars and bass, groove-laden drums, and well-implemented electronics; the track is a more than suitable hook to suck you in and send you on the journey that is ‘The Crucial Line‘. Where “Wake Up Call” brought you on the dance floor, the grungy, toe-tapping stomp of “Can’t Quite Call It a Fall” will urge you to shake and drop it like it’s hot. The sonic “Bring Me to Life” is in no need of help from Amy Lee or Paul McCoy, because Marcus’ shrewd delivery is more than enough to make this propulsive cut a mainstay. “Best of Me” rivals anything on rock radio, and I am continually lured to this song because of the ethereal sound the band waves in the background; well-rounded and professional, BulletProof Messenger turns the brooding persona of the song inside out in the closing seconds, as “Best of Me” crosses the finish line with ferocity. The delicate verses of “Heavenly Answer” are coupled harmoniously with glib, upbeat choruses, and a sultry bridge further espouses its eclectic badge. BulletProof Messenger borrows from H.I.M. for the opening credits of “The Way”, which is soon ripped out from underneath and you are lunged into crunchy, splitting riffage; the band retreats to its original gameplan as each chorus arrives, capturing two identities without sounding pretentious. ‘The Crucial Line‘ puts on boxing gloves for the hulky, funk-driven “Finest Hour”, the album’s punchiest, tightest romp. Vocalist Marcus remind me of David Draiman of Disturbed fame at times, with the astute “Tomorrow” paying testament. The band blasts to the past with “Save Me”, piloted by riff work circa 2000-01. Although it sounds frightening, BulletProof Messenger goes to work, tweaking the riff and weaving it into the song’s captivating verses and choruses for some added spice; the bridge of “Save Me” is catastrophic, complete with an unexpected couple measures of an arena-ready guitar solo, and shamelessly revealing itself as the album’s most complete affairs. The snare drum effects injected into “Awaken” are quite enjoyable, and although Draiman, er, Mr. Marcus comes up short, the five guys behind him pick up the slack with unflinching guitar chugs and driving verses. The pulsating “DTD” rips open in guttural and resonant fashion, machine-gunning along with catastrophic force; BulletProof Messenger cools things off with a placid bridge, which is erased as quickly as it arrived by the song’s TNT-fed outro. ‘The Crucial Line‘ wishes you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year with the album’s title track, an eloquent way for the band to land this plane. Energetic, staccato bursts of energy keep the album’s vitality alive all the way to the end, without forfeiting the track’s sensitivity. ‘The Crucial Line‘ is fourteen slabs of revved up rock, but BulletProof Messenger’s funky, groovy persona, combined with glossy vocals and hooks that are easy to pick out prove this sexy sextet has an incredible amount of depth.

The Bad: ‘The Crucial Line‘ is as solid a rock album as you will run across, but there is still room to put some notches on BulletProof Messenger’s docket. As you arrive at the end of ‘The Crucial Line‘, you are invited to skip right over “The Truth” and head right for the final track; the band summersaults through the rap oriented cut, an unpleasant and unsatisfying couple of minutes that strays from what BulletProof Messenger had done so well twelve songs previously, despite their best efforts to make the song sound like it belongs. ‘The Crucial Line‘ becomes predictable rapidly, with nearly every song sticking t - Tunelab


Overview: Finally, New York’s BulletProof Messenger are strapped with their sophomore record ‘Arm Yourself‘, the follow-up to 2006’s ‘The Crucial Line‘. All I’m gonna say is that if you don’t yet have ‘The Crucial Line‘, shame, shame, shame on you. But there’s no time for ridicule, because there’s a new BPM effort to talk about.

The Good: Well there’s good. Then there’s great. And then there’s ‘Arm Yourself‘. Once these gurus of groove crank the ignition with “This Fantasy”, you know you’re in for something special. Although steered by bossy riffs , “This Fantasy” has an undeniable warmth, contributed largely by voluptuous choruses and unbreakable melodies. The first three ticks of “Move On” are the audio doppelganger of Janet Jackson’s “If”, a dope connection to a gnarly pop hit. It doesn’t stop there, because like “If”, “Move On” is fed a healthy diet of crunchy guitars and forceful snare and bass drum thumps. Unlike “If”, the bridge of “Move On” is f—–g illin’! “DLD” might only be a brief segue into the following song, but BPM carves out a niche for the little guy, dropping bass chugs in that foreshadow the title track waiting on deck. “Arm Yourself” boasts a masterful dichotomy, a colorful and spirited number birthed by a down-tuned string section. Punchy and pepped up, “Control” is aptly branded to describe its chorus, an omnipotent team of titanic musicianship helmed by Marcus’ impassioned vocal urgency; BPM throws a real curveball with a rebel inspired epic solo, which makes you wonder what else the band can pull out of their hat. The intro of “No Way Out” is a melting pot of a trio of goodies: Silverchair’s “Abuse Me”, 3 Doors Down’s “When I’m Gone”, and Oasis’ “Champagne Supernova”. However the song travels its own path, floating unhindered down a stream of majestic and reflective splendor with an enviable effortlessness. After a rousing intro from the pages of Depeche Mode and The Cure, “Wasted” rolls on with blazing consistency. The bridge is when “Wasted” truly shines, an equal part tribal and ethereal séance and a perfect way for the band to peak. “Where We All Belong” is like Prince, in that success and talent never waned despite an identity crisis. From a Baroque era piano lullaby, to romanticized synth-rock, to a macho, pre-grunge anthem, “Where We All Belong” proves the versatility of its six creators. The runway ready chorus of “Grand Disaster” is dressed for success, sweeping and peachy and with an overwhelming amount of sincerity and charm. BulletProof Messenger is still blowing steam by the time “Step Out” comes knocking, a stale ending out of the question. “Step Out” starts off with an eerie, samba-ish build up, tip-toeing into verse one and then letting it ride, as it gradually becomes more involved. After one last riotous eruption, “Step Out” begins the album’s final descent with the samba pattern from earlier, this time infused with a suave smooth jazz vibe that carries you to the end; this best proves the trend of ‘Arm Yourself‘, that BulletProof Messenger continuously outdo themselves.

Special praise is in order for “Lose It All”, a 3 minute 17 second audio-definition of beauty. I guarantee you will lose yourself in the rapture of this dynamically brilliant song. What pulled me in were the uber-hooky harmonies beaming from the chorus, as well as the energy and radiance of the post-chorus jams. I’ve listened to “Lose It All” 18 times and counting and I still get goosebumps every time.

The Bad: I had to dig HARD for my only two gripes about ‘Arm Yourself‘. The progression of the chorus of “Grand Disaster” sounds almost too close to the chorus of “On My Own” by Hedley and BPM would have benefited from taking the bridge of “Wasted” and running with it a bit longer. That’s about all I got.

Bottomline: Wow, what an album. The fact that BulletProof Messenger remains unsigned is not only scary but an injustice. ‘Arm Yourself‘ has left me speechless.

Rating: 9.5 out of 10 - Tunelabmusic.com


Overview: From the heart of New York City (Long Island to be exact) comes BulletProof Messenger. Originally calling themselves Gone to Earth, the chose to abandon their former name and adopt the moniker BulletProof Messenger to coincide with frontman Marcus’ union with the group back in 2004. Not long after the band found its newest piece, Incubus came knocking at their door, inviting the group to open for them. After the Incubus performance, the BulletProof Messenger headed into 2005 and made a significant amount of noise; a Clear Channel Battle of the Bands win, an enviable gig opening for Collective Soul’s CD release party, and a selection to open for Trapt and Blindside’s nationwide fall tour are only a few of the band’s highlights from that year. BulletProof Messenger went into the studio in 2006, fresh off their year of successes, and arrived that fall with a full length, entitled ‘The Crucial Line‘. The band is currently wrapping up the finishing touches on its new record, expected to hit the public this summer.

The Good: ‘The Crucial Line‘ is a fourteen song goliath of a rock album that has enough Aces under the table and rabbits in its hat to make Criss Angel cry to mommy. You quickly figure this out, thanks in part to the album’s leadoff song “Wake Up Call”. Living up to its billing, the bustling, energized “Wake Up Call” reveals what BulletProof Messenger is all about-easy to swallow vocals, surging guitars and bass, groove-laden drums, and well-implemented electronics; the track is a more than suitable hook to suck you in and send you on the journey that is ‘The Crucial Line‘. Where “Wake Up Call” brought you on the dance floor, the grungy, toe-tapping stomp of “Can’t Quite Call It a Fall” will urge you to shake and drop it like it’s hot. The sonic “Bring Me to Life” is in no need of help from Amy Lee or Paul McCoy, because Marcus’ shrewd delivery is more than enough to make this propulsive cut a mainstay. “Best of Me” rivals anything on rock radio, and I am continually lured to this song because of the ethereal sound the band waves in the background; well-rounded and professional, BulletProof Messenger turns the brooding persona of the song inside out in the closing seconds, as “Best of Me” crosses the finish line with ferocity. The delicate verses of “Heavenly Answer” are coupled harmoniously with glib, upbeat choruses, and a sultry bridge further espouses its eclectic badge. BulletProof Messenger borrows from H.I.M. for the opening credits of “The Way”, which is soon ripped out from underneath and you are lunged into crunchy, splitting riffage; the band retreats to its original gameplan as each chorus arrives, capturing two identities without sounding pretentious. ‘The Crucial Line‘ puts on boxing gloves for the hulky, funk-driven “Finest Hour”, the album’s punchiest, tightest romp. Vocalist Marcus remind me of David Draiman of Disturbed fame at times, with the astute “Tomorrow” paying testament. The band blasts to the past with “Save Me”, piloted by riff work circa 2000-01. Although it sounds frightening, BulletProof Messenger goes to work, tweaking the riff and weaving it into the song’s captivating verses and choruses for some added spice; the bridge of “Save Me” is catastrophic, complete with an unexpected couple measures of an arena-ready guitar solo, and shamelessly revealing itself as the album’s most complete affairs. The snare drum effects injected into “Awaken” are quite enjoyable, and although Draiman, er, Mr. Marcus comes up short, the five guys behind him pick up the slack with unflinching guitar chugs and driving verses. The pulsating “DTD” rips open in guttural and resonant fashion, machine-gunning along with catastrophic force; BulletProof Messenger cools things off with a placid bridge, which is erased as quickly as it arrived by the song’s TNT-fed outro. ‘The Crucial Line‘ wishes you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year with the album’s title track, an eloquent way for the band to land this plane. Energetic, staccato bursts of energy keep the album’s vitality alive all the way to the end, without forfeiting the track’s sensitivity. ‘The Crucial Line‘ is fourteen slabs of revved up rock, but BulletProof Messenger’s funky, groovy persona, combined with glossy vocals and hooks that are easy to pick out prove this sexy sextet has an incredible amount of depth.

The Bad: ‘The Crucial Line‘ is as solid a rock album as you will run across, but there is still room to put some notches on BulletProof Messenger’s docket. As you arrive at the end of ‘The Crucial Line‘, you are invited to skip right over “The Truth” and head right for the final track; the band summersaults through the rap oriented cut, an unpleasant and unsatisfying couple of minutes that strays from what BulletProof Messenger had done so well twelve songs previously, despite their best efforts to make the song sound like it belongs. ‘The Crucial Line‘ becomes predictable rapidly, with nearly every song sticking t - Tunelabmusic.com


Discography

"The Crucial Line" - 2006, Featuring: Bring Me To Life, Wake Up Call, and Best of Me.
"Arm Yourself" - 2009, Featuring: Lose It All, Where We All Belong, and Grand Disaster

Available through:
-BulletProofMessenger.net
-MySpace.com/BulletProofMessenger
-iTunes
-Napster
-Rhapsody
-CD Baby

Airplay on the following stations:
XM Satellite Radio
92.5 KGB Fm
104.1 FM WWYL
102.3 FM WBAB
90.5 FM WFTU

Photos

Bio

BulletProof Messenger’s music can be described as melodic enough to attract alternative rock fans, though heavy enough to appeal to even metal listeners. Couple this with layers of electronics, powerful vocals, and an intense live show BPM creates a completely new dynamic.

Formed by DJ/Programmer Matt Litwin and Guitarist Voley Martin, BulletProof Messenger underwent a great deal of change before finding their niche. While the duo wrote various tracks together and performed instrumentally for quite some time, finding a solid vocalist was paramount to the success of the group.

Unwilling to compromise the sound with poor vocals, after a grueling three year search for a singer, vocalist Marcus Klavan joined the band. His dedication was immediately evident when he relocated from his home in Maryland to New York.

Immediately following Marcus' incorporation into the group, the band was selected by Incubus to perform as their opening act. This ignited the following year’s touring schedule.

Later that year, the band was selected to perform in the 92.5 KGB FM Clear Channel Battle of the Bands. The band went on to win the competition, turning heads along the way with their newest addition, Drummer Alex Straiter.

Following this success, the band was selected by Collective Soul to be the direct opener for the release of their new album. Just days later, the band was selected by XM Satellite Radio as one of the top unsigned acts in the country and was selected by the band Trapt to open their shows.

After 18 months in pre-production and 3 months in the studio, working with noteworthy individuals such as Tony Dawsey (NIN, Jay-Z, Kid Rock) BulletProof Messenger completed their self-produced debut release, “The Crucial Line”, released in November 2006.

After the release of The Crucial Line, two new members were added to the group: Bassist Jesse Downing (Shootyz Groove), and Guitarist Scott Martin. As a result of these two new members, the sound and live presence of the group were enhanced.

Following the band’s debut release, in mid 2007, BulletProof Messenger was selected from over 3,000 acts world-wide to perform a special showcase for Sellaband at the Gibson Guitar Studios in London. This show attracted the attention of various international music press and greatly increased the bands international following.

In 2008, the group raised 50K from individual investors across the world in order to record their 2nd full length release, the group’s sophomore debut entitled “Arm Yourself” was recorded in late 2008 and released Jan 30, 2009.

Billboard published BulletProof Messenger's announcement of being the first band selected for Sellaband/Arenaworks Entertainment’s “Arenafest 2009”.

Now welcoming new Drummer Vince Gorski III (Regulation Blue), BulletProof Messenger is pushing their live show to the limits including a new stage look as well as a custom light show. Watch for BulletProof Messenger in 2010!!