Candlefuse
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Candlefuse

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Jan
26
Candlefuse @ Candlefuse performs over 200 shows per year myspace.com/candlefuse for up to date tour dates

Birmingham, Alabama, USA

Birmingham, Alabama, USA

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This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

The best kept secret in music

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"It’s about the kids and the people that we sing to … and it’s about Jesus."

Candlefuse is an indie rock band out of Fyffe, Alabama. They’ve opened for Disciple, Kutless, Salvador, Dizmas, and the Smalltown Poets. If, despite that fact, you still haven’t heard of them, a recent deal with Infinity Distribution and an affiliation with World Vision is getting ready to change all of that. These guys are the real deal … they rock and they mean business about spreading the Gospel.

Meet Ben Honeycutt ( Lead vocals, guitar), Drew Garrett (Lead guitar, vocals) and Steven Howell (Bass guitar, vocals) …

Tell me about Candlefuse.
Steven – The main thing that we do is genuinely minister. We never really wanted to consider ourselves a rock band or even in Christian entertainment. We really do consider ourselves a ministry.
What we do is important. It’s not about the money or the notoriety or the fame or anything that comes with this business. Ultimately, you have to deal with that at times, but the ministry is the biggest aspect of it. We always feel like no matter how small the venue or how small their budget is, we want to make ourselves available to anyone who wants to have us. The people that really need to be ministered to are not going to come pay $10 to see us play. We’re really going to have to go out and reach those people ourselves; sort of like a mission thing. So that’s what Candlefuse is about.

Let’s talk about relevance. If you don’t have a connection with your listeners, you’re not helping them. So what makes Candlefuse relevant?
Steven – Wow! That’s a really good question. I guess the biggest thing is that we all come from such diverse backgrounds and different upbringings. Ben was raised by his mom. We’ve all been through so many different things in our lives. I think that really helps us connect. One group of kids may gravitate towards me and another group may connect more with Ben or Drew. We’re not just up there on stage. The real ministry happens off stage when you’re meeting with these kids and you’re talking with them. I think that each of us has gone through things in our own lives and that’s helped equip us in different aspects. We compliment each other well. I think that we can reach a much more diverse group of kids because we’ve got something for everyone, in that aspect.

When you knew that God had made you for musical ministry, what was your unmistakable clue?
Ben – We went on a thing called the Extreme Tour, which is a tour where independent Christian bands team up with a skate team and we tour skate parks, churches and other venues. It was really cool leap of faith for us. You’re not guaranteed any money and you’re providing your own transportation. You’re basically living off of merch sales. Once we got there, we knew that it was exactly where we were supposed to be. There were a couple of bands that we automatically bonded with. We made good friendships. There was this one time at about 3 o’clock in the morning when people were coming in, one at a time, just talking, to this building we were in. It ended up turning into a worship service with us all passing around an acoustic guitar. It really let us know that it’s not about us. It’s about the kids and the people that we sing to … and it’s about Jesus.

Steven – Like Ben said, it was totally relying on faith. You may only play in front of 20 kids one night and not know if you’re going to make enough to even make it to the next venue. It was difficult in that aspect, but it was so rewarding in the end. We had a chance to hang out with some really great kids. A lot of them had never been to church, and generally didn’t know anything about God or Jesus or the religious things that we take for granted. Getting to hang out and share the Gospel is totally cool. We ended up giving away a lot of CDs because that’s what we were there for … to minister.

Ben – Our hearts were just broken for these kids. These were some really great kids and they tend to end up on the fringe of church society. These aren’t the people that churches particularly want to cater to a lot of times. It’s sort of like they want you to get cleaned up before you come in and that’s not what God says. Let Him do the cleaning. You just make sure that you present them with the Gospel and just let them know that being a Christian is not what you see out there. That’s not what genuine Christianity is about. That’s religion and we’re not about religion.

- About.com - Kim Jones


"We really like to hang out with the kids before the show."

Music can cross all kinds of boundaries in a way that words simply can’t. For everyone I know, there is one song that they can count on to open their hearts to God, so in the bad times, they can get across to the other side. What is the one song for you?

Drew – For me, it would have to be Switchfoot’s “Dare You To Move.” There’s just something about that song … it will just speak to me, no matter what’s going on.

Ben – I’ll have to go with a song called “Be Love.” It’s a song by Plus One. As far as lyrically, it’s to the point of what we’re supposed to be.

Steven – There are so many of them. I find myself riding around in the car listening to something and sometimes I’ll just be crying my eyes out.
It just depends what I’m dealing with at that time. So it’s a different song for me every day. Some days it’s soft ballads and some days it’s all out rockers. It just depends on how I’m feeling.

OK … so what was yesterday’s song?
Steven – It’s a Story Side: B song called “It’s Not Over.” Man, that’s a great song. I listened to that song yesterday, literally like a hundred times. I just put it on repeat. I don’t normally do that, but yesterday that is what I needed … that song.

How about closet songs?
Drew – Actually, the song I really love is a Southern Gospel song. I know that sounds weird, coming from someone in a rock band. I love the song “Through the Fire” by the Crabb Family.

Steven – I don’t know if that would be closet though, because I’m open about loving Southern Gospel. As far as for me (guys – don’t hate me and kick me out of the band) Abba’s “Dancing Queen.”

Ben – Oh wow! It’s sort of a running joke, and I wouldn’t really call myself a fan, but I think that the Backstreet Boys have some good songs. Probably “As Long As You Love Me” for me (and now I can get kicked out as well).
You’re in ministry, in a band – and sometimes you become “the band” instead of real people in the eyes of fans.

Steven – That’s so true. And that’s the problem with Christian music. We want to take our “Christian stars” and put them on this pedestal, just like we do famous evangelists. We see them as either A. infallible – and then when something happens, it just devastates our whole thought of who they are; or B. you lose your individual identity and it’s hard to relate to people if they’re star-struck. We always try to diffuse that. Not trying to be critical, but there are some bands who prefer to be backstage before they play and do the whole rock-star thing. We really like to hang out with the kids before the show. We want them to understand that we want them to be entertained and ministered to, but we really want to get to know them and who they are. That’s what we’re about. The band Dizmas is the same way. They are really sort of our model of who we want to be. We don’t want people to view us as something that we’re not. We can’t live up to those expectations, no matter how hard we try to live right. We want to meet them on a personal level first … before we play.

Ben – It sort of goes back to your first question about who we are. We can’t act like we have it all together. We let them know that we go through some of the same struggles and temptations. We deal with sin in general just like they do. Just because we’re in a band doesn’t mean that we’re more righteous or holy than they are. We’re all born into sin. Paul talked about it….

Steven – He said he was the chief amongst sinners and I totally understand that. I know the thoughts that I have and stuff that people don’t see. I may not act on any of that, but I know what runs through my mind. We certainly make everything G-rated when it comes out of our mouths, but we know that there are times when something else is running through your head and you’re thinking, “Man I wish I could say this.” Even in our private lives, we don’t speak to each other like that, but it’s still in there and as long as it’s in your head, it’s in your heart and that’s sin. The great thing about is when you face those things and don’t fall prey, it’s a victory.

- About.com - Kim Jones


The four guys who make up rocker band Candlefuse have a message for the masses in Never Go Unheard, out this fall. Ben Honeycutt (vocals, guitar), Drew Garrett (guitar), Steven Howell (bass), and Brian Hechler (drums) want the world to know that their music will not be stopped. I think they’re right.

Their name comes from Matt. 5:14 and Psalm 133:1, expressing their sincere desire to be unified as a light to the dark world, and they’re committed to using their music to communicate. Their strong orientation toward ministry comes across immediately as you listen to the new album. Opening with the blistering “Fighter” leaves no doubt about their intentions: I’m letting go of me/greater is he that lives within me/I’m a fighter, strong and brave/Won’t you run with me/I’m pursuing a life of faith/because I believe.

Hard but melodic rockers, I think Candlefuse will appeal to a broad audience. Without dripping with Bible references, they manage to teach some significant truths. Both “Echoes of Words” and the fierce “Shut Your Eyes” comment truthfully on the heart’s hidden behaviors and the mouth’s deadly powers. The slicing guitars of “Shut” illustrate perfectly the woes of the slicing tongue. The airy “Carousel” musically conveys the same sense of fruitless spinning as its lyrics. “Bulletproof” is radio-ready, as its buzzy urgency testifies to our invincibility in Christ.

An amped up cover of Kathryn Scott’s “Hungry” is both fresh and pressing. Another standout track is the closer “Beauty Cries,” an aching lament over society’s destructive messages to young women. The lashing guitar solo only affirms its truths, especially potent coming from an all-male band.

Keep your eyes on Candlefuse and their mission. These guys are gonna blow up big.

Written by Kevan Breitinger
- Buddyhollywood.com


Sounds like … modern rock with a major guitar presence that's reminiscent of Skillet, the latest Yellowcard album, and Evanescence (minus the female lead vocals).

At a glance … while the formula isn't exactly new or complex, Candlefuse packs an emotional punch with 10 catchy and relatable rock songs for the church.

With a desire to be "unified as a light in a dark world," Alabama-based rockers Candlefuse have the angst-ridden, guitar-fueled sound down pat without the depressing "What does it all mean?" lyrics so many of the hippest hard rock bands serve up these days. While Candlefuse certainly isn't afraid to tackle the tough questions of life and spirituality either, there's still a tangible, non-clichéd sense of hope found by engaging in a deeper relationship with Jesus.

With the help of producer Barry Blair (Audio Adrenaline, Bleach) and the mixing prowess of Skidd Mills (Skillet, Third Day), the message behind Never Go Unheard is pure ear candy, particularly on the instantly catchy power chorus of "Carousel," the adrenaline-fueled anthem "Bulletproof" and the moody, reflective nature of "Shut Your Eyes." Though I'm typically not a fan of "let's-make-worship-music-rock" moments that bands like Skillet and Kutless have released in the past, Candlefuse's rather aggressive cover of "Hungry (Falling on My Knees)" is actually enjoyable as it reflects the heartfelt passion and sense of desperation for God's redemption that's conveyed in the song's simple lyrics.

Comprised of Ben Honeycutt (vocals), Drew Garrett (guitar), Steven Howell (bass) and Brian Hechler (drums), the band started playing together in 1999, and, for the past six years, have been traveling across the southeast, performing at a variety of venues. With the belief that "music is sometimes able to communicate truth when other methods fail," Honeycutt says the band's mission is simply "to let people know about Him—to let them know how lost we are without a Savior."

reviewed by Christa Banister - Christianity Today.com review


My conversation with Ben Honeycutt of melodic hard-rockers Candlefuse was just like their music: to the point. Ben does most of his talking with his guitar.

But the mission statement of Candlefuse says it all, again, in the most direct manner: “With purpose, poetry, and passion, we choose to follow Jesus Christ and the ministry example He set: To go out into the highways and hedges and compel souls to come in. We pray that our ministry will bring edification to the body of Christ and be a hand of comfort and healing to an aching world in need of His love.” The purpose and passion part are pretty self-explanatory but I wanted to hear Ben’s take on the poetry.

“It has everything to do with our music, written by myself and bass player Steven Howell. We see our music as art, as far as our lyrics and arrangements,” he explained. “It all flows together, allowing us to use what God gave us to penetrate the culture.”

It’s what Ben most wants listeners to take away from the unique and penetrating music of Candlefuse. “Ministry doesn't have to imply mediocrity,” he says. “We don’t, as Christians, have to accept the stereotype that as artists we are somehow inferior to our secular counterparts. We should be even more creative than they are with the gifts that God has given us, in expressing ourselves musically and lyrically.” He adds also, “The other message underlying all of our songs is that Jesus Christ is the only way to heaven.” He claims dc Talk as the band most influential to his own ministry development, and it’s easy to see the comparison in mission if not music.

Matt. 5:14 and Psalm 133:1 are the Scriptural references that explain their choice of name and mission, to be a light to the dark world with music as their communication medium. I think of God’s willingness to use the humble as Ben tells me a bit about his early days.

“I’ve been writing music for about five years now, playing guitar since I was 14. I was really shy when I began and actually never played in front of anyone for a long time. But eventually I started playing with the worship team in front of the church and that’s where it began for me. Candlefuse actually began when another band came to the church and it really struck me that I needed to get serious about my music.”

Sometimes the best things come from inauspicious beginnings. “Never Go Unheard” is Candlefuse’s challenge to the community, ten stirring and well-crafted tracks produced by Dove-winner Barry Blair. (Find review here.) Candlefuse puts a point on it, and a poetic point at that.

by Kevan Breitinger - Suite 101.com


The four guys who make up rocker band Candlefuse have a message for the masses in “Never Go Unheard,” out this fall.
Ben Honeycutt (vocals, guitar), Drew Garrett (guitar), Steven Howell (bass), and Brian Hechler (drums) want the world to know that their music will not be stopped. I think they’re right.
Their name comes from Matt. 5:14 and Psalm 133:1, expressing their sincere desire to be unified as a light to the dark world, and they’re committed to using their music to communicate. Their strong orientation toward ministry comes across immediately as you listen to the new album. Opening with the blistering “Fighter” leaves no doubt about their intentions:
I’m letting go of me/greater is he that lives within me/I’m a fighter, strong and brave/Won’t you run with me/I’m pursuing a life of faith/because I believe.

Hard but melodic rockers, I think Candlefuse will appeal to a broad audience. Without dripping with Bible references, they manage to teach some significant truths. Both “Echoes of Words” and the fierce “Shut Your Eyes” comment truthfully on the heart’s hidden behaviors and the mouth’s deadly powers. The slicing guitars of “Shut” illustrate perfectly the woes of the slicing tongue. The airy “Carousel” musically conveys the same sense of fruitless spinning as its lyrics. “Bulletproof” is radio-ready, as its buzzy urgency testifies to our invincibility in Christ. An amped up cover of Kathryn Scott’s “Hungry” is both fresh and pressing. Another standout track is the closer “Beauty Cries,” an aching lament over society’s destructive messages to young women. The lashing guitar solo only affirms its truths, especially potent coming from an all-male band. Keep your eyes on Candlefuse and their mission.

by Kevan Breitinger - Suite 101.com


Artist: Candlefuse
Title: "Never Go Unheard"
Label: Infinity

Candlefuse has been pounding the pavement to promote its national debut "Never Go Unheard." Comprised of Ben Honeycutt (lead vocals, guitar), Drew Garrett (guitar, vocals), Steven Howell (bass, vocals) and Brian Hechler (drums, vocals), the band first entered the music scene with its self-titled indie EP in early 2005 and went on to share the stage with Kutless, BarlowGirl, Salvador and Disciple.

Produced by Barry Blair (Audio Adrenaline, Bleach) and mixed by Skidd Mills (Third Day, Sister Hazel) and Plink Giglio (Bride, The Roosevelts), "Never Go Unheard" features 10 tracks tailored to today’s modern rock fan. From the way Honeycutt’s tight vibrato tenor vocals are carried by distortion-laden guitar riffs and a pounding rhythm section, to the relational songwriting, it’s all very much in sync with current trends.

Lyrically, Candlefuse creates content that will resonate with listeners both within the church and beyond its walls. Sings Honeycutt in the melodic anthem “Carousel”: “We’re too comfortable in our own skin/ Never moving from the place we’re in/ We can’t walk a mile in another’s shoes/ For fear of what we have to lose/ They need love.”

Combining efforts in the songwriting process, the four members of Candlefuse all contribute to the band’s alternative rock sound, which is notably similar to bands such as Pillar and Kutless. In addition to anthemic numbers, Candlefuse shows it’s also adept at occasionally performing a stirring insightful slow jam (“Beauty Cries”).

"Never Go Unheard"’s lead single, meanwhile, is an effective rock rendition of Kathryn Scott’s popular worship song “Hungry,” revealing the band’s greatest strength may be the variety of influences from which it draws inspiration.

by Rachel Wegner
- CCM Magazine


With their debut album entitled Never Go Unheard, the boys of Candlefuse aim to do just that armed with catchy melodies and solid rock hooks. The band has a lot of momentum in the early going and vocalist Ben Honeycutt sits down to answer some questions from Infuze's Matt Conner.

Matt: The record has been pretty well received thus far. How do you feel about it all?

Ben: We feel really good about it. We're excited to see what happens with the record. It's definitely a cool thing to see your CD in a store... but mainly just trying to stay focused and continuing to walk through the doors God opens for us.

For those unfamiliar with Candlefuse, how would you describe your sound?

Ah, yes. I knew this question would come. For some reason, it's a little difficult to answer it effectively without just lumping us into the "modern rock" category. Well, for me anyways. But here goes... we sound a lot like Beethoven with a little polka influence. Uh, not really. We try to write music that we would listen to ourselves. I really like hearing a good, catchy melody over a solid chord progression. I think that's the best answer I can give. Just give it a listen.

You guys initially got your start in Alabama. How did you come together?

Sweet home Alabama. It all started about five years ago. Originally we all went to the same high school -- Drew, Brian and me. Drew and Brian (former drummer) already had a band. To make a long story short, that band played at my church. I was there leading a couple of worship songs. After the night was over, they told me their singer was moving off to college, then asked if I would be interested in auditioning. Of course I wanted to be a part of an amazing band. (Laughs).

I say that because looking back on it, we weren't really a good band at all, but I think all bands have to think they're really good or else they would give up. So along those five years, we've grown a lot spiritually, matured as musicians and artists, went through a couple of lineup changes, had a lot of good shows, a lot of bad shows, and everything else that comes with being in a band.

You guys are a part of Indie Community. How has that worked for you all?

Becoming a part of Indie Community was probably one the best decisions we have made as a band. Definitely one of our best investments. Jennifer McConnell, [the] founder, does an amazing job and knows a lot about the independent music scene. I really don't think we would be as far along as we are without Indie Community. From booking shows, to networking with other bands and youth pastors, to being on their website. All of that has played a crucial role in the development of our band.

Working with Skidd Mills and Barry Blair definitely had a positive impact on your sound. Can you tell us how those collaborations came about and what they brought to the music?

This is kind of a funny story. We had released a self-produced, self-recorded album, which we posted on our website. The songs had been on there for a while before we realized how bad they really sounded. So we decided to start on a new project. While we were tracking for it, I mean we were actually in the studio, when we got a call from our drummer. Evidently, Barry had just sent us an email telling us he heard some clips online and was interested in working with us. How he heard something in those songs still blows our minds to this day.

So of course we decided to work with him. He totally reconstructed and tore apart some of our songs, in turn really teaching us how to write and arrange better songs for live shows as well as in the studio. Skidd was an acquaintance of Barry's. We found out that we could have him mix our songs. It was a no-brainer.

Funniest moment in the studio?

The funniest moment in the studio was definitely the last day of tracking. We decided to add tambourine to the chorus of "Hungry." And who better to play it than Barry Blair. We have this on video and I'm sure it would be a lot funnier to see it for yourself. But picture this: Barry walks in to start recording, but then he begins to violently shake the tambourine above his head. He tracks the song while making some funny faces along the way. The big finale was when he slammed the tambourine on the floor at the end of the song. Believe me, it was so rockstar.

Tell us what's happening with the album. You have a single out entitled "Hungry."

Yeah, "Hungry" is still doing pretty well at radio. We were kind of torn between releasing it as our first single or not. With it being a cover song, we didn't really know how people would respond. It's been a very pleasant surprise, so to speak. It's really helped out with the promotion of our album Never Go Unheard.

Now you're currently on tour to a lot of places in the south and Midwest. Do you enjoy life on the road?

We love it. It's the best thing in the world to do something you really love for a living. Seeing new places, meeting new faces is what we enjoy. That sounded like a really corny song lyric. Sorry.

What is both the best and worst parts of being on the road?

The best part would probably be being stuck in the van with three other guys for long periods of time. The worst part would be being stuck in the van with three other guys for really long periods of time.

You've said that ministry doesn't have to sacrifice musicianship or that your artistry doesn't have to be lacking simply because it's faith-based, correct? What makes you say this? And how is this true?

I think today many people have come to the conclusion that Christian music will never be as good as its secular counterpart. That couldn't be farther from the truth. Especially now that the Christian production quality has already caught up. We believe exactly the opposite. God is a very creative Creator. He created us to be creative. When He has control over our hearts and our minds, that's when His artistry will shine through us.

Do you think that artistry is sacrificed a lot at the altar of ministry?

Yes and no. It goes both ways. I think there are artists that are so focused on their "ministry" that they lose hold on their God-given ability, in turn making their ministry far less effective. If nobody wants to listen to your music, who are we reaching? One could also be so determined on their "music" that their ministry falls by the wayside. Don't get me wrong, I think it's a pretty difficult line to walk, but that's something that we strive to become better at everyday.

- Infuze mag.com


Discography

Never Go Unheard - released nationally through INFINITY/Central South Distribution - October 2006

Photos

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Bio

BIO
With a rare combination of spiritual depth and high energy performances, Candlefuse simply rocks. Based in North Alabama, the band includes Ben Honeycutt (vocals, guitar), Drew Garrett (guitar), and JW Woodward (bass). Candlefuse began playing together in 1999 and chose their name from Matthew 5:14 and Psalm 133:1, reflecting their desire to be unified as a light in a dark world.

For the past six years, the band has been traveling across the southeast, performing at churches and venues of all sizes. Their mature songwriting and unique alternative rock sound have landed them slots opening for national artists like Kutless, Disciple, and BarlowGirl. Candlefuse has also been featured on Steelroots TV. The band’s success caught the attention of Dove Award winning producer Barry Blair (Bleach, Poor Man’s Riches) who produced their new album, “Never Go Unheard.” Recently, Candlefuse was selected as a winner of the Hearitfirst.com Indiescovery contest, gaining national exposure and landing a performance slot at Creationfest NW 2006. Their music has also been featured on TNA Wrestling. Even with accomplishments like these, the band remains humble and intentional in their ministry. Lead singer, Ben Honeycutt, says, “Our focus remains on Christ 100%. Our mission is simply to let people know about Him-- to let them know how lost we are without a Savior.”

Candlefuse’s full-length debut album, “Never Go Unheard,” features 9 original rock songs and a new version of the popular worship song “Hungry.” The record exposes the heart of the band – to boldly share the love of Jesus Christ. With aggressive guitar hooks and commanding vocals, songs like “Fighter” and “Echoes of Words” communicate that Candlefuse is not timid about sharing their faith. Themes of repentance, forgiveness, and finding contentment in Christ also permeate the album. The cd was released in October 2006 through INFINITY/Central South Distribution. Radio is already embracing their first single, “Hungry,” and the band will soon be touring nationwide. With powerful songs and dynamic live performances, Candlefuse hopes that their music will change the lives of those who listen.