Casey Buckley
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Casey Buckley

South Orange, New Jersey, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2010 | SELF

South Orange, New Jersey, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2010
Band Rock Singer/Songwriter

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Aug
16
Casey Buckley @ House of Blues New Orleans

New Orleans, Louisiana, United States

New Orleans, Louisiana, United States

Aug
15
Casey Buckley @ Workplay

Birmingham, Alabama, United States

Birmingham, Alabama, United States

Aug
14
Casey Buckley @ City Winery - Nashville

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Music

Press


Casey Buckley, an upcoming musician from South Orange, New Jersey, spent the past five years of work to create his debut album “Take The Good” which was released on Oct. 16th. Casey’s music is very similar to that of Ed Sheeran and Jack Johnson, due to its deep lyrics and acoustic, feel-good style. Casey began playing music on the piano at a very young age and learned many new instruments throughout his life. He currently plays multiple instruments in his songs including piano, guitar, harmonica, and many more. Casey’s variety in instruments makes his songs have a unique and diverse sound.

Each of Casey’s songs has deep meaning in their lyrics that can be interpreted in many ways. These vague, but meaningful lyrics allows each listener to connect the message of the song into their own personal lives, allowing Casey’s songs to become more personal and touching.

On “Take The Good”, Casey’s talent on the piano can be heard the best in the song "3000 Miles." This song showcases not only his piano skills, but also Casey’s ability to harmonize his voice with the piano melody. The slow tempo of this song sets the mood for the deep, meaningful lyrics that accompany it. "3000 Miles" describes the hardships of long distance relationships, but has an uplifting tone because the distance won't last forever. Another song that highlights Casey’s piano skills is "Moment of Silence." This song is more upbeat than "3000 Miles" but continues the theme of deep songs about love and life advice. This song is about how life can get clustered and stressful, and a moment of rest might seem like a waste of time, but it can be a good release.

Casey’s piano talent is matched only by his skills on the guitar. He uses finger picking throughout most of his songs which fits perfectly with the soft, smooth tone of each song. One song with finger picking that stands out above the rest is "Gravity Defying Tears." This song uses finger picking to create a rich, full sound making the lyrics more prominent. This song is about a girl who loves a boy that isn't good for her. Casey speaks to the girl and tell her not to let him bring her down. Casey’s guitar sounds match effortlessly with another instrument he plays, the harmonica. In "Second Guessing," Casey’s use of the harmonica adds a western feel to his music. In this song Casey gives advice to the listener; he suggests that standing up for something you believe in, and showing emotion, makes you a stronger and more full being. Casey even says that seconding guessing your god, is alright as long as you are confident in what you believe in.

Some other songs included in “Take The Good” are "Emily" and "Lover Who May." "Emily," one of the slower songs on the album, reveals the story of Emily, a blue eyed girl that Casey had feelings for, but never got to get to know her. The story of this song connects with "Lover Who May," in which Casey sings a warning to future lovers that he is moving fast and it would be a shame if they missed their chance with him. Casey missed his chance with "Emily" and he doesn’t want other people to have the same regrets and miss their chance with a future lover. Love is the overarching theme of “Take The Good” which is the cornerstone to the feel good mood of the album.

I rate this album a 4.5 out of 5 because the vocals and instrumentals sound great and fit perfectly together, but all of the songs sound very similar. Casey has a unique sound compared to other artists, but he doesn’t have a lot of variety within his album. As a solo artist, Casey plays every part of the song himself and he is able to create a full sound that most musicians need an entire band to create. Casey has an outstanding voice with a wide range that can be heard in all of his songs and makes him stand out amongst other upcoming artists. Overall, Casey Buckley is well worth a listen. He is an amazing musician with a lot of talent and potential.

If after listening to this album you haven't had your fill of Casey, he posted a seven part video series of the song "Rains of Castamere," where Casey plays each part of a different instrument. These videos show the range of Casey’s voice with slower, more diverse music. His ability to play all seven instruments is impressive enough, but his vocals on top of that make these videos, by far, worth your time. - Musiqtone.com


New Jersey singer/songwriter Casey Buckley will be releasing his debut album, "Take The Good" on October 16th. He has performed alongside other great songwriters like Howie Day and Pat McGee and used that experience for his latest release. Beginning with "Take Me There," Casey's vocals are gentle and inviting as an acoustic guitar is all that supports his needs. The pop music feel of "The One To Lose" has success written all over it and before you know it, Casey's music finds it way to your soul with "Moment Of Silence." He gives a classic folk feel to "Lover Who May" as his delivery makes him seem like a seasoned artist. The warm tones of "Gravity Defying Tears" and "Still Confused" will leave you wanting more from this rising young star. To find out more about Casey Buckley and his new album "Take The Good," please visit caseybuckley.com. - JPs Music Blog


Newcomer Casey Buckley is releasing his debut album, Take the Good, on Oct. 16. We are premiering the first single from his debut, titled "Take Me There." Of the single, Casey states "I wrote this song on the trunk of my car about 5 hours from home one weekend in September 2013. It's the first song of the album and sets the intention of the record - one that spans my journey so far and bridges early songs with more recent creations. I've closed nearly every show with it since its writing - and I seem to find new meaning in it each time."

Buckley made his entrance with his debut single "Rise" for Hurricane Sandy Relief in 2012. He then followed with his debut self-titled EP in March 2013 and released Live at Evanston S.P.A.C.E. in June 2015. Take the Good is Casey Buckley's debut full-length and was recorded and mixed at Chris Badami's Portrait Recording Studios. It was mixed to tape and sent to New York City where Scott Hull completed the analog mastering. In Spring 2015, Casey Buckley toured nationally in support of Tony Lucca, just before embarking on Pat McGee's Album Release Tour (Summer 2015). Buckley most recently wrapped up a Southeastern U.S. tour in support of Howie Day.

Take The Good Tracklisting:

01 - Take Me There
02 - The One to Lose
03 - Remember Me
04 - Moment of Silence
05 - The Last Time
06 - Lover Who May
07 - Shadows
08 - Gravity Defying Tears
09 - Still Confused
10 - 3,000 Miles
11 - Emily
12 - Second Guessing

Casey has spent the last five years developing the record for the Take the Good, and is a compilation of life lessons during some very pivotal years of the songwriter's young life, told through the stories of different relationships with friends, girlfriends, and his relationship with himself. - AXS


VENTS Magazine is proud to join forces with singer-songwriter Casey Buckley for the premiere of his new single “Moment of Silence” off his new album Take The Good.

Casey comments
Moment of Silence is in many ways a retrospective on my college years and, by extension, my youth. At times told through the lens of a relationship that has ended, it calls for an objective look at life and a realistic view of the future. The chorus ending of ‘This is no time to be proud’ should not be taken as a negative sentiment. It isn’t meant to cut down the speaker in the song. Instead, it asks for an honest view of a situation. People have a tendency to overstate the positive and, as a defensive mechanism, place more emphasis on past achievements during self-reflection. Moment of Silence highlights the notion that introspection’s true value lies in a humble approach. - VENTS Magazine


Casey Buckley – “Remember Me”: Casey’s main claim to fame at the moment involves a recent summer tour with Howie Day (betcha didn’t know Day was still touring, did ya?). “Remember Me” is a song celebrating nostalgia, in much the same way some might have approached going to a Howie Day show. The simple song tells a former lover to be free to cherish the memories, but not be held back from moving on. It’s common sense advice for all of us, but words that need to remind sometimes. Nostalgia is great, as long as we’re not stuck there. But neither should we forget whom made us who we are. - Tuned Up


To say Casey Buckley grew up fast would be an understatement. Graduating university at age 20, he faced what seemed to be an impossible pursuit: to fully develop as an artist amidst the harsh reality of student loans in an uncertain economy. Not one to be deterred by a challenge, Casey forged ahead on this dichotomous path. Trading in his briefcase for a guitar each evening, he has spent equal time honing his craft both in the boardroom and on stage. We had the pleasure of interviewing Casey about his songwriting process and here is that interview.

BTS: What was the reason you started writing songs?

Casey: I’ve been writing poetry my whole life. I’ve also played music my whole life – starting with piano and violin at an early age. The shift to writing songs was really a natural combination of these two pastimes. As far as what drove me to write poetry, music, or what keeps me writing to this day – it’s to memorialize and communicate some mood or feeling. It allows me to separate a situation or thought from myself and let it exist on its own. Not only does it add permanence but also eases sharing it with others.

BTS: What was the name and subject of your first song?

Casey: I honestly can’t remember – an early one was called ‘Cold Front’ and was about a friend who had a bit of a rough winter. The song was letting her know everything was about to get better and her mood would warm up with the passing season.

BTS: What is the subject of your most current song?

Casey: The last song I wrote focuses on the balancing act of helping someone you care about through a tough time. There’s a fine line between being available and being overbearing – sometimes it can be difficult to navigate that situation.

BTS: Where do you derive inspiration from? i.e., art, music, movies, life, etc.

Casey: I primarily derive inspiration from life. Occasionally a work of art (visual, music, movie, etc.) can remind me of reality – but I always write from personal experience.

BTS: Who were your musical influences in the beginning of your songwriting?

Casey: Four J’s – as I’ll often joke about with my friends – have been huge influences on my songwriting. James Taylor, John Mayer, Jackson Browne, and Jack Johnson.

BTS: Who are your musical influences now? i.e., current artists, singer-songwriters.

Casey: The above artists continue to inspire me – I especially enjoy listening to their latest work in the context of what they’ve written in the past. I like to view a songwriter’s career in its entirety. Just as an individual album tells a story, so do a series of albums. I listen a lot of music, but some recent influences (past few years) include, in no particular order: Jason Isbell, Ryan Adams, Kacey Musgraves, Dawes, Diane Birch, Rayland Baxter, Ed Sheeran, John Fullbright, Ryan Bingham, Glen Hansard…I could keep going on…

BTS: Do you have a method of writing, place, vibe, setting, instrument you prefer to write on? And why?

Casey: I like writing alone and in dim lighting. My basement tends to be a pretty reliable spot. The less you overload the senses, the more you can focus on the task at hand – writing the song. I definitely need it to be absolutely quiet – songwriting is one of the few times where I can’t deal with extraneous noise. White noise is fine though (crickets, rain, etc.) As far as instrument, I’d say guitar – really just because I’ve written more songs on guitar than any other instrument.

BTS: What elements do you think contribute to making a great song?

Casey: The song must be true to itself. Some songs are deep, some aren’t. Some are sad, some are uplifting. I believe that an authentic song can come in many forms – as long as it’s not trying to be something it isn’t.

BTS: How do you push past writer’s block?

Casey: If it’s writer’s block for a particular song, I’ll just start working on another song. Sometimes I just need to switch instruments. If it’s really bad writer’s block, I’ll just walk away altogether and do something other than music. Writer’s block never lasts forever.

BTS: What would be your advice to any beginning songwriter trying to make their way and trying to express themselves musically?

Casey: Write as much as you can, but make each song count. Then play your songs for as many different people as possibly in as many different settings as possible. You’ll know when your songs are finally getting through to them. - Build the Song


Casey Buckley :: Keep Art Alive :: 10 Questions Project

What music (or other art form) inspires you when you create your art?
I have this collaborative Spotify playlist with my friend Erin – it’s called “Somewhat Depressing Music for Erin (but not too depressing)”. It’s full of borderline sad songs – more a focus on pensive lyrics than anything. I find it a bit difficult to write when I’m overly energetic so this playlist helps slow me down and get me thinking.

As a side note, she tried making me a “Happy but not Obnoxiously Happy Music for Casey” playlist. I don’t listen to it nearly as much as the former…

Long distance road trip: what three people do you invite along (fictional or non-fictional, dead or alive)?
Benjamin Franklin, Leonardo Da Vinci, Siddartha Gautama

We could discuss a pretty broad range of topics given everyone’s areas of expertise…

What is your favorite breakfast cereal?
Eggs and bacon – I don’t eat cereal. I loved frosted mini wheats when I was a kid though…

What is one thing that is hanging on your bedroom wall?
One of many bookshelves/bookcases. Probably overflowing with books.

What smell/scent evokes strong memories for you?
My mom’s chocolate-chip cookies.

Coffee or tea?
I alternate between iced black coffee and Barry’s gold tea.

What has been the most impactful compliment, or criticism, you have ever received?
My aunt referred to my manner as ‘comfortable, confident, and non-arrogant’. I try to work on maintaining that disposition whenever I’m on stage.

As a performer, it’s easy to fall into the trap of over-“performing”. I want to share my authentic self with people. I may choose some of the more entertaining bits or stories, but I aim to never misrepresent who I am or what I’m about.

As far as criticism, I have a tendency to get over-excited and get ahead of myself planning for the future. I’ve had a few key people remind me to focus on the moment and take my time – always appreciated.

Three words that describe you?
Curious, driven, unpredictable

What is/was your cartoon character crush?
Misty from Pokemon.

The world is ending in ten minutes and you get to listen to one, and only one, song: Which song?


Given the gravity of the situation, I’d probably have to go with Jeff Buckley’s recording of Hallelujah.

Editor’s Note: Such an inspired and beautifully moving choice. One of my all-time favorites. Have you ever covered it? Have you ever covered any Jeff Buckley?

I was lucky to discover Casey Buckley when he opened up for Tony Lucca at The Hotel Cafe back in May of this year (see review here). He was so talented, and completely genuine in his performance, and as a performer, that his music has stuck with me since the show. Casey is most definitely one to watch, and the great news is that this Tuesday — June 30th — he has an album of live tracks, from the tour I got to see (including my favorite track, 3,000 Miles and his amazing Radiohead cover of High & Dry) that is going up on iTunes. He’s gifted us one of the tracks for lyriquediscorde readers and I urge you to have a listen to it/enjoy it, AND go and pick up the album on Tuesday. Keeping art alive is up to all of us, as is sharing with others the art (in this case music) that we love and enjoy. - Lyrique Discorde


After returning from a summer tour with Howie Day, singer-songwriter Casey Buckley has announced the release of his debut album Take The Good set for October 16, 2015. Five years in the making, Take The Good is an amalgam of life lessons during some very pivotal years of Buckley’s life told through the stories of different relationships with friends, girlfriends, and with himself. Here is what Casey Buckley had to say about the EP:



“Take the Good is not a lyric found anywhere in the album, nor is it a lyric in any other song. It holds multiple meanings that can be found in the many songs on the album. It can mean taking the good experiences and the good people with you on your journey, as in ‘Take Me There’. It can mean taking the good memories with you of past relationships and encouraging others to do the same, as in ‘Remember Me’. It can mean taking the good parts of yourself and moving on in life as you grow up, as in ‘Moment of Silence’. Take the Good means all these things and more.” – Casey Buckley



Casey Buckley made his entrance with his debut single “Rise” for Hurricane Sandy Relief in 2012. He then followed with his debut self-titled EP in March 2013 and released Live at Evanston S.P.A.C.E. in June 2015. Take the Good is Casey Buckley’s debut full-length and was recorded and mixed at Chris Badami’s Portrait Recording Studios. It was mixed to tape and sent to New York City where Scott Hull completed the analog mastering. In Spring 2015, Casey Buckley toured nationally in support of Tony Lucca, just before embarking on Pat McGee’s Album Release Tour (Summer 2015). Buckley most recently wrapped up a Southeastern U.S. tour in support of Howie Day.



Fans of Casey Buckley can check out the Live Studio Video of “Remember Me,” a track off Take The Good on YouTube. Keep your eyes peeled for a single release by this artist shortly. Follow Casey Buckley on social media for updates and new music.
Drawing upon his multi-instrumental background, Casey Buckley brought a number of different sounds together to create a wholly unique work of art – and yet, one that serves to further the American singer-songwriter tradition. His instrumental dexterity is representative of his approach towards life: whether it be languages, academic, or recreational pursuits. Rejecting the familiar idiom of a “Jack of all Trades, Master of None”, Casey is humbly pursuing the true archetype of a Renaissance Man: “Jack of all Trades, Master of Some”.



Buckley’s forthcoming album, Take the Good, is a record five years in the making. It’s an amalgam of life lessons during some very pivotal years of the songwriter’s young life, told through the stories of different relationships with friends, girlfriends, and his relationship with himself. In discussing the album title itself, Buckley offers, “Take the Good” is not a lyric found anywhere in the album, nor is it a lyric in any other song. It holds multiple meanings that can be found in the many songs on the album. It can mean taking the good experiences and the good people with you on your journey, as in ‘Take Me There’. It can mean taking the good memories with you of past relationships and encouraging others to do the same, as in ‘Remember Me’. It can mean taking the good parts of yourself and moving on in life as you grow up, as in ‘Moment of Silence’. In a more light-hearted sense, it can also mean taking good songs out of the past five years of my life and only recording 12 for the album. I had originally planned on recording somewhere around 30 songs split among a couple albums and EPs until I decided to simply choose 12 and focus on one project. Take the Good means all these things and more.”



Take The Good features the song “Moment of Silence”, a song Buckley wrote about a critical period of introspection. Buckley says “sometimes in life you’re fortunate to recognize a period of reflection is necessary, other times it’s thrust upon you. Regardless of how the situation comes about – it’s often a good idea to take a periodic inventory of the people in your life and how they play a part in the grand scheme of your journey. Sometimes you affirm that it’s wise to continue the journey with them. Sometimes the journey is best continued without.”



This thoughtful approach to songwriting is reflected throughout Take The Good, the debut album from a young man who aspires to contribute to the great narrative of folk and popular music for many years to come. - Hellhound Music


WARREN, NJ | September 8, 2015 -:After returning from a summer tour with Howie Day, singer-songwriter Casey Buckley has announced the release of his debut album Take The Good set for October 16, 2015. Five years in the making, Take The Good is an amalgam of life lessons during some very pivotal years of Buckley's life told through the stories of different relationships with friends, girlfriends, and with himself. Here is what Casey Buckley had to say about the EP:


"Take the Good is not a lyric found anywhere in the album, nor is it a lyric in any other song. It holds multiple meanings that can be found in the many songs on the album. It can mean taking the good experiences and the good people with you on your journey, as in 'Take Me There'. It can mean taking the good memories with you of past relationships and encouraging others to do the same, as in 'Remember Me'. It can mean taking the good parts of yourself and moving on in life as you grow up, as in 'Moment of Silence'. Take the Good means all these things and more." - Casey Buckley

Casey Buckley made his entrance with his debut single "Rise" for Hurricane Sandy Relief in 2012. He then followed with his debut self-titled EP in March 2013 and released Live at Evanston S.P.A.C.E. in June 2015. Take the Good is Casey Buckley's debut full-length and was recorded and mixed at Chris Badami's Portrait Recording Studios. It was mixed to tape and sent to New York City where Scott Hull completed the analog mastering. In Spring 2015, Casey Buckley toured nationally in support of Tony Lucca, just before embarking on Pat McGee's Album Release Tour (Summer 2015). Buckley most recently wrapped up a Southeastern U.S. tour in support of Howie Day.

Fans of Casey Buckley can check out the Live Studio Video of "Remember Me," a track off Take The Good on YouTube. Keep your eyes peeled for a single release by this artist shortly. Follow Casey Buckley on social media for updates and new music.

"Remember Me" Live Studio Video:



More About Casey Buckley:
Drawing upon his multi-instrumental background, Casey Buckley brought a number of different sounds together to create a wholly unique work of art - and yet, one that serves to further the American singer-songwriter tradition. His instrumental dexterity is representative of his approach towards life: whether it be languages, academic, or recreational pursuits. Rejecting the familiar idiom of a "Jack of all Trades, Master of None", Casey is humbly pursuing the true archetype of a Renaissance Man: "Jack of all Trades, Master of Some".


Buckley's forthcoming album, Take the Good, is a record five years in the making. It's an amalgam of life lessons during some very pivotal years of the songwriter's young life, told through the stories of different relationships with friends, girlfriends, and his relationship with himself. In discussing the album title itself, Buckley offers, "Take the Good" is not a lyric found anywhere in the album, nor is it a lyric in any other song. It holds multiple meanings that can be found in the many songs on the album. It can mean taking the good experiences and the good people with you on your journey, as in 'Take Me There'. It can mean taking the good memories with you of past relationships and encouraging others to do the same, as in 'Remember Me'. It can mean taking the good parts of yourself and moving on in life as you grow up, as in 'Moment of Silence'. In a more light-hearted sense, it can also mean taking good songs out of the past five years of my life and only recording 12 for the album. I had originally planned on recording somewhere around 30 songs split among a couple albums and EPs until I decided to simply choose 12 and focus on one project. Take the Good means all these things and more."


Take The Good features the song "Moment of Silence", a song Buckley wrote about a critical period of introspection. Buckley says "sometimes in life you're fortunate to recognize a period of reflection is necessary, other times it's thrust upon you. Regardless of how the situation comes about - it's often a good idea to take a periodic inventory of the people in your life and how they play a part in the grand scheme of your journey. Sometimes you affirm that it's wise to continue the journey with them. Sometimes the journey is best continued without."


This thoughtful approach to songwriting is reflected throughout Take The Good, the debut album from a young man who aspires to contribute to the great narrative of folk and popular music for many years to come. - Big City Thoughts


After a successful summer tour with Howie Day, Casey Buckley has returned home with the announcement of an album debut set for October 16th, 2015. Take The Good is an album five years in the making, and it is one full of life lessons during some very momentus years of Buckley’s life. All of which is told through stories of different relationships with friends, girlfriends, and himself.

Here is what Casey Buckley had to say about the new album:

“Take the Good is not a lyric found anywhere in the album, nor is it a lyric in any other song. It holds multiple meanings that can be found in the many songs on the album. It can mean taking the good experiences and the good people with you on your journey, as in ‘Take Me There’. It can mean taking the good memories with you of past relationships and encouraging others to do the same, as in ‘Remember Me’. It can mean taking the good parts of yourself and moving on in life as you grow up, as in ‘Moment of Silence’. Take the Good means all these things and more.“

Buckley made his entrance into music with his debut single, “Rise,” in 2012 after Hurricane Sandy. Afterwards, Buckley released a self titled EP in March 2013. Take The Good is his first full-length album, one that will show off his singer-songwriter roots.

Fans of Casey Buckley can check out the Live Studio Video of “Remember Me,” while also keeping their eyes peeled for a single release coming shortly.

You can follow Buckley on social media for news and updates, too! - Half Beat Magazine


In spring 2014, longtime Sonicbids user Casey Buckley applied for youbloomDublin, an international music festival that books several acts through Sonicbids. After being invited to perform, he had no idea how monumental the trip would be, both musically and personally. Here's his awe-inspiring story about how he finally met his long-lost cousins in Ireland.
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Music is all about connections. Whether it's the interplay of instruments and lyrics, the communication between performer and audience, or the shared appreciation of art, music transcends all customary interaction. There is one more type of bond, however, wholly unique to the touring artist: the connections with individuals met on the road. While this often manifests as a friend of a friend or a fan who keeps in touch, occasionally the universe throws something truly special your way.

When I first received an invitation to play youbloom 2014 in Dublin, Ireland, I was excited, to say the least. With Irish surnames on both sides of my family tree, I couldn't wait to visit the land from which my people came and share my music abroad.

A bit more on "my people" – I knew my great-grandparents were born in Ireland and that cousins of some order were still living on the family land in County Longford. We even had an old photograph of my late American grandfather, Maurice Sullivan, and his Irish first cousin, the late Christy McManus, taken many years ago on a trip to the homeland. Since then, however, everyone had largely lost touch, and we knew nearly nothing of the younger generations.

The festival date approached and within a week of leaving, I was given a handwritten note with two Irish phone numbers and some names. I packed the paper in my guitar case and didn't take it out until I was in my Dublin hotel room. On it were the numbers for Mary McManus, wife of the aforementioned Christy McManus, and Catherine Collum (née McManus), their daughter.

I dialed the first number and was met with an error tone. I would later learn that since the last visit, the Irish telephone system had undergone some changes, and I needed to append a new location code to the beginning of the number. I dialed the second number and a girl picked up. I asked if Catherine was available – she was not at the moment. According to my Irish contact list, Catherine had given birth to a daughter named Tina approximately 17 years ago. Utilizing my brilliant deduction skills, I asked the girl, "Is this Tina?" It was.

I then followed up with what may be the strangest thing she has ever heard a stranger say over the phone: "I'm Casey Buckley, an American musician playing a festival in Dublin this weekend. And I'm your third cousin."

Logistics followed, and after more phone calls, a rental car, and an hour-and-a-half trip to the heart of rural Ireland, I was surrounded by more cousins than I ever knew existed. We ate, traded stories, and caught up on life for hours in the house where my great-grandmother and every prior generation for longer than anyone can remember had lived. Good craic was had by all. (Craic, in case you were wondering, is an Irish noun for fun, conversation, laughs, etc. "Good craic" is close to saying "a good time.")

I met even more family on the drive home that night, stopping in towns along the way back to Dublin. Since June, I've been back once more with my mother and brother. The whole family is now in regular contact with each other and future visits are already in the works.

As for the festival itself, I could not have had a more enjoyable performance. Ireland is an incredibly musical nation – a statement that anyone who has visited can attest to. From the traditional pub musicians across the island to the line of buskers on Grafton Street, music is an integral part of the land's culture.

I didn't quite know what to expect going into the performance, but was nonetheless blown away by the crowd packed into the second-floor performance space of the venue. With so many people that I could barely fit my guitar through to reach the stage, I could not believe just how quiet the room was when I began playing.

The performance, however, didn't end with the passing of my set time. I soon found out that walking around in Dublin with a guitar is very similar to Nashville, in that random strangers will stop you in the street to talk about it. The key difference is, while in Nashville I've found people are usually looking for a co-writer, in Dublin, people want a song! Maybe this only applies past the witching hour, but I distinctly remember singing "Wagon Wheel" with a group of girls somewhere along Trinity Street.

Of the many wonderful things my musical career has led me to, this one in particular stands out – not only for its personal significance, but also for the far-reaching effects it had on my entire extended family. I look forward to the many places music will take me to as well as the people I will meet along the way, but this irreplicable experience in Ireland will forever hold a special place in my heart. - Sonicbids


After returning from a summer tour with Howie Day, singer-songwriter Casey Buckley has announced the release of his debut album Take The Good set for October 16, 2015. Five years in the making, Take The Good is an amalgam of life lessons during some very pivotal years of Buckley’s life told through the stories of different relationships with friends, girlfriends, and with himself. Here is what Casey Buckley had to say about the EP:
“Take the Good is not a lyric found anywhere in the album, nor is it a lyric in any other song. It holds multiple meanings that can be found in the many songs on the album. It can mean taking the good experiences and the good people with you on your journey, as in ‘Take Me There’. It can mean taking the good memories with you of past relationships and encouraging others to do the same, as in ‘Remember Me’. It can mean taking the good parts of yourself and moving on in life as you grow up, as in ‘Moment of Silence’. Take the Good means all these things and more.” – Casey Buckley
Casey Buckley made his entrance with his debut single “Rise” for Hurricane Sandy Relief in 2012. He then followed with his debut self-titled EP in March 2013 and released Live at Evanston S.P.A.C.E. in June 2015. Take the Good is Casey Buckley’s debut full-length and was recorded and mixed at Chris Badami’s Portrait Recording Studios. It was mixed to tape and sent to New York City where Scott Hull completed the analog mastering. In Spring 2015, Casey Buckley toured nationally in support of Tony Lucca, just before embarking on Pat McGee’s Album Release Tour (Summer 2015). Buckley most recently wrapped up a Southeastern U.S. tour in support of Howie Day.


Fans of Casey Buckley can check out the Live Studio Video of “Remember Me,” a track off Take The Good on YouTube. Keep your eyes peeled for a single release by this artist shortly. Follow Casey Buckley on social media for updates and new music. - The Wellz Street Journal


Singer-Songwriter Casey Buckley recently announced the release of his debut album, Take The Good, set for October 16, 2015. Today, the New Jersey based musician has partnered with VENTS Magazine to release “Moment of Silence,” a beautifully compelling track from the album. Five years in the making, Take The Good is an amalgam of life lessons during some very pivotal years of Buckley’s life told through the stories of different relationships with friends, girlfriends, and with himself. Here is what Casey Buckley had to say about the meaning behind “Moment of Silence“:
“‘Moment of Silence’ is in many ways a retrospective on my college years and, by extension, my youth. At times told through the lens of a relationship that has ended, it calls for an objective look at life and a realistic view of the future. The chorus ending of ‘This is no time to be proud’ should not be taken as a negative sentiment. It isn’t meant to cut down the speaker in the song. Instead, it asks for an honest view of a situation. People have a tendency to overstate the positive and, as a defensive mechanism, place more emphasis on past achievements during self-reflection. ‘Moment of Silence’ highlights the notion that introspection’s true value lies in a humble approach.” – Casey Buckley


Casey Buckley made his entrance with his debut single “Rise” for Hurricane Sandy Relief in 2012. He then followed with his debut self-titled EP in March 2013 and released Live at Evanston S.P.A.C.E. in June 2015. Take the Good is Casey Buckley’s debut full-length and was recorded and mixed at Chris Badami’s Portrait Recording Studios. It was mixed to tape and sent to New York City where Scott Hull completed the analog mastering. In Spring 2015, Casey Buckley toured nationally in support of Tony Lucca, just before embarking on Pat McGee’s Album Release Tour (Summer 2015). Buckley most recently wrapped up a Southeastern U.S. tour in support of Howie Day.


Head to VENTS Magazine today to stream the infectious track,”Moment of Silence.” Take The Good will be released on 10/16/15 and will become available for preorder on 9/18/15. Follow Casey Buckley on social media for updates and new music. - The Wellz Street Journal


After returning from a summer tour with Howie Day, singer-songwriter Casey Buckley has announced the release of his debut album Take The Good set for October 16, 2015. Five years in the making, Take The Good is an amalgam of life lessons during some very pivotal years of Buckley’s life told through the stories of different relationships with friends, girlfriends, and with himself. Here is what Casey Buckley had to say about the EP:
“Take the Good is not a lyric found anywhere in the album, nor is it a lyric in any other song. It holds multiple meanings that can be found in the many songs on the album. It can mean taking the good experiences and the good people with you on your journey, as in ‘Take Me There’. It can mean taking the good memories with you of past relationships and encouraging others to do the same, as in ‘Remember Me’. It can mean taking the good parts of yourself and moving on in life as you grow up, as in ‘Moment of Silence’. Take the Good means all these things and more.” – Casey Buckley


Casey Buckley made his entrance with his debut single “Rise” for Hurricane Sandy Relief in 2012. He then followed with his debut self-titled EP in March 2013 and released Live at Evanston S.P.A.C.E. in June 2015. Take the Good is Casey Buckley’s debut full-length and was recorded and mixed at Chris Badami’s Portrait Recording Studios. It was mixed to tape and sent to New York City where Scott Hull completed the analog mastering. In Spring 2015, Casey Buckley toured nationally in support of Tony Lucca, just before embarking on Pat McGee’s Album Release Tour (Summer 2015). Buckley most recently wrapped up a Southeastern U.S. tour in support of Howie Day.


Fans of Casey Buckley can check out the Live Studio Video of “Remember Me,” a track off Take The Good on YouTube. Keep your eyes peeled for a single release by this artist shortly. Follow Casey Buckley on social media for updates and new music.
More About Casey Buckley:
Drawing upon his multi-instrumental background, Casey Buckley brought a number of different sounds together to create a wholly unique work of art – and yet, one that serves to further the American singer-songwriter tradition. His instrumental dexterity is representative of his approach towards life: whether it be languages, academic, or recreational pursuits. Rejecting the familiar idiom of a “Jack of all Trades, Master of None”, Casey is humbly pursuing the true archetype of a Renaissance Man: “Jack of all Trades, Master of Some”.
Buckley’s forthcoming album, Take the Good, is a record five years in the making. It’s an amalgam of life lessons during some very pivotal years of the songwriter’s young life, told through the stories of different relationships with friends, girlfriends, and his relationship with himself. In discussing the album title itself, Buckley offers, “Take the Good” is not a lyric found anywhere in the album, nor is it a lyric in any other song. It holds multiple meanings that can be found in the many songs on the album. It can mean taking the good experiences and the good people with you on your journey, as in ‘Take Me There’. It can mean taking the good memories with you of past relationships and encouraging others to do the same, as in ‘Remember Me’. It can mean taking the good parts of yourself and moving on in life as you grow up, as in ‘Moment of Silence’. In a more light-hearted sense, it can also mean taking good songs out of the past five years of my life and only recording 12 for the album. I had originally planned on recording somewhere around 30 songs split among a couple albums and EPs until I decided to simply choose 12 and focus on one project. Take the Good means all these things and more.”
Take The Good features the song “Moment of Silence”, a song Buckley wrote about a critical period of introspection. Buckley says “sometimes in life you’re fortunate to recognize a period of reflection is necessary, other times it’s thrust upon you. Regardless of how the situation comes about – it’s often a good idea to take a periodic inventory of the people in your life and how they play a part in the grand scheme of your journey. Sometimes you affirm that it’s wise to continue the journey with them. Sometimes the journey is best continued without.”
This thoughtful approach to songwriting is reflected throughout Take The Good, the debut album from a young man who aspires to contribute to the great narrative of folk and popular music for many years to come.
To Keep Up With Casey Buckley Online: - SwitchBitch Noise


As I settled into a spot at the venue, coming early as to not miss any of the opening acts (three on the bill), I was lucky not to miss New Jersey singer, Casey Buckley. Unassuming, with just a guitar and a sweet demeanor, Casey sang a set of personal songs with such vulnerability, and perfect pitch, that I found myself mesmerized. All but one song were original, and all but one song were played on an acoustic guitar. My favorite original, though, was performed on the piano (I have such a soft spot for piano – a song about the struggles of long-distance love, dedicated to a girl in California, called 3,000 Miles. The cover Casey did blew me away. It is not easy to master Thom Yorke and have it both become your own interpretation, and still do Thom’s crazy range justice. Casey did both with an amazing take on High and Dry that gave me all over chills. Casey is one to watch. I plan to feature more of his work here as his musical path unfolds. More to come, most definitely. - Lyrique Discorde


Singer/songwriter Casey Buckley is back from touring with Howie Day this summer, and now he has announced that his debut album Take The Good will be released on October 16th. It is the result of five years of work, inspired by the ups and downs of life during that time.

“Take the Good is not a lyric found anywhere in the album, nor is it a lyric in any other song. It holds multiple meanings that can be found in the many songs on the album. It can mean taking the good experiences and the good people with you on your journey, as in ‘Take Me There’. It can mean taking the good memories with you of past relationships and encouraging others to do the same, as in ‘Remember Me’. It can mean taking the good parts of yourself and moving on in life as you grow up, as in ‘Moment of Silence’. Take the Good means all these things and more.” – Casey Buckley

Buckley began his career with his single “Rise” which was meant for Hurricane Sandy Relief in 2012. Since then, he released a debut self-titled EP and Live at Evanston S.P.A.C.E. in June 2015.

Related: The Importance of Singer/Songwriters

You can already listen to a live performance “Remember Me” off the album: - Confront Magazine


A Basking Ridge singer-songwriter impacted by his own Hurricane Sandy power outages has released a new single about the storm and is donating proceeds to victims of Hurricane Sandy.

Casey Buckley, 22, has written and recorded a new song, entitled "Rise," in honor of the many victims of Hurricane Sandy, with the proceeds from its iTunes sales going to Gov. and Mary Pat Christie's Hurricane Sandy Relief Fund.

"Hurricane Sandy wreaked havoc upon everything in its path," Buckley said. "The recovery has started, but many are still without basic utilities in their homes. If I could lift one spirit from the despair brought by this storm, I thought, I would consider the song a success."

Buckley said that his own power was out for more than a week, with no heat, and at about a half-dozen trees down. While he was passing messages between his friends to make sure they were alright, he got a burst of creativity.

"I ran down to my cold, dark basement, picked up my guitar and finished the song in 15 minutes," Buckley said. "I don't even know where the song came from, it was like a connection from a higher power."

He found a recording studio that still had power almost two weeks after the storm —Soundwaves Studios in Union, with producer/engineer Tom Stratton.

"The video was just the original song, all acoustic, but I wanted (the single) to be more upbeat," Buckley said. "I put as much positive energy as possible into the production without undermining the authenticity of the song"

Buckley wants the bulk of the funds to go to New Jersey victims through the governor's relief fund, but he also wants to help Breezy Point, Queens, N.Y. and Staten Island, N.Y.


"As funds roll in, I want to make sure no place is forgotten," Buckley said. "I'm New Jersey at heart, but the storm crossed state boundaries."


Buckley said he found a website that lets him keep all of the money raised from sales on iTunes so the most help as possible is generated. He also started a website for the song and its relief efforts.

"If you or someone you know suffered as a result of Hurricane Sandy, or any natural disaster for that matter, it might help to alleviate some of that pain - even if just for three minutes and 16 seconds," Buckley said.

- NJ .com


Casey Buckley, an artist I didn’t know, opened the show and I really enjoyed his music. It was just him and his guitar, a pure singer songwriter, and his set was very engaging. He had good stage presence and good stories about his songs. He seems to have a very honest approach to his music and is clearly very talented. I really liked his style and have definitely added him to my list of favorites. - Carrie Loves Concerts


I received Casey Buckley's 2013 EP release in my inbox this morning and am pleasantly surprised by what I've heard! Being a singer/songwriter is all about conveying emotion through your music as best as you possibly can and he certainly has done so. The collaboration of a bunch of different people's thoughts just isn't there when it is only one person writing the music and it is clear listening to his self-titled EP what emotion he wants to convey throughout: heartbreak!

I know what you're thinking; "another album about relationships? About love??" I thought that too but when it comes down to it, love will always be the upmost relateable emotion to convey. Everyone can have some sort of connection to lyrics like, "Are still you confused, do you have to lose your mind every time? Do you still feel so absolutely low that your life is moving too slow? Because I do too." I'm confident that everyone has been there at some point or another and will most likely be back there in the future. The way that Casey Buckley conveys it though is concise, ever after layering so much instrumentalization that most singer/songwriters would dilute their message. Casey Buckley doesn't. I've heard two guitars, vocal melody, 3 part harmony, drums, bass guitar, piano, and even what sounds like a ukelele in the 8th and final track, "Please Come Down" and in every song I haven't heard a single instrument out of place. The only drawback I can see to this album is exactly what I believe makes this an EP as opposed to a full release. The EP is 8 tracks long, which one would think could easily be made into a full release, however there just isn't much direction or flow to the tracks. It is simply a collection of somber ballads with very clever lyrical content. All of the tracks are simply too similar for this to be considered a full album and Casey Buckley knew that.

I have definitely enjoyed listening to Casey Buckley's self-titled EP and would listen to it again even though I typically don't frequent the singer/songwriter genre. I believe that, should Buckley decide to put out an LP and really pour his heart and soul into making it an album instead of a collection of songs, he's going to do extremely well for himself and his listeners. Bravo!

- Music Emissions: John Berry


TV Feature on 'Rise (For Hurricane Sandy Relief)' - Verizon Fios News: Push Pause


Former Chronicle managing editor, Casey Buckley (WCAS ’11), has written a song for charity called “Rise” about the devastation Sandy wrought on the East Coast recently. You can download the song here- all proceeds go to the Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief Fund.

Casey lives in coastal New Jersey and his home was hit especially hard by the storm – check out these photos he took of the area.

- Northwestern Chronicle


For the past five years, young New Jersey-based singer-songwriter Casey Buckley has cultivated countless stories of relationships and lessons learned, all fitting cohesively in his debut 12 track record, Take The Good, officially releasing tomorrow. As a multi-instrumentalist and vocalist, Buckley encompasses the singer-songwriter title with a nuanced flair for songwriting and sweet singing.

On Take The Good, which Buckley says is “12 stories that are indicative of the larger whole. Each of these moments represents a point along some timeline in my life – some beginnings, some middles, and some ends,” each track has something in common: light, steady vocals, effortless instrumentation, and sincere songwriting. The album is not an explosion but rather a sophisticated, youthful romp into Buckley’s soul, clearly a hopeful but haunted place. Accompanied by simple guitar lines, repetitive rhythms, and pretty melodies, Buckley’s trained voice takes the spotlight on every track, singing his stories with an admirable ingenuity. Two of the most charming tracks on the album serve as its conclusion, “Emily” being a quiet ballad in which Buckley sings “If I wrote you a song, would you listen to the words?/’Cause after all/This has just been a long way to say/’I never really met you/But I sure wish I could/Emily'”, and the album’s final track “Second Guessing” serving as a subdued, slightly folk-y finale with clever lyrics and gentle tempos.

Take The Good is a commendable debut record, featuring Casey Buckley’s great talents at storytelling and singing. With every track advancement, listeners learn a little more about Buckley’s mind, told by his uncomplicated instrumentation, sweet voice, and honest songwriting. - Elmore Magazine


Discography

2015 - Take the Good - 12 Track Studio Album
2015 - Live at Evanston S.P.A.C.E. - 7 Track Live Album
2013 - Casey Buckley - 8 Track Studio EP
2012 - Rise (For Hurricane Sandy Relief) - Single

Photos

Bio

Available as solo acoustic act or with full band!

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Opened for Howie Day and Pat McGee (extended tour runs) in Summer 2015. 

Opened on Tony Lucca's national Paint a Picture Tour in April/May 2015. 

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Full Length Debut Album - 'Take the Good' - released October 16, 2015

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Drawing upon his multi-instrumental background, Casey Buckley brought a number of different sounds together to create a wholly unique work of art – and yet, one that serves to further the American singer-songwriter tradition. His instrumental dexterity is representative of his approach towards life: whether it be languages, academic, or recreational pursuits. Rejecting the familiar idiom of a “Jack of all Trades, Master of None”, Casey is humbly pursuing the true archetype of a Renaissance Man: “Jack of all Trades, Master of Some”.

Buckley’s forthcoming album, “Take the Good”, is a record five years in the making. It’s an amalgam of life lessons during some very pivotal years of the songwriter’s young life, told through the stories of different relationships with friends, girlfriends, and his relationship with himself. In discussing the album title itself, Buckley offers, “‘Take the Good’ is not a lyric found anywhere in the album, nor is it a lyric in any other song. It holds multiple meanings that can be found in the many songs on the album. It can mean taking the good experiences and the good people with you on your journey, as in ‘Take Me There’. It can mean taking the good memories with you of past relationships and encouraging others to do the same, as in ‘Remember Me’. It can mean taking the good parts of yourself and moving on in life as you grow up, as in ‘Moment of Silence’. In a more light-hearted sense, it can also mean taking good songs out of the past five years of my life and only recording 12 for the album. I had originally planned on recording somewhere around 30 songs split among a couple albums and EPs until I decided to simply choose 12 and focus on one project. ‘Take the Good’ means all these things and more.”

“Take The Good” features the song “Moment of Silence”, a song Buckley wrote about a critical period of introspection. Buckley says “sometimes in life you’re fortunate to recognize a period of reflection is necessary, other times it’s thrust upon you. Regardless of how the situation comes about – it’s often a good idea to take a periodic inventory of the people in your life and how they play a part in the grand scheme of your journey. Sometimes you affirm that it’s wise to continue the journey with them. Sometimes the journey is best continued without.”

This thoughtful approach to songwriting is reflected throughout “Take The Good”, the debut album from a young man who aspires to contribute to the great narrative of folk and popular music for many years to come.

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2013, 2014 Dewey Beach Music Conference

2013 CBGB Music Festival

2014 Millennium Music Conference **Selected for Compilation CD**

2014 Cape May Singer Songwriter Festival

2014 YouBloom Festival in Dublin, Ireland

Band Members