Catrin O'Neill
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Catrin O'Neill

Band Folk Celtic

Calendar

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Sep
11
Catrin O'Neill @ Wedding

Aberdyfi Wales LL35 UK, Not Applicable, United Kingdom

Aberdyfi Wales LL35 UK, Not Applicable, United Kingdom

Aug
28
Catrin O'Neill @ The Warf Gardens

Aberdyfi Wales LL35 UK, Not Applicable, United Kingdom

Aberdyfi Wales LL35 UK, Not Applicable, United Kingdom

Aug
19
Catrin O'Neill @ Beautiful Days Festival

Escot Park Ottery St Mary Devon Southwest EX11 1LU, Not Applicable, United Kingdom

Escot Park Ottery St Mary Devon Southwest EX11 1LU, Not Applicable, United Kingdom

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Music

Press


Welsh singer Catrin O'Neill was charming, to a quite stunning extent. Her influences are traditional Welsh, Irish and Breton. Some songs are traditional (some in Welsh), and some self-penned. She performed a varied set with talent, grace and warmth, from tender love songs to drinking songs to tragic ballads. She sang beautifully and powerfully, accompanying herself on guitar and bodhran. Catrin, you're a star! Look out for her, readers, and her new album Nain's Kitchen. - Rychard Carrington of Moving Tone and Rock and Reel Magazine


“Any album with a song about drinking hard cider has got something going for it. Catrin O'Neill has put together an album of traditional classics and contemporary gems that I guess she's hoping will add to their number. "Nain's Kitchen" is an album of stoves and crock pots rather than ovens and bowls, songs of the people, not the peers, but delightfully practical with nothing going to waste. O'Neill herself can turn her voice from songs, sang almost angelically in Gaelic to rough drinking songs that seem to put you over the drink drive limit just by listening. Refreshingly direct”. - FATEA Magazine.


Discography

Nain's Kitchen / Cegin Nain - Album 2010

Photos

Bio

Catrin O'Neill grew up by the sea in Southern Snowdonia, surrounded by a wealth of traditional Welsh music and culture. Her Grandmother or Nain, was one of the first to introduce her to the magic of folk songs, often sung in the kitchen beside the warm Aga with cup of tea in hand. Her roots lie firmly in Wales and its music, but as soon as she was able, adventure called and with it a whole world of musical influences.
"I took my guitar and had five years of travel," she says. "I produced children's cabaret shows in the depths of China and was a chorus line dancer the Bollywood film industry in India, among other things."
Eventually though her longing for her homeland bought her back to its fair shores.
Now settled in the Vale of Glamorgan, she is fast becoming a rising star of the Welsh folk scene, with her first album Nain’s Kitchen / Cegin Nain is being commercially released in March 2010.
Since returning her musical explorations have continued but somewhat closer to home. The influence of her Irish ancestry and love of Breton dance and its music can clearly be heard in her performances. However it is in the Welsh music that her true passion lies.
“Welsh folk music has been overlooked for so long” says Catrin, “even well known Celtic musicians not really being aware of its existence. Many people think that our folk music consists of Hymns or male voice choirs, so far from the reality. The true folk music of Wales can be compared to the carefree passion of Irish, or the beauty of Breton music, but with it bringing harmonies and a poetic tradition to rival that of anywhere in the world. I think it would be very mean of us not to share it!”
She can turn her hand from hauntingly beautiful airs sung in her native Welsh, to rowdy Irish drinking songs accompanied only with her Bodhran. It is however her humour and ability to tell a story, transporting the audience to places past and present, that really set her aside from other folk singers, her style recently being referred to as a “female Rory McLeod”.
She often plays solo but also as a duo or as part of a four piece incorporating harp, two fiddles, bouzouki, pipes and whistle.