Cecilia  Coleman Big Band
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Cecilia Coleman Big Band

New York City, New York, United States | SELF

New York City, New York, United States | SELF
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"Jazz Times IMAGES review 2007"

Jazz Times "IMAGES" review July 2007

The band is Cecilia Coleman on piano, David Smith on trumpet,Adam kolker on tenor saxophone, Tim Givens on bass and Jeff Brillinger on drums. Not a household name among them. The instrumentation is common. So is the art form: latter-day post- Blue Note bop. In the right hands, it is an art form whose capacity for self-renewal is unlimited. Cecilia Coleman is an honest, intelligent pianist, an accomplished composer and an intuitive ensemble conceptualist. One of her structural ideas for "Images" is simple but effective. She introduces her originals with short piano versions of standards. "You Are My Sunshine," somber as a hymn, is released into "Free," a throbbing contrapuntal waltz. Her "Blue and Gold" is a brooding but logical extension of Irving Berlin's lead-in, "What'll I Do. Adam Kolker and Coleman take subtle, soft, circling solos. Kolker is also indirect and sinuous yet highly effective on "The Dance," which is set up by the sweet romanticism of Michel Legrand's "I Will Wait For You." Coleman's revelation of relatonships between know motifs and original material is just one example of the creative connections that give this music its sense of continuum. "Images" is a single sustained musical statement and a high-quality project whose attention to detail includes excellent recorded sound by Rudy Van Gelder. -Thomas Conrad JAZZTIMES June 2007 - Thomas Conrad


"Jazz Times IMAGES review 2007"

Jazz Times "IMAGES" review July 2007

The band is Cecilia Coleman on piano, David Smith on trumpet,Adam kolker on tenor saxophone, Tim Givens on bass and Jeff Brillinger on drums. Not a household name among them. The instrumentation is common. So is the art form: latter-day post- Blue Note bop. In the right hands, it is an art form whose capacity for self-renewal is unlimited. Cecilia Coleman is an honest, intelligent pianist, an accomplished composer and an intuitive ensemble conceptualist. One of her structural ideas for "Images" is simple but effective. She introduces her originals with short piano versions of standards. "You Are My Sunshine," somber as a hymn, is released into "Free," a throbbing contrapuntal waltz. Her "Blue and Gold" is a brooding but logical extension of Irving Berlin's lead-in, "What'll I Do. Adam Kolker and Coleman take subtle, soft, circling solos. Kolker is also indirect and sinuous yet highly effective on "The Dance," which is set up by the sweet romanticism of Michel Legrand's "I Will Wait For You." Coleman's revelation of relatonships between know motifs and original material is just one example of the creative connections that give this music its sense of continuum. "Images" is a single sustained musical statement and a high-quality project whose attention to detail includes excellent recorded sound by Rudy Van Gelder. -Thomas Conrad JAZZTIMES June 2007 - Thomas Conrad


"All About Jazz 2007"

All About Jazz Review "Images" August 2007 by Jim Santella
"IMAGES" Cecilia Coleman Quintet (Interplay) This is Cecilia Coleman's first release as leader since moving to New York. The personnel in her modern mainstream quintet has changed and they've laid down a program of fresh new compositions for this, her seventh release overall, but it's still the same kind of dynamic sound that grabs you by the shirt collar and pounds your chest with passion. Coleman formed her first trio in 1990 and her first quintet three years later, both in Los Angeles, where she took the jazz scene by surprise after graduation from the University of California in Long Beach. Afetr a decade of soaking up the LA jazz atmosphere and making a significant impact on the music, she decided that New York had a different quality that agreed with her music more. The memories are all in place: Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers, Bud Powell, Thelonious Monk and many more legendary pioneers who've influenced Coleman along with the rest of us. The pianist opens five of her program selections with solo piano versions of familiar songs,leading to one cohesive quintet adventure after another. Tenor saxophonist Adam Kolker, trumpeter David Smith, bassist Tim Givens and drummer Jeff Brillinger mesh with Coleman's driving piano to create quite a storm. She cascades up and down the piano percussively with plenty to say, as the unit ties a hardbop tradition together with spontaneous changes in mood and perspective. It's a team effort where everybody converses freely. The trumpet and tenor frontline blows a stiff breeze that underscores the East Coast power that Coleman has unleashed. "Crazybird", loosely based on Coltrane's "Lazy Bird", features antics that derive from knowing which rules can be broken. The freedom this quintet shows in it's interpretations translates into a reliance on the tried and true jazz mainstream for it's foundation but they march considerably further. by Jim Santella AAJ/ New York August 2007 - Jim Santella


"All About Jazz 2007"

All About Jazz Review "Images" August 2007 by Jim Santella
"IMAGES" Cecilia Coleman Quintet (Interplay) This is Cecilia Coleman's first release as leader since moving to New York. The personnel in her modern mainstream quintet has changed and they've laid down a program of fresh new compositions for this, her seventh release overall, but it's still the same kind of dynamic sound that grabs you by the shirt collar and pounds your chest with passion. Coleman formed her first trio in 1990 and her first quintet three years later, both in Los Angeles, where she took the jazz scene by surprise after graduation from the University of California in Long Beach. Afetr a decade of soaking up the LA jazz atmosphere and making a significant impact on the music, she decided that New York had a different quality that agreed with her music more. The memories are all in place: Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers, Bud Powell, Thelonious Monk and many more legendary pioneers who've influenced Coleman along with the rest of us. The pianist opens five of her program selections with solo piano versions of familiar songs,leading to one cohesive quintet adventure after another. Tenor saxophonist Adam Kolker, trumpeter David Smith, bassist Tim Givens and drummer Jeff Brillinger mesh with Coleman's driving piano to create quite a storm. She cascades up and down the piano percussively with plenty to say, as the unit ties a hardbop tradition together with spontaneous changes in mood and perspective. It's a team effort where everybody converses freely. The trumpet and tenor frontline blows a stiff breeze that underscores the East Coast power that Coleman has unleashed. "Crazybird", loosely based on Coltrane's "Lazy Bird", features antics that derive from knowing which rules can be broken. The freedom this quintet shows in it's interpretations translates into a reliance on the tried and true jazz mainstream for it's foundation but they march considerably further. by Jim Santella AAJ/ New York August 2007 - Jim Santella


"LA Weekly/Dec. 2003"

LA Weekly/ Pick of the Week Dec. 5-11,2003
Though she split for NYC in '98, Long Beach - born pianist-composer Cecilia Coleman returns monthly to teach at alma-mater CSULB, often managing to squeeze in a gig while she's here. Coleman's music is steeped in the classic, hard- edged Blue Note sound of the early '60's , but she's no retread. Whether diving into an archtypical piece of hard-bop history like Wayne Shorter's "Speak No Evil" or exploring one of her own inventive compositions,Coleman continues to find surprising new things to say within the form, and never fails to swing. Her longtime West Coast quintet is a tight one, with trumpeter Steve Huffsteter, tenor saxophonist Jerry Pinter, bassist John Crooks and drummer Thomas White. At Jax, Mon-Tues Dec. 8-9 ----Brandt Reiter - Brandt Reiter


"LA Weekly/Dec. 2003"

LA Weekly/ Pick of the Week Dec. 5-11,2003
Though she split for NYC in '98, Long Beach - born pianist-composer Cecilia Coleman returns monthly to teach at alma-mater CSULB, often managing to squeeze in a gig while she's here. Coleman's music is steeped in the classic, hard- edged Blue Note sound of the early '60's , but she's no retread. Whether diving into an archtypical piece of hard-bop history like Wayne Shorter's "Speak No Evil" or exploring one of her own inventive compositions,Coleman continues to find surprising new things to say within the form, and never fails to swing. Her longtime West Coast quintet is a tight one, with trumpeter Steve Huffsteter, tenor saxophonist Jerry Pinter, bassist John Crooks and drummer Thomas White. At Jax, Mon-Tues Dec. 8-9 ----Brandt Reiter - Brandt Reiter


"Into The Night/Pasadena weekly"

Into The Night/ Pasadena Weekly
A few years ago, one of the most accomplished and prominent local jazz singers (who happens to be a woman) made a declaration in confidence that was surprising, to say the least. "I'd never work with a female pianist," she said, with certainty but without rancor. "Woman pianists don't have the kind of energy I need when I sing." Almost as soon as she said that , she amended her statement. "But," she asked, "do you know who I'd love to work with? Cecilia Coleman. She's got great energy and there are lot's of men who'd like to work with her too." If you see pianist Cecilia Coleman on the street,energy might not be the first word that occurs to you. She's a slender woman with a delicate bone structure. Her speaking manner is quiet and she's socially reserved to the point of shyness. Nonetheless, energy is a relevant word when applied to Coleman's music. You can hear it in her playing, her compositions and her band. Coleman works out of the vigorous hard-bop tradition. While hard-bop is her frame of reference, it's by no means a boundary for Coleman. The late hard-bop drummer, Art Blakey,is a touchstone to Coleman in many ways.Her quintet bristles with the same kind of vitality heard in many editions of the Messengers. She's steadily grown as a writer and that forward motion can be measured on her 3 albums, the last of which is "Home" on the Resurgent music label. All of these releases show Coleman at the helm of a quintet that boasts some of the finest local players, like trumpeter Steve Huffsteter. Kirk Silsbee Dec. 20-26, 1996 - Kirk Silsbee 1996


"Into The Night/Pasadena weekly"

Into The Night/ Pasadena Weekly
A few years ago, one of the most accomplished and prominent local jazz singers (who happens to be a woman) made a declaration in confidence that was surprising, to say the least. "I'd never work with a female pianist," she said, with certainty but without rancor. "Woman pianists don't have the kind of energy I need when I sing." Almost as soon as she said that , she amended her statement. "But," she asked, "do you know who I'd love to work with? Cecilia Coleman. She's got great energy and there are lot's of men who'd like to work with her too." If you see pianist Cecilia Coleman on the street,energy might not be the first word that occurs to you. She's a slender woman with a delicate bone structure. Her speaking manner is quiet and she's socially reserved to the point of shyness. Nonetheless, energy is a relevant word when applied to Coleman's music. You can hear it in her playing, her compositions and her band. Coleman works out of the vigorous hard-bop tradition. While hard-bop is her frame of reference, it's by no means a boundary for Coleman. The late hard-bop drummer, Art Blakey,is a touchstone to Coleman in many ways.Her quintet bristles with the same kind of vitality heard in many editions of the Messengers. She's steadily grown as a writer and that forward motion can be measured on her 3 albums, the last of which is "Home" on the Resurgent music label. All of these releases show Coleman at the helm of a quintet that boasts some of the finest local players, like trumpeter Steve Huffsteter. Kirk Silsbee Dec. 20-26, 1996 - Kirk Silsbee 1996


"LA Times 1994"

Time Is on the Side of Cecilia Coleman's Quintet
Santa Ana - All of us might not be pleased that time marches on, but the leader of a working jazz band usually is: Longevity gives a group the sort of unity that only can come from a continuing succession of performances. Proof: Cecilia Coleman's quintet, holding forth Tuesday nights this month at Randell's. Fresh from a summer tour of Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah, the band sounds tough and muscular. Coleman (keyboards), Steve Huffsteter (trumpet), Andy Suzuki ( tenor sax), Dean Taba (bass) and Kendall Kay (drums) have been together for 18 months and the time is really starting to pay dividends. On a recent Tuesday, before a hardy handful of appreciative fans, the band delivered many choice selections from Coleman's new "Young and Foolish" CD succinctly and with precision. The set included the luscious, medium-tempo "Real Thing", the slow and evocative "Somalia," the charged "Divine'" and "Celia," a nod to the great Bud Powell. During the improvisations, the sure-footedness that comes from familiarity with this demanding material, and from listening to other band members, was apparent. Huffsteter, a highly-regarded jazzman for more than two decades, and Suzuki, a solid newcomer, are fine extemporaneous players, and Coleman has emerged as an ace soloist herself. For some time, it appeared that composition was the Long Beach native's strong suit, but in the past six months or so, her playing has reached new heights. - Zan Stewart


"LA Times 1994"

Time Is on the Side of Cecilia Coleman's Quintet
Santa Ana - All of us might not be pleased that time marches on, but the leader of a working jazz band usually is: Longevity gives a group the sort of unity that only can come from a continuing succession of performances. Proof: Cecilia Coleman's quintet, holding forth Tuesday nights this month at Randell's. Fresh from a summer tour of Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah, the band sounds tough and muscular. Coleman (keyboards), Steve Huffsteter (trumpet), Andy Suzuki ( tenor sax), Dean Taba (bass) and Kendall Kay (drums) have been together for 18 months and the time is really starting to pay dividends. On a recent Tuesday, before a hardy handful of appreciative fans, the band delivered many choice selections from Coleman's new "Young and Foolish" CD succinctly and with precision. The set included the luscious, medium-tempo "Real Thing", the slow and evocative "Somalia," the charged "Divine'" and "Celia," a nod to the great Bud Powell. During the improvisations, the sure-footedness that comes from familiarity with this demanding material, and from listening to other band members, was apparent. Huffsteter, a highly-regarded jazzman for more than two decades, and Suzuki, a solid newcomer, are fine extemporaneous players, and Coleman has emerged as an ace soloist herself. For some time, it appeared that composition was the Long Beach native's strong suit, but in the past six months or so, her playing has reached new heights. - Zan Stewart


Discography

Images (2007) Pearl (2007) Japan only The Impostor (1998) Kismet & Camelot (2001) Higher Standards (1998) Home (1995) Young & Foolish (1994) Words of Wisdom (1991)
All received national and international airplay on Jazz Stations and some syndicated radio shows

Photos

Bio

Cecilia formed her quintet in 1991 in Los Angeles, Ca. They have recorded 7 CD's and performed at many venues and festivals including Monterey Jazz Festival (1995), Telluride Jazz Festival, and more. In 1998, Cecilia moved to NYC and formed her East Coast quintet which recorded their first CD "Images" in 2007. More info. is also avail. @ www.ceciliacoleman.com