Charmingly Ghetto
Gig Seeker Pro

Charmingly Ghetto

Boston, Massachusetts, United States | SELF

Boston, Massachusetts, United States | SELF
Band Hip Hop

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

Music

Press


Charmingly Ghetto is standing in the basement level of an Old Navy in Manhattan, holding a pair of leather pants and debating their merits. It’s December first, the day before the Boston Music Awards—the city-wide celebration of local music which had nominated CG as one of Boston’s best rappers in 2012—and he was trying to complete his wardrobe, augmented by some free swag from Brooklyn retailer Ferris.

After repeated pleas from an Old Navy employee (and me) to rock the leather, he disappears to the dressing room, only to re-emerge minutes later holding the pants and shaking his head vehemently. “They were dope, but I couldn’t fit into them,” he says, putting them back onto a shelf. “Maybe one day when I get some more money, I’ll learn how to put them on.”



I first met Charmingly Ghetto over a year ago, walking into the smoke-choked green room in the basement of the now-shuttered Southpaw in Park Slope, Brooklyn and immediately got drawn into a heated discussion about the mechanics of the music business. He was prepping to release his Study A’Broad mixtape, and was unloading question after question about how to get his music out; blogs, promotion, doing the whole thing himself (not that I was much help). But later, after I heard the tape, his flow and delivery over laid back, soul-infused beats had a classic feel, sometimes bringing an edge that pushed the track to a more energetic place, other times bumping along languidly on top of the beat by way of introduction (“My name is Charmingly Ghetto and yo it’s nice to meet you/I light an L and wipe my feet when I’m about to greet you” from “Pursuit of Happyness”), it felt good, like something you could bite and dig deeper into, deciphering the wordplay and clever storylines that embellished his everyday life-style street poetry. He has an ability to make you want to hear more, to listen harder, to understand more fully what he’s talking about, the makes you bump his music over and over.

Since then, there’ve been a whirlwind of highlights for the Dorchester-born, Boston-bred rapper with a serious passion for the Celtics and a gift for spreading his stories around the world. Case in point: Study A’Broad united producers from as far away as New Zealand (The ENOvator), Iceland (Abstrakt Idea), the U.K. (Cypria), Sweden (Pajozo), Germany (SmoothKingBoehm), Spain (JC_BeatZz) and Atlanta (Introspective Minds) for a cohesive project that opened his music up to listeners on three continents. He followed that up with two projects later in the year—the soul-drenched Scotland Yahd (with Cypria), and the swampy SuaveHaus with ATL crew ThumbsUp—and found some time in between to win the Show and Prove showcase at the Brooklyn Hip-Hop festival in July, which put him on the main stage opening for a Busta Rhymes-led Leaders of the New School reunion.

So the Boston Music Award nod, while an honor, was not totally unexpected considering the wave CG has been building since 2011 on the strength of his street-conscious storytelling and near-constant hustle. And on his latest project, the seven-track EP Kickz-N-Starez, recently released with TheMadBloggers.com and HeyDay Footwear—he’s continuing the narrative of the outcast struggling to make it in a world that pushes him aside, the kid from Dorchester who found an audience in the world of Boston’s collegiate community, the Boston rapper who broke outside the city limits to find inspiration (not to mention production) the world over.



It’s a narrative so ingrained in him that it’s reflected in his name, Charmingly Ghetto, a line spat derisively by Dean Cain in How High that nonetheless represents the duality of his life. Duality is such a part of him that you can apply it to almost every facet of his life: on stage, he’s a formidable, at times aggressive performer, towering over his audience while offering glimpses of a smile, while off stage he’s soft-spoken, yet almost bubbling over with an earnestness that betrays a musician’s age-old ability to be wildly misunderstood. When he’s talking, he’s asking as many questions about his own music as he’s answering—What do you think about the lyrics? What do you think about the stage show?—but when he has a mic in his hand, the insecurities melt away.

Kickz-N-Starez also continues CG’s propensity to look to the Internet as his oyster, grabbing production from Pipol (France), Daschade (Germany), Sauce Fonda (California) and Def Soul (New Jersey), as well as bringing in LA-based MC Lyric Jones and Brooklynites ScienZe and Maya Azucena for features. He released a video for the track “Catching Feelings” (shot by Boston-based Decriminals) as a present to his fans over the holidays, and is grabbing positive responses the world over.

“I would say that this project is probably my most well-timed… it has all the different elements that I’ve been trying to cultivate,” he said while sitting on the balcony of a friend’s 22nd floor apartment on Manhattan’s East Side, casually - Noisey Music


I had the chance to interview Boston rapper Charmingly Ghetto, one of the movers and shakers of Boston’s hip hop scene. As a 25-year-old graduate of University of Massachusetts Amherst, CG recently linked up with UK-based producer Cypria for his latest release, Scotland Yahd. Here’s what he had to say.

Brandon Kesselly: What was your inspiration for the EP?

Charmingly Ghetto: My inspiration for the EP was wishing to continue to further the relationship and respect I had for Cypria, who very early on was a huge advocate for my music and pushed me to keep releasing material and stay focused on the progression of what I continued to create. I also wanted to keep on working with international producers to keep with the theme that Study Abroad had helped push forth which was my new-found love and appreciation for art worldwide and recognizing the unilateral respect for hip hop in every corner of the world. People kept informing me that they enjoyed hearing this style of music and listening to the struggle, visions and vividness that I shared, so that inspired me to share more.


BK: How did you connect with Cypria?

CG: I met Cypria through the power of the Internet and through that connection we were just able to develop a better working relationship that blossomed into some real timeless music. This was just a great opportunity for two artists to connect to develop a great project and in the future we hope to create more.


BK: What other projects do you have planned in the near future?

CG: I have a number of projects that are in development. Right now I would continue to say keep your eyes and ears open for this Scotland Yahd project that we have in store and check out the video for “No Light.” This is my heart and soul, and Cypria and I would greatly appreciate people still knocking this.

I have a project that’s dropping with the homies from TheMadBloggers.com in collaboration with Heyday Footwear called “Kicks n Stares.” I am very excited for this project as it is the first that I have done that is sponsored by a clothing brand company, so it just shows me that people are supporting my message and that it is in line with the people at large.


BK: Which was your favorite song on the EP and why?

CG: My favorite song on the EP would have to be “Nat Turner.” I’m really speaking to the race relations in our country from the first point of view of someone who was enslaved in our country, and it is really interesting how the current view and experience of blacks in the U.S.A. is very similar to what would have been going on in the mind of a slave at the time. At least I think so.

Charmingly Ghetto plays Friday, Oct. 5 at BU Central as part of his Good Vibes Tour. Free admission for any BU student plus two guests. - The Daily Free Press (Boston University)


It’s a Friday night on the upper floors of a plush high-rise apartment building in Manhattan’s Lower East Side, and the man they call Charmingly Ghetto is going to work. The room is silent, the only sound leaking from his headphones as the beat pumps through the system. Producer Alex Healy (AKA Alex The Great, or just ATG) stares at the ProTools sound waves flying by on his monitor, and singer Katrina relaxes on a couch across the room, ready for the rapper to unveil his craft.

It’s a laid-back setup, and a rather paradoxical one for the task at hand; a bed occupies one section of the room, the walls are a muted color, and only a solitary microphone in the corner and the myriad guitars and basses scattered around the room give any indication that this is anything more than a bedroom, that it’s a laboratory set up with the sole purpose of pumping out high-quality hip-hop. CG rips through a verse in one take before ATG stops him.

“The biggest pain in the ass with working with this dude,” ATG says, turning away from the microphone and grimacing across the room, “is that he’s so passionate that his levels always peak.” He turns back to his computer, adjusting his settings. “You fucking asshole.”

CG laughs and attacks the beat again – it’s an 80s-era piano vamp with a reverb-soaked guitar, something straight out of a Cool Jazz mixtape, but which ATG says he sampled from an artist in Japan. Reading the lyrics off the Blackberry in his hand, CG rolls through three verses of a track the two agree to call “Dreams Are,” with Katrina laying down a pitch-perfect hook in between that she had written on a post-it note at work that day.

The duo then move on to another track, a far more sinister and ominous beat than anything that has shown up on his debut album, Overstanding, which dropped last June (and was produced by frequent collaborators Introspective Minds, the moniker of Atlanta-based production duo Stephen Jones and Winston Lord), or his internationally-produced recent mixtape Study A’Broad, which came out on his younger brother’s 21st birthday in November. Picking up on the vibe of the beat, CG ups the intensity, but trips himself up in his initial attempts.

“Bring it back,” he says into the mic without stopping for a breath.

“You feeling it now?” asks ATG, looping back to the beginning.

“Just bring it back,” he says, before flowing straight through to the end, not stopping until both verses are glued to the tape. Only then does he look up and acknowledge anything else in the room besides the microphone and the beat.


The concept of paradox is not foreign to the Boston-bred MC from Dorchester; rather, it imbues everything he does. Even his moniker, Charmingly Ghetto, developed after his years in college at UMass-Amherst, acknowledges how deeply that permeates his life. It’s a throwaway line from the Method Man and Redman movie How High, directed at the duo when they are goofing off in a Harvard classroom, but it means more than just a line in a movie to CG.

“I was thinking about the duality of black people in America… I kind of feel like we live between two worlds a little bit, racially, socially, economically, all that,” he says. “And I just applied that to what I wanted to stand for musically – a little bit of everything. A little bit of the finer things, a little bit of the bad things, all of that. That’s who I am as a person.”

But with CG, as with many artists dedicated to their craft, it’s impossible to separate the person from the persona, the rapper on his grind from the 24-year-old kid taking property management classes to try to pay the bills if the music doesn’t work out. He’s prepared for whatever may come in life, and he filters it all back through hip-hop.

CG is also a lyricist of remarkable consistency, spinning real-life stories with the eye, accuracy, and attention to detail of someone who double majored in journalism and economics while at Amherst. His words bring to mind all the best bits and pieces that made Nas such an enduring storyteller, spinning tales about his outlook on life, society, and everything around him. “I’m definitely influenced by the storytelling, the first person-type, the street journalist-type shit, and Nas is definitely a street journalist,” he says. “All those guys that speak their mind, talk about what’s going on, what people don’t think about.”

On “Dreams Are,” the first track he tackles with ATG (the initials are strong with this duo), he even drops the Queensboro MC’s name, but uses it to highlight another aspect of his personality – his dedication to those who show love for what he’s doing: “Nas tryin’ to be the Don this year / I came this close to shaking his hand / then I made the choice of a man and stayed with the fam.” It’s a line that conveys loyalty to the people that have helped him along the way, though it quickly becomes apparent that his loyalty is not as geographically-centered as Nas’ is around the housing projects w - The Couch Sessions


It’s 8.30am. Within the morning hustle and bustle through the crowded pathways of London Bridge station, I find myself stopping to listen to an artist exert his will over a smooth jazz infused instrumental sampling two hip hop greats, Big L and AZ. As I enter the carriage and raise the volume of my earphones, I find myself wondering if any other passengers can hear the quality of what I’m listening to. It’s not long before my attention is grabbed again…“I embody his spirit, I’m the son, so I’ll think take the credit”.

Charmingly Ghetto first came on to the scene with the mixtape Overstanding. Hailing from the city which claims talented artists such as Termanology and REKS, CG is the latest artist to come from Boston and is looking to elevate his status into a household hip hop name. The Cypher was able to interview CG and gain insight on the artist…

The Cypher: What was it like to be born and raised in Boston?

Charmingly Ghetto: “Being born and raised in Boston is very interesting because you get to clearly experience urban inner city life but not very far from you is remnants of aristocracy, and some of the worlds leading academic institutions and reminders of how the area has been so influential on political and social movements through the countries history. Through this lens it is not difficult for one to ask themselves what they deserve and where they should be in life. This is a direct result from the reality that you may face in direct correlation with the opportunities that you see before you when you step out of your norm. I would describe the feeling to be a constant catharsis so to speak.”

If you’re familiar with CG’s first mixtape you will know about his ability portray his life experiences on wax. In Study Abroad, CG returns, delivering potent rhymes over boom bap beats which features production from all over the world, adding strength to the aim of reaching a worldwide audience.

Youve dropped 3 mixtapes so far with remarkable response for an underground hip hop artist. What’s the next step for you ? Is it to stay independent or sign for a major deal?

I am currently in the process of working on just increasing my network and knowledge of the music industry day in and day out, so that’s my current modus operandi moving forward. We have seen the recent successes of underground artists and the power there is in being able to attain the support and love of people without major labels, but I think that anything can make sense for me moving forward. I think its all a matter of what I think is the best for what I intend to do for myself in the long run.

Your latest mixtape ‘Study A’broad’ includes a mix of producers from different continents. What inspired this mixtape ? it reminds us of the way Jay-Z went on a hunt for the greatest shit for The Black Album.


I just felt the need to branch my sound out and start thinking about the power of sound itself. Sound travels in a scientific sense, so why not make sounds that travel in an artistic sense. Sound is and was never to be confined and this project enabled me to tap into creative outlets and work with some amazing producers I may have never known if I hadnt broadened my horizons and reached out. This came from a number of different inspirations including understanding the psyche and habits of women, the search for knowledge of hip hop culture from all over and the need to bring these minds together to converge and collectively create something timeless. I am really hoping that everyone enjoys it.

We hear of a lot of compromises made by artists when signing to major labels. Do you feel that would be able to satisfy the commercial hunger of a major label? or would this defeat the point of your movement?

Again, I sincerely believe right place and the right decision is everpresent and when that path is crossed, I’ll know it. I’m not in a rush to make bad decisions you know? Any decision that’s made would have to coincide with the way that I would like to position myself within the structure of whatever I do and whomever I work with. Perhaps I can change the meaning of the current connotation of “commercial hunger” and make it more akin with the lyricism and the music that I am creating already. In a perfect world…

Commercial success is much harder for an artist who emphasizes lyrics to come by. In an industry where the best selling rappers are not the most talented, it is a testament to the humbleness and self-belief CG possesses. Not content with what he has, the hunger for success is evident on the track “Simplicity” where CG proclaims he is “a deadly combination of Biggie, Big L and Pac”.

A versatile artist should be capable of being introspective and equally comfortable in the braggadocio nature of rap. With a clear and concise delivery, CG doesn’t mince his words as he tells the hip hop world he’s an artifact in the game on “Put It On”, which samples Kid Capri from the similarly named track by Big L. His song wri - http://www.thecypher.co.uk


8. Charmingly Ghetto
The first word that comes to mind when describing Charmingly Ghetto is poetic. This spitter rockin out of Boston, Mass has taken the art form back to the form of art! Reminiscent of a young Nas, his verses insist you bring your brain to the game. Charmingly Ghetto was an appreciated breath of fresh air in a simplistic versed world. - http://www.AllHipHop.com


YouTube Video - http://nehip-hop.com/


We’ve been debuting new tracks from the ATL – BOS crew SuaveHaus since early June. Today the team comprised of Charmingly Ghetto (Boston), Abib Jahleel (Atlanta) and J-Coop (Atlanta) are here with the release of their self titled 9-track EP SuaveHaus. With a motto somewhere between ridiculously vintage and the new classic era of Hip-Hop, this crew emits nothing but honest, raw organic Hip-Hop at all times. This collaboration is not only meant to pay homage to a vintage sound of Southern Hip-Hop, but also meant to correctly portray a perspective some can’t seem to grasp anymore – narrating real life stories of trials and tribulations of the black plight through music, in a raw and genuine way. The project features production from Introspective Minds, Str8outdaden, DFrank and EvilDewer, with guest features from Keith Charles Spacebar, Will, Weedy, Truth, and Bridget Perez. Hit the jump to let the resurrection begin. - RubyHornet


Hip-hop collective SuaveHaus, comprised of Charmingly Ghetto, Abib Jahleel and J-Coop, have recently dropped off their self-titled EP. The eight-track work highlights the trio's intriguing combination of vintage and new era hip-hop. This particular project was aimed at paying homage to classic Southern rap, as you can gauge the tape for yourself via the stream/download below. Be sure to leave us your thoughts on SuaveHaus. - HypeTrak


Although the city of Boston and our friends across the pond have had quite the interesting relationship (anyone remember that little party involving tea?), Beantown emcee Charmingly Ghetto and UK-based producer Cypria were still able to whip up a heavy amount of dopeness on their latest collab No Light. Serving as the first single off of the their forthcoming, collaborative EP Scotland Yahd, No Light is a whimsical mix of Ghetto’s powerful lyrics and Cypria’s equally mesmerizing production. As if the chemistry between the emcee/production duo wasn’t already heightened enough the pair also recruit Boston vocalist Steph Barrak for No Light‘s airy hook. Stay on the prowl for more tunes from the duo when Scotland Yahd is released this September. - www.DJBooth.net


Not glimpsed in The DJBooth since dropping off Alone in the World back in September of 2011, Charmingly Ghetto makes his long-awaited return to our pages with new promo single The Shot Heard ‘Round the World. While some (OK, myself) might be slightly disappointed to find that the record isn’t a cover of the Schoolhouse Rock classic, the record finds the Boston repper in characteristically dope form, dropping complex, defiantly real bars over a beat by Introspective Minds. This joint isn’t attached to any forthcoming project, fans can keep it locked for all the latest from Charmingly Ghetto. - www.DJBooth.net


The good folks over at RubyHornet.com and itsthebino.com finally unleash their #OTTN (On To The Next) mixtape today, which gathers some of the most gifted, complete, and not to mention deserving, young talents in hip hop for one incredible compilation.

With a line-up comprised of Sir Michael Rocks, Jon Connor, Asaad, Nemo Achida, Chuuwee, Charmingly Ghetto and more, consider this the flipside to the XXL Freshmen and all its politics, and simply a showcase of pure talent.

Stream and download below, and read Ruby Hornet’s in-depth artist profiles to get familiar with all the featured names.


Sourced From: http://www.soulculture.co.uk/blogs/ruby-hornet-x-itsthebino-on-to-the-next-mixtape-stream-x-free-download/#ixzz23lfrH72K - SoulCulture.co.uk


One of the purest talents rising from today’s underground Hip Hop scene, Charmingly Ghetto carries a broader ambition beyond his hometown of Boston, Massachusetts.

Releasing Study A’broad: The International Mixtape in November 2011, the concept project sees CG follow through with the title and gather production from around the globe; USA’s Introspective Minds, Spain’s Pajozo and our very own UK beatsmith Cypria all among those contributing.

The Fresh Heir recently sat down with Charmingly Ghetto to fully introduce the name behind the project, in a sleek video courtesy of Decriminals. Watch below as CG speaks on the complex meaning behind his name, his inspirations for Study A’broad and what fans should stay tuned for in the future – plus take a listen to “Alone In The World” featuring Reks and “Che Magnifique” from Study A’broad, which you can also download for free below.

Sourced From: http://www.soulculture.co.uk/music-blog/newmusic/charmingly-ghetto-interview-with-the-fresh-heir-video/#ixzz23lfZEa7m - SoulCulture.co.uk


A few days ago, I got a chance to sit down and talk with Charmingly Ghetto, one of the most talented, well-spoken young MCs coming out of Boston. We chopped it up about everything from the meaning behind his unique name to his experience putting together his recent project, Study Abroad: The International Mixtape, to what he’s got in store for the future, and a whole lot more.

The content is enough to make the interview a must-watch, but with the good people at Decriminals on the cameras and in the editing lab, the Charmingly Ghetto x The Fresh Heir Interview ended up with a look that represents the quality all parties involved consistently achieve.

After you peep the interview, be sure to hit up the links below and check out a few of Charmingly Ghetto’s most recent tracks. Click the image at the bottom of the page, and you’ll be able to download Study Abroad for yourself. If you haven’t heard it yet, take a minute to download, and then find a small window of time to put life on hold while you vibe to a mixtape, one of the best from a Boston artist in recent memory, with a truly global feel and next level lyricism from start to finish. Trust me, you won’t be disappointed. - The Fresh Heir x Decriminals


The Susan Sarandon Story may seem like an odd name for a mixtape, but ATG didn’t think so. The mixtape features are numerous and impressive, ranging from West Coast MC’s Fashawn and Planet Asia to East Coast artists Reks, Termanology, CurT@!n$, and Charmingly Ghetto, to name a few. Most of the tracks are original to the mixtape so no matter what it’s called, just know it’s dope. - RubyHornet


A short while back, the web was treated to a phenomenal product from an unsigned treasure by the name of Charmingly Ghetto. His project, Study A’broad – The International Mixtape, dropped last November, and if you were among those who took a listen, your encyclopaedic thirst was probably screaming for the low down on this cat. That’s where we come in…

Read More: http://bit.ly/N7wAah - Kevin Nottingham


Charmingly Ghetto doesn’t go to Boston University, which makes his decision to meet at the school’s campus in Kenmore Square - at 1 p.m. on a Sunday no less, the time most students are still in bed recovering from the previous night - an unusual one.

The usually packed sidewalks on Commonwealth Avenue are barren and the cold late-winter air quickly chills any exposed skin; CG, as his friends call him, pulls a long scarf tight around his neck when he arrives in front of the university’s radio building for the photo shoot. The school is far from where he went to college at UMass-Amherst, and a vastly different environment than the one found in his native Dorchester, but, as evidenced in his exciting development as an artist, CG has a knack for making connections - across borders both geographic and psychological.

Read more: http://bo.st/GWCiIQ - www.Boston.com


Right about now Charmingly Ghetto should be rocking a show in NYC, and if you’re lucky enough to be there, you’re getting a taste for what his upcoming tape Study A’Broad sounds like. But if not Intersections has you covered. As I mentioned in a earlier preview, the project will be dropping next Monday, the 14th, and is pure dopeness. In the run-up to the release CG took some time out of his busy schedule to answer a few questions about his previous tape, the acclaimed Overstanding, Study A’Broad, and his approach to making music. Hit the jump for interview, as well as a couple of previously released tracks from Study A’Broad. 1) Tell me about your artistic development.

I began making music when I was in high school. Originally just with friends and classmates going back and forth, fooling around with different rhyme schemes, etc. Then I began to write rhymes down in what we called a “Rhyme Book” (sorta what used to be considered a Slam Book, but it was a little more appropriate in nature) and go back and forth with my friends writing rhymes in it. I would say that my musical influences stem from being exposed to a number of different genres growing up that helped to mold me into being so creative lyrically.

2) As a MA resident myself, I’m curious about the effect growing up in Boston has had on your music and outlook.

I feel that Boston itself is a breeding ground for intellect and knowledge because of the universities in the area, the political history of the city and the melting pot of cultures here. I see a microcosm of the world here and in the cultures everywhere around me. It’s an inspiration unparalleled to say the least and has definitely sculpted my worldview.

3) How did you hook up with Introspective Minds and others you work with, for the making of The Overstanding? The sound is just so good, I’m wondering how that relationship came to be.

The power of the internet brought us together. After sitting down and working with the team, developing tracks which then culminated in us planning my last project Overstanding (cop it here if you haven’t yet) I was able to build a strong relationship that really showed me how much of a shared vision that we had to develop timeless music together, and I think we’ve done just that.

4) Tell me about the new project you’re working on.

The new project that I am working on is entitled “Study A’Broad: The International Mixtape”. The name is significant as there will be production from producers all over the world (from England to New Zealand and back), and it has a true school hip hop vibe. I was really going for that sound because this project is a progression from the last project with a more boom bap, hard hitting, resonating feel. It is centered around the world we live in and the opportunities that the world has to offer those who seek out meanings and truths by taking the time to recognize our similarities over the differences.

5) Your bio mentions your interest in literature…would you mind telling me a bit about that? What kind of influence has that had on your lyrics, your music, and your viewpoint on life? What works stand out for you, and what did you take from them/ are you taking from them?

I wanna be cliché here for a minute and say that “Reading is Fundamental” in the sense that through literature we can learn so much about ourselves and our interests. Reading has helped me to practice meter in my music, especially through reading poetry and short stories as it helps one to be very concise and direct. Reading has made me want to learn about the world around me. I love poetry, revolutionary writers and I especially am fond of stories and fables written by people all over the world that identify origins and histories of those who are indigenous; they’re riveting.

6) Do you feel like your music expresses, somehow, the dichotomy or ambiguity of feeling often associated with urban, particularly ghetto, spaces? What would you say your role is in terms of duality of this particular variety?

As an artist I am always evolving and I feel like my music does bring to light the topic of ambiguity and a certain dichotomy of addressing race and class, as any relevant thinker or artist of their time should focus on doing. I like to think of myself as a catalyst, if you will, to addressing things that people think about in regards to the duality of the mind, and this back and forth within ourselves enables us to grow individually. I like to embrace that duality in my music because it keeps me creative, enables me to almost administer the Socratic method to myself, and influences me to share my inward thoughts on wax. It’s a catharsis in a sense you know? Very liberating…

7) What role does spirituality play in your music? I feel like it factors fairly heavily in your lyrics and your process, and I’m wondering if you could expand on that a bit.

I have found myself to steer much more towards my spirituality than religion recentl - The Daily Princetonian


For an up-and-coming rapper still making his name locally, opting to seek out instrumentals from producers outside of Boston - and the rest of the country, for that matter - is a bold move. But on the online mixtape “Study A’broad,’’ going outside of his immediate surroundings helps Dorchester-based lyricist Charmingly Ghetto develop a sound that isn’t tied down to the well-defined East Coast rap aesthetic. Working with producers from Denmark, Italy, New Zealand, and various other locales, CG crafts a surprisingly cohesive collection of tracks that showcase his rapidly developing songwriting skills and a mature mike presence that betrays his young age. His direct, punchy rhymes can engage in the requisite rap posturing (see the cooly confident strut of “Glory’’), but CG is infinitely more interesting when he allows his mind to wander through deeper emotions, as on the ironically titled “Simplicity’’ and the melancholic “Alone in the World,’’ costarring Reks, a rapper CG’s highly personal and forceful style is reminiscent of. Over the warm jazz flute and piano beat of “Follow Me,’’ he remarks, “I think I’ve found my sound’’; international or local, Charmingly Ghetto is in a good place right now. (Out now) - The Boston Globe


Previously heard spitting about The Plight of inner-city dwellers on a May EP leak, Charmingly Ghetto returns to our pages to share more of his dark lyrical reflections on mixtape inclusion Alone in the World. Making its world premiere right here in the Booth, this Introspective Minds-produced joint finds the headliner and guest emcee REKS spitting about the struggle to survive in a cold and unforgiving industry. For more, check out Ghetto’s Study Abroad mixtape when it hits the ‘net in early November. - www.DJBooth.net


Talk about a bait and switch; on his first feature, Charmingly Ghetto lures listeners in with the promise of something, well, charmingly ghetto, only to turn around and force us to think about the totally un-charming realities of inner-city poverty and racial inequity. No, of course I’m not being sarcastic. (OK, I am.) On this new EP single, the Beantown native bulldozes rap’s glamorized depictions of the street life, illuminating The Plight of those left with no recourse but making a living through crime. Introspective Minds take an understated approach behind the boards, blending atmospheric strings with smooth sax riffs (courtesy of Baba Kamal) and a low-key bassline as the headliner turns a critical eye on gangster mythology. Lending a hand on the back, fellow Boston buzzmaker MC Colo drives the point home: “F*ck these rap kids, n*ggas hustle ‘cause they have to / no benefits and no days off.” Has this jam left you craving more thought-provoking new material? Ask and ye shall receive; Charmingly Ghetto’s latest street release, the Overstanding EP, will be available in June 7th via RubyHornet.com. - www.DJBooth.net


"This new video for "Current Events" is a very well put together video with a sound to match. CG is really making some big moves and I am a huge fan." - Donuts and Milk


Get to know the one the only Charmingly Ghetto he was able to take sometime out of his busy schedule to do this interview.

Introduce yourself to the people let them know who Charmingly Ghetto is.

CG: Charmingly Ghetto is a reality, a train of thought, an experience and a journey. My name bascially summarizes the dual lives that people of color in the US are subject to face everyday. Derived from the Double Conciousness Theory of WEB Dubois in The Souls of Black Folk I am that. An enigma that lyrically prods pushes and tests the limitations of not only myself but others through music. An identifiably unique sound with a profound message of rawness delievered through misunderstanding and the need for self expression. Did I lose you... good.

Thats whats up, all right man question one. Who are your biggest influences on your music?

CG: My musical influences range from the literature that I have exposed myself to, to the artists that I listen to on a daily basis, to my experiences that I've learned and grown from. As far as other hip hop artists that I've likened my music to that have definitely been influences such as Nas, Common and the Wu (yea... the whole squad!) I can relate to such artists based on the subject matter of their lyrics, their mastery of the microphone and their charisma and intrigue. Through literature I have been able to learn the poetic devices I use and also develop the ability to create storylines and script out tales with rhymes, the same way an author draws the reader in by adding their unique touch. As far as experience goes, I think we can all relate to the way that our realities are shaped by what we go through. So yea those are my influences...they are my easel with which I paint.

What can listeners expect from the album and can you tell us a release date yet?

CG: As of rite now, I have an upcoming mixtape project in the works that is in development and let's just say its centered around the essence of what hip hop is and what it has the potential to become as long as we delve deep into its origins: utilizing the elements for the greater good, communicating the pain and frustration of the present day and remaining innovative and relevant through revamping the tools we have been given thus far.

Its a great look for hip hop and music in general. EP and album work will definitely be forthcoming no doubt. Stay tuned...

Looking forward to that. Production wise who are you working with right now?

CG: I am working with a team outta ATL that goes by the name of Introspective Minds and let me just tell you this - dudes are crazy with the vibes. You can check out my work on their production on my new single "1 More Rhyme" (that is ready for free DL and radio airplay on the promo site at www.charminglyghetto.com/). I'm also working with a couple of great international producers, which I will feature on forthcoming projects as well. Check it out and you'll def feel the essence on that 1 Morre Rhyme joint. I'm always open to workin with creative minds and expanding my network, so anyone out there feeling the music just let me know and just link me via my website or Twitter and let me know!

I'll be sure to check them out, they'll be up on the blog soon then. If you could work with one producer who would it be?

CG: I would be honored to work with a producer like Pete Rock for sure. Just hang out in the studio with him, observe his artistic tendencies, get a feel for the manner in which he develops his beats and recognizes the syncopation patterns within his music, and the manner in which he would take the time to match his beats to my rhymes. Then I would call the track we put together "Beats 2 My Rhymes". Wouldn't that be dope? Can I say I'd like to work with 9th Wonder as well? We can save that for the next interview. Haha!

I would love to see that happen next interview for sure hahah. Who are you checking for as far as emcees?

CG: Man listen I may have to 1 thru 5 that list, cuz its way too extensive. I'd have to say I'd definitely wanna collab with artists like J Cole, Fashawn and Freddie Gibbs. Artists like those guys seem to exute a particular keen sense of creatively conveying the message of the struggle within oneself, their current surroundings and the knowledge and experience of their past that makes them who they are. All of that really interests me in the MCs I vibe off of and gain influence from for my own music. Im always concerned with what will affect my own craft and direction of my life when I think about the music I listen to, whether its a feel good track or a soul searching type of song, what feeling does it leave me with? I can't forget MCs like Styles P and Ghostface Killah as well who are just the ultimate microphone controllers! Shouts to them as well!

One last question and it's a tough one. If you only had one album to listen to for the rest of your life what would it be?

If I had 1 album to listen to for the rest of my life.. - Emcees and Producers to Watch


"CG delves into the moments that defined him as an MC, and those experiences and situations people struggle with daily in 2011. The concise 6-track tape is the ideal introduction to one of the most promising lyricists to emerge from the Hip-Hop mecca Boston once was." - RubyHornet


Get to know the one the only Charmingly Ghetto he was able to take sometime out of his busy schedule to do this interview.

Introduce yourself to the people let them know who Charmingly Ghetto is.

CG: Charmingly Ghetto is a reality, a train of thought, an experience and a journey. My name bascially summarizes the dual lives that people of color in the US are subject to face everyday. Derived from the Double Conciousness Theory of WEB Dubois in The Souls of Black Folk I am that. An enigma that lyrically prods pushes and tests the limitations of not only myself but others through music. An identifiably unique sound with a profound message of rawness delievered through misunderstanding and the need for self expression. Did I lose you... good.

Thats whats up, all right man question one. Who are your biggest influences on your music?

CG: My musical influences range from the literature that I have exposed myself to, to the artists that I listen to on a daily basis, to my experiences that I've learned and grown from. As far as other hip hop artists that I've likened my music to that have definitely been influences such as Nas, Common and the Wu (yea... the whole squad!) I can relate to such artists based on the subject matter of their lyrics, their mastery of the microphone and their charisma and intrigue. Through literature I have been able to learn the poetic devices I use and also develop the ability to create storylines and script out tales with rhymes, the same way an author draws the reader in by adding their unique touch. As far as experience goes, I think we can all relate to the way that our realities are shaped by what we go through. So yea those are my influences...they are my easel with which I paint.

What can listeners expect from the album and can you tell us a release date yet?

CG: As of rite now, I have an upcoming mixtape project in the works that is in development and let's just say its centered around the essence of what hip hop is and what it has the potential to become as long as we delve deep into its origins: utilizing the elements for the greater good, communicating the pain and frustration of the present day and remaining innovative and relevant through revamping the tools we have been given thus far.

Its a great look for hip hop and music in general. EP and album work will definitely be forthcoming no doubt. Stay tuned...

Looking forward to that. Production wise who are you working with right now?

CG: I am working with a team outta ATL that goes by the name of Introspective Minds and let me just tell you this - dudes are crazy with the vibes. You can check out my work on their production on my new single "1 More Rhyme" (that is ready for free DL and radio airplay on the promo site at www.charminglyghetto.com/). I'm also working with a couple of great international producers, which I will feature on forthcoming projects as well. Check it out and you'll def feel the essence on that 1 Morre Rhyme joint. I'm always open to workin with creative minds and expanding my network, so anyone out there feeling the music just let me know and just link me via my website or Twitter and let me know!

I'll be sure to check them out, they'll be up on the blog soon then. If you could work with one producer who would it be?

CG: I would be honored to work with a producer like Pete Rock for sure. Just hang out in the studio with him, observe his artistic tendencies, get a feel for the manner in which he develops his beats and recognizes the syncopation patterns within his music, and the manner in which he would take the time to match his beats to my rhymes. Then I would call the track we put together "Beats 2 My Rhymes". Wouldn't that be dope? Can I say I'd like to work with 9th Wonder as well? We can save that for the next interview. Haha!

I would love to see that happen next interview for sure hahah. Who are you checking for as far as emcees?

CG: Man listen I may have to 1 thru 5 that list, cuz its way too extensive. I'd have to say I'd definitely wanna collab with artists like J Cole, Fashawn and Freddie Gibbs. Artists like those guys seem to exute a particular keen sense of creatively conveying the message of the struggle within oneself, their current surroundings and the knowledge and experience of their past that makes them who they are. All of that really interests me in the MCs I vibe off of and gain influence from for my own music. Im always concerned with what will affect my own craft and direction of my life when I think about the music I listen to, whether its a feel good track or a soul searching type of song, what feeling does it leave me with? I can't forget MCs like Styles P and Ghostface Killah as well who are just the ultimate microphone controllers! Shouts to them as well!

One last question and it's a tough one. If you only had one album to listen to for the rest of your life what would it be?

If I had 1 album to listen to for the rest of my life.. - Emcees and Producers to Watch


"Charmingly Ghetto’s single, “1 More Rhyme” has been in steady rotation during #BodegaRadio’s #InboxSessions on PNCRadio.fm" - Brooklyn Bodega


Charmingly Ghetto - "Glory" - HipHopDX


"His content is symbolic of the role Hip Hop played in it’s Golden years when there was always some sort of a jewel or a lesson being learned. He mixes a slew of lyrical ability with his own unique world view. There are many artists out there but few have a sound totally their own! I can honestly say that CG is a part of that talented few!" - OutabodiXperience (Sundiata)


Discography

(1) "The Opening Act Mixtape: The Birth of an MC" | Released January 2011

Follow the rhymes as I flow over classic beats with talented storytelling and timeless lyricism.

Listen/Download: http://bit.ly/OodnB9

(2) "OVERstanding" [EP] (produced entirely by the production team Introspective Minds) | June 2011

"Overstanding" is comprised of 10 tracks, representing a vibrant new sound, heavily influenced by the classic original projects crafted in the 90's in the south, as well as the east coast. The EP meshes the emotion of the raw boom bap feel, with the jazzy glide that is so apparent in southern hip-hop, depicting what the future holds when two budding styles of Hip-Hop collab with one goal.

Listen/Download: http://bit.ly/KvkH1H

(3) "Study A'Broad: The International Mixtape" | November 2011

Collaborating with producers from numerous countries around the world, Study Abroad is the realization of my goal to express his art to a worldwide audience through the powerful connectivity of the internet. Like the project itself, the message expressed through my music is meant for a universal audience, addressing timeless issues affecting societies across the globe.

Listen/Download: http://bit.ly/upL7aH

(4) "SuaveHaus" [EP] | August 2012

I teamed up with Abib Jahleel and J-Coop from Atlanta to put out the "SuaveHaus" EP, a collaboration not only meant to pay homage to a vintage sound of Southern Hip-Hop, but also meant to correctly portray a perspective some can’t seem to grasp anymore – narrating real life stories of trials and tribulations of the black plight through music, in a raw and genuine way.

Listen/Download: http://bit.ly/NqnDcv

(5) "Scotland Yahd" (Produced entirely by Cypria) | September 2012

The collaborative EP, which dropped in September, is solely produced by co-founder of Lunatick Records Cypria who hails from Kendal, UK. This project dropped at a time when all eyes were on London, England (2012 Olympics) which is why it was important to note that this U.S. x U.K. collaboration goes even deeper than just the artists involved.

Listen/Download: http://bit.ly/Q3Gctc

(6) "Kickz n Starez" | January 2013

To continue building momentum, I released a 6-track EP titled Kickz-n-Starez via The Mad Bloggers and Heyday Footwear. This project features talented production from the US and Europe, as well as verses from ScienZe, Lyric Jones and Maya Azucena.

Listen/Download: http://bit.ly/VgbgsI

Photos

Bio

As an artist, I am an individual pulling together life’s experiences and lyrically airing them out on wax. I've harnessed life’s dualities and am creating something extraordinary with my music. I’m not scared of the limelight at all. The most important thing for me is that when the limelight arrives, it’s a limelight I can be proud of.

Originally from Boston, I have reached many corners of the globe, especially with 'Study A'Broad: The International Mixtape' which featured production from beatmakers in over seven different countries. I've showcased my talents in front of audiences in Boston, Atlanta and New York - most notably, I passed through three rounds of the Brooklyn Bodega Show and Prove competition and earned my spot to
open up the 2012 Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival. To end a strong 2012, I received a nomination as "Hip-Hop Artist of the Year" in the 25th annual Boston Music Awards.

I'm not concerned with fly-by-night success. I'm making the kind of music that harkens to Hip-Hop’s history while continuing to push the margins forward. I'm crafting music for forever because making timeless music is important. You’ve got to make music for the future because you never know who’s going to pick it up and listen to it.

Peace.

- C.G.

** PS: Here is my energy during live performances: **

(1) "No Lime" (In-Studio Performance): http://bit.ly/16GsD7E

(2) "Untitled" (Freestyle): http://bit.ly/Zgvkqn