Chris Hendricks Band
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Chris Hendricks Band

Raleigh, North Carolina, United States | SELF

Raleigh, North Carolina, United States | SELF
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"My Carolina Today video- Chris Hendricks"

Chris Hendricks will perform at the Courage Rocks! Be Bold Festival in Durham Sunday, April 14th. - WNCN News Raleigh, NC


"Chris Hendricks Band To Present “Breaking Down Barriers” Program To Brier Creek Elementary School"

RALEIGH, N.C. – Chris Hendricks Band (http://www.chrishendricksband.com), a rock band based in Raleigh, N.C., has announced that it will present to Brier Creek Elementary School on Aug. 31 as part of its “Breaking Down Barriers” anti-bullying program. The band will kick off the presentation with a short concert followed by a speech from lead singer and program frontman Chris Hendricks. Diagnosed with cerebral palsy at an early age, Hendricks was bullied throughout his entire childhood and teen years, but now uses his musical talent and experience with bullying as an opportunity to provide inspiration for others facing similar situations by reaching out to North Carolina schools to deliver the “Breaking Down Barriers” program. Hendricks will speak to students about the dangers of bullying and the importance of being true to one’s self.

QUOTES:

“It is an honor to be given the opportunity to use my own experience with bullying and love of music to inspire these students,” said Hendricks. “When I was younger, I always wanted to be a hero. With this program, I can show students that you do not have to fly or wear capes, but can simply become a hero by doing the right thing and standing up to bullying.”

NEW MEDIA CONTENT:

Chris Hendricks Band’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/CHendricksBand

Chris Hendricks Band’s Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChrisHendricksBand

ABOUT CHRIS HENDRICKS BAND:

Chris Hendricks Band is a rock band based in Raleigh, N.C. Formed in 2011, the band gained attention early on, landing the opportunity to perform with Grammy award winning artists such as MercyMe, Amy Grant and Israel Houghton, as well as having their song “Noise” played at every game as the theme song for the NHL’s Carolina Hurricanes and Florida Panthers. Chris Hendricks Band has appeared on Raleigh’s major AOR station, G105, as well as 96 Rock and regularly performs at the Triangle’s most established venues such as Cat’s Cradle and Lincoln Theatre. For more information about Chris Hendricks Band, visit http://www.chrishendricksband.com.

ABOUT THE “BREAKING DOWN BARRIERS” ANTI-BULLYING PROGRAM:

Chris Hendricks Band’s “Breaking Down Barriers” is an anti-bullying program that reaches out to area schools to raise awareness about the dangers of bullying and the importance of being true to one’s self. Each performance kicks off with a short concert followed by a speech from lead singer Chris Hendricks. Diagnosed with cerebral palsy at an early age, Hendricks was bullied all throughout his childhood and teen years because of his disability. Through the program, he uses his experience with bullying along with his musical talents to reach out to and inspire others who are facing similar situations. The program has and continues to make a difference in the Triangle, as participating schools have reported a decrease in behavioral problems and bullying as a result of the program. For more information about “Breaking Down Barriers,” visit http://www.chrishendricksband.com/breakingdownbarriers. - Linking the Triangle


"Chris Hendricks Speaks To Physical Therapy Students At University Of North Carolina At Chapel Hill"

PRLog (Press Release) - Sep. 12, 2012 - RALEIGH, N.C. –Chris Hendricks Band (http://www.chrishendricksband.com), a rock band based in Raleigh, N.C., has announced that lead singer Chris Hendricks spoke to first year students of the school of physical therapy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on Sept. 7. Hendricks spoke to the students about his experience with and the importance of physical therapy. Diagnosed with cerebral palsy at an early age, he spent a large part of his childhood and teen years in physical therapy. Hendricks shared with students how early on he recognized the need for physical therapists to focus not only on providing therapy for patients during scheduled appointments, but on equipping patients with the necessary skills to help themselves outside of therapy sessions, as well as mentoring patients on an emotional and mental level.

QUOTES:
“As someone with cerebral palsy who once aspired to become a physical therapist, I understand the significance of physical therapy and the power this role holds for really making a difference in someone’s life,” said Hendricks. “Effective physical therapists not only provide excellent care during appointments, but serve as a mentor to patients, helping them to gain more independence and work to improve their condition on their own. I encourage these students to take on and proactively own this important role.”

NEW MEDIA CONTENT:
Chris Hendricks Band’s Twitter:
https://twitter.com/CHendricksBand

Chris Hendricks Band’s Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/ChrisHendricksBand

ABOUT CHRIS HENDRICKS BAND:
Chris Hendricks Band is a rock band based in Raleigh, N.C. Formed in 2011, the band gained attention early on, landing the opportunity to perform with Grammy award winning artists as well as having their song “Noise” played at every game as the theme song for the NHL’s Carolina Hurricanes and Florida Panthers. Chris Hendricks Band has appeared on Raleigh’s major AOR station, G105, as well as 96 Rock and regularly performs at the Triangle’s most established venues such as Cat’s Cradle and Lincoln Theatre. For more information about Chris Hendricks Band, visit http://www.chrishendricksband.com. - PRLOG Press Release Distribution


"Chris Hendricks Announces “Meant To Survive” CD Release Show Jan. 5 At Lincoln Theatre"

RALEIGH, N.C. – Chris Hendricks, a musician based in Raleigh, N.C., has announced that he will release his latest EP, “Meant To Survive,” during an all-ages CD release show on Saturday, Jan. 5 at Lincoln Theatre located at 126 East Cabarrus Street. Joining Hendricks will be Raleigh-based band Saints Apollo followed by The Kicks from Nashville, Tenn. Recorded over a month-long period, the EP’s final listing of songs includes: “Make It,” “Meant to Survive,” “Battle Cry,” and “Poetic Behavior.” Tickets are on sale now for $8 if purchased in advance or $10 if purchased the day of the show. Advance purchase tickets include a free download of “Battle Cry,” a track from the new EP that can be obtained by forwarding your confirmation email to management@chrishendricksmusic.com. Open to all ages, the doors will open at 7 p.m. with the show beginning at 8 p.m. To purchase tickets, visit http://www.lincolntheatre.com.

Leading up to the release of the EP, Hendricks has kept busy playing selections from “Meant To Survive” while spreading the message of anti-bullying to area schools as part of his “Breaking Down Barriers” program. In the month of November alone, Hendricks reached around 10,000 students from central North Carolina, and plans to continue his efforts well past the EP release.

“Meant To Survive” is Hendricks’ second EP, following the successful release of his first EP, “Noise,” the title track of which was chosen as the 2011-2012 season theme song for the NHL’s Carolina Hurricanes and Florida Panthers in addition to being featured at the Louvre Museum in Paris.

QUOTES:

“I am excited about the release of this new EP and for the chance to celebrate its launch with friends, fans and other very talented musicians,” said Hendricks. “When we recorded our first EP, I had been performing and writing songs for less than a year and was still working to find my own unique sound. This new album is the reflection of a great deal of work and represents the sound I have been searching for personally since I began playing music. It is so exciting and rewarding to finally get to share it with everyone.”

NEW MEDIA CONTENT:

Chris Hendricks’ Twitter:

https://twitter.com/CHendricksBand

Chris Hendricks’ Facebook:

http://www.facebook.com/ChrisHendricksMusic

ABOUT CHRIS HENDRICKS:

Chris Hendricks is a rock musician based in Raleigh, N.C. Diagnosed with cerebral palsy at a young age, Hendricks uses his music and experiences in an effort to inspire others, reaching out to schools, businesses and organizations throughout the country. Over the course of his career, Hendricks has performed at iconic venues across the country including Cat’s Cradle, Carolina Theatre, Eddie’s Attic and the Los Angeles House of Blues. His hit song “Noise,” was featured at every artist’s dream destination – the Louvre Museum in Paris – and was chosen as the 2011-2012 season theme song for the NHL’s Carolina Hurricanes and Florida Panthers. Quickly becoming a hit, the EP that features “Noise” has sold more than 6,000 copies to date. Hendricks’ latest EP, “Meant To Survive,” will be released on Saturday, Jan. 5 during a CD release show at Lincoln Theatre in Raleigh. For more information about Chris Hendricks, visit http://www.chrishendricksmusic.com.

ABOUT THE “BREAKING DOWN BARRIERS” ANTI-BULLYING PROGRAM:

Chris Hendricks’ “Breaking Down Barriers” is an anti-bullying program that reaches out to area schools to raise awareness about the dangers of bullying and the importance of being true to one’s self. Each performance kicks off with a short concert followed by a speech from Hendricks. Diagnosed with cerebral palsy at an early age, he was bullied all throughout his childhood and teen years because of his disability. Through the program, he uses his experience with bullying along with his musical talents to reach out to and inspire others who are facing similar situations. The program has and continues to make a difference in the Triangle, as participating schools have reported a decrease in behavioral problems and bullying as a result of the program. For more information about “Breaking Down Barriers,” visit http://www.chrishendricksmusic.com/breakingdownbarriers. - MMI Public Relations Inc.


"Five words with Chris Hendricks"

Talking to Chapel Hill songwriter Chris Hendricks—or, for that matter, listening to his bold, grandiose pop music—feels like watching an athlete being interviewed on the air after a championship: He gushes about the friends and collaborators who made it possible. He thanks them repeatedly. And he speaks of his music as the guiding light for his life, a means for survival.

The four-song Meant to Survive, which Hendricks releases this week, is only his second EP. But he treats it as a defining point in his life, a moment of triumph and truth.

And really, it is: As a child, Hendricks was diagnosed with cerebral palsy, a disorder that he says pushed him, at best, into a quiet childhood and, at worst, into a punching bag for the bullies at his school. He still sports a scar beneath his chin from those juvenile beatings. Hendricks now uses his Breaking Down Barriers program to speak to students about the detriments of bullying and how to stop it. And then he plays tunes with titles such as "Make It" and "Battle Cry," coupling his motivational speech with songs to match.

"I hope that listeners can hear the honesty," he says. "I really hope so."

SINGING

I've been singing since I was 4 years old, and I feel like singing is my way to express myself the most comfortably. I felt like that was the only way people were going to accept me for who I was. If I couldn't find a place where I could be honest with people, then I was going to be invisible for the rest of my life. Singing was my way to be visible to people. I discovered that shortly after college. I didn't see singing as a medium for me to express myself until I turned to writing music, writing down my thoughts and turning them into songs.

MOTIVATION

When we started this anti-bullying program, my manager spoke with someone in a school who wanted me to come into a classroom and speak to some of the kids. My manager said, "Well, why don't we just put on a concert for the school?" I didn't know how the kids were going to take it initially. You went to school. You remember how it was. Some guy in a suit would talk about not setting fires in the classroom or something. It was never real. I wanted to give them something that was real and direct. I tell them the story of me growing up and my experience as it is. There's no better honor than to have a kid come up to me after a show and say that they want to pursue their dreams as an individual as a result of the music, concert and story.

The world doesn't have enough [motivation]. I really want the listeners of this record to use these songs to help them find their own identity. Hopefully, these songs possess the motivational tools to create the energy and joy that I would hope for them to hear from their own life experience.

ARRANGEMENTS

I grew up in the '90s. That's the music I know and love. But I like to think this record feels a little more evolved and mature. The arrangements themselves feel a little more raw. For a lot of these songs, the verses stay very chill so that, when the chorus hits, there's this big jump. They have a drive behind them. That applies to motivation: The drive of the music can help drive the listener. It's like an engine for them that helps get the audience going.

SUPPORT

I would not have been able to find myself in this music if it hadn't been for the people I surrounded myself with in the making of this record and my career up to this point. When you love something to the point that you have to pursue it and it's the one thing you have to do, you can't just love it for yourself. You have to love it so much that you create this energy where you're able to draw people into your life and help guide you.

I was really shy in middle school and high school. Because I kept quiet for so long, by the time this record came out, I had so much to say. It was this disorganized jumble that I wanted to let out someway, somehow. But these people—my producer, my manager, my friends—have helped take this jumbled sketch of a vision and bring it to life. This would be nothing without them.

REDEMPTION

When I decided to start writing music, not only was it cathartic for me, but it was a way I could forgive the people who picked on me, and myself, for going through that period where I was quiet and shy and avoided life, really. For a long time, I felt so very small. Music, for me, was a way I could be OK with that piece of my life. That was a journey to this point. As a result of everything I've gone through, I feel like I'm truly on the right path.

This article appeared in print with the headline "Key notes." - Indy Week/Grayson Haver Currin


"TAP Unlimited Benefit Concert featuring Chris Hendricks Band"

TAP Unlimited Benefit Concert featuring Chris Hendricks Band
TAP Unlimited is celebrating it's 10th anniversary with a benefit concert featuring the Chris Hendricks Band. We now serve over 200 individuals with aphasia, their families, and the community. This event will create awareness of aphasia, share the impact of our life participation approach to aphasia, and bring us to the next level of service provision in our community. It is our intent to "Continue the Conversation" with the addition of a comprehensive Children's Program, addition of new modules of Learning to Speak Aphasia, and collaboration with the Aphasia Alliance for national collection of outcome data and best practice guidelines.

We are excited to celebrate with help from the Chris Hendricks Band. Hendricks has overcome various obstacles in his life and uses his music and experiences in an effort to inspire others.

"Passionate, soulful, and mesmerizing are three words that describe North Carolina singer songwriter Chris Hendricks' musical prowess and vocal style. With powerful hooks and catchy melodies, Hendricks has been blowing away audiences in the South East. and is looking forward to taking his music to all parts of the globe. It's just another reminder of how powerful and personal his songs are. His voice pulls you in and leaves you wanting more. You feel his words, you feel his pain, and you celebrate his life along side of him. Fans of real music look out, your champion has arrived. His name is Chris Hendricks." - Journalist Chris Wells - Brown Paper Tickets


"Music Review: The Chris Hendricks Band- Noise EP"

The Chris Hendricks Band, a local group from Durham, North Carolina, looked to make some noise within the music industry last year when they released, to iTunes, their debut EP Noise. An advantage The Chris Hendricks Band holds over other upcoming musicians includes a story seemingly destined for Hollywood writers. Born with cerebral palsy, a neurological disorder which affects body movement and coordination, doctors doubted Chris Hendricks would ever walk. Countless surgeries and a hard work ethic helped prove doctors wrong as Chris now walks onto stages fronting The Chris Hendricks Band. The Noise EP shows the group possesses the musical talent needed to carry Hendricks's inspirational story far.

Noise contains six tracks, all which demonstrate outstanding vocal and instrumental collaboration. While The Chris Hendricks Band uses guitars and drums to compose their pop sound, many tracks on Noise incorporate a jazz vibe. Most tracks on the EP, like jazz music, feature a relaxing feeling. Soothing vocals combined with just the right instrumental notes creates this laidback sensation.

Interestingly enough the EP's overall soothing tone enables the songs "Noise" and "Anthem" to standout. Both tracks maintain a more upbeat sound. The lyrics to "Noise" and "Anthem" mirror the positive musical vibe with inspiring lyrics. "Noise" provides encouragement with the words "You're nothing, now you're something, keep strumming what you're dreaming of." "Anthem" reminds you to keep going even during tough times with the lyrics "Although the rain is heavy and the road is long, sing it with me and be strong, this is my anthem song."

Additionally, "Noise" illustrates the passion Chris Hendricks possesses for music. No line makes this more evident than "This music is my purpose. This music is my voice. I do it for the noise." Hendricks shares the goal behind his music with the admission "I want to touch your life. I want to touch your soul." Selecting the right instrumentals to echo their songs' moods enables The Chris Hendricks Band to leave that desired lasting impression. The track "Affliction," which contains mellow instrumentals to reflect the pain in Chris's voice, best demonstrates this.

If Noise acts as an accurate foreshadow for the band's first full length release, currently in the works, get ready for some ear enticing music. A few lineup changes since Noise's production and release may raise some challenges but compared to the cerebral palsy related obstacles Chris already triumphed over in life, any lineup change difficulties will likely seem miniscule. - Yahoo! Voices w/ Zachary Fenell


"WPU Concert & Comedy Series: Chris Hendricks Band"

Breaking Down Barriers

William Peace University is pleased to present the Chris Hendricks Band in concert. FREE ADMISSION. RAIN LOCATION: KENAN HALL.

Bring your blanket and a picnic basket and come enjoy a concert on the lawn (University Green, Main Lawn)!

Diagnosed with cerebral palsy at an early age, musician Chris Hendricks was once told that he would never walk. Today, he goes wherever his music takes him.

A native of Durham, N.C., Hendricks' musical roots were planted early on when he began singing at the age of four. While his vocal ability continued to improve and evolve throughout his childhood and teen years, it was not until his junior year at Elon University in Elon, N.C. that Hendricks picked up a guitar for the first time. The connection was instantaneous. Before long, Hendricks discovered a passion for songwriting and began to pursue a career in music.

During a 2009 chance meeting, Hendricks connected with West Virginia native Aaron Gallagher in a Chapel Hill coffee shop. Gallagher immediately recognized Hendricks' songwriting skill and vocal ability. Determined to help him reach his dream as a musician, Gallagher soon signed on as Hendricks' manager.

Over the course of his career, Hendricks has performed at iconic venues across the country including Cat's Cradle, Carolina Theatre, Eddie's Attic and the Los Angeles House of Blues. His hit song "Noise," was featured at every artist's dream destination - the Louvre Museum in Paris - and was chosen as the 2011-2012 season theme song for the NHL's Carolina Hurricanes and Florida Panthers. Quickly becoming a hit, the EP that features "Noise" has sold more than 6,000 copies to date.

Having overcome various obstacles in his life, including being bullied throughout his childhood and teen years because of his disability, Hendricks uses his music and experiences in an effort to inspire others.

In 2010, he began reaching out to students as part of his Breaking Down Barriers program, an anti-bullying initiative that works with area schools to raise awareness about the dangers of bullying and the importance of being true to one's self. Additionally, Hendricks travels the country speaking to various organizations and businesses, hoping to inspire them with his story and help encourage individuals to identify and pursue their own passions-a lesson after which he has modeled his own life.

Hendricks is back in the studio recording his latest EP, "Meant to Survive," which is set to be released in winter 2012. "With the 'Meant to Survive' EP, I feel like we have really pushed our boundaries musically," says Hendricks. "Working with producer Mark McKee has allowed me to open up and deliver the same raw emotion in the studio that I feel during a live performance."

Striving to reach and inspire as many people as possible with his music, Hendricks knows he has his work cut out for him. It is a daunting task, but he is excited to be on a journey that is fueled completely by his utmost passion in life. At the end of the day, as his song states, he does it for the noise.

"Passionate, soulful, and mesmerizing are three words that describe North Carolina singer songwriter Chris Hendricks' musical prowess and vocal style. Hendricks has only been playing guitar for three years but has been singing for most of his life. With powerful hooks and catchy melodies, Hendricks has been blowing away audiences in North Carolina and is looking forward to taking his music to all parts of the globe. His voice reminds you of an old school blues man with a pop accessibility that makes him stand out in a world of cookie cut singers who don't take the emotional expense to do their own thing. His voice pulls you in and leaves you wanting more. You feel his words, you feel his pain, and you celebrate his life along side of him. Fans of real music look out, your champion has arrived. His name is Chris Hendricks." - Journalist Chris Wells

Event Time: 7:00 p.m.

Event Location: University Green (Main Lawn) RAIN LOCATION: KENAN HALL

Tickets: FREE ADMISSION - William Peace University


"Chris Hendricks to Play William Peace University, 9/21"

William Peace University, a private four-year university located in downtown Raleigh, has announced it will host a concert performance by rock musician Chris Hendricks on Saturday, Sept. 21 at 7p.m. on the University Green, located at 15 E. Peace St. The local musician will perform accompanied by his band members, Mark McKee, Michael Bare, Saul Johnson and Chad Lister. Sponsored by Bad Daddy's Burger Bar, Which Wich, Dickey's Barbecue Pit and Tyler's Restaurant and Taproom, the event is free and open to students, faculty and staff, as well as the greater Raleigh community. This family-friendly event is open to guests of all ages, and Raleigh residents are welcome to bring their children and pets.

Hendricks appeared in August on the campus to present his Breaking Down Barriers program for nearly 400 WPU first year students. Breaking Down Barriers is an anti-bullying initiative that works with area schools to raise awareness about the dangers of bullying and the importance of being true to one's self. Diagnosed with cerebral palsy at a young age, Hendricks uses his music and life experiences in an effort to inspire others, reaching out to schools, businesses and organizations throughout the country.

Throughout his career, Hendricks has performed at iconic venues across the country, including Cat's Cradle in Carrboro, N.C., and the Los Angeles House of Blues. His hit song "Noise" was featured at the Louvre Museum in Paris and was chosen as the 2011-2012 season theme song for the National Hockey League's Carolina Hurricanes and Florida Panthers. The EP that features "Noise" has sold more than 6,000 copies to date. Hendricks' latest EP, Meant To Survive, is quickly becoming a fan favorite.

For more information on Chris Hendricks, visit http://www.chrishendricksmusic.com. To register for the event, visit http://www.peace.edu/event/196-wpu-concert-and-comedy-series-chris-hendricks-band. - Broadway World News Desk


"Raleigh musician Chris Hendricks uses music to inspire"

Raleigh based musician Chris Hendricks was diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a child. Hendricks uses his life experiences to inspire others.

He was told that he would never walk but has overcome that obstacle with physical therapy and determination. Hendricks writes his songs so they are relatable and are written in the hopes of inspiring and speaking to others and their experiences.

Hendricks has performed all across the country, playing in some iconic venues. He has played at the Cat’s Cradle, Carolina Theatre, Eddie’s Attic and the Los Angeles House of Blues.

His song “Noise” was chosen as the season theme song by the Carolina Hurricanes and the Florida Panthers. “Noise” has also been featured at the Louvre Museum in Paris.

Hendricks latest EP, “Meant To Survive” will have a release party at Lincoln Theater on Jan. 5.

Hendricks will bring his next “Breaking Down Barriers” program event to Green Hope High School on November 19.

For more information about Chris Hendricks, visit http://www.chrishendricksmusic.com. - WNCN News Raleigh, NC


"Chris Hendricks To Present “Breaking Down Barriers” Program To Saint Mary’s School"

RALEIGH, N.C. – Chris Hendricks, a musician based in Raleigh, N.C., has announced that he will present to Saint Mary’s School in Raleigh on Sunday, Nov. 11, as part of his “Breaking Down Barriers” anti-bullying program. Hendricks will kick off the event at the all-girls school with a short concert followed by a presentation educating students on the dangers of bullying and the importance of being true to one’s self. Diagnosed with cerebral palsy at an early age, he was bullied throughout his childhood and teen years because of his disability. Hendricks now uses his musical talent and experience with bullying as an opportunity to provide inspiration for others facing similar situations by reaching out to North Carolina schools to deliver the “Breaking Down Barriers” program.
QUOTES:
“It is an honor to be given the opportunity to use my own experience and love of music to inspire these students,” said Hendricks. “Unfortunately, bullying is fairly common in our schools, but with this program, I am able to discuss the importance of standing up to bullying in an effort to make a difference.”

NEW MEDIA CONTENT:
Chris Hendricks Band’s Twitter:
https://twitter.com/CHendricksBand
Chris Hendricks Band’s Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/ChrisHendricksBand
ABOUT CHRIS HENDRICKS:
Chris Hendricks is a musician based in Raleigh, N.C. Diagnosed with cerebral palsy at a young age, Hendricks uses his music and experiences in an effort to inspire others, reaching out to schools, businesses and organizations throughout the country. Over the course of his career, Hendricks has performed at iconic venues across the country including Cat’s Cradle, Carolina Theatre, Eddie’s Attic and the Los Angeles House of Blues. His hit song “Noise,” was featured at every artist’s dream destination – the Louvre Museum in Paris – and was chosen as the 2011-2012 season theme song for the NHL’s Carolina Hurricanes and Florida Panthers. Quickly becoming a hit, the EP that features “Noise” has sold more than 6,000 copies to date. Hendricks is back in the studio recording his latest EP, “Meant To Survive,” which is set to be released in winter 2012. For more information about Chris Hendricks, visit http://www.chrishendricksmusic.com.
ABOUT THE “BREAKING DOWN BARRIERS” ANTI-BULLYING PROGRAM:

Chris Hendricks’ “Breaking Down Barriers” is an anti-bullying program that reaches out to area schools to raise awareness about the dangers of bullying and the importance of being true to one’s self. Each performance kicks off with a short concert followed by a speech from Hendricks. Diagnosed with cerebral palsy at an early age, he was bullied all throughout his childhood and teen years because of his disability. Through the program, he uses his experience with bullying along with his musical talents to reach out to and inspire others who are facing similar situations. The program has and continues to make a difference in the Triangle, as participating schools have reported a decrease in behavioral problems and bullying as a result of the program. For more information about “Breaking Down Barriers,” visit http://www.chrishendricksmusic.com/breakingdownbarriers.
- MMI Public Relations Inc.


"Chris Hendricks Band releases Meant to Survive"

A humanist is defined as a person having a strong interest in or concern for human welfare, values, and dignity. Singer-songwriter Chris Hendricks is such a man. He is described by his friends as passionate, humble, and grateful. Hendricks describes his performances as "giving away an emotional experience." Chris' goal is to connect and share energy with the audience. "If you have done it right, you put a smile on their face, and then; you have done your job."
The Chris Hendricks Band recently released "Meant to Survive;" their second EP. I attended a release party at the Lincoln Theatre on January 5th. Chris's father, who is also a musician, flew in from Wisconsin to see his son perform for the first time. The show was well attended and well received.
The new EP was cut at Mark McKee's K House Recording. McKee co-wrote several songs and is instrumental in establishing the band's song arrangements. The Lincoln performance featured Saul Johnson on drums, John Briggs on bass; and Chad Lister on rhythm guitar/backing vocals. Hendricks' stated how blessed he feels to be surrounded by an astonishing set of artists. Hendricks demonstrates a unique ability to connect with an audience. His songs reflect an inner strength and determination. He writes from a place that is real, honest, and vulnerable. His goal is to provide positive motivation to society in general. He wishes for the audience to connect emotionally, to relate experientially to the feelings being expressed lyrically.
Singer songwriter Chris Hendricks might be best known for penning the song 'Noise' that was selected by the NHL Carolina Hurricanes to be their theme song for the 2011-2012 season. Penned in about 30 minutes the song captures the energy and spirit of athletic competition.
The bands humanitarian effort in area schools is also very noteworthy. After a Frank Stasio "The State of Things" NPR radio interview, a teacher reached out and asked if Chris would tell his "story" to his students. During the program, Hendricks relates how he has overcome his personel challenges, and has found happiness through musical expression. The message is highly motivational. Hendricks was diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy when he was four years old and walks with a cane. Manager and close personal friend Aaron Gallagher relates how 'the kids just flood to Chris." Chris and the band have performed for 20,000-25,000 middle and high school age students in the Triangle area in the past 3 months. The program is called "Breaking Down Barriers."
I would be remiss if I failed to mention that the cover art for the new EP uses a photograph shot by RMC's staff photographer, Christer Berg. Below is on old video I think gives you a feel for the man and the artist.
For more information: http://www.chrishendricksband.com/
- Raleigh Music Industry Association


"William Peace University Hosts Concert Performance By Chris Hendricks"

RALEIGH, N.C. – William Peace University, a private four-year university located in downtown Raleigh, has announced it will host a concert performance by rock musician Chris Hendricks on Saturday, Sept. 21 at 7p.m. on the University Green, located at 15 E. Peace St. The local musician will perform accompanied by his band members, Mark McKee, Michael Bare, Saul Johnson and Chad Lister. Sponsored by Bad Daddy’s Burger Bar, Which Wich, Dickey’s Barbecue Pit and Tyler’s Restaurant and Taproom, the event is free and open to students, faculty and staff, as well as the greater Raleigh community. This family-friendly event is open to guests of all ages, and Raleigh residents are welcome to bring their children and pets.
Hendricks appeared in August on the campus to present his Breaking Down Barriers program for nearly 400 WPU first year students. Breaking Down Barriers is an anti-bullying initiative that works with area schools to raise awareness about the dangers of bullying and the importance of being true to one’s self. Diagnosed with cerebral palsy at a young age, Hendricks uses his music and life experiences in an effort to inspire others, reaching out to schools, businesses and organizations throughout the country.
Throughout his career, Hendricks has performed at iconic venues across the country, including Cat’s Cradle in Carrboro, N.C., and the Los Angeles House of Blues. His hit song “Noise” was featured at the Louvre Museum in Paris and was chosen as the 2011-2012 season theme song for the National Hockey League’s Carolina Hurricanes and Florida Panthers. The EP that features “Noise” has sold more than 6,000 copies to date. Hendricks’ latest EP, Meant To Survive, is quickly becoming a fan favorite.
For more information on Chris Hendricks, visit http://www.chrishendricksmusic.com. To register for the event, click here.
“As we kick off the fall 2013 semester and welcome students back to campus, William Peace University is proud to host Chris Hendricks and his band for a live concert for not only students, but the local community to enjoy,” said Debra M. Townsley, Ph.D., president of William Peace University. “Our desire is to make outdoor concerts a regular part of our arts programming and hope that the community will come out to the first concert event to help support Chris and future outdoor community events. Stop by Seaboard Station, pick up dinner and enjoy the evening at WPU.”
- William Peace University


"The Chris Hendricks Band: Bringing Joyful Noise with “Noise”"

Chris Hendricks strikes me as a polite Southern boy who treats his lady right and attends church every Sunday. When he contacted me regarding his latest album,”Noise,” he was very humble yet confident; anxious for my opinion, but not aggressive.

Hendricks was diagnosed with cerebral palsy at an early age and was told he would never walk. He is unstoppable, and it is so inspiring to see that he didn’t let this diagnosis stop him from creating musical masterpieces.

Upon listening to “Noise,” a six track EP, I felt a sense of calm come over me. The tone to Hendricks’ voice is very soothing, immediately engaging the listener and drawing you in. This album is emotional, honest, and beautiful. Each track is upbeat yet oozing with emotion and has catchy hooks that you can sing along to with ease.

The tracks “Noise” and “Crazy” have received airplay on local radio stations such as 96 Rock and G105. The final track is entitled “Anthem” and features hand clapping you can’t help but clap along to.

His music is well suited for just about anything—driving, laying on the beach, even housework. I am surprised that this is the first I have heard from The Chris Hendricks Band, and I’m sure it will not be the last. - Raleigh Music Industry Association


"Phases of Musical Fate: Aaron Gallagher Riding the Wave of the Unexpected"

Had someone told Aaron Gallagher a decade ago that he would someday be in a band - and his music would be played at NHL hockey arenas and even the Louvre in Paris – he wouldn’t have believed it.

That sounded more like the future of his buddy, Brooks Parker, from Fairmont.

He was the musician. Gallagher was the athlete, a regular on the baseball field and basketball court during the years leading up to and including 2003, his senior year. His short-term plans: To play baseball and study biology at West Virginia Wesleyan. His long-term goal: To become a doctor; likely in optometry.

But during his senior year at Wesleyan, Gallagher picked up a guitar and a whole new world opened up for him.

“I started taking guitar lessons, but it didn’t feel like it helped me as much as it should have, so I tried to learn on youtube. There were a few good people, but I found that some just wanted to show off,” he said. “So I told myself that once I learned to play a little, I’d post lessons for beginners – the average person who didn’t know what the strings or parts of the guitar were even called.”

And so he did and people took notice – lots of them. The postings led to an endorsement with Taylor Guitars. Some lessons got hits from tens of thousands of people, including Jim Melanson of Toronto, Canada.

“He told me he was a web designer and had learned to play guitar from my video. He said he felt like he ripped me off for free lessons and wanted to design a site for me,” Gallagher said. “We exchanged like 100 emails and talked on the phone. I gave him some ideas and he ran with it and built my website.”

That site was called Free and Easy Guitar (www.freeandeasyguitar.com), which grew to include some 400 videos and accessed by about 40 million.

“I had one video that got 7 million views in one day,” Gallagher said. “That’s really not typical. It’s just one of those things.”

It seems those out-of-the-ordinary circumstances just kept happening, further launching Gallagher into a career with music.

After receiving a bachelor’s in biology from Wesleyan, Gallagher opted not to go right into medical school, but instead take a little time off. He relocated to Raleigh, NC to work in the biotechnology field. It was there that he met Chris Hendricks, the next link in his musical fate.

“I met Chris about two and a half years ago. I saw him on stage at a coffee shop. He had cerebral palsy and he was so talented. I saw him as this kid with unlimited potential; just someone who needed a push and a little help,” he said. “So I asked him if he wanted a career in music and I started managing him. We worked together recording albums and trying to put a band together.”

Gallagher represented Hendricks and also served as an intermittent member of the band. The regionally-touring Chris Hendricks Band was born.

Hooking up with Gallagher was meant to be, Hendricks said.

"We make a great team because he has the mind of a businessman and I have the mind of an artist," he said. "But we both bring something creative to the table. It's just as much an art to create a good business plan as it is to create a great piece of music."

But there was much more in store for the band than creating tunes.

“We started going into schools, starting with 20 minutes of rock music and Chris telling his story of growing up with cerebral palsy and how he was bullied and picked on in school; how it made him feel and how he overcame it by finding something he loved – music,” Gallagher said. “Then we finished with 20 more minutes of music.”

Johnson & Johnson heard about the band’s circuit at schools and proposed a trip to The Chris Hendricks Band – to fly them to New York City to film a documentary: “Rise Up to The Chris Hendricks Story,” now found on You Tube and the band’s website, www.chrishendricksband.com.

That led to Hendricks doing more motivational speaking, including that on a corporate level.

“At his first show in Florida, Chri - Connect Bridgeport News


"Chris Hendricks' Music Experience"

Passionate, soulful, and mesmerizing are three words that easily describe North Carolina singer songwriter Chris Hendricks' musical prowess and vocal style. With powerful hooks and catchy songs, Hendricks has only been playing guitar for three years but has been singing for most of his life but in that short time he has been blowing away audiences in North Carolina and is looking forward to taking his music to all parts of the globe. His voice reminds you of an old school blues man with a hint pop accessibility that makes him stand out in a world of cookie cut singers who mimic their influences but don't take the emotionally expense to do their own thing. Hendricks has already been lucky enough to play his songs live on a major AOR station, G 105, in Raleigh, a rare feat for an unsigned artist. His voice pulls you in and takes you there and doesn't leave you. You feel his words, you feel his pain, and you celebrate his life along side of him. And if that wasn't enough, Chris has been known to throw in some hot freestyle too boot! Fans of real music look out, your champion has arrived. His name is Chris Hendricks.

- Chris Wells, Raleigh Journalist


"Aspiring Entertainers with Cerebral Palsy"

Cerebral palsy, a neurological disorder that affects an individual's ability to function, can make tasks often taken for granted, like walking and running, difficult. The majority of cerebral palsy cases are caused before or at birth, either by abnormal fetal development or birth complications. Having cerebral palsy means facing obstacles in life most people don't have to deal with. Kevin Decker and Chris Hendricks, two individuals with cerebral palsy, are looking to overcome these obstacles and make their names known in the entertainment industry.
Kevin Decker
Kevin Decker, a 22 year old from Grand Forks, ND, wishes to establish his name on the standup comedy circuit. The Grand Forks Herald reported in an article entitled "A Comedy Dream" that as a youngster Decker and his parents were told by doctors that Decker may never walk. However, next month on July 29th Decker will walk out onto the stage at the Empire Arts Center and perform his standup comedy. One reason this will be possible is the rhizotomy (a medical procedure) Decker underwent as a child to reduce his symptoms of cerebral palsy.

Decker rented out the Empire Arts Center himself for his upcoming show. Decker finds material for his standup comedy routines through his own life experiences, as well as current events. In addition to Decker, two local Grand Forks bands will be performing at the Empire Arts Center on July 29th.

Chris Hendricks
Like Decker, Chris Hendricks was told at a young age he may never walk. Hendricks, who desires to make an impact in the music industry, went on and proved doctors wrong. Hendricks expressed in an interview with News Observer that he wants to use his music to become a role model for others, especially children with disabilities. In 2009 Hendricks was invited to perform on G105's "Bob and the Showgram" morning show. This summer the Chris Hendricks Band will play their biggest show yet as a part of the Life and Faith tour, a faith-based music festival.

Additionally, Hendricks looks to release his debut album, "Noise," sometime in 2010. According to the News Observer, former Beach Boys manager and current bluegrass/country music producer Fred Vail is interested in producing Hendricks' debut album for him.
- Yahoo Voices! w/ Zachary Fenell


"Aspiring Entertainers with Cerebral Palsy"

Cerebral palsy, a neurological disorder that affects an individual's ability to function, can make tasks often taken for granted, like walking and running, difficult. The majority of cerebral palsy cases are caused before or at birth, either by abnormal fetal development or birth complications. Having cerebral palsy means facing obstacles in life most people don't have to deal with. Kevin Decker and Chris Hendricks, two individuals with cerebral palsy, are looking to overcome these obstacles and make their names known in the entertainment industry.
Kevin Decker
Kevin Decker, a 22 year old from Grand Forks, ND, wishes to establish his name on the standup comedy circuit. The Grand Forks Herald reported in an article entitled "A Comedy Dream" that as a youngster Decker and his parents were told by doctors that Decker may never walk. However, next month on July 29th Decker will walk out onto the stage at the Empire Arts Center and perform his standup comedy. One reason this will be possible is the rhizotomy (a medical procedure) Decker underwent as a child to reduce his symptoms of cerebral palsy.

Decker rented out the Empire Arts Center himself for his upcoming show. Decker finds material for his standup comedy routines through his own life experiences, as well as current events. In addition to Decker, two local Grand Forks bands will be performing at the Empire Arts Center on July 29th.

Chris Hendricks
Like Decker, Chris Hendricks was told at a young age he may never walk. Hendricks, who desires to make an impact in the music industry, went on and proved doctors wrong. Hendricks expressed in an interview with News Observer that he wants to use his music to become a role model for others, especially children with disabilities. In 2009 Hendricks was invited to perform on G105's "Bob and the Showgram" morning show. This summer the Chris Hendricks Band will play their biggest show yet as a part of the Life and Faith tour, a faith-based music festival.

Additionally, Hendricks looks to release his debut album, "Noise," sometime in 2010. According to the News Observer, former Beach Boys manager and current bluegrass/country music producer Fred Vail is interested in producing Hendricks' debut album for him.
- Yahoo Voices! w/ Zachary Fenell


"Personality Profile - Chris Hendricks"

Guitarist and singer Chris Hendricks fronts the appropriately named Chris Hendricks Band (CHB). Hendricks stands out from other front men because he happens to have cerebral palsy. Early on in his life doctors said Chris may never walk. Thanks in part to countless surgeries the musician now walks on and off stages wherever CHB finds gigs. Hendricks and his band’s reach expands past North Carolina, their home state. In fact CHB recently opened for Andy McKee and Eric Johnson at House of Blues in Los Angeles, CA!

Similar to previous “Personality Profile” subjects here at Off Balanced, I came across Chris Hendricks through my “cerebral palsy” Google Alerts email. Tammy Grubb’s News Observer article “Singer Chris Hendricks is Living His Dream” back from June 2010 captured my attention and once I heard the singer’s powerful vocals I became hooked. At the time I still wrote for Disaboom so I sent an interview inquiry to CHB manager (and bassist) Aaron Gallagher. Sadly by the time we scheduled and followed through with the interview a change in management at Disaboom left me no longer affiliated with the disability orientated website. I did however review the group’s debut EP Noise for Yahoo! Voices (read here).


CHB debut with the EP Noise in 2010.
In addition to Chris’s powerful voice, the band’s genuine kindness shines. Last year when planning to go visit a friend in North Carolina I contacted Aaron to see if CHB had any concerts coming up. I really wanted to see Chris Hendricks Band live. They didn’t have any upcoming shows but Aaron offered me an open invitation to come down with my friends and watch the band practice. Unfortunately given the five hour commute between Hot Springs, NC (where I visited) and Durham, NC (where CHB calls home) the situation didn’t work out.

Over the past six months I’ve kept tabs on Chris Hendricks Band via Facebook (like them here) and I’m excited to see the group gain momentum. I strongly recommend you visit chrishendricksband.com, search “Chris Hendricks Band” on Youtube, or best yet buy the Noise EP on i-Tunes so you can experience CHB for yourself.

- Off Balanced by Zack Fenell


"The Chris Hendricks Band at Deep South"

Raleigh - As I sat eagerly watching the ever-growing crowd filter though the doors of the red-walled Deep South Bar in Raleigh, I looked forwards to listening to the Chris Hendricks Band play their set. I sat in a bar booth trying to stifle my heavy cough, but even my bad flu could not keep me from coming out to see the band. I waited excitedly to listen to their live performance after having listened to their tracks on ReverbNation a few days prior to the show.
Looking around the bar, I was impressed with the venues decorative style. Red walls were adorned with famous music quotes painted in white with all different styles of hand writing. The downtown Raleigh bar, with its pool table, good setting, impressive drink collection, and friendly bartenders, was a wonderful venue for what some had called a "homecoming" show for the band.
The crowd was hopping and ready to rock. The band, composed of Chris Hendricks (lead vocals), J. Michael Sullivan, III (lead guitar, backup vocals), Anthony Gallo (drums), and Aaron Gallagher (bass), filled the room with a thick and full sound. Aaron Gallagher also works for the band as their manager. Chris Hendricks' voice blazed over the microphone, and like a warm knife cutting through butter, the women reacted with great enthusiasm, and the crowed screamed in delight. With that, the band began to jam, and the bar crowd cheered and danced to the music. The show was off the chain!
I later had the opportunity to do a small interview with the band via email as my flu had landed me in bed for the next week. With the help of Aaron Gallagher, I was put in touch with frontman Chris Hendricks, who was kind enough to answer my questions about the band.
33: How did the band start?
Chris Hendricks: A little over a year and a half ago, Aaron Gallagher found me in a coffee shop in Chapel Hill, called Jack Sprat Cafe doing acoustic covers. He asked me if I had any original music. I told him I did, but I didn't think it was very good. He thought I had potential, so he asked to hear my original music. Shortly after that, he began managing me as a solo act. I had the opportunity to play locally as well as Nashville and New York. A few months later we met Michael Sullivan at the same coffee shop Aaron and I crossed paths. He began to play lead guitar for us. We needed a bass player, so the manager Aaron jumped on board and picked up the instrument rather quickly. Only five or six months ago we found our drummer Anthony Gallo.
All things considered we've only had a full band sound for a short while, but we have been tremendously blessed. We've performed at the RBC Center and the Raleigh Amphitheater downtown. We've played the Koka Booth Amphitheatre in Cary. We have played Lincoln Theatre in Raleigh. We played at 3rd and Lindsley in Nashville, and we had the opportunity to open up for Amy Grant and Mercy Me this summer. We've also been interviewed on G105 a few times and have received air play on 96Rock.
33: Tell me about the band's good times, rough times.
CH: Myself and the other members are very passionate about performing and driven to succeed. Getting others to listen has been the biggest struggle with the band. Often times we are underestimated as a group, which is both a blessing and a curse. The trouble with music is that there is just so much of it out there. It is often difficult to convince a new venue that the art we provide is very unique in nature. Once we are able to perform, however, the music speaks for itself.
33: Tell me about the band's creative process.
CH: One of my favorite aspects of the band is our ability to come together as a creative unit when it comes to music. Initially I will provide a sketch. Using the guitar or piano, I come up with lyrics, chords and a melody. We come together as a band to create arrangements that speak to us internally and relay the message of the song. From the first verse to the final chorus, we want to be remembe - Magazine 33


"Chris Hendricks Band Interview w WUNC"

Durham singer-songwriter Chris Hendricks has spent the summer touring. He’s been up and down the East Coast opening for established acts like Amy Grant and Diamond Rio. Now, he’s preparing to celebrate the release of his band’s first CD called "Noise." Hendricks' music career is a far cry from the military career he wanted in his younger years - and it far exceeds the expectations society placed on him as a person born with cerebral palsy. Hendricks and his band join host Frank Stasio in the studio to play live and talk about being an inspiration to children and adults with disabilities. - North Carolina Public Radio


"Musicians with Cerebral Palsy"

Singers Jesse Magee and Chris Hendricks show despite the extra obstacles cerebral palsy can place in your life, you shouldn't deter from pursuing your dreams. The physical frustrations caused by cerebral palsy, a neurological condition which hampers body movement, can be hard to overcome but both Magee and Hendricks offer hope through their inspirational stories. The two serve as the front-men of their respective rock bands, Left Stronger and The Chris Hendricks Band.
Jesse Magee- Left Stronger
If you like inspirational music, you will like Jesse Magee and Left Stronger. Magee not only has cerebral palsy, but is also legally blind. However, the front man hasn't let the adversity created by his disabilities discourage him from his passion of music. Left Stronger's website reveals Magee adopted a passion for music from his family growing up. At an early age he became interested in the drums. Magee's drum instructor told him he wouldn't be able to play the drums because of his condition. The now singer would go on to prove his instructor wrong. In fact, Left Stronger lead guitarist Rob Holt shared on an ABC 2 appearance that he met Jesse when Jesse was teaching others the drums.

The ABC 2 appearance also saw Magee reveal he learned guitar and started writing original music by 15. 2010 saw the debut of Magee and Left Stronger's debut album So Close. Magee's cerebral palsy has given him a unique perspective on life which allows him to write inspirational music. For instance, take the track "Reborn" from So Close. The Left Stronger website explains "Reborn" is about learning to become stronger from diversity.

Chris Hendricks- The Chris Hendricks Band
Like Magee, Chris Hendricks developed a passion for music from his family life and hasn't let his cerebral palsy hold him back from pursuing a music career. The overall positive vibe Hendricks sends out with his music proves more amazing when you learn about his back-story. Doctors predicted the singer would never be able to walk because of his cerebral palsy. However, a number of surgeries along with Chris's hard work, proved the nay-saying doctors wrong. When you think about his situation, Hendricks could have easily adopted a bitter attitude towards life but he didn't. In fact, Hendricks wants to use his music to destroy barriers between the able-bodied and disabled communities.

Hendricks, along with his bandmates Michael Sullivan (lead guitar), Aaron Gallagher (bass), and Anthony Gallo (drums), achieved a major milestone in 2010 when they released their debut EP Noise. The EP contains six tracks which display Hendricks' tremendous vocal talents. Noise offers inspirational music with tracks like "Noise" and "Anthem." In addition, The Chris Hendricks Band pulls at your heart strings with the song "Affliction." The song's slow tempo combined with Hendricks' singing makes you feel Chris's pain.
- Yahoo Voices! Zack Fenell


"Chris Hendricks Take the Hearts of Leesville Students"

While Leesville’s juniors spent hours trapped in the dungeon that is the ACT, freshmen, sophomores and seniors were treated to a special assembly. The assembly featured Chris Hendricks and his acoustic band.
Chris Hendricks, who was diagnosed with cerebral palsy at the age of 4, decided to dedicate his life to playing music and inspiring people. He frequently visits different venues to share his music and his story.
“Playing for high schools is a lot harder than performing at a venue,” said Hendricks in a personal interview. “At a venue, people come for the music. At an assembly, the kids are forced into the auditorium. I wanted to give the students a less crappy assembly, with no mascots dressed up, lecturing about safety. I hope that through a concert type assembly, the kids can really take something away.”
The presentation was packed with cliche, yet inspiring quotes, such as the popular: “you only live once,” or the more rare “time is one thing that you will never get back.”
Hendricks said that he tried to be “really direct and honest” in his approach to addressing the audience. He hoped that he could get through to the kids by using his story, rather than a lecture. He also used some classic high school humor to connect to his adolescent audience, evident when he referred to “band geeks” and “emo kids that wear too much make-up and hate their parents.”
He played many inspiring songs that told tales of dealing with disability and overcoming bullying. In his most popular song, “Affliction,” Hendricks poured out the emotional story of his childhood and all the emotional hardships that he faced while dealing with “affliction.”
His performance truly showed that music is his outlet. When asked about his means of finding music, Hendricks explained, “I needed to get over my fear of people– or more the fear of myself and the shame that I felt. I found my escape from that fear through my music.”
While the song “Affliction” evoked a heartfelt reaction from the audience, it hardly compared to his last song “Noise.” The song, used as the theme song for the Carolina Hurricanes, offered an upbeat and exciting end to his meaningful show.
Hendrick’s performance was well received, for he met a standing ovation at the end of the performance.
As a final message to Leesville, Hendricks said, “I hope they realize to be careful who to judge and pick on. You never know the effect you could have on someone, and who you might help someone become.” - The Mycenaean


"Elon alumnus positively rock n’ rolls"

When Chris Hendricks was young, doctors told him he would never walk. He was diagnosed with cerebral palsy at age 4, a neurological condition that affects muscle function. The messages from his brain to his legs are disrupted, limiting his mobility.
Around the same time, Hendricks said, he began singing. It was a love of music that would never fade.
Hendricks tried leg braces and wheelchairs, “the whole nine yards,” he said, and was shuffled in and out of hospitals for much of his young life. Multiple operations kept him out of school for days or weeks, and when he returned, he was bullied.
Following his last operation, an infection further weakened his legs. The outlook seemed grim.
“Doctors didn’t think I could recover,” Hendricks said. “But it was my exercise and my time at Elon that changed that.”
Hendricks is a 2007 graduate of the university. During his first year, he met and befriended a football player who introduced him to weightlifting. He didn’t look back, and even majored in exercise and sport science. He lifted five or six days a week, putting on around 60 pounds of muscle by the time he graduated.
“College was a clean slate,” Hendricks said. “I made a promise to my dad to turn my life around.”
A self-described shy and lonely band geek, Hendricks transformed into an “almost annoying,” larger-than-life funnyman. At open mic nights, he would perform stand-up, laughing at his disability so others would feel comfortable. And after picking up a guitar during his junior year, he performed music whenever he could.
His band at Elon, The Rising, was more appropriately named than he realized at the time.
“It’s all about rising from the ashes,” Hendricks said, an echo of his own success and Elon’s emblematic phoenix.
After college, he moved to Orlando and worked at Disney World and Epcot in sales services. While in Florida, Hendricks started writing songs after again after a relationship ended painfully.
“I needed a way to let go,” he said. “Of that, and all of that other stuff like growing up in and out of hospitals. This was just a way to express that energy – not anger.”
Hendricks began performing at coffee shops and open mics after returning to his hometown of Durham. There, he met bandmate and manager Aaron Gallagher, and drummer Will Perrone joined shortly thereafter. The Chris Hendricks Band was formed, playing songs with positive messages while still delivering an energetic listening experience.
“I’ve always believed that music with a message doesn’t have to be bad,” Hendricks said. “You can write awesome music without writing about cheating on your girlfriend.”
The band most recently played a concert at Ligon Middle School in Raleigh. Playing to preteens may not be a rock god’s driving ambition, but Hendricks said he believes the band can do both.
“What kid doesn’t like rock n’ roll?” he said. “I 100 percent want to impact these kids. But we are still looking for a label. We want to make it big.”
Making it big won’t mean forgetting his roots, Hendricks said. His experience at Elon changed him. He helped organize benefits for Make-A-Wish, a charity he was not a part of but valued for its mission to help sick children, and bulked up physically at the gym.
“Elon is really kind of responsible for morphing me into the person I am today,” Hendricks said. - The Pendulum


"Nothing To Be Ashamed Of"

GARNER -- Chris Hendricks had his guitar in hand and his walking cane on the floor as he shared a message with special-needs students at East Garner Middle School.

He encouraged them to embrace their disabilities rather than hide from them, to even find humor in their situation.

"There is nothing to be ashamed of," said Hendricks, who has cerebral palsy. "There is nothing to be afraid of."


Hendricks, 26, of Durham performed at East Garner Middle earlier this month, and he returned last week to talk to students. He hopes to visit more local schools to share his passion for music - and to urge kids to stop bullying each other, accept one another's differences and be comfortable with who they are.

Hendricks knows all too well what it's like to be picked on. Growing up, his classmates bullied him because of his disability. Cerebral palsy is a neurological disorder that affects movement, and the disease has left his limbs deformed.

"When I was younger, I was kind of ashamed of myself for a while," Hendricks told students on Thursday. "I did everything I could to hide that part of me."

But Hendricks made a change when he headed to Elon University. After several surgeries, doctors had wanted him to be in a wheelchair when he left home for college. He insisted on wearing leg braces instead, making his way around campus the best he could.

At Elon, Hendricks found a love for exercise. He spent hours in the gym bulking up. But it wasn't just a physical change - Hendricks said he shifted the way he approached his disability. For starters, he talked about it.

"If I make some joke about how I have better parking than everybody else, then it's funny," Hendricks said.

He had planned to become a physical therapist, but a new dream of a music career emerged when he picked up a guitar during his junior year of college.

Over the years, Hendricks has performed in places such as New York and Nashville. And he formed the Chris Hendricks Band, which plays local gigs.

Now, Hendricks said, he wants to focus on performing at schools.

In Garner, the school's 1,300 students were captivated by the band, school principal Cathy Williams said. They saw a video that showed Hendricks putting on his leg braces.

"My kids were absolutely silent watching him do this," Williams said. "It was really a message about tolerance."

Williams said that message is critical for middle schools, where bullying is common.

And Hendricks brought hope to the special-needs children, said Maria Blanc, 31, whose son, Victor, a sixth-grader at East Garner Middle, has cerebral palsy.

Victor is confined to a wheelchair, but he will have a bright future, Blanc said. "He's going to college - he better," she said.

Hendricks said he wouldn't change his life even if he could - except for maybe one day to find out what it's like to run a marathon. Otherwise, he said, he's happy with who he's become.

"It's really been an absolute gift for me," Hendricks said.

Nagem: 919-829-4758

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2011/10/01/1530357/there-is-nothing-to-be-ashamed.html#ixzz1ZwGHKzVA#storylink=cpy - News and Observer


"East Garner Middle breaks down barriers with the Chris Hendricks Band"

The Chris Hendricks Band’s Anti-Bullying program, “Breaking Down Barriers,” hit East Garner Middle School Students in the ears and heart.

On Sept. 16, The Chris Hendricks Band with featured guest Lizzie O, a 12-year-old indy recording artist and Wakefield Middle School student, rocked East Garner Middle School with their energizing music and educational anti-bullying message.

East Garner Middle School Principal Cathy Williams said, “It was the most amazing presentation we have ever had at EGMMS. Chris’ story is compelling and he has the ability to reach students in a way that I have never seen before – after over 20 years in education. Thank you for giving us this opportunity to hear his story, enjoy his music and make our first early release Friday the best we have ever had!”

East Garner Middle School PTA along with City Treasure Card sponsored the four-performance event that lasted four hours. More than 1,300 students experienced the Breaking Down Barriers program that featured CHB original songs like Anthem and Noise, which if you’re a Carolina Hurricanes fan you would have heard before each home game last season and fan favorites like Affliction and Hungry that featured Lizzie O. The program’s focus was on an anti-bullying message brought by lead singer Chris Hendricks who was diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy at age four and was bullied as a child. Growing up, Hendricks wanted to be a hero.

“I’ve always believed in heroes.” he said.

His dream was to be a U.S. Navy SEAL.

“I loved the idea of saving the world,” Hendricks said.

The doctor told Hendricks’s parents that he might never walk. Cerebral Palsy is a neurological disorder that affects movement and muscle coordination, often resulting in deformed limbs.

Hendricks did learn to walk, but he will never be a SEAL. Instead, he picked up a guitar and started sharing his message: He wants everyone, especially children with disabilities, to know that anyone can dream big.

“I wouldn’t change a thing when it comes to my CP,” Hendricks said. “Whether it’s me or someone else down the line, there is a need for someone for disabled kids to look up to.”

Lizzie O said, “It is an honor to be on stage with someone as talented as Chris and to be a part of such a positive program only tops off the experience for me.”

Raleigh resident and Wake County School students solo indy music “Save me” and “Famous” can be found on iTunes.

Hendricks speaks to students about the ever present problem of bullying.

“I was bullied a lot as a kid because of my disability. I was picked on, called names, excluded from activities and even pushed down. Once I was pushed down and busted my chin open. Now I have this scar under my chin to remind me about how I was bullied and that I now have an opportunity to try and reach those who bully others and those who are bullied. I want to make a difference.”

Hendricks, band-mates and Lizzie O are making the most of this opportunity as they reach out to local North Carolina schools to deliver the “Breaking Down Barriers” program. The program consists of a concert and speech by Hendricks, which talks to kids about the dangers of bullying and the importance of being true to yourself.

“Don’t be afraid to be yourself. I used to be ashamed of my disability and with that I was ‘normal’ like everyone else. It took me a while to realize that my disability is what made me special. My disability is what gave me this unique opportunity to reach out and help people see myself in a different light through our music,” Hendricks said.

“If you have been bullied in the past or are currently being bullied, remember that you are an amazing person and that there is nothing wrong with you. Stay true to yourself and try your best to love others for who they are.”

Hendricks topped of the show, getting students energized every time he sang, “If you know love, scream.” - Garner News


"Chris Hendricks Band Hosts Tornado Relief Concert"

Raleigh, N.C. — Change and chaos blew in on April 16 for students and teachers at Raleigh's Ligon Middle School when a band of damaging tornadoes swept across the capital city.
The event, originally conceived as a year-end celebration, quickly morphed into a benefit concert. The Chris Hendricks Band donated their time and talents, and all the proceeds from the $5 cost of admission will go to Ligon students and teachers who lost something in the storms.

"I don't really know how far the money will go, but I know it's going to the right place, and it's going to help somebody," Hendricks said. - WRAL News Raleigh, NC


"Wouldn't Change A Thing"

Singer Chris Hendricks doesn't let disabilty derail his dream.

Growing up, Chris Hendricks wanted to be a hero.

"I've always believed in heroes," said Hendricks, whose childhood dream was to be a U.S. Navy Seal. "I loved the idea of saving the world."

Hendricks was born with cerebral palsy. His doctor told his parents that he might never walk. Cerebral palsy, or CP, is a neurological disorder that affects movement and muscle coordination, often resulting in deformed limbs.

Hendricks did learn to walk, but he will never be a Seal. Instead, he picked up a guitar and started sharing his message and his music with people. He wants everyone, especially children with disabilities, to know that anyone can dream big.

"I wouldn't change a thing when it comes to my CP," Hendricks said. "Whether it's me or someone else down the line, there is a need for someone for disabled kids to look up to."

This summer, he will share that message with his biggest audience yet.

In June, Hendricks joins several big-name performers on the two-month Life and Faith Tour. With stops in Richmond, Rockingham and Atlanta, the tour features contemporary Christian artists such as Amy Grant, Shenandoah and Hawk Nelson. Organizers said it will attract tens of thousands of people, raising money for local charities and nonprofit groups.

Hendricks is also working on a full-length album, which may be released this summer.

"We have never played a crowd like this. It's going to be huge," said Hendricks' manager, Aaron Gallagher, who shares an apartment with him in southern Durham.

Hendricks grew up in Durham and attended Immaculata Catholic School. After graduating from Cardinal Gibbons High School in Raleigh, he earned a degree in exercise and sports science from Elon University in 2007.

Staying active has always been an important part of Hendricks' life. At Elon, he swam and worked out with weights for hours every day.

Although he uses a cane, he's just like any other 24-year-old, working regular shifts at Best Buy and chilling with friends in his spare time.

He tries not to let his CP get in the way, although he has to sit down when he's performing. It can be hard to balance a guitar, a microphone and a cane, he said.

Because of Hendricks' disability, Gallagher said he didn't expect Hendricks to be very good when he met him at a Chapel Hill open mic night. Gallagher said he changed his mind after seeing Hendricks play.

"It's really cool for me to just watch Chris," Gallagher said. "You can tell that the one place in this world where he really feels at home is on stage playing for people."

Hendricks said he is aware of the stigmas that disabled people can face.

"People are afraid to approach, engage and get to know them," he said. As a result, some disabled people "have absolutely no faith in themselves."

However, Hendricks is determined to make it in the music business.

"The biggest challenge is getting people to take me seriously," he said.

Even his mom fought him over his music at first, he said. It was rough on their relationship, he said, but he knows she was just trying to protect him.

Now, he said, she's one of his biggest supporters, along with his dad, who taught him his first three guitar chords when he was a junior at Elon.

The Chris Hendricks Band has been playing fundraisers, private parties and clubs around the Triangle for over a year. These days, you can sometimes find the band, including guitarist Michael Sullivan, at Bailey's Pub and Grille in Chapel Hill, or The Brewery in Raleigh.

Gallagher said Hendricks also is a hit with listeners of Durham radio station G105.

Last summer, Hendricks and Gallagher were invited to be on the station's "Bob and the Showgram" morning show.

During the interview, Gallagher said, host Bob Dumas was sad to hear that Chris hadn't brought his guitar.

"I looked at Chris and kind of smiled, because Chris didn't know what I knew, and that was that I had put the guitars in the trunk the night before," Gallagher said. "It was pretty cool, because that was the station he grew up listening to, and there he was actually singing live. Since then, they've played his songs a couple of times."

Gallagher, who works in pharmaceutical sales and consulting, said he is learning how to be a manager as he goes. Fortunately, he already had a few friends in Nashville in the music business and was able to introduce Hendricks to people such as Amy Grant and her husband, country legend Vince Gill. They also met with Fred Vail, the Beach Boys' longtime manager and an independent music producer of major country and bluegrass artists.

Gallagher said Vail has expressed interest in producing Hendricks' album, too, although they're considering their options.

"The whole thing, since the beginning, has been a blessing. It's like a dream," Hendricks said. He wears a ring from his dad to remind him of that dream.

Gallagher thinks the dream may be - Chapel Hill News and Observer


"Singer Chris Hendricks is living his dream"

Growing up, Chris Hendricks wanted to be a hero.

"I've always believed in heroes," he said. His dream was to be a U.S. Navy SEAL. "I loved the idea of saving the world."

Hendricks was born with cerebral palsy; the doctor told his parents that he might never walk. Cerebral palsy is a neurological disorder that affects movement and muscle coordination, often resulting in deformed limbs.
Quantcast

Hendricks did learn to walk, but he will never be a SEAL. Instead, he picked up a guitar and started sharing his message: He wants everyone, especially children with disabilities, to know that anyone can dream big.

"I wouldn't change a thing when it comes to my CP," Hendricks said. "Whether it's me or someone else down the line, there is a need for someone for disabled kids to look up to."

This summer, he will share that message with his biggest audience yet: Hendricks joins several big-name performers on the two-month Life and Faith Tour.

With stops in Richmond, Va.; Rockingham, and Atlanta, the Life and Faith Tour features contemporary Christian artists such as Amy Grant, Shenandoah and Hawk Nelson. Organizers said it will attract tens of thousands, raising money for local charities and nonprofit groups.

Hendricks is also working on a full-length album, which might be released this summer.

"We have never played a crowd like this. It's going to be huge," Hendricks' manager, Aaron Gallagher, 25, who shares an apartment with him in southern Durham, said before this weekend's tour kickoff concert in Richmond.

Hendricks grew up in Durham and attended Immaculata Catholic School. After graduating from Cardinal Gibbons High School in Raleigh, he received a degree in exercise and sports science from Elon University in 2007.

Staying active has always been an important part of Hendricks' life. At Elon, he swam and worked out with weights for hours every day, he said.

Although he uses a cane, he's like other 24-year-olds, working regular shifts at Best Buy and chilling with friends in his spare time.

He tries not to let his condition get in the way. He does sit when he's performing. It can be hard to balance a guitar, a microphone and a cane.

At home on stage

Because of Hendricks' disability, Gallagher said, he hadn't expected Hendricks to be very good when they met at a Chapel Hill open mic night. Gallagher said he changed his mind after seeing Hendricks play.

"You can tell that the one place in this world where he really feels at home is on stage playing for people," Gallagher said.

Hendricks is determined to make it in the music business. "The biggest challenge is getting people to take me seriously," he said.

Even his mother fought him over his music at first, he said. Now she's one of his biggest supporters, along with his father, who taught him his first three guitar chords when he was a junior at Elon.

The Chris Hendricks Band has been playing fundraisers, private parties and clubs across the Triangle for over a year. These days, you can sometimes find the band at Bailey's Pub and Grille in Chapel Hill, or at Falls River Music or The Brewery in Raleigh.

Last summer, Hendricks and Gallagher were invited to be on the radio station G105's "Bob and the Showgram" morning show. During the interview, Gallagher said, the host was disappointed that Chris hadn't brought his guitar. But Gallagher had put the guitar in the car trunk the night before.

"It was pretty cool, because that was the station he grew up listening to, and there he was actually singing live," Gallagher said.

Contacts in Nashville

Gallagher, who works in pharmaceutical sales and consulting, said he is still learning how to be a manager. Fortunately, Gallagher already had a few friends in Nashville and was able to introduce Hendricks to Grant and her husband, Vince Gill. They also met with Fred Vail, who once managed The Beach Boys and is now an independent country and bluegrass producer. Gallagher said Vail has expressed interest in producing Hendricks' album.

"To be honest with you, it's crazy how fast this has taken off," Gallagher said. "I've got a lot of friends in Nashville who are in the music industry, and they've been going at it for five, six, seven years. It's just there are so many people trying to make it in the music industry, that the only way you can make it is if you're really good or you have an amazing story."
tammy.grubb@yahoo.com or 336-380-1325

- Raleigh News and Observer


"Living a big dream"

Faith trumps disability for singer/songwriter Chris Hendricks

Growing up, Chris Hendricks wanted to be a hero.

"I've always believed in heroes," he said. His dream was to be a U.S. Navy Seal. "I loved the idea of saving the world."

Hendricks was born with cerebral palsy; the doctor told his parents that he might never walk. Cerebral palsy, or CP, is a neurological disorder that affects movement and muscle coordination, often resulting in deformed limbs.

Hendricks did learn to walk, but he will never be a Seal. Instead, he picked up a guitar and started sharing his message and his music with people. He wants everyone, especially children with disabilities, to know that anyone can dream big.

"I wouldn't change a thing when it comes to my CP," Hendricks said. "Whether it's me or someone else down the line, there is a need for someone for disabled kids to look up to."

This summer, he will share that message with his biggest audience yet.

In June, Hendricks joins several big-name performers on the two-month Life and Faith Tour. With stops in Richmond, Rockingham and Atlanta, the tour features contemporary Christian artists like Amy Grant, Shenandoah and Hawk Nelson. Organizers said it will attract tens of thousands, raising money for local charities and nonprofit groups.

Hendricks is also working on a full-length album, which may be released this summer.

"We have never played a crowd like this. It's going to be huge," said Hendricks' manager, Aaron Gallagher, 25, who shares an apartment with him in southern Durham.

Hendricks grew up in Durham and attended Immaculata Catholic School. After graduating from Cardinal Gibbons High School in Raleigh, he earned a degree in exercise and sports science from Elon University in 2007.

Staying active has always been an important part of Hendricks' life. At Elon, he swam and worked out with weights for hours every day, he said.

Although he uses a cane, he's just like any other 24-year-old, working regular shifts at Best Buy and chilling with friends in his spare time.

He tries not to let his CP get in the way, although he has to sit down when he's performing. It can be hard to balance a guitar, a microphone and a cane, he said.

Because of his disability, Gallagher said he didn't expect Hendricks to be very good when he met him at a Chapel Hill open mic night. He said he changed his mind after seeing Hendricks play. Now, he gets the same response from other people.

"It's really cool for me to just watch Chris," Gallagher said. "You can tell that the one place in this world where he really feels at home is on stage playing for people."

Hendricks said he is aware of the stigmas that disabled people can face.

"People are afraid to approach, engage and get to know them," he said. As a result, some disabled people "have absolutely no faith in themselves."

However, Hendricks is determined to make it in the music business.

"The biggest challenge is getting people to take me seriously," he said.

Even his mom fought him over his music at first, he said. It was rough on their relationship, he said, but he knows she was just trying to protect him.

Now, he said, she's one of his biggest supporters, along with his dad, who taught him his first three guitar chords when he was a junior at Elon.

The Chris Hendricks Band has been playing fund-raisers, private parties and clubs around the Triangle for over a year. These days, you can sometimes find the band, including 28-year-old guitarist Michael Sullivan, at Bailey's Pub and Grille in Chapel Hill, or Falls River Music or The Brewery in Raleigh.

Gallagher said Hendricks also is a hit with listeners of Durham radio station G105.

Last summer, Hendricks and Gallagher were invited to be on the station's "Bob and the Showgram" show.

During the interview, Gallagher said, host Bob Dumas was sad that Chris didn't bring his guitar and couldn't play for the listeners.

"I looked at Chris and kind of smiled, because Chris didn't know what I knew, and that was that I had put the guitars in the trunk the night before," Gallagher said. "It was pretty cool, because that was the station he grew up listening to, and there he was actually singing live. Since then, they've played his songs a couple of times."

Gallagher, who works in pharmaceutical sales and consulting, said he is learning how to be a manager as he goes. Fortunately, he already had a few friends in Nashville and was able to introduce Hendricks to people like Amy Grant and her husband, country legend Vince Gill. They also met Fred Vail, the Beach Boys' longtime manager and an independent producer of major country and bluegrass artists.

Gallagher said Vail has expressed interest in producing Hendricks' album, too, although they're considering their options.

"The whole thing, since the beginning, has been a blessing. It's like a dream," Hendricks said. He wears a ring from his dad to remind him of that dream.

Ga - The Durham News


Discography

Released 6 song EP in June 2010 titled "Noise"
Released 4 song EP in winter 2012 titled "Meant to Survive"

2010 Deep South Battle of the Bands Grand Prize Winners
2011 Sony Your Life in 3D Contest 1st Place Vote Winners

Two songs of debut EP, Noise and Anthem, have been selected by the Carolina Hurricaes to be used during their games this season. In 2011, the NHL Carolina Hurricanes and NHL Florida Panthers used "Noise" as their theme songs.

First single off the album titled "Crazy" has received radio airplay on 96 Rock and G 105.1 out of Raleigh, NC, 101.9 WVAQ out of Morgantown, WV. and 90.7 WFUV out of New York, NY

"Noise", the EP's title track, has received airplay from 96 Rock, G 105.1, 91.5 WUNC out of Raleigh, NC.

"Anthem" has recieved airplay on G105

"Make it," off of the 'Meant to Survive' EP, has recieved airplay on G105

"Make it" is also played during Carolina Hurricanes games

Chris Hendricks has also been interviewed by 96 Rock in regards to their appearance on the Life and Faith Tour along with other grammy award winning artists,

Chris Hendricks has also been guests on WUNC's The State of Things with Frank Statio and performed two songs live on air during their interview.

The band has also been regular guests on G 105.1's Bob and the Showgram.

Photos

Bio

Pop/rock singer-songwriter Chris Hendricks was instilled with a passion for music from the very beginning. His father, a country singer in his own right, helped foster his desire to be courageous behind a microphone. Unbeknownst to him, this courage would be the staging point for the rest of a long musical journey that would take him places he never dreamed.

A native of Durham, N.C., Hendricks began singing at the age of four. While his vocal ability continued to improve and evolve throughout his childhood and teen years, it was not until his junior year at Elon University in Elon, N.C. that Hendricks picked up a guitar for the first time. The connection was instantaneous. Before long, Hendricks discovered a passion for songwriting and began to pursue a career in music.

During a 2009 chance meeting, Hendricks connected with West Virginia native Aaron Gallagher in a Chapel Hill coffee shop. Gallagher immediately recognized Hendricks' songwriting skill and vocal ability. Determined to help him reach his dream as a musician, Gallagher soon signed on as Hendricks' manager.

Over the course of his career, Hendricks has performed at iconic venues across the country including Cat's Cradle, Carolina Theatre, Eddie's Attic and the Los Angeles House of Blues. His hit song "Noise," was featured at every artist's dream destination - the Louvre Museum in Paris - and was chosen as the 2011-2012 season theme song for the NHL's Carolina Hurricanes and Florida Panthers. Quickly becoming a hit, the EP that features "Noise" has sold more than 6,000 copies to date.

Having overcome various obstacles in his life as a result of his Cerebral Palsy, Hendricks uses his music and experiences in an effort to inspire others. Everyone has their own affliction, but passion and purpose can overcome all obstacles. It is his hope that the vulnerability in his music will shed some light on the lives of others and show them there own potential.

Hendricks latest EP is titled 'Meant to Survive. Recorded in winter of 2012, the music stays true to the spirit and message he stands for. Its a modern twist on an old soul with a real since of honesty behind every track. I feel like we have really pushed our boundaries musically," says Hendricks. "Working with producer Mark McKee has allowed me to open up and deliver the same raw emotion in the studio that I feel during a live performance." Hendricks looks forward to returning to the studio soon. For now, be on the lookout, his is a live performance experience you dont want to miss.

Striving to reach and inspire as many people as possible with his music, Hendricks knows he has his work cut out for him. It is a daunting task, but he is excited to be on a journey that is fueled completely by his utmost passion in life. At the end of the day, the music speaks for itself.

Band Members