Chuck Mosley and VUA
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Chuck Mosley and VUA

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Reversed Image Unlimited To Release

CHUCK MOSLEY’S WILL RAP OVER HARD ROCK FOR FOOD

Former Faith No More Vocalist’s New Solo Album

~August 11, 2009~

New York, NY—Rap and Rock music, though viewed through the public lens as worlds apart, are not as distant from one another as they seem. The energy, aggression, and valiant spirit make them the perfect vehicles for unabashed expression, and rap-rock veteran Chuck Mosley realizes this. He is the embodiment of the unification of these two musical forces, as well as the various musical influences he has accumulated as both an artist and an avid music fan. On August 11, he releases his first solo album Will Rap Over Hard Rock For Food via Cleveland-based label Reversed Image Unlimited.

Mosley’s return with Will Rap Over Hard Rock For Food showcases the Godfather of rap-metal seamlessly blending rock, hip-hop, metal, punk and funk. Recounting his previous work, Mosley, as he describes it, would “rant to the beat.” On his latest effort, Mosley’s musical stew combines this approach with an exploration of his vocal range. It’s apparent that he chose to let his amalgam of cultural saturations melt into this new album, which he describes as “just very normal for me.”

Will Rap… was produced by multi-platinum award-winning producer/engineer Michael Seifert (Bone Thugs-n-Harmony, Fountains of Wayne, and most recently Reversed Image electro-rockers THIS IS A SHAKEDOWN!). Featuring guest appearances from a cast of characters Chuck has affectionately deemed Vanduls Ugenst Allliderasy, John 5 (Rob Zombie, Marilyn Manson), Roddy Bottum (Faith No More, Imperial Teen), and Michael Cartellone (Lynyrd Skynyrd) all contribute to the record. Korn frontman Jonathan Davis (courtesy of Warner Bros. Records), who attributes Mosley as a massive influence, also makes an appearance on the lead single “The Enabler”.

In the 70s, Mosley was just a kid growing up in Southern California with no limitations on his tastes in music. A musical sponge, he studied classical piano for 10 years, while soaking up influences from jazz, rock, pop, and early rap. Eventually signing on to front Faith No More, he crafted these influences to pioneer a whole new take on heavy music. Bringing the rhythm and raw emotion of rap vocals to the riff-laden, chaotic-nature of rock, Mosley became an innovator which many musical acts would emulate, including Korn, Linkin Park, Limp Bizkit, and Kid Rock. He would later front legendary hardcore/reggae group the Bad Brains as well.

On July 28th – August 10th, fans will be able to pre-order Chuck Mosley’s Will Rap Over Hard Rock For Food CD Online at www.ReversedImageUnlimited.com <http://www.ReversedImageUnlimited.com>, and receive a personally autographed CD, plus completed download and a special edition postcard.

Reversed Image Unlimited LLC is a non-traditional, highly innovative record label featuring indie, electronic, rock and pop artists.

Track Listing:
1.) Intro
2.) The Enabler
3.) Tractor
4.) Punk Rock Movie
5.) Nameless
6.) Pile Driver
7.) Come Around
8.) King Arthur’s Cousin, Ted.
9.) Sophie
10.)WCAL
11.)Bob Forest


- Carol Kaye


On August 11, former Faith No More frontman Chuck
Mosley releases his solo debut, 'Will Rap Over Hard Rock
for Food.' The title is, typically, ironic since he's as much a
rapper as he is a singer. It just took him a while to become
fully confident with the latter. "I never thought I was that
good," Mosley tells Spinner. "I always admired people
who could sing in key. But I started to take myself
seriously and got better. I'm in key 95% of the time now,"
he boasts with a giggle.
Mosley says that he only rapped by accident on iconic
FNM songs like 'We Care A Lot,' which he covers on the
new record with FNM keyboard player, Roddy Bottum.
Other guests on the record include Korn frontman
Jonathan Davis, who duets with Mosley on the driving rap metal anthem, 'The Enabler.' Mosley
met Davis in 1996, backstage at a Korn show.
"They told me if I was never born they wouldn't be a band," Mosley says. "Besides me, cause I
have to like myself, Jon is probably my favorite voice in rock right now. I can't believe I'm
hearing that voice I've been admiring for the past ten years on my record. I felt ... proud."
"The rapping thing started with Faith No More," he recalls of his style. "I love melodies and if
it's in my range I can sing it. But their music, I couldn't hear any melodies. At the time, I was a
big fan of rap, even though I wasn't any good at it.
"Let's summarize: I never could sing; I never could rap," he laughs. "But I never let that stop
me."
www.reversedimageunlimited.com - Spinner- Linda Laban


Just looking at Chuck Mosley, you can tell that nothing comes easy for him.
As he steps out of his silver Escalade EXT in front of Ante Up Studios one afternoon in early July, he's a frazzled mess. His trademark medusa-like cornrows are even more disheveled than usual, his Hawaiian-print shirt is wrinkled and unbuttoned, his Dickies sag and his work boots aren't laced all the way up. He's been sick recently and has just returned from a bureaucratic odyssey, applying for a new birth certificate and Social Security card — he lost both — so that he can get a new drivers license — also lost — so that he can fly to a gig in Milwaukee.
Mosley cracks open an early-afternoon Blue Moon and then quietly excuses himself to clean up the floor after it fizzes over.
"The way I walked in here, I looked like I was all fucked up," admits Mosley as he slouches on the studio's leather sofa. "I'm just tired. I've been sick and didn't eat all weekend for like two and a half days. We practiced last night, and that was like the first day I felt OK. I'm not on drugs; I don't have the energy for drugs anymore."
But, at 51, he still hasn't lost his passion for singing. The former frontman for the avant-metal band Faith No More has finally finished a 10-years-in-the-making solo album, the aptly titled Will Rap Over Hard Rock for Food. Despite Mosley's long layoff, the album is getting some national attention. Billboard magazine has already covered it, and AOL is streaming tracks prior to its release next week. And that Milwaukee gig is opening for Korn in front of 5,000 fans.
But this recent success was hard-won. The tale behind the L.A. native's journey to Cleveland is full of twists and setbacks and just-missed opportunities. Just talking about it adds to Mosley's exhaustion. As we listen to the album, which has just gone through final mastering, Mosley nods off, even though studio owner and engineer Michael Seifert has the speakers cranked up so that the studio walls are practically shaking.
Born in Hollywood, Mosley was given up for adoption before he even had the chance to meet his parents. He says he has since discovered that his mom was Jewish and his dad was African American and Native American. (In a strange coincidence, his adoptive parents were of the same ethnic backgrounds.) He studied classical piano for 10 years and was also a motocross enthusiast.
By his late teens, Mosley was hanging out in Venice Beach, spending as much time near the ocean as possible. Later he started attending shows in East Hollywood and joined a band called the Animosity with Billy Gould. That lasted a few years, until Gould left for UC-Berkeley.
Gould would go on to form Faith No Man, which evolved into Faith No More, an art-metal band that had a rotating cast of singers. "They liked somebody and would be enthusiastic until they decided they didn't like them anymore," says Mosley of the band's treatment of vocalists. But the guys liked Mosley, who sang with them whenever they played L.A., so they asked him to join the group. He replaced Courtney Love.
"They had three shows booked and had gotten rid of her," says Mosley, noting that Love had become involved in a complex love triangle within the band. "I did those shows in San Francisco, and I just came out really aggressive. We might have even practiced for those shows. Their fans liked me, and other people around them told them I was good enough. Then it came to going in the studio and actually singing. I could croon a little because I liked David Bowie, but I couldn't do much else." Mosley says he simply "rapped over the stuff where I couldn't hear a melody."
The band's first album, 1985's We Care a Lot was issued on the indie label Mordam and generated a bona fide hit with the anti-anthem title track. (It's now the theme for the cable reality show Dirty Jobs.) Looking back, Mosley says his voice was a work in progress.
"When it came to the stuff that required more singing, I had to really focus to get in tune," he says. "I hear myself out of tune a couple of times on those first two records. You couldn't adjust anything. It was just whatever you could get. [Producer] Matt [Wallace] was good at getting the best out of me."
Right after the release of the equally ambitious Introduce Yourself in 1987, Mosley was booted from the band. He says that contrary to rumors, his drug problem began after his dismissal, not before.
"When we were in the band, I didn't have a drug problem," he says. "I would do drugs. But after the third show and the band became serious, I realized I couldn't do drugs because of the energy output. Whenever we were working, I didn't do drugs. Sometimes people offer you stuff on the road, and sometimes I take it. You know, mushrooms and acid and a line of coke. It was on downtime when I got bored that I would go off and do stuff. But that wasn't why they fired me. They said I quit, and I told them they can't say that. Then rumors started up on the Internet, and I be - Cleveland Scene- Jeff Niesel


On August 11, former Faith No More frontman Chuck Mosley releases his solo debut, 'Will Rap Over Hard Rock for Food.' The title is, typically, ironic since he's as much a rapper as he is a singer. It just took him a while to become fully confident with the latter. "I never thought I was that good," Mosley tells Spinner. "I always admired people who could sing in key. But I started to take myself seriously and got better. I'm in key 95% of the time now," he boasts with a giggle.

Mosley says that he only rapped by accident on iconic FNM songs like 'We Care A Lot,' which he covers on the new record with FNM keyboard player, Roddy Bottum. Other guests on the record include Korn frontman Jonathan Davis, who duets with Mosley on the driving rap metal anthem, 'The Enabler.' Mosley met Davis in 1996, backstage at a Korn show.

"They told me if I was never born they wouldn't be a band," Mosley says. "Besides me, cause I have to like myself, Jon is probably my favorite voice in rock right now. I can't believe I'm hearing that voice I've been admiring for the past ten years on my record. I felt ... proud."

"The rapping thing started with Faith No More," he recalls of his style. "I love melodies and if it's in my range I can sing it. But their music, I couldn't hear any melodies. At the time, I was a big fan of rap, even though I wasn't any good at it.

"Let's summarize: I never could sing; I never could rap," he laughs. "But I never let that stop me."
- AOL Spinner - Linda Labin


~CD Release Party on August 14 at Cleveland’s Beachland Ballroom~

New York, NY—On Friday, August 14, former Faith No More vocalist Chuck Mosley will celebrate the release of his new album, Will Rap Over Hard Rock For Food (Reversed Image Unlimited) at the Beachland Ballroom in Cleveland, OH. The CD will hit stores August 11.

Mosley will proudly present his new material on the Beachland Ballroom stage, with his band Vanduls Ugenst Allliderasy. Cleveland bands Red Giant and The Bomb Selleck will open the show.

After years of fronting various other projects, including Faith No More, Cement and a brief stint with the legendary Bad Brains, Mosley embarked on a solo project that oozes his eclectic soul. Produced by multi-platinum award-winning producer/engineer Michael Seifert (Bone Thugs-n-Harmony, Fountains of Wayne, and Reversed Image electro-rockers THIS IS A SHAKEDOWN!), Will Rap… is a unique blend of rock, punk, funk, hip-hop, and metal. This amalgam of influences is topped with Chuck’s unique vocal delivery, which he describes as “ranting to the beat.” Add a calvacade of musical guests to this CD including Jonathan Davis (KoRn), John 5 (Marilyn Manson, Rob Zombie), Roddy Bottum (Faith No More, Imperial Teen), and Michael Cartellone (Lynryd Skynyrd),RIU label-mate Leah Lou and you have an impressive work of art which is worth the celebration!

Admission is $10 at the door.

Reversed Image Unlimited LLC is a non-traditional, highly innovative record label featuring indie, electronic, rock and pop artists. For more information, regarding this and other Reversed Image Unlimited releases, please contact Carol Kaye at Carol@Kayosproductions.com.

- Carol Kaye


Faith No More may have enjoyed their biggest commercial success with Mike Patton as their singer, but it was his predecessor, Chuck Mosley, who got the ball rolling with such alt-rock classics as 1985’s We Care A Lot and 1987’s Introduce Yourself. Since exiting the band in 1988, not much has been heard from the man who some feel is responsible for first merging rap and rock on the title track from We Care A Lot. But for the past few years, Mosley has been working on his first-ever solo release, Will Rap Over Hard Rock for Food, which drops August 11th.
“It just took that much time to be able to get it done right,” Mosley tells Rolling Stone. “Some of the wonderful people that helped me on this record, I might not have had all of them available five years ago or so. As far as I’m concerned, there isn’t any filler on this album.” The “wonderful people” that Mosley is referencing include Korn’s Jonathan Davis and Rob Zombie’s John 5 (on “The Enabler”), Leah Lou (”Nameless”), and even his ex-FNM bandmate, Roddy Bottum (a remake of “We Care A Lot”).
Interestingly, Mosley’s return coincides with Faith No More’s decision to reunite for live work — with Patton, however. “Of course I have to say that it’s not a total Faith No More reunion. But aside from that, more power to them,” Mosley says. “Good luck, and thanks for helping promote the records that I’m on even a little bit more, and perhaps expanding on my royalties.” However, he recently almost did share the stage once more with the band. “They actually invited me to come out [to Europe] and sing a duet with Mike Patton. But unfortunately, my passport expired and I couldn’t get it in time.”
That said, would Mosley ever reunite with Faith No More? “Oh, totally! Especially with [guitarist] Jim Martin, because personally, I thought [firing Martin] was as big if not bigger a mistake than getting rid of me — just because he had a lot of pull with the big part of their crowd at the time. And he was ‘the personality,’ y’know? There was something people could identify to. After Jim, they were going through a string of different guitar players, and I couldn’t name one of them. That Jagger/Richards, Plant/Page thing was gone.” Mosley plans on supporting Will Rap Over Hard Rock for Food with a full tour.
Related Stories:
• Faith No More Roar Back to Life at London Reunion Show
• After Faith No More, Is There Hope For Other Long-Shot Reunions?
• Faith No More Confirm Reunion, Reveal Lineup
Greg Prato

- Rolling Stone - Greg Prato


Discography

Man With The Action Hair- Cement

Cement- Cement

Introduce Yourself - Faith No More

We Care A Lot - Faith No More

Photos

Bio

A distinctly intriguing character, Chuck Mosley is singer and songwriter and a pioneer of the music genre commonly referred to as “Rap Rock”. Mosley was the original front-man of the groundbreaking and highly influential band Faith No More. He joined the band between 1984 and 1985 replacing Courtney Love (Hole) as lead singer.
He was featured on their debut album We Care a Lot and on their second, Introduce Yourself.

After parting ways with Faith No More in 1988, Mosley went on to form a new band, Cement. Cement released two albums: Cement and Man with the Action Hair. Both albums were distributed by Dutch East India Trading. The band toured the United States and Europe promoting their music. Mosley also spent a brief stint as lead singer in revered hardcore punk band Bad Brains.

In the early 90’s, Mosley relocated to Cleveland, Ohio. He has spent the last several years writing and compiling new material while raising his two daughters Sophie and Erica.

Throughout his hiatus, Chuck has continued to be sited as a major influence by prevalent groups such as Korn, Limp Bizkit, and others. During this time he was featured in Billboard Magazine in spite of the fact that he hadn’t released a record in several years. His original recording of “We Care a Lot” remains as popular and relevant as ever. It is currently the theme song for the Discovery Channel show Dirty Jobs and it was featured prominently in the major motion picture Grosse Pointe Blank (starring John Cusack, Dan Aykroyd, and Minnie Driver). He retains an extremely loyal “cult” following amongst fans, both in the United States and overseas.

Chuck teamed up with multi-platinum producer/engineer Michael Seifert (Reversed Image Unlimited) and inked a record deal for a new full-length album, which was produced at Ante Up Audio, a recording complex in Cleveland, Ohio. The Album, “Will Rap Over Hard Rock For Food” was released on August 11, 2009 by Reversed Image Unlimited. A supplemental series of video blogs chronicling the making of “Will Rap Over Hard Rock For Food” (produced by Bryan Porter of Enigma Digital Media) have been made available online at www.chuckmosleycom.