Cinetrope
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Cinetrope

Atlanta, Georgia, United States | SELF

Atlanta, Georgia, United States | SELF
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Cinetrope
A FINE ROMANCE: "Ochre Haze," the opening track from this Atlanta quartet's new CD, sounds like a jazzier and less synth-centric Stereolab, but that's just part of the story. The flexible, free-ranging vocals of Sharron Scott contain traces of Siouxsie Sioux and Portishead's Beth Gibbons more often than the 'Lab's Laetitia Sadier. Cinetrope's stylish bounce most often recalls the criminally underrated and largely forgotten Canadian group Martha and the Muffins. Go see this CD release show, grab a copy of Cinetrope's groovy "This Strange Romance" and then go check out the Muffins' "This Is the Ice Age." With Five Eight, the Lord Is My Shotgun.

-Shane Harrison - Atlanta Journal Constitution's Access Atlanta 9/29/06


Cinetrope’s film music concept is apparent in the band’s mood-setting dream pop. With the occasional surf-like guitar, front woman Sharron Von Hoene’s Siouxsie Sioux-meets-Nancy Sinatra style and overall David Lynch-esque atmosphere, the band’s indie rock is undeniably ethereal and catchy. In celebration of its latest release “Once I Ruled The World,” a concept album about a zombie-like apocalypse that leaves few survivors, the band is offering a free copy with each paid admission. Atlanta’s Feeding Fingers play an equally ethereal, Cure-like goth pop that takes the listener on a somewhat darker aural exposition. Nerd Parade’s acoustic-y indie pop with occasional electronic flourishes acts as the opening credits to the night’s proceedings.

Jonathan Williams - Metromix Atlanta (Feb 15, 2010)
- Metromix Atlanta


Emergenza Music Festival Semifinals (Cinetrope place 3rd out of 9 bands that evening):
"Cinetrope, the only band this evening with a female lead vocalist, closed out the evening with some of the best compositions, vocalizations and stage presence of the evening." - Emergenza.net


Emergenza Music Festival Semifinals (Cinetrope place 3rd out of 9 bands that evening):
"Cinetrope, the only band this evening with a female lead vocalist, closed out the evening with some of the best compositions, vocalizations and stage presence of the evening." - Emergenza.net


Emergenza Music Festival second set of eliminatory rounds in Atlanta review. (Cinetrope was one of 4 bands out of 10 to be voted on to the next round):

"Cinetrope, the only band of the weekend with a female lead vocalist, ripped it up. Boy did that lady have a voice!" - Emergenza.net


Emergenza Music Festival second set of eliminatory rounds in Atlanta review. (Cinetrope was one of 4 bands out of 10 to be voted on to the next round):

"Cinetrope, the only band of the weekend with a female lead vocalist, ripped it up. Boy did that lady have a voice!" - Emergenza.net


A New Sound
By Tristan D'Ennery


When was the last "alternative" band you heard that was actually alternative? I certainly can't remember. But last night I saw two original bands at the 10 High Club that truly provided an alternative to everything I've been hearing lately: Twelfth Planet and Cinetrope.

Both bands have female leads that, while their vocal styles are a bit different, share a talent for writing poetic, meaningful lyrics that draw the audience in. Twelfth Planet blends rock, jazz, new wave, funk, and world, creating a delicious musical collectivism that really does defy a label. Their songs encompassed everything from a bossa tune with inspirational lyrics to an angst-filled rock odyssey.


Twelfth Planet
Aradia, the vocalist (and sometimes guitarist) of Twelfth Planet, has an electrifying stage presence that hypnotized the crowd for the full 35 minutes that they were on stage - myself included. Her Eastern-influenced dance and the driving rhythmic, melodic quality of their songs made for a tasty combination. The whole band displayed high-caliber musicianship.

Cinetrope has a smooth, spacey sound that is unlike anything I've ever heard. Sharron sings with an almost jazzy texture, reminding me just a little of Portishead. They did a fantastic funked-out cover of Immigrant Song, which everybody loved. Their set brought together the genres of rock, pop, new wave, and something I couldn't quite put my finger on. Whatever it was, it's what made them sound so different. While their style was a little mellower than Twelfth Planet, they kept the entire room equally engaged for the duration of their set.

I highly recommend these bands the next time you're shopping for a CD or looking to check out a great local show. Visit www.twelfthplanet.org and www.cinetrope.net for more info

- AtlantaShows.com


A New Sound
By Tristan D'Ennery


When was the last "alternative" band you heard that was actually alternative? I certainly can't remember. But last night I saw two original bands at the 10 High Club that truly provided an alternative to everything I've been hearing lately: Twelfth Planet and Cinetrope.

Both bands have female leads that, while their vocal styles are a bit different, share a talent for writing poetic, meaningful lyrics that draw the audience in. Twelfth Planet blends rock, jazz, new wave, funk, and world, creating a delicious musical collectivism that really does defy a label. Their songs encompassed everything from a bossa tune with inspirational lyrics to an angst-filled rock odyssey.


Twelfth Planet
Aradia, the vocalist (and sometimes guitarist) of Twelfth Planet, has an electrifying stage presence that hypnotized the crowd for the full 35 minutes that they were on stage - myself included. Her Eastern-influenced dance and the driving rhythmic, melodic quality of their songs made for a tasty combination. The whole band displayed high-caliber musicianship.

Cinetrope has a smooth, spacey sound that is unlike anything I've ever heard. Sharron sings with an almost jazzy texture, reminding me just a little of Portishead. They did a fantastic funked-out cover of Immigrant Song, which everybody loved. Their set brought together the genres of rock, pop, new wave, and something I couldn't quite put my finger on. Whatever it was, it's what made them sound so different. While their style was a little mellower than Twelfth Planet, they kept the entire room equally engaged for the duration of their set.

I highly recommend these bands the next time you're shopping for a CD or looking to check out a great local show. Visit www.twelfthplanet.org and www.cinetrope.net for more info

- AtlantaShows.com


Take Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Portishead, Aimee Mann, Pink Floyd, a Quentin Tarantino Film, and Maybe a Shot of Absinthe..and You Get the Band Cinetrope. They Are Seriously Brilliant. I'm Having Trouble Picking Only One Track to Play. - 99X Radio Atlanta


CD Review: Cinetrope ‘Once I Ruled The World’

May 27, 2010 · Print This Article

As choppy as a White Zombie radio sample, the Spanish words welcome, “Hello, thanks for calling…” and trail off into the electronic buzz and static sounds that give way to the title track, “Once I Ruled The World” by Cinetrope. This band seemingly takes its name from the words for cinema, which is associated with the act of making ‘movies’ or the place in which they are shown, and trope, which pertains to a figure of speech used in nonliteral ways such as metaphor or an embellishment added to certain Medieval songs. Such is a perfect combination of ideas for an album which revolves around a cinematic theme which would lend well as the soundtrack to a zombie motion picture.

The beauty of the music lies in the smooth vocals which range from a sultry, jazz low to an appropriate high. The meshing of vocal melody over an almost disco sound inspires the feeling, again, of a soundtrack. The samples add to this effect and give a more modern, electronic touch reminiscent of early White Zombie albums.

Some of the notable tracks on their own include, “Inside My Head” which hinges on recalling Patsy Cline’s “Crazy” but adds a general queasy theme of unease which ties into the central idea of turning into a zombie. On the more humorous side of fearing returning from the dead is a hidden track with instructions for callers to push the number corresponding to their need for advice on dealing with zombie invasions. “Push ? For the latest list of household items which can be used for defense in a zombie attack” can’t help but to bring a smile.

Once I Ruled The World ends suitable with an instrumental piano suite, “Epilogue” after playing through its songs including Acts Parts 1 and 2 “Apprentice” and “Turning” followed by the “Fear (Reprise). A well-done and artsy recording which would well serve indie film makers. Even the cover art painting of a lady with a 50s style hairdo and pearl earings, by H.C. Warner of www.HCWARNER.com, draws attention. The listener will instantly want to know what her eyes see as they watch just off the cover…let the cinema begin.

Be sure to see Cinetrope in action at The Masquerade on North Avenue for this year’s Strange Daze Music and Art Festival on August 14 and 15. Hear them now and get a copy of Once I Ruled The World at www.myspace.com/cinetrope.

Ellen Eldridge, Indie Contributor - The Silver Tongue


Cinetrope think big. The Atlanta band, whose name means “film music,” have created a concept album about a man-made plague that ends the world (turning people into zombies, of course), the guilt the creator of the plague goes through, and the creator’s ultimate redemption by inventing a spacecraft that allows some people to escape the deadly earth. That said, the story plays a minimal role in the beauty of this CD.

As their name implies, Cinetrope create music that the listener can see. It is rich and ominous at one point, and harsh and danceable the next. Songs such as “Fear” and “Act Part II: Turning” have that same effect of a slowly pulsing ocean of beats and ambiance that the best Radiohead songs have. They’re moody, cerebral, and slightly uncomfortable, but ultimately captivating.

Lead singer Sharron Von Hoene is often compared to Siouxie Sioux, but one listen to pop gems such as “Inside My Head,” and it is obvious she can also pull off the bubbly goodness of singers such as the Submarines’ Blake Hazard. In the song she is happy and giddy and in love (with a scientist who is killing her slowly). It demonstrates a sunnier side to a woman who can do dourness and dismay with the best of them.

While much of the CD is fueled by dream-pop, “Act Part I: Apprentice” offers up some driving rock including a guitar riff that recalls Cheap Trick’s “Dream Police.” And “Stars in My Hands” has a sort of jazzy/funky ’70s feel to it that would fit in well in a Roger Moore-era James Bond flick.

This entire CD has a swirling, moody effect, much like one would imagine such a heady concept album to have. It’s a gorgeous effect. The melodies linger, like dew on a flower petal. Then they slowly seep in and nourish.

Cinetrope take part in the 500 Songs for Kids event at Smith’s Olde Bar, during which they will perform the Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ “Maps,” on Friday, April 30. - Atlanta Music Guide


CD Review: Cinetrope ‘Once I Ruled The World’

May 27, 2010 · Print This Article

As choppy as a White Zombie radio sample, the Spanish words welcome, “Hello, thanks for calling…” and trail off into the electronic buzz and static sounds that give way to the title track, “Once I Ruled The World” by Cinetrope. This band seemingly takes its name from the words for cinema, which is associated with the act of making ‘movies’ or the place in which they are shown, and trope, which pertains to a figure of speech used in nonliteral ways such as metaphor or an embellishment added to certain Medieval songs. Such is a perfect combination of ideas for an album which revolves around a cinematic theme which would lend well as the soundtrack to a zombie motion picture.

The beauty of the music lies in the smooth vocals which range from a sultry, jazz low to an appropriate high. The meshing of vocal melody over an almost disco sound inspires the feeling, again, of a soundtrack. The samples add to this effect and give a more modern, electronic touch reminiscent of early White Zombie albums.

Some of the notable tracks on their own include, “Inside My Head” which hinges on recalling Patsy Cline’s “Crazy” but adds a general queasy theme of unease which ties into the central idea of turning into a zombie. On the more humorous side of fearing returning from the dead is a hidden track with instructions for callers to push the number corresponding to their need for advice on dealing with zombie invasions. “Push ? For the latest list of household items which can be used for defense in a zombie attack” can’t help but to bring a smile.

Once I Ruled The World ends suitable with an instrumental piano suite, “Epilogue” after playing through its songs including Acts Parts 1 and 2 “Apprentice” and “Turning” followed by the “Fear (Reprise). A well-done and artsy recording which would well serve indie film makers. Even the cover art painting of a lady with a 50s style hairdo and pearl earings, by H.C. Warner of www.HCWARNER.com, draws attention. The listener will instantly want to know what her eyes see as they watch just off the cover…let the cinema begin.

Be sure to see Cinetrope in action at The Masquerade on North Avenue for this year’s Strange Daze Music and Art Festival on August 14 and 15. Hear them now and get a copy of Once I Ruled The World at www.myspace.com/cinetrope.

Ellen Eldridge, Indie Contributor - The Silver Tongue


Art-B-Que

Within the Avondale Estates thriving art gallery district, Art-B-Que will celebrate its third year with even more bands, booze, barbecue and fun. Expanding to three days, the event kicks off June 11 with an opening- night party at the Alcove Contemporary Arts Gallery for Tree Huggers, its latest show featuring works by surrealist artists Leslie Ditto and Benji Williams. The opening features a performance by North Carolina new wave garage band Snagglepuss.

The following two days will be filled with the sounds of bands like dream pop act Cinetrope, the arena punk punch of the Biters, the multifaceted rock of Gringo Star and the singer-songwriter strummings of Heather Luttrell. But it wouldn’t be an Art-B-Que without two additional things: art and barbecue. And they will both be available in abundance as local restaurants such as Fox Bros. Bar-B-Q, Smoker and the Bandit and others offer grilled meats and such. And plan on an assortment of arts-and-crafters such as H.C. Warner, Chris Hamer and Becky Sizemore, offering paintings, sculptures, jewelry and various creative wares.

Each day and into the night, area galleries such as Alcove, Little Tree Studios and Bart Webb Studios will feature new works and musical performances. Carnival-like aspects and a parade to kick off Sunday’s festivities, make Art-B-Que an event truly meant for all the sense - AJC Access Atlanta


CINETROPE, FEEDING FINGERS, NERD PARADE Cinetrope celebrates the CD release party for its latest album of melancholy pop, Once I Ruled the World. Goth-tinged pop trio Feeding Fingers and locals Nerd Parade open. $10 (includes CD). 8 p.m. The Five Spot. 404-223-1100. www.fivespot-atl.com. — CR - Creative Loafing


Art-B-Que

Within the Avondale Estates thriving art gallery district, Art-B-Que will celebrate its third year with even more bands, booze, barbecue and fun. Expanding to three days, the event kicks off June 11 with an opening- night party at the Alcove Contemporary Arts Gallery for Tree Huggers, its latest show featuring works by surrealist artists Leslie Ditto and Benji Williams. The opening features a performance by North Carolina new wave garage band Snagglepuss.

The following two days will be filled with the sounds of bands like dream pop act Cinetrope, the arena punk punch of the Biters, the multifaceted rock of Gringo Star and the singer-songwriter strummings of Heather Luttrell. But it wouldn’t be an Art-B-Que without two additional things: art and barbecue. And they will both be available in abundance as local restaurants such as Fox Bros. Bar-B-Q, Smoker and the Bandit and others offer grilled meats and such. And plan on an assortment of arts-and-crafters such as H.C. Warner, Chris Hamer and Becky Sizemore, offering paintings, sculptures, jewelry and various creative wares.

Each day and into the night, area galleries such as Alcove, Little Tree Studios and Bart Webb Studios will feature new works and musical performances. Carnival-like aspects and a parade to kick off Sunday’s festivities, make Art-B-Que an event truly meant for all the sense - AJC Access Atlanta



"Atlanta combo Cinetrope pump out bouncy, new wavish pop-rock, a bit shadowy and moody but easy on the ears, a bit like the later, lighter Siouxie & the Banshees albums. Once I Ruled the World is their new, second CD, with cover artwork by Alcove Gallery's H.C. Warner. "
Jeff Clark - Stomp & Stammer - Stomp & Stammer



"Atlanta combo Cinetrope pump out bouncy, new wavish pop-rock, a bit shadowy and moody but easy on the ears, a bit like the later, lighter Siouxie & the Banshees albums. Once I Ruled the World is their new, second CD, with cover artwork by Alcove Gallery's H.C. Warner. "
Jeff Clark - Stomp & Stammer - Stomp & Stammer


Discography

New Release "Once I Ruled The World" out now.

"This Strange Romance" available also

Photos

Bio

Cinetrope translating to “film music” is a 4 piece from Atlanta.
The unique makeup of influences of its members make Cinetrope hard to classify.
They have had comparisons ranging from Stereolab to Yeah Yeah Yeahs.
The music is heavy melody driven that is dark, dreamy yet danceable with a cinematic feel. Cinetrope have just followed up the critical success of their first release “This Strange Romance” with a concept piece released in 2010 entitled “Once I Ruled The World”.