Cinged Blues
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Cinged Blues

Band Folk Pop

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Music

The best kept secret in music

Press


"An Enthusiastic Crowd"

Charles Gluck and the Cinged Blues band have performed at the Arlington County Fair on numerous occassions and have always been greeted with an enthusiastic crowd. The entertainment at the
Arlington County Fair is on a volunteer basis so to have such talented performers are a huge plus for the Fair. They will always be welcome and we look forward to their return.
- Lester Morgan, Entertainment Chair


"This is a show you won't want to miss."

Cinged Blues combines compelling songwriting, superb musicianship,
wonderful harmonies, and a cool groove to offer one of the finest CDs released in the past year. It certainly doesn't hurt that their disk was produced by perennial Wammie award-winning Producer of the Year Marco Delmar. This is a show you won't want to miss. - Don Bridges, President, Songwriters Association of Washington


"Genius, cinged with dark/light, profane/profound, ordinary/extraordinary"

Genius--it's hard to find. It's rare to find a CD that contrasts the dark and the light, the profane and the profound, and the ordinary and the extrordinary as vividly as does this debut CD by Cinged Blues.

It's even more unusual--and delightful--to find a CD with such compelling themes driven by killer hooks and grooves galore. From the tight, infectious opening riff of "These Stones" to the shimmering textures of "What Do I Do" to the soaring chorus of "Southbound" to the slide-guitar stylings of "Stupid Little Car," the CD traverses an eclectic landscape of folk, blues, pop, gospel, and even African rhythms.

Acoustic-based yet multi-layered, the sonics are full and colorful without being over-produced. If it's not true genius, it's certainly cinged genius.

Although the band sums up its sound as "suburban pop," it often strays beyond the bounds of suburbia.

The songs are inspired by events from Korea, Alabama, Canaan, the Road to Damascus, and a road-rage-filled D.C. parking lot.

Drummer Charles Gluck, who spent part of his childhood in Cameroon, turns a beautiful ballad of faith and hope, "Do Not Be Afraid," into a percussive romp that rocks into tribal hinterlands. In one of the CD's many whimsical moments, guitarist/vocalist Cindi Slaughter analogizes a Korean bus to a strong (or is it headstrong?) woman on "Number 20."

This whimsy tempers the largely spiritual tensions at the heart of the CD. "What Do I Do" imagines St. Paul in an existential crisis at the crossroads of Judaism and Christianity. "These Stones" and "Profanity of Perfection" are cries for deliverance from destructive habits of the heart. "Southbound" is about the mind--not a train.

In one of the CD's darker moments, the bridge of "Do You Know What I Mean," the combination of a distorted guitar, chimes, and an ominous Mike Brown-bass line turn the quai-romantic lyrics into a cynical plea for understanding.

Cinged Blues pauses from the darkness and introspection long enough for listeners to savor the CD's lighter moments. On perhaps the brightest and most melodic track of the collection, "Love Like Yours," keyboardist/singer Jennifer Gluck delivers an unabashed anthem of true love to her drummer-husband: "Love like yours . . . makes love like mine . . . deeper, stronger . . . to stand the test of time."

Even amidst tracks of tension and turmoil, the band finds humor and hope. Inter-personal struggles are parodied in the irreverant jams, "Stupid Little Car" and "Talking Part Down," and cinged with hope in the poignant, "Daddy."

The untitled, hidden track at the end of the CD celebrates new life with a strange twist and a wacky sense of humor.

At its core, "Accidental Genius" is a celebration of life and faith in the midst of suburban, urban, and universal struggle, confusion, and heavy traffic. It makes a memorable musical ride--one of the year's greatest.
- Steve Clark, free lance writer


Discography

Cinged Blues released "Accidental Genius" in September 2004.

It will be recieving airplay on XM radio and is available for purchase through CD Baby and the Cinged Blues websites.

Photos

Feeling a bit camera shy

Bio

Genius--it's hard to find. And if it's not true genius, it's certainly cinged genius.

You can see it from the tight, infectious riff of "These Stones" to the shimmering textures of "What Do I Do" to the soaring chorus of "Southbound" to the slide-guitar stylings of "Stupid Little Car.

Cinged Blues traverses an eclectic landscape of folk, blues, pop, gospel, and even African rhythms.

Acoustic-based, the songs are inspired by events from Korea, Alabama, Canaan, the Road to Damascus, and a road-rage-filled D.C. parking lot.

Drummer Charles Gluck, who spent part of his childhood in Cameroon, turns a beautiful ballad of faith and hope, "Do Not Be Afraid," into a percussive romp that rocks into tribal hinterlands.

Guitarist/vocalist Cindi Slaughter analogizes a Korean bus to a strong (or is it headstrong?) woman on "Number 20."

Inter-personal struggles are parodied in the irreverant jams, "Stupid Little Car" and "Talking Part Down," and cinged with hope in the poignant, "Daddy."

In "Love Like Yours," keyboardist/vocalist Jennifer Gluck delivers an unabashed anthem of true love to her drummer-husband: "Love like yours . . . makes love like mine . . . deeper, stronger . . . to stand the test of time."

A Cinged Blues concert includes a lot of on-stage banter and humor, intermingled with some jamming and lyrics that read like a great book.