Code Pie
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Code Pie

Montréal, Quebec, Canada | SELF

Montréal, Quebec, Canada | SELF
Band Rock Pop

Calendar

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Apr
07
Code Pie @ Clark Hall, Queens University

Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Apr
03
Code Pie @ Casa del Popolo

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Mar
10
Code Pie @ TBA

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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Music

Press



Montreal has adopted a new musical trend, consisting of
smart, compositionally complicated indie-rock. With
Stars and The Arcade Fire already leading the way, let
me introduce Code Pie, a six-piece multi-gendered
collective that may very well be the next to bathe in
mainstream acclaim. With a multi-layered approach akin
to Win and Regine, Code Pie has crafted an impressive
collection of textured tracks that could beck and call any
indie enthusiast. With a cellist and trumpeter (both
female by the way) accompanying riff-heavy, '80s�
influenced guitar chords and strong, dance-fused new
wave rhythmic lines, Code Pie's take on smart,
politicized indie is as gorgeous as anything else
currently being crafted in Montreal. My proof is "Cement
Truck" and "Gala." Go ahead, see for yourself.
[SHAIN SHAPIRO] - SHAIN SHAPIRO



Montreal has adopted a new musical trend, consisting of
smart, compositionally complicated indie-rock. With
Stars and The Arcade Fire already leading the way, let
me introduce Code Pie, a six-piece multi-gendered
collective that may very well be the next to bathe in
mainstream acclaim. With a multi-layered approach akin
to Win and Regine, Code Pie has crafted an impressive
collection of textured tracks that could beck and call any
indie enthusiast. With a cellist and trumpeter (both
female by the way) accompanying riff-heavy, '80s�
influenced guitar chords and strong, dance-fused new
wave rhythmic lines, Code Pie's take on smart,
politicized indie is as gorgeous as anything else
currently being crafted in Montreal. My proof is "Cement
Truck" and "Gala." Go ahead, see for yourself.
[SHAIN SHAPIRO] - SHAIN SHAPIRO



It would be misleading to call this local sextet an orchestral pop band, despite their occasionally clean melodies and prominent trumpet and cello. They don't fit the modern indie-rock mould either, though the youthful energy of their guitars, handclaps, Casio cooing and falsetto backup vocals would merit an honourary membership in the indie club, (not to mention "Gala," which sounds like an outtake from the first Strokes album). Their pensive intros, escalating arrangements and the heady sheen of their peaking guitars bring a touch of post-rock to proceedings, completing the triangular seduction of this debut disc. 8/10 - Lorraine Carpenter



It would be misleading to call this local sextet an orchestral pop band, despite their occasionally clean melodies and prominent trumpet and cello. They don't fit the modern indie-rock mould either, though the youthful energy of their guitars, handclaps, Casio cooing and falsetto backup vocals would merit an honourary membership in the indie club, (not to mention "Gala," which sounds like an outtake from the first Strokes album). Their pensive intros, escalating arrangements and the heady sheen of their peaking guitars bring a touch of post-rock to proceedings, completing the triangular seduction of this debut disc. 8/10 - Lorraine Carpenter



A delightfully expansive indie-rock sound emerges on the second release by this Montreal collective. Broken Social Scene fans who lost the plot in trying to follow that band's cluttered last album might find more to like here, where the jangly musicianship still leaves room for the melodies. Recorded by producer Brian Paulson (Beck, Wilco, Superchunk) and local music scene vets Kevin Komoda, Howard Bilerman and Thierry Amar at Mile End's fabled Hotel2tango studio, the album features 16 songs that fly freely through friendly skies. Trumpets, strings, twinkling guitars and an intuitive attraction to the modestly anthemic make for good times, and feel-good tunes.
Rating 4 (out of 5) - The Montreal Gazette



A delightfully expansive indie-rock sound emerges on the second release by this Montreal collective. Broken Social Scene fans who lost the plot in trying to follow that band's cluttered last album might find more to like here, where the jangly musicianship still leaves room for the melodies. Recorded by producer Brian Paulson (Beck, Wilco, Superchunk) and local music scene vets Kevin Komoda, Howard Bilerman and Thierry Amar at Mile End's fabled Hotel2tango studio, the album features 16 songs that fly freely through friendly skies. Trumpets, strings, twinkling guitars and an intuitive attraction to the modestly anthemic make for good times, and feel-good tunes.
Rating 4 (out of 5) - The Montreal Gazette



When this Montreal band came out with their still-fabulous debut, This Habit, it criminally flew under everyone’s Montreal music meter but hopefully, this jam-packed, fun, fast-paced follow-up will change that. Where This Habit succeeded in mixing slow build-ups with crazy climaxes, Yous goes for broke, getting rid of the tension and relief, going for the melodic jugular with every track. Stuffing 16 tracks of frantic drums, urgent vocals and vibrant trumpet into the mix would leave anyone a little breathless, and while sometimes the tracks bleed into one another and the focus is a little blurry, the high points are very high. “Conway Killjoy” is the perfect encapsulation of the Code Pie sound, capturing their youthful energy, layered horns and cheerful optimism perfectly. “The Surface” feels like it came off of their debut (which is a good thing) and “New You” is perfect for those who want to swim in languid, easy-going melody. Indeed, Code Pie know how to revel in their party but, as “Home” showcases, they can also do subtle and beautiful. This band is busting at the musical seams, so now is a good time to take notice of their amazing bag of tricks.(Flagless) - Exclaim



When this Montreal band came out with their still-fabulous debut, This Habit, it criminally flew under everyone’s Montreal music meter but hopefully, this jam-packed, fun, fast-paced follow-up will change that. Where This Habit succeeded in mixing slow build-ups with crazy climaxes, Yous goes for broke, getting rid of the tension and relief, going for the melodic jugular with every track. Stuffing 16 tracks of frantic drums, urgent vocals and vibrant trumpet into the mix would leave anyone a little breathless, and while sometimes the tracks bleed into one another and the focus is a little blurry, the high points are very high. “Conway Killjoy” is the perfect encapsulation of the Code Pie sound, capturing their youthful energy, layered horns and cheerful optimism perfectly. “The Surface” feels like it came off of their debut (which is a good thing) and “New You” is perfect for those who want to swim in languid, easy-going melody. Indeed, Code Pie know how to revel in their party but, as “Home” showcases, they can also do subtle and beautiful. This band is busting at the musical seams, so now is a good time to take notice of their amazing bag of tricks.(Flagless) - Exclaim


By Scott A. Gray

Bursting with energy, Code Pie delivered songs mostly culled from their recent album to an enthusiastic crowd at Casa Del Popolo. The intensity of the performance gave the material a punkier edge live, especially in the gruff vocals. Solid cello, great horn melodies, a fantastic rhythm section and tasteful atmospheric leads on the guitar bolstered the band's awesome pop powers. Possessing a powerful group dynamic reminiscent of Modest Mouse by way of the Arcade Fire, it should only be a matter of time before Code Pie become one of Canada's prime musical exports.



- Exclaim


By Scott A. Gray

Bursting with energy, Code Pie delivered songs mostly culled from their recent album to an enthusiastic crowd at Casa Del Popolo. The intensity of the performance gave the material a punkier edge live, especially in the gruff vocals. Solid cello, great horn melodies, a fantastic rhythm section and tasteful atmospheric leads on the guitar bolstered the band's awesome pop powers. Possessing a powerful group dynamic reminiscent of Modest Mouse by way of the Arcade Fire, it should only be a matter of time before Code Pie become one of Canada's prime musical exports.



- Exclaim



Code Pie are a self-professed band of geeks. Apart from the fact that several of the band’s members hold careers in the technology field, the lively six-piece was initially formed through an internet ad. Yet, nowadays such aspects seem hardly unconventional. As technological occupations become more frequent and the internet continues to expand in use, it is not at all surprising when a band claims that they “met on the internet.” Using such contemporary skills, eventual lead vocalist and guitarist Enzo Palermo understood coherently that the internet could lead to life-changing experiences — musically and otherwise. Palermo, a professional graphic designer, put up an internet ad in 2002 as he searched for musicians to vacate the lineup for his anticipated musical project. When guitarist Salvatore Ciofli replied and the two hit it off, they began to compose several tunes that Palermo described as a mixture of electronic minimalism and post-rock. As other members, like bassist Michel Semienchuck and drummer Vince Varano, began to join, the group’s sound evolved into a more straightforward, accessible form of rock ‘n’ roll.

Upon the arrival of trumpeter Eva Boodman and cellist Rebecca Lessard, it appeared as if the now resolute sextet had finally traveled the long and grueling road to the discovery of a consistent stylistic method. With classic rock influences overshadowing a slight ska tinge of brass elements, they began to draw a local following in their native Canada. Ironically, they still had yet to decide on a name. Though they originally called themselves the unoriginal but amusing “Three Wops, Two Jews and a Ukrainian”, Palermo eventually decided on a name that would be deemed less controversial while implementing a bit of an inside joke for fellow computer programmers: Code Pie. When they released their debut album, This Habit, in 2005, it was an expressive display of their lovable DIY intellect. Openly revealing that the recording of the album was cut on a $700 budget using rented equipment and recorded in a variety of locations from a high school auditorium to the band members’ apartments, it sounded surprisingly professional considering Code Pie’s insufficient resources. Filled with catchy punk-edged guitar riffs and a concrete rhythm section, it was an enjoyably energetic debut that caught the attention of those who were caught in the appeal of a boastful six-member band. Even more appropriately, This Habit was released on their self-funded label, Flagless Records.

Due to local success and a bit of blogging chit-chat concerning Code Pie’s energetic live presence, This Habit led to a redistribution deal with PHD Canada, one of Canada’s most prominent music distributors. Since the distributive agreement, Code Pie have earned understandable comparisons to Arcade Fire on more than one basis. Due to the sheer facts that both bands hail from Montreal and contain a trumpeter and a cellist in their lineups, I suppose up-to-date Canadian music fans saw the evident comparisons even prior to the release of Funeral in 2004. However, as much as both bands enjoy the dramatic flair and the local limelight, the comparisons are nearly entirely superficial. Code Pie are more rooted in punk influences while Arcade Fire appear more fixated on orchestral emotion and overall ambitiousness. Despite some occasional likenesses, they are in separate leagues of stylistic importance. Code Pie’s two albums consist of songs that often utilize a consistent instrumental approach while Arcade Fire’s albums represent more of a grandiose quality, successfully attempting a variety of lyrical and instrumental methods in a fervent display of familial-based emotion. Despite such blatant musical differences, there remains one aspect that both can relate to. Resonating purely, they never give off a dull impression.

The Most Trusted Name in Yous is Code Pie’s second album, released on June 16th and now available on their own Flagless Records. A sprawling, ceaselessly entertaining release that stretches over sixteen tracks in nearly an hour, it is yet another sophomore album that enhances the previously distinguishable style of its predecessor. Code Pie now appears quite at ease with the use of Boodman’s trumpet and Lessard’s viola. Whereas This Habit saw more songs with a guitar-driven, punk-ridden aroma, nearly every song on The Most Trusted Name in Yous implements either a viola or trumpet. That being said, the band has fortunately shown no reluctance toward guitar or rhythm. The aggressively dynamic “Kinsey, Are We Even?” offers a fair share of each instrument as Palermo vocally relays a catchy form of energy reminiscent of excitable alt-rock acts in the vein of Mclusky. As he hoots and hollers a series of lyrical repetitions, Lessard’s backing vocals add a nice supplemental touch, employing a sense of rare serenity in a scene of chaos. “Conway Killjoy” is another track where the brass shines along with Palermo’s vigorous ene - Obscure Sound



Code Pie are a self-professed band of geeks. Apart from the fact that several of the band’s members hold careers in the technology field, the lively six-piece was initially formed through an internet ad. Yet, nowadays such aspects seem hardly unconventional. As technological occupations become more frequent and the internet continues to expand in use, it is not at all surprising when a band claims that they “met on the internet.” Using such contemporary skills, eventual lead vocalist and guitarist Enzo Palermo understood coherently that the internet could lead to life-changing experiences — musically and otherwise. Palermo, a professional graphic designer, put up an internet ad in 2002 as he searched for musicians to vacate the lineup for his anticipated musical project. When guitarist Salvatore Ciofli replied and the two hit it off, they began to compose several tunes that Palermo described as a mixture of electronic minimalism and post-rock. As other members, like bassist Michel Semienchuck and drummer Vince Varano, began to join, the group’s sound evolved into a more straightforward, accessible form of rock ‘n’ roll.

Upon the arrival of trumpeter Eva Boodman and cellist Rebecca Lessard, it appeared as if the now resolute sextet had finally traveled the long and grueling road to the discovery of a consistent stylistic method. With classic rock influences overshadowing a slight ska tinge of brass elements, they began to draw a local following in their native Canada. Ironically, they still had yet to decide on a name. Though they originally called themselves the unoriginal but amusing “Three Wops, Two Jews and a Ukrainian”, Palermo eventually decided on a name that would be deemed less controversial while implementing a bit of an inside joke for fellow computer programmers: Code Pie. When they released their debut album, This Habit, in 2005, it was an expressive display of their lovable DIY intellect. Openly revealing that the recording of the album was cut on a $700 budget using rented equipment and recorded in a variety of locations from a high school auditorium to the band members’ apartments, it sounded surprisingly professional considering Code Pie’s insufficient resources. Filled with catchy punk-edged guitar riffs and a concrete rhythm section, it was an enjoyably energetic debut that caught the attention of those who were caught in the appeal of a boastful six-member band. Even more appropriately, This Habit was released on their self-funded label, Flagless Records.

Due to local success and a bit of blogging chit-chat concerning Code Pie’s energetic live presence, This Habit led to a redistribution deal with PHD Canada, one of Canada’s most prominent music distributors. Since the distributive agreement, Code Pie have earned understandable comparisons to Arcade Fire on more than one basis. Due to the sheer facts that both bands hail from Montreal and contain a trumpeter and a cellist in their lineups, I suppose up-to-date Canadian music fans saw the evident comparisons even prior to the release of Funeral in 2004. However, as much as both bands enjoy the dramatic flair and the local limelight, the comparisons are nearly entirely superficial. Code Pie are more rooted in punk influences while Arcade Fire appear more fixated on orchestral emotion and overall ambitiousness. Despite some occasional likenesses, they are in separate leagues of stylistic importance. Code Pie’s two albums consist of songs that often utilize a consistent instrumental approach while Arcade Fire’s albums represent more of a grandiose quality, successfully attempting a variety of lyrical and instrumental methods in a fervent display of familial-based emotion. Despite such blatant musical differences, there remains one aspect that both can relate to. Resonating purely, they never give off a dull impression.

The Most Trusted Name in Yous is Code Pie’s second album, released on June 16th and now available on their own Flagless Records. A sprawling, ceaselessly entertaining release that stretches over sixteen tracks in nearly an hour, it is yet another sophomore album that enhances the previously distinguishable style of its predecessor. Code Pie now appears quite at ease with the use of Boodman’s trumpet and Lessard’s viola. Whereas This Habit saw more songs with a guitar-driven, punk-ridden aroma, nearly every song on The Most Trusted Name in Yous implements either a viola or trumpet. That being said, the band has fortunately shown no reluctance toward guitar or rhythm. The aggressively dynamic “Kinsey, Are We Even?” offers a fair share of each instrument as Palermo vocally relays a catchy form of energy reminiscent of excitable alt-rock acts in the vein of Mclusky. As he hoots and hollers a series of lyrical repetitions, Lessard’s backing vocals add a nice supplemental touch, employing a sense of rare serenity in a scene of chaos. “Conway Killjoy” is another track where the brass shines along with Palermo’s vigorous ene - Obscure Sound



L’evoluzione del Brit Pop viene dal Canada, ha musicisti che si chiamano Salvatore Ciolfi, Enzo Palermo, Vince Varano, ha un numero spaventoso di “additional musicians, thinkers and noise makers”. Fantastico, splendente, di ottimo umore. Un disco che ha un ottimo umore. Non c’è una-canzone-una che non carichi a molla il cervello imprimendogli una scarica di raggiante serenità. Carica propulsiva, zucchero e tanti ricordi che si perdono dietro a un pop allegro, contaminato, distorto. Un sound potente….un bel muro a mattoni. Chitarre che non badano a finezze di sorta, trombe, violini, gli Arcade Fire e il loro alchemico trambusto, mescolati a dovere all’elettricità ansiosa dei Doves e allo scazzo, all’arroganza giovanile dei primi Supergrass. Una voce che raschia, incede spavalda, marcia sulle vostre frustrazioni senza troppi complimenti e si va a prendere l’ultima goccia di luce su quel cazzo di sole. Un disco con un’urgenza sonora pressante, particolare, semplice eppure ipnotica. “Contemplato, scritto, registrato, finanziato durante un periodo di due anni (che comprendono 20 canzoni, un tremendo blackout e molte tempeste di stagione)” questo disco brucia più dell’estate che vi si addormenta ogni giorno sulla pelle recentemente. Quando arrivano dischi così in redazione non sono contento. Sono estasiato. - Indie For Bunnies



L’evoluzione del Brit Pop viene dal Canada, ha musicisti che si chiamano Salvatore Ciolfi, Enzo Palermo, Vince Varano, ha un numero spaventoso di “additional musicians, thinkers and noise makers”. Fantastico, splendente, di ottimo umore. Un disco che ha un ottimo umore. Non c’è una-canzone-una che non carichi a molla il cervello imprimendogli una scarica di raggiante serenità. Carica propulsiva, zucchero e tanti ricordi che si perdono dietro a un pop allegro, contaminato, distorto. Un sound potente….un bel muro a mattoni. Chitarre che non badano a finezze di sorta, trombe, violini, gli Arcade Fire e il loro alchemico trambusto, mescolati a dovere all’elettricità ansiosa dei Doves e allo scazzo, all’arroganza giovanile dei primi Supergrass. Una voce che raschia, incede spavalda, marcia sulle vostre frustrazioni senza troppi complimenti e si va a prendere l’ultima goccia di luce su quel cazzo di sole. Un disco con un’urgenza sonora pressante, particolare, semplice eppure ipnotica. “Contemplato, scritto, registrato, finanziato durante un periodo di due anni (che comprendono 20 canzoni, un tremendo blackout e molte tempeste di stagione)” questo disco brucia più dell’estate che vi si addormenta ogni giorno sulla pelle recentemente. Quando arrivano dischi così in redazione non sono contento. Sono estasiato. - Indie For Bunnies



What the hell is it with Montreal? How does that place keep producing amazing, creative, and completely independent bands like Code Pie? I mean, these guys don’t even have a label, it looks like they made their CD cases on a Xerox, but their energetic, upbeat, trumpet-adorned art rock still ranks up there with the other boundary-pushing bands in the genre (the Old Soul, Broken Social Scene, Think About Life, etc. etc.), still catches you and makes you wanna move. Created over a period of two years, with the help of various friends in the face of all kind of adversity (blackouts, failed government grants), The Most Trusted Name in Yous has finally come to fruition, officially launched June 15, likely to blow minds and rock parties in cities near you.

- James Sandham - The Spill Magazine



What the hell is it with Montreal? How does that place keep producing amazing, creative, and completely independent bands like Code Pie? I mean, these guys don’t even have a label, it looks like they made their CD cases on a Xerox, but their energetic, upbeat, trumpet-adorned art rock still ranks up there with the other boundary-pushing bands in the genre (the Old Soul, Broken Social Scene, Think About Life, etc. etc.), still catches you and makes you wanna move. Created over a period of two years, with the help of various friends in the face of all kind of adversity (blackouts, failed government grants), The Most Trusted Name in Yous has finally come to fruition, officially launched June 15, likely to blow minds and rock parties in cities near you.

- James Sandham - The Spill Magazine


Discography

This Habit (LP) released April 10th 2005.

The Most Trusted Name in Yous (LP) released June 16th 2007.

Love Meets Rage (LP), April 5th 2011.

New (EP), Summer 2013

Photos

Bio

By the standards of the fickle world of independent music, Code Pie’s history is a long one. It began with a series of home recordings by singer Enzo Palermo in the year 2000. Two years later Palermo contacted guitarist Salvatore Ciolfi through an internet ad, and the two began writing and playing music together. The duo were soon joined by drummer Vince Varano, bassist Michel Semienchuk, trumpet player Eva Boodman and cellist Rebecca Lessard, and the newly minted sextet began playing shows in and around Montreal.

Their first album, This Habit, was recorded on a shoestring budget of $700 and released in April of 2005. Using rented equipment, the band recorded tracks in various locations, including a high school auditorium, family homes, apartments and offices. To release the album, the band founded Flagless Records.

Code Pie’s second album, The Most Trusted Name in Yous (June 2007) was recorded over a period of more than a year at Montreal’s Hotel 2 Tango studio with Howard Bilerman, Brian Paulson and Kevin Komoda.. Also entirely self-produced and financed, the band once again released the album on their own Flagless Records.

Following the release of that album, Code Pie appeared at Canadian Music Week, Pop Montreal, North by Northeast, the Halifax Pop Explosion, and the In the City emerging music festival in Manchester. Still not entirely sick of each other, the band decided to take some time off from performing in 2009 to work on new material. Once again, they did all the recording for the album themselves at Varano’s D.I.R.T studio in Montreal, with mixing help from Kevin Komoda of Hotel 2 Tango. The result is Love Meets Rage.