Conjunto Los Pochos
Gig Seeker Pro

Conjunto Los Pochos

Band Latin World

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


"Great stuff! What a thrill stepping out of our cultural vapor-lock for a genuine, soulful music that needs no mainstream. 'Conjunto Los Pochos' is a musical treasure to behold!"
- M. Cummings, Heart of the Underground


"Don't fear the accordion. Otoño Luján takes the much-maligned instrument to refreshing heights on Margie's, an energetic combination of original and traditional songs. The vocal interplay between Luján and Elliott Baribeault is playful and pleasing throughout Margie's. Their original songs, mostly penned by Baribeault, hold up impressively well when stacked side-by-side against the music of their predecessors. Baribeault displays a keen interest in the foibles of human relationships...

Los Pochos has more going on than meets the ear on first listen. These toe-tapping, dance-friendly songs have a layer of darkness that makes the celebration all the more poignant. When they salute their ancestors, they do so mostly through traditional conjunto music, but Hank Cochran and Harlan Howard's "I Fall To Pieces" is also given a loving treatment."
- Adam McKibbin, Entertainment Today


Discography

Margie's (Latest album), 2004
Conjunto Los Pochos (Self-titled album), 1999

CDs available for previewing and purchase now at:
http://www.cdbaby.com/all/lospochos

Photos

Bio

Conjunto Los Pochos' core members, Otoño Luján (button-accordion) and Elliott Baribeault (bajo sexto) met in 1996 at the California Institute of the Arts. The two Southern California natives played traditional conjunto music as a duet at backyard barbeques and for anyone who wanted to enjoy Conjunto music. In the summer of 1997, the four-piece ensemble "Conjunto Los Pochos" was born.

The band's name initially came about to address the perceived peculiarity of a bunch of [primarily] acculturated Mexicans (Pochos), barely speaking Spanish and playing "Norteño" music (border music from Northern Mexico). Ironically though, this music - having stemmed from the merging of European and Texas-Mexican cultures in the late 1800's - continues to reflect the process of Pochismo (or acculturation) through its lyrics and music.

Conjunto Los Pochos has lived this music at dance halls, weddings, concerts and a variety of venues from the Eastside to the Westside, throughout Southern California and across the country. They have developed their unique sound that combines elements of both Texas and Mexico conjunto styles with original music as well as classic favorites. They have been joined by Ernesto Molina (1999) and veteran musician, Lorenzo Martinez (2001), who tour with the band and play on their newly released CD “Margie’s.” Los Pochos has performed regularly at the Annual Grassroots Music Festivals in New York and North Carolina and at the Annual Tejano Conjunto Festival in San Antonio, Texas. The band has appeared on KMEX/Channel 34’s “Los Angeles Al Día” and has performed alongside legendary musicians such as Poncho Sánchez, Los Dos Gilbertos, Flaco Jimenez and Little Joe y La Familia.

Los Pochos has arrived at the year 2005 successfully presenting a genuine L.A. expression of traditional Conjunto music to a steadily growing audience that cuts across race, nationality and social status.