CSHARP
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CSHARP

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"C-sharp poised to deliver new note"

Tuesday, October 26, 2004

The landscape of the Jamaican music industry is about to be turned on its ear with the official launch of the music band C-sharp on Saturday, October 30 at the Ranny Williams Entertainment Centre in Kingston.

The five-member all-male group, comprised of graduates of the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts - Aeion Hoilett (bass), Mark Bradford (lead vocals), Dwain Campbell-Fletcher (keyboard), Randevon Patrick (Drums), and Lamont Savory (guitar)-is in fact no stranger to the entertainment scene, having been in existence now some 3 1/2 years.

"Most people know C-sharp to be a backing band," bassist Hoilett says. Indeed, the list of entries on the group's resume is impressive, including work with artistes of the ilk of Roberta Flack and Peabo Bryson, and tours with Tony Rebel. They have done concerts in Europe, Suriname (Carifesta), the Bahamas and Haiti.

But now the members of C-sharp, who have recently been doing the rounds in media appearances in Kingston, are set to move from supporting role and take the spotlight as a main act.

"We're ready to provide Jamaicans with entertainment that is second to none," Hoilett explains. "What C-sharp brings to the table is versatility, in that we can play dancehall, we can play reggae, we all sing, but we also add a whole dramatic presentation to a show, not just the ordinary show where you just set up the boxes and a man come on and sing. We are here to do a performance."

The group, who lists Third World as one of their musical influences, refuses to be pigeonholed about their sound. Although their music is predominantly indigenous reggae in nature, the group is determined to take it beyond the geographical confines of home-their upcoming album, due in stores in January 2005, will feature two Spanish/French language songs-so there are other flavours that spice up a delectable gumbo of eclectic offerings, including salsa, hip-hop, and gospel.

The members of the group, whose mean age is 22, have all come from a religious background. "All the roots spring from the church," keyboardist Campbell-Fletcher says proudly. Lead vocalist Bradford concurs, pointing out that the group's music is, importantly, wholesome family-oriented entertainment, in a time when popular music seems to be going the route of vulgarity, profanity and debasement.

Without a clear-cut mandate to preach, however, the group is nevertheless committed to making its mark and fulfilling a long-term goal of packing auditoriums and concert halls with people and seeing them transformed by "the healing power of music".

The launch on Saturday night should inspire a new chapter in the musical biography of Jamaica. It is not an album launch, the group's manager, Robert Stewart of Alternative Music, stresses. He sees the band being a catalyst for change within the music industry.

"It's really the first time Jamaica will see them perform as C-sharp, and not a backing band. We just want the country to know that. this is what we're coming to give Jamaica," he adds.

Saturday night's show is titled "A moment with C-sharp" and will feature a full-scale entertainment package including dancing and drama, and see a performance of two other bands from Edna Manley-Centrestage band and Further Notice. The group To Isis is also scheduled to appear. The show will kick off at 7:00 sharp. Admission is free.

- Sharon Leach, Observer writer


"C-sharp poised to deliver new note"

Tuesday, October 26, 2004

The landscape of the Jamaican music industry is about to be turned on its ear with the official launch of the music band C-sharp on Saturday, October 30 at the Ranny Williams Entertainment Centre in Kingston.

The five-member all-male group, comprised of graduates of the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts - Aeion Hoilett (bass), Mark Bradford (lead vocals), Dwain Campbell-Fletcher (keyboard), Randevon Patrick (Drums), and Lamont Savory (guitar)-is in fact no stranger to the entertainment scene, having been in existence now some 3 1/2 years.

"Most people know C-sharp to be a backing band," bassist Hoilett says. Indeed, the list of entries on the group's resume is impressive, including work with artistes of the ilk of Roberta Flack and Peabo Bryson, and tours with Tony Rebel. They have done concerts in Europe, Suriname (Carifesta), the Bahamas and Haiti.

But now the members of C-sharp, who have recently been doing the rounds in media appearances in Kingston, are set to move from supporting role and take the spotlight as a main act.

"We're ready to provide Jamaicans with entertainment that is second to none," Hoilett explains. "What C-sharp brings to the table is versatility, in that we can play dancehall, we can play reggae, we all sing, but we also add a whole dramatic presentation to a show, not just the ordinary show where you just set up the boxes and a man come on and sing. We are here to do a performance."

The group, who lists Third World as one of their musical influences, refuses to be pigeonholed about their sound. Although their music is predominantly indigenous reggae in nature, the group is determined to take it beyond the geographical confines of home-their upcoming album, due in stores in January 2005, will feature two Spanish/French language songs-so there are other flavours that spice up a delectable gumbo of eclectic offerings, including salsa, hip-hop, and gospel.

The members of the group, whose mean age is 22, have all come from a religious background. "All the roots spring from the church," keyboardist Campbell-Fletcher says proudly. Lead vocalist Bradford concurs, pointing out that the group's music is, importantly, wholesome family-oriented entertainment, in a time when popular music seems to be going the route of vulgarity, profanity and debasement.

Without a clear-cut mandate to preach, however, the group is nevertheless committed to making its mark and fulfilling a long-term goal of packing auditoriums and concert halls with people and seeing them transformed by "the healing power of music".

The launch on Saturday night should inspire a new chapter in the musical biography of Jamaica. It is not an album launch, the group's manager, Robert Stewart of Alternative Music, stresses. He sees the band being a catalyst for change within the music industry.

"It's really the first time Jamaica will see them perform as C-sharp, and not a backing band. We just want the country to know that. this is what we're coming to give Jamaica," he adds.

Saturday night's show is titled "A moment with C-sharp" and will feature a full-scale entertainment package including dancing and drama, and see a performance of two other bands from Edna Manley-Centrestage band and Further Notice. The group To Isis is also scheduled to appear. The show will kick off at 7:00 sharp. Admission is free.

- Sharon Leach, Observer writer


Discography

CD Title "What A Day "
Singles: Who's Gonna Save the poor, No More, Road To Zion, Dancing Like Crazy, Play a song, Tonight, Rebel

Photos

Bio

Perhaps you’ve seen or heard of them, but one thing is for sure, they have one of the most exquisite amalgamations of musical talent that the island of Jamaica has seen in a long time. Originally referred to as Sentimental Touch in the ‘jazz world’, C-Sharp came together in December 2001 with core members, Aeion “Yaaka” Hoilett, Dwain “Wiya” Campbell and Ordean “Bingy” Francis while studying at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts. All hailing from the North Coast, the group began their journey in the renowned “Room 13” at the college, ‘jamming’ for hours after classes.
Needing to satisfy their insatiable appetite for playing music, during the first two years of coming together, the guys played at weddings, school concerts and many other small events once the opportunity arose. During this time guitarist Lamont “Monty” Savory joined the group and C-Sharp formed alliances with great musical influences such as Ibo Cooper, of the famed Third World Band, that would later on prove very influential in their becoming the renowned group they are today.

In perfecting their sound C Sharp changed faces by welcoming Randevon “Randy” Patrick as new drummer, and Chevaughn Clayton with his dynamic vocal skills as lead singer, both bringing a solid sound to an already eclectic five-man band. C-Sharp has evolved dramatically as the members either changed or became more committed to their calling as musicians. In six years they boost an impressive resume, having toured over fourteen European countries including France, Italy, and Germany and have represented the island in Suriname at The Caribbean Festival of the Arts (Carifesta) in 2003.
Along with performing at Carifesta, the group was invited to share in Haiti’s milestone of 200th year of Independence in early January 2004 then in 2005 represented the country and reggae music at the Jamaican Independence Celebration held in Beijing China.
. The group has worked closely with phenomenal; artistes such as Third World’s Ibo Cooper, Gospel Sweethearts Robert and Jenieve Bailey, Taurus Riley, Abijah, Queen Omega, Turbulence and were the touring band for Reggae artistes Tony Rebel and Queen Ifrica. They were the opening act for Rita Marley in Germany and Hungary during the summer of 2005. In February 2006 C-Sharp worked as opening act for the I Three singers in Ghana Africa.

C-Sharp made a debut of some of their best tracks at Red Stripe Reggae Sumfest of 2005, showcasing a vibrant collection of sound and youthful melody. Their debut album “What a Day” graced the shelves in January 2006, clippings of which can be heard on their website, www.csharpmusic.net.

The group’s hot new single “No More” released in 2007 is making a lasting impression on the air waves. The video has been released and for weeks has been in the top 5 position on CVM’s Hit List. .
C-Sharp continues to tour, and as they build their musical reputation a Sentimental Touch is left with fans worldwide.

Band Members

Aeion Yaaka Hoilett (Bass Player)
Like most musicians, Aeion, the last of four children, began his musical journey on the bandstand at his church in his hometown of Golden Grove St. Ann. He started out as a drummer and then moved on to play the organ. His fascination with the bass guitar started when he enrolled in the CLAJ (Caribbean Latin American Jazz) program at the Edna Manley College of Visual and Performing Arts, the Caribbean’s premiere arts college. While there he forged a lasting friendship with one of his greatest influences and incidentally also his tutor, Ibo Cooper of Third World Fame. Ibo became a mentor and a driving force behind much of his accomplishments.

Lamont Monty Savory (Guitar Player)
At the age of eight Monty developed his unwavering interest and passion for the guitar after seeing Bob Marley’s “Redemption Song” video. He would fashion his own guitar out of a sardine can, a piece of board and an elastic band. This resourcefulness continued until Monty discovered that his uncle owned a guitar. He would stop at his uncle’s house after church every Sunday to hear him play the G-Major scale which at the time rendered his uncle the greatest guitarist that he had ever heard. Monty’s passion for music continued throughout high school and upon graduation Monty decided that he wanted to learn more about the guitar and auditioned for the CLAJ (Caribbean Latin American Jazz) Program at the Edna Manley College of Visual and Performing Arts where he later met the other members of the band.

Randevon Randy Patrick (Drummer)
Randy discovered his talent for playing music at the age of six when he would make guitars from sardine cans, board and fishing lines. As he got older he learned to play the bass, which he played at church but later on committed to playing the drum which he felt most comfortable with. Graduating from the Edna Manley College of Visual and Performing Arts in 2001, Randy started teaching at the Seaforth High