Cyndi Harvell
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Cyndi Harvell

Los Angeles, California, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2000 | INDIE

Los Angeles, California, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2000
Solo Pop Singer/Songwriter

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"From the Echo - Album Review"

The Introduction: Cyndi Harvell, a singer-songwriter with a Deep South , Georgia origin of fried catfish, grits, and sweet tea, just released her second album and called it “From The Echo.” The music blooms with Southern accents, including hers, a slide guitar, and sometimes a banjo. She explains it as “an album about freedom and release and moving away from the things that hold us back towards the things that give us hope.” Harvell’s angelic voice has that feel of hope, freedom, and release, while the ominous devil wan of the slide guitar lingers close. Each song aspires to spread her wings to escape from the grasp of the worldly evils. Being a musician is difficult, she is often filled with doubt while pursuing forward as if it is her only nature. Her poetic lyrics express this persistence. The following are Cyndi Harvell’s “From The Echo” album of eleven songs in order with eleven possible lyric interpretations about her struggles and wonders of being an independent artist:

1. From The Echo: The musician thing is tough, a turbulent task, but Harvell will not giving in “until the walls cave in from the echo.” She will do until she cannot do no more. She will starve through the slow movements and fight against the wind, the crowd, and the negative noise. She is a soldier in endless battle, in war with the self, others, and surrounding temptations, often stuck on waiting for the next inspiration, idea, with fear that it may not appear again, but the tighter she holds firm to her aspirations, the greater she desires to not let go. She will create her art until it destroys her, self-sacrificing.

2. Lighthouse: Harvell uses a lighthouse as metaphor for her music: “Oh, lighthouse. Ah, burning sound. Oh, I found a way around.” Her music is a beacon to herself and others. Music is her form of art that has helped to find meaning within her and can help others as well. Though, she has lost faith in the human race, she is uncertain if she sings because her hate for society inspires her or she hates the way it is, but cares enough to attempt to change things. She is a lighthouse not only for those that are lost at sea with themselves, but also for those that feel content yet not right in heart. Her music is her light and she shines it bright for anybody that desires to listen.

3. Middleman: “I am the middleman, laying down the road for your false starts.” She draws a line between the pros and cons, as if it will easily decide if she should continue. It is ridiculous. This is the doubting center of being an artist. There are no clear and distinct lines or paths for this craft. Concrete logic is a hindrance. There is no black and white answer to decide if her art is good or bad, meaningful or useless, purposeful or not. There is no true form to prove an artist. Others place a value upon it when it is priceless. The pressure of attempting to categorize, label, and market the artist causes the artist to doubt their work and capabilities. Artists may fool themselves not to be artists when they start drawing that middle line.



4. Northbound: It is about being careful to have a unique idea in life. Once a genuine idea takes form it becomes like a cloud that is always above, never falling, always headed “Northbound.” It is also about keeping up hope, keeping the spirit lifted. There will be losses and distractions, but keep heading in the positive direction. It is also about doubt, which is like an idea in the opposite form. Once doubt enters the thought, it will constantly hinder the will, “don’t say the wrong words now.” It is about the highs and lows. Uniqueness has its consequences. The artist makes a choice to keep moving toward the vision or fall away and be safe. It is easier to conform to a system than to stay original. However, the artist that conforms ceases to be a truthful artist.

5. Loaded Question: “I’m a loaded question. I’m a loaded gun.” This is also about self-doubt of choosing the less traveled path. Do not try to stop and question the choice to continue searching for the end of the rainbow. Although the purpose is often a thought, there should not be moments of indecision of letting go. Do not question to be an artist or not. Keep on the steady stride, though it may sometimes feel like self-punishment, do not stop and rest and wonder if it is time to call it quits. Doubt only serves as an artist killer.

6. Off Chance: Do not let others decide what is best for an artist’s art. Whether others see the work as good or bad, do not let them sway the vision. Once again, it is the line between the two, trying to make an exact decision of what is the right thing to do, “in the off chance that I might be a little wrong.” It is as though others think they know what is best for her. She tried as an artist. Now others feel it is time to fail and adapt to safer prospects. She feels the strain. She wants to be normal, but at the same time, she does not want to give up. She is different. She is an ar - Picksy Sticks


"From the Echo - Album Review"

The Introduction: Cyndi Harvell, a singer-songwriter with a Deep South , Georgia origin of fried catfish, grits, and sweet tea, just released her second album and called it “From The Echo.” The music blooms with Southern accents, including hers, a slide guitar, and sometimes a banjo. She explains it as “an album about freedom and release and moving away from the things that hold us back towards the things that give us hope.” Harvell’s angelic voice has that feel of hope, freedom, and release, while the ominous devil wan of the slide guitar lingers close. Each song aspires to spread her wings to escape from the grasp of the worldly evils. Being a musician is difficult, she is often filled with doubt while pursuing forward as if it is her only nature. Her poetic lyrics express this persistence. The following are Cyndi Harvell’s “From The Echo” album of eleven songs in order with eleven possible lyric interpretations about her struggles and wonders of being an independent artist:

1. From The Echo: The musician thing is tough, a turbulent task, but Harvell will not giving in “until the walls cave in from the echo.” She will do until she cannot do no more. She will starve through the slow movements and fight against the wind, the crowd, and the negative noise. She is a soldier in endless battle, in war with the self, others, and surrounding temptations, often stuck on waiting for the next inspiration, idea, with fear that it may not appear again, but the tighter she holds firm to her aspirations, the greater she desires to not let go. She will create her art until it destroys her, self-sacrificing.

2. Lighthouse: Harvell uses a lighthouse as metaphor for her music: “Oh, lighthouse. Ah, burning sound. Oh, I found a way around.” Her music is a beacon to herself and others. Music is her form of art that has helped to find meaning within her and can help others as well. Though, she has lost faith in the human race, she is uncertain if she sings because her hate for society inspires her or she hates the way it is, but cares enough to attempt to change things. She is a lighthouse not only for those that are lost at sea with themselves, but also for those that feel content yet not right in heart. Her music is her light and she shines it bright for anybody that desires to listen.

3. Middleman: “I am the middleman, laying down the road for your false starts.” She draws a line between the pros and cons, as if it will easily decide if she should continue. It is ridiculous. This is the doubting center of being an artist. There are no clear and distinct lines or paths for this craft. Concrete logic is a hindrance. There is no black and white answer to decide if her art is good or bad, meaningful or useless, purposeful or not. There is no true form to prove an artist. Others place a value upon it when it is priceless. The pressure of attempting to categorize, label, and market the artist causes the artist to doubt their work and capabilities. Artists may fool themselves not to be artists when they start drawing that middle line.



4. Northbound: It is about being careful to have a unique idea in life. Once a genuine idea takes form it becomes like a cloud that is always above, never falling, always headed “Northbound.” It is also about keeping up hope, keeping the spirit lifted. There will be losses and distractions, but keep heading in the positive direction. It is also about doubt, which is like an idea in the opposite form. Once doubt enters the thought, it will constantly hinder the will, “don’t say the wrong words now.” It is about the highs and lows. Uniqueness has its consequences. The artist makes a choice to keep moving toward the vision or fall away and be safe. It is easier to conform to a system than to stay original. However, the artist that conforms ceases to be a truthful artist.

5. Loaded Question: “I’m a loaded question. I’m a loaded gun.” This is also about self-doubt of choosing the less traveled path. Do not try to stop and question the choice to continue searching for the end of the rainbow. Although the purpose is often a thought, there should not be moments of indecision of letting go. Do not question to be an artist or not. Keep on the steady stride, though it may sometimes feel like self-punishment, do not stop and rest and wonder if it is time to call it quits. Doubt only serves as an artist killer.

6. Off Chance: Do not let others decide what is best for an artist’s art. Whether others see the work as good or bad, do not let them sway the vision. Once again, it is the line between the two, trying to make an exact decision of what is the right thing to do, “in the off chance that I might be a little wrong.” It is as though others think they know what is best for her. She tried as an artist. Now others feel it is time to fail and adapt to safer prospects. She feels the strain. She wants to be normal, but at the same time, she does not want to give up. She is different. She is an ar - Picksy Sticks


"CMJ Music Marathon"

...
DAY ONE: started a little late for
me. My first stop was the Big Picture
Media showcase. Big Picture Media is
the official publicity company of CMJ
Music Marathon, and they have worked
with some amazing talent—from Pepper,
Thrice, and Anberlin, to The Secret
Handshake, and Kaci Battaglia—so I knew
it would be a great show.

I got there just in time to catch Cyndi
Harvell—an up-and-coming Americana
artist—charm the crowd with her soft folkrock
like a Jewel for a new generation. A
cute girl, with a beautiful voice, singing
heartfelt lyrics, behind only an acoustic
guitar and a slide guitar, was the perfect
way to usher this southern boy into the
big city. Her newest album, From the Echo
is available now. - Island Waves - Texas A&M


"Cyndi Harvell : The Whole Package"

Raised in the deep south and seasoned on the west coast, Cyndi Harvell is ascintillating artist who sings with apurity that could make seraphimenvious. Her latest album, FROM THE ECHO, sizzles with a slightly dark passion that is tempered by awholesome spirit to create awonderfully uplifting and engagingwork.Cyndi took some time during her recent tour to answer a few questions fromSongwriter’s Monthly.

Songwriter’s Monthly:
How does Georgia compare to California? What drew you to the west coast? Do you think your music would have been different if you were raised in Californiainstead of Georgia?

Cyndi Harvell:
They are both completely different. California is abeautiful place to live. In the bay area, you’ve got close access to ocean, mountains, desert, big city, andcountry . . . so much beauty rightthere. And the people are diverse and open-minded and from all kinds of different backgrounds. Georgia is quiet and modest and has its own kind of beauty. Southern hospitality is real and abundant. I lived in Georgia for 23 years, but I feel a certain kinship with the west coast and a different sense of belonging than I ever felt in Georgia. But all that said, I am who I am because of where I come from so I can’t say that I would have the same appreciation for California had I been brought up there. And I can’t say that I would be writing the same kind of music either. I have a slight “country-ness” to my voice that perhaps comes from growing up in Georgia. I used to deny it, but I’ve learned to embrace it. I think the fact that I’ve lived in these vastly different parts of the country has influenced and inspired the way I write and the perspective I have on life.

SM:
Who are youfavorite vocalists?

CH:
I love Neko Case. She has some serious pipes. Patty Griffin has a lot of soul and feeling in her voice, too. Ray LaMontagne. Love the singer from DeVotchKa. Cat Power. The singer from Bon Iver. Regina Spektor. I love to hear honest, pure, soulful vocals, more like old vintage style with character than new sleek shiny polished.

SM:
There’s a similar theme to “Lighthouse” and “Break For It,” were they written around the same time? Did they represent your flight to the west coast or are they about something else?

CH:
They were probably written about a year apart. I wrote “Lighthouse” after taking a trip to the Point Reyes Lighthouse here on the California coast with some friends. We drove for about half an hour through nothing but green fields and finally ended up at this lighthouse. I was fascinated by people who may have lived there to run the lighthouse at some point in time. Sometimes I get frustrated with life and dealing with difficult people and the idea of moving into a lighthouse seemed romantic and like some sort of hideaway.“Break For It” is completely different. It came from an article I read in New York magazine about this guy who broke out of prison on more
than one occasion. He was a really creative, artistic guy and it was kind of a shame that his creativity went to waste. He actually made a “gun” out of a bar of soap, added some coffee to dye it and some screws to it and it fooled people. Crazy.

SM:
You have a lot of really great lines and images in your writing. Do they come easily or do you have to struggle?

CH:
A lot of the time, those most interesting lines just come out of nowhere, like it’s some other source channelling through me which I always think is a weird thing for people to say. But that’s what it feels like. It’s hard to explain. I’ve written poetry since I was little and I’ve always loved crafting interesting images out of words.

SM:
In the song, “Middleman,” the line about pulling out a piece of paper to settle all your arguments is great! Is this the line that inspired the song? Do you know someone who does that?

CH:
The other day, we were listening to this track and my guitar player said, “I could totally see you doing that,” which is funny because it’s probably true. I’m a listmaker. I write things down, I weigh out the pros and cons endlessly for every decision I have to make. The song itself came out of a dream I had, though. I was in my parents’ house, in the living room, and we heard a commotion coming from the back, where my room used to be. This little, old, angry man ran out and stopped, and I asked, “Who are you?!” He answered, “I’m the middleman!” And I woke up. It was so bizarre and weird and had me wondering what kind of “middleman” this guy was. What did it mean? I’ve read before that people in dreams are just different forms of yourself. I just kind of took all these ideas and ran with them.

SM:
My current favorite is “Off Chance.” I just love the whole vibe of that song. Did the song start groove first? Where did the emotion come from in the melody line? It really sounds inspired.

CH:
This song was written in a different way than I usually write. The guy who produced the album (and also played bass on a couple of the - Songwriter's Monthly


"Cyndi Harvell in Denver"

Beautiful and talented, Cyndi Harvell is making waves on the music scene and loving every minute of it. On the heels of her newly released album from, From The Echo, Harvell is touring, promoting, and making her sounds heard all over the country. She recently performed on Fox Connecticut Morning TV, Fearless Radio in Chicago, and twice at CMJ in New York. She's also wrapping up her US tour, including two shows in Denver. One is tonight, November 17th, at 9:00 pm at Cervantes Other Side and the other is tomorrow night, November 18th, at Washington Park Grille starting at 9:30pm.

Harvell's story is heartwarming and inspiring. Deciding that music was her calling, she sold her material possessions at a flea market in Georgia and headed west to the Bay Area. With a keen motivation and a 'never look back' attitude, Harvell and her band threw themselves into their music straight away. Their hard work snagged them an introduction to producer Jack Douglas (the Who, Aerosmith, John Lennon, Patti Smith), but their talent is what delivered them to the next level. Harvell's beautiful soprano voice, layered over serene melodies and genre-bending beats is the perfect recipe for catchy, meaningful music.

The new album, produced by Jim Greer, seems to mimic Harvell's leap of faith move across the country. There are songs about escaping, stumbling, rising, and succeeding; there are lyrics that spin tales involving the very basic human desire to soar, change, and evolve into something new, something better.

Don't miss your chance to see Harvell perform live in Denver tonight or tomorrow night. Heck, check her out tonight and you might just find yourself drawn so intimately in that you'll need a second helping tomorrow. - Denver Examiner


"Cyndi Harvell in Denver"

Beautiful and talented, Cyndi Harvell is making waves on the music scene and loving every minute of it. On the heels of her newly released album from, From The Echo, Harvell is touring, promoting, and making her sounds heard all over the country. She recently performed on Fox Connecticut Morning TV, Fearless Radio in Chicago, and twice at CMJ in New York. She's also wrapping up her US tour, including two shows in Denver. One is tonight, November 17th, at 9:00 pm at Cervantes Other Side and the other is tomorrow night, November 18th, at Washington Park Grille starting at 9:30pm.

Harvell's story is heartwarming and inspiring. Deciding that music was her calling, she sold her material possessions at a flea market in Georgia and headed west to the Bay Area. With a keen motivation and a 'never look back' attitude, Harvell and her band threw themselves into their music straight away. Their hard work snagged them an introduction to producer Jack Douglas (the Who, Aerosmith, John Lennon, Patti Smith), but their talent is what delivered them to the next level. Harvell's beautiful soprano voice, layered over serene melodies and genre-bending beats is the perfect recipe for catchy, meaningful music.

The new album, produced by Jim Greer, seems to mimic Harvell's leap of faith move across the country. There are songs about escaping, stumbling, rising, and succeeding; there are lyrics that spin tales involving the very basic human desire to soar, change, and evolve into something new, something better.

Don't miss your chance to see Harvell perform live in Denver tonight or tomorrow night. Heck, check her out tonight and you might just find yourself drawn so intimately in that you'll need a second helping tomorrow. - Denver Examiner


"Poptimes Magazine Review"

NEW YORK– Cyndi Harvell is packaged as a country-folk artist. And while she does sound like it in most tracks in her latest album, From the Echo, there seems to be a lingering blues-driven soul that aches to be released. I caught that release in several tracks and I enjoyed it. I wouldn’t be surprised if she would release a soul-blues record in the near future. That is something worth looking forward to.
Don’t get me wrong, though, her bluegrass-country-folk stuff works as it is and could very well catapult her to the top of the genre. Her voice is soulful enough not be annoying like other country girls who sound like they were chewing grass while recording. Cyndi’s vocals has that quality of a country girl with issues and that gives her the street credibility to let out that blues-driven soul that I said I caught in the other tracks.


The song Off Chance is one track where I experienced her blues and really felt it. Another is the song Break For It, which is my favorite song in the album. I don’t know, it could just be me, but I hear a Robert Plant/Led Zeppelin feel in this song and I absolutely love it. The rhythm and melody of the chorus is an earworm that never leaves one’s head after one listening. This song is a winner.
Eye of A Needle is also a great song with nice chords and clever lyrics: “I’ll be your cliché anytime.” Promising.
The Underside is also a beautiful piano tune that reminded me of Regina Spektor in a good way. When I listen to this track, it assures me that the girl singing is a beautiful girl.
As a whole, From the Echo is brilliant work by a brilliant singer-songwriter. It is that kind of record that would make the listener ask: Where the hell was I when this came out?
Fortunately for me, I was here and I enjoyed Cyndi Harvell’s From the Echo when it came out.

Best Track: Break For It

Cyndi Harvell: From the Echo
Release Date: October 12, 2010
Fortune Records 2010
www.cyndiharvell.com - Poptimes Magazine


""Witty Confessionals from Veteran of Athens GA""

Cyndi Harvell cut her musical teeth playing in Athens, Georgia; a city noted for its rich musical history, but on her fifth release “The Night Turned to Song” she is in no way weighted down by such roots, rather occasionally indebted to them.


In fact the record as a whole operates on its own terms, it’s breezy, urbane and sometimes a little precious. It mines a familiar female singer-songwriter vein but not in any way that is derivative or boring, even if some tracks do call to mind the glossier possibilities of that vein as typified by the likes of Michelle Branch. Mostly though there is a folksier Laurel Canyon vibe running through the record, and great use is made of slide guitar and harmonies, even if their effect is diluted somewhat by an ever present tasteful pop sheen. This mould is occasionally stretched, as on the countrified shuffle of “The Light” or the swampy lead guitar and jaunty vocal of “Strongest Man Alive”.


Lyrically, “The Night Turned to Song” is populated by smartly written confessionals, concerning themselves with dissatisfaction and ennui and at times recalling Aimee Mann in her more witty moments. There are stories of lives that have reached standstills and are in need of change, though some tracks (“Horoscope”, “Photographs”) also deal with an unwillingness to enact such change, their narrators stuck in familiar patterns that they aren’t prepared to break: “...I’m waiting for the reason and the moment to agree/Waiting for photographs to find me...”. This duality creates a unique and compelling tension in the songwriting and imbues it with more personal dimensions.


“The Night Turned to Song” is a pleasure to listen to, and its occasional concessions to a more radio friendly sound belie a very noteworthy talent.


Date review added: Wednesday, March 04, 2009
Reviewer: Alex Cleary - AmericanaUK


"San Diego Troubadour Review"

The Bay Area has fostered yet another songster, Cyndi Harvell, who has recorded and released her latest disk, The Night Turned to Song. The CD is aimed at the younger generation, with the wanderlust of late, late adolescence and the early adulthood chore of carving out an identity for oneself, serving as the inspirations and subject matter for the lyrics of the tunes. But the disk is one that you might want to put on when your parents come over for a visit. They should like it, too.
The CD's instrumentation - drums, bass, piano, and guitar - is spare but not sparse and complements the tunes that Harvell has written or co-written. The songs all belong to the pop/rock/ county genre that goes back to the Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, 10,000 Maniacs, Dire Straights, and just about any other performer or band that has built their fortunes on songs with a soft, easy rocking backbeat and an accessible chorus.
As this acre of popular music is so often tilled and harvested, a performer might have a difficult time distinguishing herself from so many others who are strumming guitars and cribbing notes from Jackson Browne and Tori Amos. Despite revisiting this well-worn territory, Harvell's songs are fresh and tuneful, each one a pleasure to listen to. She distributes memorable hooks throughout her songs, and the melodies sometimes take surprising turns that are quite beguiling.
The star of the show is Harvell's voice. One of the sweetest sopranos to come along in a while, Harvell sings with a rare, straightforward clarity. Even in some of the forte sections, there is no sense of strain or that she's reaching too far. With the ubiquitous use of Auto-Tune, it's easy to assume that even Barack Obama is using it now as he reads from his teleprompter, and that this computer program was used to fix things up on this disk. But Harvell sounds like the real deal, unpasteurized, untreated with r-BST, and able to hit those notes spot on without those recording studio gimmicks.
Among the disk's more memorable tunes is "Anywhere But Here." The song opens with, and the chorus repeats, a not often used two note half-step rise (Think of the Ri-A from West Side Story's Maria.) that so effectively sets the emotional tone for the rest of the song. The brightest, most promising number is "Life That I Would Miss," which opens the disk, a refreshing combination of riffs, melody, and a lyric that places its emphasis on the protagonist's short-lived Walter Mitty imaginings as her way of escaping the ennui of a humdrum life. If the country music stations of this nation ever decided to get away from the over wrought, over produced dreck that comes out of Nashville today, they might play "The Light" from this recording. The song has a catchy, radio friendly chorus that is missing from the airwaves these days.

--Written by Paul Hormick
- San Diego Troubadour


"Artist To Watch!"

Simplistically performed but unbelievably complex folk rock. With the slightest flavor of southern twang, The Night Turned to Song is the best of what is going on in contemporary folk, but funneled into one incredible lady.

Intricate vocal melodies, interesting songwriting (phenomenal guitar playing!), and a simplistic flow to it that makes the mix of elements become something far superior to all the rest. Highly recommenced for folk lovers.

***ARTIST TO WATCH!!!*** - jsitop21.com


"CD SINGLE REVIEW: Cyndi Harvell - "Photographs""

By Gian Fiero - 09/01/2008 - 06:04 PM EDT

Genre: Adult Alternative
Sounds Like: Joni Mitchell
Technical Grade: 9/10
Production/Musicianship Grade: 10/10
Commercial Value: 10/10
Overall Talent Level: 9/10
Songwriting Skills: 10/10
Performance Skill: 10/10
Best Songs: Single
Weakness: ?
CD Review:

From her forthcoming LD, The Night Turned To Song, San Francisco Bay Areas based singer/songwriter Cyndi Harvell releases Photographs, a song that I had the pleasure of first hearing while moderating a panel at a music conference in Emeryville.

We listened to 20 songs that day and Cyndi’s song, the highly melodic "Photographs," was hands down, the best and the clear audience favorite with its quick start, well-produced but organic musical backdrop, and tight lyrical and vocal composition. “Photographs” is an instant radio hit…it just needs airplay.

While I’m compelled to compare Cyndi to her contemporary colleagues such as Tori Amos, Michelle Branch, Paramore, or even Katy Perry, it would be more accurate to reference her with Joni Mitchell – a singer with extraordinary depth and songwriting talent that has lasted for decades. Cyndi has the potential to be that kind of artist.

http://www.musesmuse.com/mrev-cyndiharvell-photograph.html

- Muse's Muse


"Love Songs with Taste and Insight"

Cyndi Harvell knows what she's after. This collection of love songs has enough craft and insight to stretch to the outskirts of folk, and enough taste in the performance to reel in pop and rock fans who appreciate a good song. Since it must be impossible to go through life without knowing and losing love, I am happy to hear that these songs describe the specific clouds and whirlpools along love's landscape enough to fit my own experience. Just knowing these moments can be so clearly described strips naked my own confusion on the subject enough to accept that I wasn't alone going through all that. Sure, these feelings were Cyndi Harvell's and not mine, but they are close enough. Guess I wasn't alone after all, and that realization makes me a little more comfortable being human.

Case in point, the first song on this album has the distance to say Some Words About Moving On by the numbers. It's not a list, of course, but something deeper despite numbers one through five playing a part in the description. I don't know anything more confusing than the process of moving on, and it's broken many a man. So, hearing it mapped out with sufficient distance to tell it as it is can save some time, help with the repairs, or alleviate some pain. If you don't happen to be going through that muck while you listen, it brings a smile of recognition. I'd like to play that song at the Hamilton bar, where I've heard a few painful stories that sound fresh after years of separation. Might do some good.

What first struck me about this album was the simplicity and taste in the performance of these songs. I'm a big fan of slide guitar, but John Howland's Weissenborn slide guitar is played with the kind of mastery that is worthy of such a fine instrument. That thing has a tone no amount of fiddling with knobs can duplicate. I think John Howland's ability on the acoustic slide guitar warrants the creation of such a fine instrument. With Cyndi on acoustic and Mike Stevens playing all things percussive with inventive simplicity (drum kit, djembe, triangles, shakers, et cetera, et cetera), this folk band gives the song what it longs for.

Cyndi's voice and songwriting style exceed the boundaries established by Edie Brickell in her infectious one hit "What I Am." There's a collaboration of folk and country in the mix that makes the Harvell sound personal and welcoming. A sense of distance and whimsy about Cyndi's vocal style sells the songs without unnecessary cathartic drama. Reading through Ms. Harvell's lyrics, my mind wanders to W.B. Yeats fine rhythmic phrase, "Words alone are certain good." This is folk sung in it's own style, luring the listener into the lyric with a welcoming sound. These love songs see things from both sides without cheapening the mystery. Some of these songs define moments I didn't have a name for. Now I have a song to sing those memories into their proper places. I understand a little now what confused me before this album. This album gives me courage to let love take its course without feeling alone. To write about this music, I have to listen on a seemingly infinitely repeat. These songs kept me sporting that wry smile and nodding in recognition. The review is done, and I'm in a mood to hear it again. That's a fine album.

THE SONGS:

1. SOME WORDS ON MOVING ON (Harvell / Howland) takes the numerical approach to the subject of breaking up. Every breakup feels like it's unique, but first time you talk to another broken friend it seems like nothing that matters is much different. This song has enough distance to see it all clearly. What makes it powerful is something buried in the lyrics. "Raise your hand up if you should fall behind." See, all your friends will tell you, "You got to move on." That's when the sympathy starts to end and those who care will wave you on. This song has a little of the sound I like from Eddie Brickell's "What I Am." That's a hard quality to describe, and harder to find.

2. HOROSCOPE (Harvell) at first sounds like Jackson Browne's "These Days," with a different intention and unrelated lyrics. Always loved that song even when I thought Tom Rush wrote it. And that's a great feeling established with just a couple of chords and a finger pick technique in common, before the song goes off on its own. There's whimsy in the lyric, a sparkle of fantasy, and the wish for a partner would learn to feel and play. There's guy on TV this week says if you don't get to play, you think different. Some bad hard bitter folks didn't play enough. I like this song for it's prescription to believe in Horoscopes for a minute, if there's hope and heart in it. "If you listen up, you might hear your heartbeat." Knowing stuff isn't enough. "Tonight, my friend, the downside will be the up / Tonight, just when you think you got the whole world figured out." All those folks who know how things work seem to miss the point at least half the time. And they a - Billy Bunker's Music Reviews


"Your Daily Lick : Cyndi Harvell"

Not what you'd expect from a record produced by Rondo Brother Jim Greer. Harvell, who moved to Oakland from Athens, Georgia in 2004, is more Michelle Branch than Handsome Boy Modeling School; her debut introduces a talented, confident new voice to the female singer-songwriter scene, albeit finished with more pop polish than folk grit. — Nate Seltenrich - East Bay Express


"10-in-10 CD Reviews"

Each Friday we bring you reviews of 10 CDs released in the last few months done in 10 words each.........

Cyndi Harvell "The Night Turned to Song" — Storytelling folkster is easy-on-the-ears, offers enjoyable debut. - Creative Loafing


Discography

Heartache & Revolution, May 2014

Holiday Five EP, October 2013

Silver Line EP, February 2013

From the Echo, October 2010: (includes "Break For It" included on the San Francisco Bay Area KFOG's Local Compilation 8 and "Middleman" featured on the HBO film Mary and Martha)

The Night Turned to Song, Feb. 2009: (includes "Photographs" played on the San Francisco bay area's KFOG and included on the locals compilation CD, "Slow Way" played on Berkeley's KPFA)

Trio Demos, 2006

Somewhere in the Outside, 2004

Moons & Muses, 2002

Photos

Bio

Los Angeles-based (but Georgia raised) singer-songwriter Cyndi Harvell creates smart, lyrically rich, ear-catching folk-pop, seasoned with Southern charm. She has toured nationally, received significant airplay on Americana stations across the globe, and was twice a featured artist on Bay Area radio station KFOG's Local Scene. In 2012, she was chosen for the prestigious ASCAP Lester Sill Songwriting Workshop, and she has also had her original music placed in TV spots, commercials, book trailers, iphone apps, indie films, and an HBO feature film. "Harvell is the real deal, unpasteurized, untreated with r-BST, and able to hit those notes spot on without those recording studio gimmicks." (San Diego Troubadour)

Band Members