Danay Suárez
Gig Seeker Pro

Danay Suárez

Miami, Florida, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2007 | MAJOR

Miami, Florida, United States | MAJOR
Established on Jan, 2007
Band World Alternative

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

May
07
Danay Suárez @ Grassroots Festival Shakori Hills

Pittsboro, North Carolina, United States

Pittsboro, North Carolina, United States

Oct
29
Danay Suárez @ University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States

Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States

Music

Press


DANAY SUÁREZ (CUBA)
We were first introduced to Cuba’s hip-hop poetess Danay Suárez two years ago when she released “Yo Aprendí” (I learned), a beautiful, downtempo track about morality. The singer/rapper, who came out of Cuba’s progressive hip-hop milieu, recently garnered more buzz outside of Havana. Interestingly, this was largely because she responded (via her track below) to Jay Z’s recent visit to Cuba and his track “Open Letter,” where he raps about Cuba-US foreign policies. He seemed to be sort of confused by the embedded politics, so Danay lays it down simple and sweet for him. There is no doubt she’s got that lyrical sophistication. - Isabela Raygoza


On the Street W/ Dariel Fernandez interviews Danay Suárez at Grand Central in Miami, Florida during the Premio Juventud VIP Tour. - Dariel Fernandez


Danay Suárez Fernández’s first performance was when she was 15, having been invited to join other renowned hip-hop artists in a concert held at the Nacional Theater. That day, self-taught Danay, overwhelmed by the amount of people in the theater, sang with her back to the audience, hoping no one would realize how nervous she was. Nerves got the best of her in her first appearance, but she wasn’t about to give up her dream.
It all began when she was in high-school and a classmate introduced her to hip-hop, rap and reggae. Influenced by that kind of music, after graduating as an IT technician, she began to go to rap concerts. Because it was ideal to express what she wanted to say, as it gave her “freedom of speech and consistency between her words and her attitude,” Danay started rapping ‘by accident,’ as she rhymed about the things that mattered the most to her. Rap also gave her the opportunity to meet, work and share with people who still believe in love and art, including Aldo Rodríguez--one of the most celebrated underground rappers and member of Los Aldeanos--who helped her produce and record her own songs. She also appeared on the documentary Calle Real 70, together with many other underground Cuban hip-hop artists with whom she has also collaborated, including Papá Humbertico, Raudel, Explosión Suprema, Anónimo Consejo, Krudas, Magyorie Epg and El Lápiz. She still fondly remembers their sleepless nights together, rapping, rhyming and improvising, and acknowledges that rap is more like her habitat, her element, where she can be herself.
In 2007, fearless Danay gathered her demos and showed up at the house of Cuban fusion superstar X Alfonso for “he was the only person in Cuba who I thought would understand what I wanted to do” and said to him, “You don’t know me, here’s my music, listen to it. If you need a backup singer, give me a call.” A few days later she received a call from X and they have been working together ever since. Under X’s wing she met many musicians, did her first tours, experimented with new sounds, improved her technique and became acquainted with the concept of ‘show,’ but most of all, she improved her stage presence, which helped launch her solo career.
Danay, who is still surprised to have shared the stage with renowned artists such as Hernán López Nussa, Omara Portuondo and Roberto Carcassés, has pointed out, “I’ve never said I’m a rapper,” and defines herself as a regular person who expresses what she’s feeling through her songs. But despite her statements, she’s been described as being more a rapper than an R&B singer and is considered by many as ‘the Queen of Latin Rap.’ Additionally, her fans have referred to her as “the representative of conscious female Cuban hip-hop with the most exquisite voice and the most intelligent lyrics,” as well as, “being on a par with the greatest Spanish-speaking urban poets.” However, she feels very passionate about jazz and has made it clear that she’d love to be a jazz singer, “I can rap and sing, but the truth is I wish I was a jazz singer and develop that style. I haven’t done it because I don’t have the musical skills, but I’ll get there some day. I’ve got it inside of me.”
Her love for jazz took her to Havana Cultura Sessions, an album that was the product of improvisation, in the style of the 1960’s jam sessions in Cuba, and was recorded together with British DJ Jack Peterson and renowned jazz pianist Roberto Fonseca, who said when he first heard her sing in the studio: “How come I didn’t know about the best singer in Cuba?!” After their tour of Europe with Danay singing and Fonseca at the piano, they have continued to work together, as evidenced by her most recent album, Palabras Manuales, produced by Fonseca--whom she affectionately calls ‘Fonse.’ This record is, in her own words, ‘a mix of both’ hip-hop and jazz.
A Cuerda Viva 2011 Award Winner for Best Alternative Music Group, Danay Suárez is partially happy with the media exposure she and other alternative music artists have had in Cuba. She cares more, however, about people being able to feel what she’s trying to convey. “What I’d like is to have the strength so that my work can go hand in hand with my ideals of love, honesty, modesty and values, and to make people reflect on and feel moved by what I say.” - CubaAbsolutely


Danay Suárez Fernández’s first performance was when she was 15, having been invited to join other renowned hip-hop artists in a concert held at the Nacional Theater. That day, self-taught Danay, overwhelmed by the amount of people in the theater, sang with her back to the audience, hoping no one would realize how nervous she was. Nerves got the best of her in her first appearance, but she wasn’t about to give up her dream.
It all began when she was in high-school and a classmate introduced her to hip-hop, rap and reggae. Influenced by that kind of music, after graduating as an IT technician, she began to go to rap concerts. Because it was ideal to express what she wanted to say, as it gave her “freedom of speech and consistency between her words and her attitude,” Danay started rapping ‘by accident,’ as she rhymed about the things that mattered the most to her. Rap also gave her the opportunity to meet, work and share with people who still believe in love and art, including Aldo Rodríguez--one of the most celebrated underground rappers and member of Los Aldeanos--who helped her produce and record her own songs. She also appeared on the documentary Calle Real 70, together with many other underground Cuban hip-hop artists with whom she has also collaborated, including Papá Humbertico, Raudel, Explosión Suprema, Anónimo Consejo, Krudas, Magyorie Epg and El Lápiz. She still fondly remembers their sleepless nights together, rapping, rhyming and improvising, and acknowledges that rap is more like her habitat, her element, where she can be herself.
In 2007, fearless Danay gathered her demos and showed up at the house of Cuban fusion superstar X Alfonso for “he was the only person in Cuba who I thought would understand what I wanted to do” and said to him, “You don’t know me, here’s my music, listen to it. If you need a backup singer, give me a call.” A few days later she received a call from X and they have been working together ever since. Under X’s wing she met many musicians, did her first tours, experimented with new sounds, improved her technique and became acquainted with the concept of ‘show,’ but most of all, she improved her stage presence, which helped launch her solo career.
Danay, who is still surprised to have shared the stage with renowned artists such as Hernán López Nussa, Omara Portuondo and Roberto Carcassés, has pointed out, “I’ve never said I’m a rapper,” and defines herself as a regular person who expresses what she’s feeling through her songs. But despite her statements, she’s been described as being more a rapper than an R&B singer and is considered by many as ‘the Queen of Latin Rap.’ Additionally, her fans have referred to her as “the representative of conscious female Cuban hip-hop with the most exquisite voice and the most intelligent lyrics,” as well as, “being on a par with the greatest Spanish-speaking urban poets.” However, she feels very passionate about jazz and has made it clear that she’d love to be a jazz singer, “I can rap and sing, but the truth is I wish I was a jazz singer and develop that style. I haven’t done it because I don’t have the musical skills, but I’ll get there some day. I’ve got it inside of me.”
Her love for jazz took her to Havana Cultura Sessions, an album that was the product of improvisation, in the style of the 1960’s jam sessions in Cuba, and was recorded together with British DJ Jack Peterson and renowned jazz pianist Roberto Fonseca, who said when he first heard her sing in the studio: “How come I didn’t know about the best singer in Cuba?!” After their tour of Europe with Danay singing and Fonseca at the piano, they have continued to work together, as evidenced by her most recent album, Palabras Manuales, produced by Fonseca--whom she affectionately calls ‘Fonse.’ This record is, in her own words, ‘a mix of both’ hip-hop and jazz.
A Cuerda Viva 2011 Award Winner for Best Alternative Music Group, Danay Suárez is partially happy with the media exposure she and other alternative music artists have had in Cuba. She cares more, however, about people being able to feel what she’s trying to convey. “What I’d like is to have the strength so that my work can go hand in hand with my ideals of love, honesty, modesty and values, and to make people reflect on and feel moved by what I say.” - CubaAbsolutely


Tengo el placer de presentarles a mi cantante favorita, Danay Suarez . Ella es residente de la Habana, Cuba. Sin duda alguna una maravillosa artista con unas letras increíbles y un corazón enorme, ella canta y rapea con una potencialidad inusual y mucho, mucho swing, Danay ha colaborado por años con Los Aldeanos, X Alfonso, Roberto Fonseca y toda la vanguardia musical de Cuba hasta madurar en una carrera en solitario que augura grandes sorpresas.

Fecha de nacimiento.
17/febrero/1985
¿Quienes forman parte del equipo de trabajo de Danay?
La familia, Productores y Amigos como El Lapiz y Roberto Fonseca, actualmente 4 musicos, Aaron Gonzalez Bajo/Contrabajo, Antuan Perugorria Drums, Lazaro pena Teclados, Maikel Olivera Guitarra Electrica,
Yasmin Gonzales en la produccion / Eric Vazquez Manager
Esta creciendo cada dia el equipo.

¿Qué significa para ti la música?
Mi lenguaje preferido

Discografía:
Polvo de La humedad 2007 Urbano Hip hop/Regae
Viejo Sonido Turbio 2008 urbano Hip Hop/Regae
Havana Cultura Session 2010 jazz tradicional

¿En qué estás trabajando actualmente?
En mi disco Palabras Manuales, disco que adoro ya escucharan, Espero que este listo en 2014

¿Tomas en cuenta las opiniones de tus fans?
Si, los respeto mucho, cada persona es valiosa para mi.

¿Qué le aconsejarías a alguien que quiera empezar en esto?
En esto o en lo que sea, Les aconsejo mucha responsabilidad, pues a veces somos victimas de nosotros mismos en nuestro camino.

¿Qué te hace sonreír?
El amor, me hace supremamente feliz ver la cara de quien ayudo

¿Con quien te gustaría hacer un ft?
Esto es bien dificil de responder para mi, mencionar unas personas negarian otras. Pero de seguro no serian muchas.

¿Qué es lo que más te satisface de tu trabajo ?
Hacerlo, y esperar calmada el regreso

Tres canciones clave en tu vida:
‘Yo aprendi’, ‘Preguntas’ y dejo el espacio para que siempre halla otra

¿Cantante favorito?
Ehhhhhh

¿Cómo se llamó la primera canción que escribiste?
Vida Mundial, Malisima jejeje, bueno con el titulo basta para saberlo

¿Qué te debilita?
Cuando eh provocado un dano en alguien quisiera que me tragara la tierra

¿Tu mayor defecto?
Asumir demasiada responsabilidad

¿Tu mayor virtud?
Ser honesta

¿Qué es lo próximo que viene de Danay?
Tendrían que seguirme hasta ese punto, juntos podemos llegar siempre a un paso próximo
¿Dónde podemos obtener más información sobre Danay?

https://soundcloud.com/danaysuarez
https://www.facebook.com/danaysuarezoficial
http://www.youtube.com/user/danaysuarez
https://twitter.com/DanaySuarez
http://www.instagram.com/danaysuarez
¿Países en los que te has presentado?
Espa;a, Alemania, Inglaterra, Suiza, Holanda, Francia, Belgica, Canada, Turkie, Austria, Estados Unidos, Venezuela, Panama, Mexico
¿Algo que quieras agregarle a la entrevista?
Es importante aunque creo que las personas que escuchan mi música no conocen este detalle, Nunca escuche muchos artistas de hip hop mundial, mi desarrollo dentro del genero Urbano fue mas bien natural de mi modo de vida dentro del estrecho movimiento de hip hop cubano, las influencias en mi desarrollo de cantar están ligadas a raíces de la música tradicional de muchos sitios del mundo, y mezclar ambas cosas ha logrado una especie de jazzy/hip hop como exprese en alguna entrevista anterior.

…La Música sana el Alma o la destruye, tiene mucho poder, Pero su lenguaje es Universal y pienso que no hay que discriminarla por géneros ni lenguas, solo encontrar la que conecta Contigo.
- Ingrid Romero


from around the world who visit each year.

Yet tragically, few Americans have ever set foot on the island nation despite its proximity to the United States. And even fewer are learning about the island's rich musical culture and the unlikely sounds lingering in Havana and beyond.

"The Cuban hip-hop culture is considered one of the best in Latin America for its socially conscious lyrical content, extraordinarily interesting sound, and use of sampling," says Cuban singer and rapper Danay Suarez, who'll perform at Blackbird Ordinary on Sunday, May 26. "The music not only touches on the realities of the socio-political climate in Cuba, but the human condition as well."

In South Florida especially, first-generation Cuban-Americans are often criticized for their desire to explore ancestral roots on an island just 90 miles south of Key West. But at 27 years old, Suarez has become that demographic's link to a place that many have longed to know, but still struggle to understand.

"The world isn't black and white. Sometimes we don't know what we're capable of doing until we're faced with certain challenges," Suarez muses.

Rapping, for example, was a talent that Suarez didn't know she had until she began writing rhymes at age 15. Influenced heavily by jazz, her flow took on an improvisational sound she calls "organic" that is also peppered with bits of folk.

"I love to discover music, particularly traditional world music," she says. "But my influences are wide-ranging. I don't simply listen to jazz or hip-hop, I'm on the constant search for traditional folklore, and generally interesting music."

Similarly, Miami's DJ EFN and business partner Michael Garcia are also on a constant search for new music. And in 2012, the duo's journey lead them and five of their friends to the Havana neighborhood of Santa Fe, Saurez's home.

"I actually kept the trip from my family," says DJ EFN. "I only told my mother, who was worried, but ultimately supported me."

Knowing that his family would disapprove, the first-generation Cuban-American's trip to his familial homeland and subsequent documentary, Coming Home, remained secret until he returned with an entirely new perspective on Cuba.

"When I came back, my family was a bit taken aback," he admits. "But at that point, they couldn't do anything. So, they tried to be supportive of my film project. The film has since helped open up dialogue on a very taboo subject matter with my family. We have debates and discussions on how things are in Cuba and what should be done moving forward in terms of the embargo, travel, relations, etc."

EFN credits Suarez with helping him see Cuba through his own eyes, not through his family's justifiably biased lens.

"I felt she was a gleaming example of expression and womanhood in Cuba," he says. "She doesn't like to be compared, but it felt like she was the Lauryn Hill of Cuba. And to be clear, I mean the Lauryn Hill that was a positive role model for women, not the Lauryn Hill of today, who, unfortunately, is going to jail for tax issues."

Suarez is currently staying in Miami for three months before heading back to Cuba to work on new material.

"It's my first time in the United States, I feel great!" she enthuses. "The main objective of this trip is to meet with people, not to do shows. But the reason I chose to do a show in Miami is because Blackbird Ordinary reminded me of the place I began singing in Havana. It has great energy."

While she's thrilled to play in South Florida, she hopes to share her music with even more folks outside of Cuba.

"I've had the opportunity to tour most of Europe. But I'm interested in visiting Latin America," Suarez says. "Music has a universal language, but the lyrics don't," she laughs. "We'll show visual representations of my lyrics on a screen when there's a language barrier."

Of course, that shouldn't be an issue in Miami. - Victor Gonzalez


Un sencillo encogerse de hombros despeja toda sospecha de envanecimiento, al comentarle que por ahí la llaman diva del hip hop cubano, reina del rap en español o la nueva revelación de la canción alternativa.
Quien la escucha pasear los matices de su voz, moverse naturalmente entre el jazz, el reggae, el funk, el hip hop y la música tradicional cubana, no imagina que la primera vez que pisó un escenario, con la precocidad de 15 años, tuvo que cantar de espaldas al público, de puro nervio.
Tampoco adivina uno que semejante talento estuvo a la zaga, mientras ella era secretaria de un hospital o trabajaba en una farmacia. Suerte que la vida tiene la caprichosa manía de enderezarse por sí sola, sobre todo para quienes trabajan hasta sacar Polvo de la humedad. No por casualidad así se llama su primer disco.
Danay empezó como seguidora del rap, de peña en peña, entre el Almendares y La Madriguera. Casi sin darse cuenta comenzó a hacer coros y a colaborar con Los Aldeanos, Papá Humbertico, Raudel, Anónimo Consejo, Krudas, DJ Lápiz y otros reconocidos exponentes del género. Escribir sus propios temas y grabarlos, caminata mediante hasta el estudio de Real 70, fue el bautismo para convertirse en parte del movimiento underground. “Me fui disolviendo como azúcar en agua”.
Sus canciones la proyectan, la revelan con honestidad de espejo. Baste oír Individual y Yo aprendí, sendas declaraciones de principios. “Soy como muy primitiva para componer, no sé, me desmenuzo por dentro”. Aún así, ella prefiere desmarcarse un poco de lo personal, con inquietudes que frecuentan temas sociales. “Sin obligar a nadie al mensaje, trato de equilibrar lo que me toca muy cerca con lo que pueda tocar a otra persona, hacer que coincidan ahí”.
Dos años como solista en la Ópera de la calle, más afluencias musicales con X Alfonso y Robertico Carcasés, ayudaron a curtir un estilo mestizo, fuerte como el rap, sentido como el filin. “Las etiquetas me molestan un poco. No me gusta decir que soy rapera, porque el hip hop es más que un género, es como un medio de vida: ahí están mis amigos, están valores que considero muy importantes. Tampoco quiero que me vean como una voz de jazz o de R&B, aunque lo pueda parecer. Lo que tengo más que todo es una necesidad de expresión”.
Tal impulso se ha nutrido escuchando. “Es increíble, pero nunca tengo temas de rap en mi reproductor. Oigo más bien música tradicional, del mundo, cosas que me van llegando y me interesan. No tengo muchas carpetas, porque la música que no me gusta, no me gusta, no quiero tenerla ni para aprender ni para nada, creo que soy muy virgen en ese sentido”.
El multifacético proyecto Havana Cultura colocó el nombre de Danay Suárez en París, Londres, Berlín, Amsterdam, Estambul, Valencia… Era el 2010, y el productor británico Gilles Peterson se refería a ella como la cantante más increíble con la que había trabajado en los últimos cinco años.
De esa experiencia nació un disco, durante unos ensayos con los músicos de Temperamento, mientras todos se soltaban a improvisar sin saber que los estaban grabando. Esto propició el encuentro con Roberto Fonseca, amigo y mentor. “Sí, porque ese es el ‘látigo’ mío”, agrega sonriendo.
Aunque Danay no viene de cuna artística, los de casa son fundamentales en su obra. “Estoy muy orgullosa de mi familia, porque somos como hormigas, vamos juntos a la labor. Cuando estoy en el escenario, los mando a que se sienten lejos, dispersos, ¡porque me ponen unas caraaas!… que me desconcentran. Pero siempre están ahí, no concibo un gran momento de mi vida sin ellos”.
Los conocimientos de graduada en informática no cayeron en saco roto, sino que se empastan ahora con su verdadera vocación. “Me gusta hacer producción musical, aprender los programas. Me encanta grabar la voz de una persona, descubrirla, y tener la sensibilidad para darle el matiz y ‘la cosa’ que lleva esa persona, y luego que se sienta contenta. Me gusta, si te voy a decorar la casa, saber un poco de ti y saber que vas sentirte cómoda después con eso”.

Foto: Cortesía de la artista
En la Isla ya cuenta con una hoja de ruta significativa: mejor banda de música alternativa en Cuerda Viva 2011, ese mismo año obtuvo el premio Lucas al mejor video clip de hip hop, y en la sala de su casa cuatro manos cerradas en yeso indican sus triunfos en el festival Puños Arriba. A ello súmesele un público que la sigue de Casa de las Américas al teatro del Museo de Bellas Artes.
Con presentaciones programadas para los días 26 y 29 en el Blackbird Ordinary (Miami) y The New Parish (Oakland), respectivamente, Danay anda ahora acercand - Eileen Sosin Martínez


Un sencillo encogerse de hombros despeja toda sospecha de envanecimiento, al comentarle que por ahí la llaman diva del hip hop cubano, reina del rap en español o la nueva revelación de la canción alternativa.
Quien la escucha pasear los matices de su voz, moverse naturalmente entre el jazz, el reggae, el funk, el hip hop y la música tradicional cubana, no imagina que la primera vez que pisó un escenario, con la precocidad de 15 años, tuvo que cantar de espaldas al público, de puro nervio.
Tampoco adivina uno que semejante talento estuvo a la zaga, mientras ella era secretaria de un hospital o trabajaba en una farmacia. Suerte que la vida tiene la caprichosa manía de enderezarse por sí sola, sobre todo para quienes trabajan hasta sacar Polvo de la humedad. No por casualidad así se llama su primer disco.
Danay empezó como seguidora del rap, de peña en peña, entre el Almendares y La Madriguera. Casi sin darse cuenta comenzó a hacer coros y a colaborar con Los Aldeanos, Papá Humbertico, Raudel, Anónimo Consejo, Krudas, DJ Lápiz y otros reconocidos exponentes del género. Escribir sus propios temas y grabarlos, caminata mediante hasta el estudio de Real 70, fue el bautismo para convertirse en parte del movimiento underground. “Me fui disolviendo como azúcar en agua”.
Sus canciones la proyectan, la revelan con honestidad de espejo. Baste oír Individual y Yo aprendí, sendas declaraciones de principios. “Soy como muy primitiva para componer, no sé, me desmenuzo por dentro”. Aún así, ella prefiere desmarcarse un poco de lo personal, con inquietudes que frecuentan temas sociales. “Sin obligar a nadie al mensaje, trato de equilibrar lo que me toca muy cerca con lo que pueda tocar a otra persona, hacer que coincidan ahí”.
Dos años como solista en la Ópera de la calle, más afluencias musicales con X Alfonso y Robertico Carcasés, ayudaron a curtir un estilo mestizo, fuerte como el rap, sentido como el filin. “Las etiquetas me molestan un poco. No me gusta decir que soy rapera, porque el hip hop es más que un género, es como un medio de vida: ahí están mis amigos, están valores que considero muy importantes. Tampoco quiero que me vean como una voz de jazz o de R&B, aunque lo pueda parecer. Lo que tengo más que todo es una necesidad de expresión”.
Tal impulso se ha nutrido escuchando. “Es increíble, pero nunca tengo temas de rap en mi reproductor. Oigo más bien música tradicional, del mundo, cosas que me van llegando y me interesan. No tengo muchas carpetas, porque la música que no me gusta, no me gusta, no quiero tenerla ni para aprender ni para nada, creo que soy muy virgen en ese sentido”.
El multifacético proyecto Havana Cultura colocó el nombre de Danay Suárez en París, Londres, Berlín, Amsterdam, Estambul, Valencia… Era el 2010, y el productor británico Gilles Peterson se refería a ella como la cantante más increíble con la que había trabajado en los últimos cinco años.
De esa experiencia nació un disco, durante unos ensayos con los músicos de Temperamento, mientras todos se soltaban a improvisar sin saber que los estaban grabando. Esto propició el encuentro con Roberto Fonseca, amigo y mentor. “Sí, porque ese es el ‘látigo’ mío”, agrega sonriendo.
Aunque Danay no viene de cuna artística, los de casa son fundamentales en su obra. “Estoy muy orgullosa de mi familia, porque somos como hormigas, vamos juntos a la labor. Cuando estoy en el escenario, los mando a que se sienten lejos, dispersos, ¡porque me ponen unas caraaas!… que me desconcentran. Pero siempre están ahí, no concibo un gran momento de mi vida sin ellos”.
Los conocimientos de graduada en informática no cayeron en saco roto, sino que se empastan ahora con su verdadera vocación. “Me gusta hacer producción musical, aprender los programas. Me encanta grabar la voz de una persona, descubrirla, y tener la sensibilidad para darle el matiz y ‘la cosa’ que lleva esa persona, y luego que se sienta contenta. Me gusta, si te voy a decorar la casa, saber un poco de ti y saber que vas sentirte cómoda después con eso”.

Foto: Cortesía de la artista
En la Isla ya cuenta con una hoja de ruta significativa: mejor banda de música alternativa en Cuerda Viva 2011, ese mismo año obtuvo el premio Lucas al mejor video clip de hip hop, y en la sala de su casa cuatro manos cerradas en yeso indican sus triunfos en el festival Puños Arriba. A ello súmesele un público que la sigue de Casa de las Américas al teatro del Museo de Bellas Artes.
Con presentaciones programadas para los días 26 y 29 en el Blackbird Ordinary (Miami) y The New Parish (Oakland), respectivamente, Danay anda ahora acercand - Eileen Sosin Martínez


Discography

Polvo de la Humedad (LP)

Havana Cultura Sessions (EP)


Photos

Bio

Danay Suárez, nació en La Habana, Cuba en 1985. Se le negó su solicitud al ISA (Instituto Superior de Arte) de Cuba. Danay se unió a "Ópera de la Calle" en 2003, lo que le permitió formarse como una cantante Lirica. Más tarde, pasó a convertirse en una de los principales figuras del movimiento Rap de Cuba. La capacidad de Danay de adaptarse le ha permitido prosperar en diferentes géneros como el Jazz, Hip-Hop, Reggae, Dub-Step y la música tradicional Cubana. Su carrera como solista y sus colaboraciones como parte de Havana Cultura la han llevado a escenarios internacionales en París, Sete, Manchester, Londres, Amsterdam, Turquía, Valencia, Barcelona, Toronto, Leeds, Israel, Brazil y Estados Unidos. En 2013, encabezó el famoso "Hip Hop al Parque" en Colombia donde cantó ante una audiencia de 120 mil fans y en el 2014 fue invitada a cantar y a exponer un cortometraje de su realización en la conferencia TED Global 2014 en Río de Janeiro, Brasil. Ella ha compartido escenarios y colaborado con Omara Portuondo, Roberto Fonseca, Idan Raichel, Stephen Marley, Los Aldeanos, Robert Glassper, X-Alfonso, Raúl Paz, DJ Mala, Gilles Peterson, Roberto Carcasés e Interactivo. Danay se encuentra actualmente trabajando en su proximo Disco, Palabras Manuales, que será lanzado a través de Universal Music. 

Danay Suárez, was born in Havana, Cuba in 1985. Whereas her application to the ISA (Instituto Superior de Arte) of Cuba was denied, she did not give up on her dream. Danay joined "Opera de la Calle" in 2003 which help form her skill as a lyrical singer. She later went on to become one of the principal figures in Cuba’s underground Rap movement. Danay's ability to adapt has allowed her to thrive in different genres such as Jazz, Hip-Hop, Reggae, Dub-Step and traditional Cuban music. Her career as a solo artist and her collaborations as a part of Havana Cultura have taken her to international stages where she has participated in shows in París, Sete, Manchester, Londres, Amsterdam, Turquía, Valencia, Barcelona, Toronto, Leeds, Israel, Brazil and the United States. In 2013 she headlined Colombia's famed festival "Hip Hop al Parque" where she sang before an audience of 120,000 fans and in 2014 she was invited to perform at TED Global in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. She has shared the stage and collaborated with Omara Portuondo, Roberto Fonseca, Idan Raichel, Stephen Marley, Los Aldeanos Robert Glassper, X-Alfonso, Raul Paz, DJ Mala, Gilles Peterson, Roberto Carcasés & Interactivo. Danay is currently working on her much anticipated album “Palabras Manuales” which will be released through Universal Music