Danny Hamilton
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Danny Hamilton

Torrance, California, United States | SELF

Torrance, California, United States | SELF
Band Country Rock

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Jul
19
Danny Hamilton @ BIGS Fullerton

Fullerton, California, United States

Fullerton, California, United States

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"Danny Hamilton & the Mudslingers - Hard Rock Cafe"

The Players:
Danny Hamilton, lead vocals, rhythm guitar (acoustic), harmonica; Bill Robinette, guest lead guitar; Kalin Krum, bass; Paul Arrieta, drums; Russell Ali, hand percussion, congas, maracas, bongos, djembe, tambourine; Christopher Lopez, keyboards.

Material:
Danny Hamilton & the Mudslingers focus on lonely themes, with love-lost lyrics. Other subjects, like corporate whores, are touched upon, but most of the songs are similar to broken-heart therapy. Opening fast with "Bury the Devil," followed by "Ace" (which received indie radio play), the set built to "Smoother Than You," the band's best song.

The material is mainstream enough for modern country with catchy lyrics such as "I was thinking about a lover that's so far gone." Near the end of the set the band went off the mainstream track with "Before We Burn" -- one of the strongest performed songs of the night.

Musicianship:
Hamilton's passionate voice conveys feelings behind the lyrics, and Ali's multiple changes of instruments and tribal sounds are sensational, helping to establish a strong connection with the audience. The acoustic/electric guitar combo, along with keyboards and percussion, add significantly to the ensemble's overall sound. Though primarily a modern country act, this group also touches upon everything from folk to rock.

Performance:
Hamilton's talent was enhanced by his relaxed nature and direct eye contact. He was obviously at home onstage and made smooth transitions between songs. An excellent rendition of the Rolling Stones' "Sympathy for the Devil" was performed as the finale. This surprised the audience -- coming totally out of left field..

Summary:
What makes this band unique is the blending of country, early rock roots and tribal sounds. Danny Hamilton & the Mudslingers would be ideal for a Texas music festival barbeque. In fact, some of their songs are suitable for square dancing while others are campfire sing-alongs. But, what makes this act most enjoyable is the energy and emotion they put into performing.

-Laura Phillips - Music Connection


"Danny Hamilton & the Mudslingers - Hard Rock Cafe"

The Players:
Danny Hamilton, lead vocals, rhythm guitar (acoustic), harmonica; Bill Robinette, guest lead guitar; Kalin Krum, bass; Paul Arrieta, drums; Russell Ali, hand percussion, congas, maracas, bongos, djembe, tambourine; Christopher Lopez, keyboards.

Material:
Danny Hamilton & the Mudslingers focus on lonely themes, with love-lost lyrics. Other subjects, like corporate whores, are touched upon, but most of the songs are similar to broken-heart therapy. Opening fast with "Bury the Devil," followed by "Ace" (which received indie radio play), the set built to "Smoother Than You," the band's best song.

The material is mainstream enough for modern country with catchy lyrics such as "I was thinking about a lover that's so far gone." Near the end of the set the band went off the mainstream track with "Before We Burn" -- one of the strongest performed songs of the night.

Musicianship:
Hamilton's passionate voice conveys feelings behind the lyrics, and Ali's multiple changes of instruments and tribal sounds are sensational, helping to establish a strong connection with the audience. The acoustic/electric guitar combo, along with keyboards and percussion, add significantly to the ensemble's overall sound. Though primarily a modern country act, this group also touches upon everything from folk to rock.

Performance:
Hamilton's talent was enhanced by his relaxed nature and direct eye contact. He was obviously at home onstage and made smooth transitions between songs. An excellent rendition of the Rolling Stones' "Sympathy for the Devil" was performed as the finale. This surprised the audience -- coming totally out of left field..

Summary:
What makes this band unique is the blending of country, early rock roots and tribal sounds. Danny Hamilton & the Mudslingers would be ideal for a Texas music festival barbeque. In fact, some of their songs are suitable for square dancing while others are campfire sing-alongs. But, what makes this act most enjoyable is the energy and emotion they put into performing.

-Laura Phillips - Music Connection


"Los Angeles Music Awards Nominee:"

2005 - "Male, Singer-Songwriter of the Year!"


"Los Angeles Music Awards Nominee:"

2005 - "Male, Singer-Songwriter of the Year!"


""Where Do I Fit In" Album Review"

Wren Bunch

Danny Hamilton has been described as, and I quote, "2 parts Springsteen with 1 part Pearl Jam, sprinkle with Ben Harper, Dave Matthews and the Soggy Bottom Boys, then shake vigorously". Well, I wouldn't go quite that far. Hamilton does have a good voice. On some tracks, he's a dead ringer for the lead singer of 7Mary3. But, after listening to this CD, Hamilton really has his own style, and his publicity people owe it to him to credit him with that. It fits perfectly with the type of music he sings. The type being hard to categorize. Sometimes he sounds like he's trying to play bluegrass, sometimes country, sometimes even blues, but its always bubblegum. Very earthy bubblegum to be sure, but still bubblegum. As far as the musical arrangements go, this CD is quite pleasing. This album gives off a "just a kid and his guitar" vibe. It fits with the artist's image. But, Hamilton is not alone. He's got a good bassist working with him-Kalin Krum, in case you want to know and a great backup band. But alot of his lyrics seem very, "High Schooler In Love Poetry" -esque. This is very evident on the track "Melissa". It seems like he's evolving from a "teen" to an adult and hasn't quite finished yet. Alot of the tracks are dedicated to expressing his love for a very lucky girl (D.H. is a real cutie!). There's finally a departure from his "I Love You, Do You Love Me? Oh Great We Love Each Other!" formula with the rollicking fifth track. "Smoother Than You" is one of my favorites tracks on here. Still hokey lyrics, but it seems to have so much life to it. 'Made me smile a little bit. After that, he stays away from the 'pop love song' for one more track with a Mariachi-music inspired love song. He tells the story of a migrant worker's love. Its got some pretty imagery in it and some nice bass work. After that we're back to pop love songs. "A World of You" touches a blues note, sort of. It deals with love's aftermath. Good love cast aside for the proverbial golden ring. Sad, sad love song. The title track - I feel like I have to mention it - deals with the pull of the dark side. Danny croons why he won't sell out on this one. His voice sounds great, so gravelly and sweet at the same time. This track is actually NOT a love song. And guess what? Neither is the next track, that's describing the inequalities in the American system. Kinda cynical for this artist, but at least he's trying. "This Song's Not For You" is a funky little country song. Wow. It really rocks! A very fun song. And really short. This one was another favorite. Back to the feelings after that. "Humming Bird" provides a love song intermission before Danny's soulful "Manzana". Featuring musical elements of Native American music, this song is cynical for this young artist. But evidently the Native American cause is something this young man really believes in. The folding of the traditional music and sound with Hamilton's brand of bubblegum soul is impressive. Here's another place where Kalin Krum shines. Kalin and Guillermo Martinez play the Native American flutes on this track. Its a song that gives out energy to spare, without being too cheesy. A surprising ender to an album that I didn't think I was going to like.

This young man is talented. He's gotten lots of good reviews. He's hooked up with some very good musicians. He's been nominated for 'Pop Album of the Year' at the 2003 LA Music Awards. I usually don't like CD's that have the phrase "I Love You" sprinkled liberally throughout many tracks. But, through the course of this CD, Danny Hamilton has won me over. The last half of the CD was very redeeming. What I thought was going to be cheese sandwich came back as a bacon double cheeseburger. This offering has some real 'meat' to it. Thanks for surprising me Danny. That doesn't happen too often.

- FMSound.net


""Where Do I Fit In" Album Review"

Wren Bunch

Danny Hamilton has been described as, and I quote, "2 parts Springsteen with 1 part Pearl Jam, sprinkle with Ben Harper, Dave Matthews and the Soggy Bottom Boys, then shake vigorously". Well, I wouldn't go quite that far. Hamilton does have a good voice. On some tracks, he's a dead ringer for the lead singer of 7Mary3. But, after listening to this CD, Hamilton really has his own style, and his publicity people owe it to him to credit him with that. It fits perfectly with the type of music he sings. The type being hard to categorize. Sometimes he sounds like he's trying to play bluegrass, sometimes country, sometimes even blues, but its always bubblegum. Very earthy bubblegum to be sure, but still bubblegum. As far as the musical arrangements go, this CD is quite pleasing. This album gives off a "just a kid and his guitar" vibe. It fits with the artist's image. But, Hamilton is not alone. He's got a good bassist working with him-Kalin Krum, in case you want to know and a great backup band. But alot of his lyrics seem very, "High Schooler In Love Poetry" -esque. This is very evident on the track "Melissa". It seems like he's evolving from a "teen" to an adult and hasn't quite finished yet. Alot of the tracks are dedicated to expressing his love for a very lucky girl (D.H. is a real cutie!). There's finally a departure from his "I Love You, Do You Love Me? Oh Great We Love Each Other!" formula with the rollicking fifth track. "Smoother Than You" is one of my favorites tracks on here. Still hokey lyrics, but it seems to have so much life to it. 'Made me smile a little bit. After that, he stays away from the 'pop love song' for one more track with a Mariachi-music inspired love song. He tells the story of a migrant worker's love. Its got some pretty imagery in it and some nice bass work. After that we're back to pop love songs. "A World of You" touches a blues note, sort of. It deals with love's aftermath. Good love cast aside for the proverbial golden ring. Sad, sad love song. The title track - I feel like I have to mention it - deals with the pull of the dark side. Danny croons why he won't sell out on this one. His voice sounds great, so gravelly and sweet at the same time. This track is actually NOT a love song. And guess what? Neither is the next track, that's describing the inequalities in the American system. Kinda cynical for this artist, but at least he's trying. "This Song's Not For You" is a funky little country song. Wow. It really rocks! A very fun song. And really short. This one was another favorite. Back to the feelings after that. "Humming Bird" provides a love song intermission before Danny's soulful "Manzana". Featuring musical elements of Native American music, this song is cynical for this young artist. But evidently the Native American cause is something this young man really believes in. The folding of the traditional music and sound with Hamilton's brand of bubblegum soul is impressive. Here's another place where Kalin Krum shines. Kalin and Guillermo Martinez play the Native American flutes on this track. Its a song that gives out energy to spare, without being too cheesy. A surprising ender to an album that I didn't think I was going to like.

This young man is talented. He's gotten lots of good reviews. He's hooked up with some very good musicians. He's been nominated for 'Pop Album of the Year' at the 2003 LA Music Awards. I usually don't like CD's that have the phrase "I Love You" sprinkled liberally throughout many tracks. But, through the course of this CD, Danny Hamilton has won me over. The last half of the CD was very redeeming. What I thought was going to be cheese sandwich came back as a bacon double cheeseburger. This offering has some real 'meat' to it. Thanks for surprising me Danny. That doesn't happen too often.

- FMSound.net


""Where Do I Fit In" Album Review"

By Ken Mowery

Danny Hamilton's new CD has been appropriately titled Where Do I Fit In? because it spans the spectrum of musical styles, tastes, and genre found in pop music today. However, listeners will appreciate the fresh originality of Hamilton's sound, which carries discernable nuances from country, rock, folk and blues.

Although it may be difficult to categorize, this project delivers notable and powerful performances with profoundly entertaining impact. The CD gets down to rock and roll business with the initial track, "Ace" which offers a suitable preview of the intensity that typifies Hamilton's music. Along with this intensity, there is an appealing insight and sensitivity that comes across in songs such as "Love Song of the Migrant Worker", "Carpe Diem", and "A World Of You." The latter stands out as one of the CD's most stirring songs with deeply personal lamentation about love lost coupled with perfectly piercing blues guitar riffs.

Hamilton unfurls his artist banner in the title song, which decries the ugliness behind the pressure to compromise artistic integrity in order to achieve commercial success. He flatly and defiantly declares his refusal to travel down that road.

In the song "American," Hamilton raises the voice of protest over several societal woes. This song's social commentary is superbly punctuated with a nice harmonica solo.

"This Song's Not For You" breaks the CD loose with some old time, good fun, get up and dance, rock and roll complete with Jerry Lee Lewis style piano and Chuck Berry-ish guitar playing.

"Manzana" brings the CD to a beautiful conclusion with the haunting charm of Native American flutes, drums and chants. This ending seems to highlight the eclectic reaches and appeal of Hamilton's style.

Where Do I Fit In? may defy description, but one thing is certain. This CD will fit in to any respectable music collection. - indie-music.com


"Hamilton's 'oh-so-sexy' voice combines variety of music"

By Maria Villalobos
Daily Staff Writer
April 30, 2004

Danny Hamilton's 2003 release, "Where Do I Fit In," is a pleasing blend of folk, blues, pop-rock and country, which will make his third album a quick sell.


Hamilton's music is reminiscent of John Cougar Mellencamp and Bruce Springsteen. The whole album is a fun, sweet-sounding success.

"Ace," the first single on the album, grabs the listener with Hamilton's raspy, oh-so-sexy voice and the sweet-sounding howls of his harmonica while Kalin Krum's bass thumps along.

Hamilton, singer and songwriter, was born and raised in Torrance and plays with band members Jeff Pitts on the drum, Ken LeBlanc on rhythm guitar, Krum on bass guitar and Russell Ali and Ismael Pineda on hand percussions.

The music has the right combination of slow and fast parts that will make the listener either kick back, relax and listen to the lyrics, or jump up and start dancing.

In Hamilton's press release, he describes his music as "different."

"It's a little rock, a little folk, a little blues and sometimes a little country ... we like to call it urban grass roots rock."

The album has a distinctive sound and style, which is attributed to the various instruments that accompany the band.

The violin, the piano and keyboards, the cello, an organ, native flutes and the harmonica, along with background vocals from the variety of other members playing these instruments, gives the album a unique and refreshing sound unlike most rock bands. Hamilton and his band play in the Southern California area, and the press release said they were nominated for "Independent Album of the year" at the 2003 Los Angeles Music Awards.

According to Hamilton's Web site, he taught himself how to play the guitar after experiencing a serious accident in the eighth grade, which left him immobilized for months with broken bones, and soon after he began writing.

Hamilton's creative juices pour out through his words, many of which have significant meaning and parallel his life.

"Where Do I Fit In" has a constant theme throughout the album about not conforming to any certain norm.

"Melissa" is a soft melody with a nice beat sure to get any listener moving. This is one that will be on the radio.

Hamilton's lyrics to the title track shadow how he feels about his music and values:

"I can't write a song thinking / how much it'll make me baby / and I couldn't care less for material things ... I don't really care if I'm ever on the cover of Rolling Stone / I won't ever drive a Mercedes Benz / I've got somewhat of a different view on what it means to succeed / I agree with Emerson ... So where do I fit in?"

"Where Do I Fit In" is not only an excellent sounding compact disc with no gripes, but it's also the perfect album to show off Hamilton's talent. - The Spartan Daily www.thespartandaily.com


""Where Do I Fit In" Album Review"

By Ken Mowery

Danny Hamilton's new CD has been appropriately titled Where Do I Fit In? because it spans the spectrum of musical styles, tastes, and genre found in pop music today. However, listeners will appreciate the fresh originality of Hamilton's sound, which carries discernable nuances from country, rock, folk and blues.

Although it may be difficult to categorize, this project delivers notable and powerful performances with profoundly entertaining impact. The CD gets down to rock and roll business with the initial track, "Ace" which offers a suitable preview of the intensity that typifies Hamilton's music. Along with this intensity, there is an appealing insight and sensitivity that comes across in songs such as "Love Song of the Migrant Worker", "Carpe Diem", and "A World Of You." The latter stands out as one of the CD's most stirring songs with deeply personal lamentation about love lost coupled with perfectly piercing blues guitar riffs.

Hamilton unfurls his artist banner in the title song, which decries the ugliness behind the pressure to compromise artistic integrity in order to achieve commercial success. He flatly and defiantly declares his refusal to travel down that road.

In the song "American," Hamilton raises the voice of protest over several societal woes. This song's social commentary is superbly punctuated with a nice harmonica solo.

"This Song's Not For You" breaks the CD loose with some old time, good fun, get up and dance, rock and roll complete with Jerry Lee Lewis style piano and Chuck Berry-ish guitar playing.

"Manzana" brings the CD to a beautiful conclusion with the haunting charm of Native American flutes, drums and chants. This ending seems to highlight the eclectic reaches and appeal of Hamilton's style.

Where Do I Fit In? may defy description, but one thing is certain. This CD will fit in to any respectable music collection. - indie-music.com


"Los Angeles Music Awards Nominee:"

"Where Do I Fit In" - 2003 - "Independent Album of the Year!"


"South Bay Music Awards Nominee:"

2003 - "Best Acoustic Artist!"


"Los Angeles Music Awards Nominee:"

"Where Do I Fit In" - 2003 - "Independent Album of the Year!"


"Los Angeles Music Awards Nominee:"

2002 - "Male, Singer/Songwriter of the Year!"


"Los Angeles Music Awards Nominee:"

2002 - "Male, Singer/Songwriter of the Year!"


""Where Do I Fit In" Album Critique"

".... his talent is palpable here. the soothing 'Flame' reflects on the healing power of loneliness. 'Ace' echoes Matchbox Twenty's Rob Thomas. Most impressive is 'Smoother Than You,' which showcases a strong roots country talent with a lickitysplit vocal delivery and a fiddle solo that really kicks." - Music Connection Magazine


""Where Do I Fit In" Album Review"

Go ahead...check out his web site. Images on the front page and the artist's pose. Danny Hamilton's appearance define "Average Joe". The self-produced musician is dressed in jeans, an orange tee-shirt, his acoustic guitar, sandles and a quasi-dopey glare. Honestly, nothing was expected outside of some folk artist with pedestrian songwriting or singing ability. I re-learned that initial impressions could be fleeting.

Danny Hamilton shares the style and talents of numerous acts. His greatest noted influence is Bruce Springsteen--there is no resemblance in sound, but their traditional rock-leaning lyrics are alike in picture setting capabilities and superlative quality. In reference to sound, think two scoops Sister Hazel, two more of Matchbox 20 and the last one for Mike Glabicki's (Rusted Root) fluttery histrionics. Admitted, the listed genres may be a stretch because they broadcast mainstream rock radio (albeit, without the Rob Thomas-penned cliches).

Where Do I Fit In? is a remarkably spotless production. Customary, semi-obsolete (rhythm guitar and harmonicas) and eclectic (cello, violin and Native American Flutes) instruments along with male/female background vocalists fleshed out various tangible environments. Producer Ken LeBlanc's treatment could not be better served even with a major label's means.

It's certainly not mind-rupturing to determine why Where Do I Fit In? was nominated by the 2003 Los Angeles Music Awards as "Independent Album of the Year!". Maybe my initial solicitation was a cunning attempt to help you get a head start to what you should already be seeking. Enjoy! - Spunout Central


""Where Do I Fit In" Album Critique"

".... his talent is palpable here. the soothing 'Flame' reflects on the healing power of loneliness. 'Ace' echoes Matchbox Twenty's Rob Thomas. Most impressive is 'Smoother Than You,' which showcases a strong roots country talent with a lickitysplit vocal delivery and a fiddle solo that really kicks." - Music Connection Magazine


Discography

"Free Dirt" 6 song EP - 2007
"Where Do I Fit In?" Full length LP - 2003
"Acoustic" Full Length LP - 2002
"Believe" Full Length LP - 2000
"Motherless Child" Full Length LP - 1997

Photos

Bio

Roots Rock / Alternative Country?

No matter what you call the music, it's catching on in a big way! In addition to being listed in Music Connection Magazine's HOT 100 list, Danny has been nominated twice at the Los Angeles Music Awards for "Male, Singer-Songwriter of the Year" and once for "Independent Album of the Year." That album, 'Where Do I Fit In', was Danny's fourth independent release, is receiving rave reviews and is currently being played on indie and college radio stations all over the country! Danny and his band had a featured spot at the Inkslinger's Ball at Anaheim Stadium, and has rocked audiences at South By Southwest and numerous art & music festivals all over Southern California. Also, In 2008, Danny and his song I'm Still Here were featured on Country Music Television's "Music City Madness" contest which aired in December. The following year, his song "Bury the Devil" took him all the way to 2nd place in that same nation-wide competition on CMT! Danny currently has three songs placed in multiple episodes of MTV's second season of "My Life As Liz."

With hand percussion, funky bass lines, female backup vocalists, whaling harmonicas, tribal chants, guitars, keys, drums, catchy melodies, and more raw energy and emotion than you can shake a stick at, you're guaranteed to move or be moved! IndieMusic.com said; "Delivers notable and powerful performances with profoundly entertaining impact!" while FMSound.net called the music "Quite pleasing! Listeners will appreciate the fresh originality of Hamilton's sound."

 

"Packed with energy... impressive... This SoCal act is highly entertaining and has a promising future!"
Trevor Blair - Music Connection
"What makes this band unique is the blending of country, roots rock and tribal sounds... What makes this act most enjoyable is the energy and emotion they put into performing... Mainstream enough for modern country with catchy lyrics!"
Laura Phillips - Music Connection

"Danny Hamilton has tremendous talent to be sure... his voice is truly unique."
- Rock City News

Band Members