Daphne Willis
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Daphne Willis

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | INDIE

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | INDIE
Band Alternative Pop

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"Review: Summery Pop From Daphne Willis"

Before beginning work on "Because I Can," prolific pop composer Daphne Willis says she wrote 50 to 60 songs, then picked 12 to record.

Keep 'em coming, Daphne.

There's not a dud among these dozen summery tunes. It helps that the 23-year-old Willis possesses a commanding, versatile alto that makes everything swing. She slides gracefully in and out of an appealing falsetto and manages R&B-style vocal leaps of nearly an octave without coming off like some oversinging "American Idol" wannabe.

Willis has clearly studied pop's past, and the material hints at disparate influences, ranging from Burt Bacharach to Chicago to Norah Jones to Alicia Keys. Willis' sound is entirely her own, though — cheery melodies, bouncy beats and clever arrangements flavored with Saturday-in-the-park brass. The music remains sunny throughout, even when Willis sings about rain.

This is an assertive young artist, as suggested by such song titles as "Shake It Off," "Spit It Out" and "Slow Down." With a record this good, she has reason to be confident.

CHECK THIS TRACK OUT: "The Song Song" starts with a piano figure worthy of "Teaching Little Fingers to Play," then blossoms into a hook-filled ode to composing. The lyrics lay out Willis' strategy: Keep things short and simple. She makes it sound easy. - The Associated Press


"Review: Summery Pop From Daphne Willis"

Before beginning work on "Because I Can," prolific pop composer Daphne Willis says she wrote 50 to 60 songs, then picked 12 to record.

Keep 'em coming, Daphne.

There's not a dud among these dozen summery tunes. It helps that the 23-year-old Willis possesses a commanding, versatile alto that makes everything swing. She slides gracefully in and out of an appealing falsetto and manages R&B-style vocal leaps of nearly an octave without coming off like some oversinging "American Idol" wannabe.

Willis has clearly studied pop's past, and the material hints at disparate influences, ranging from Burt Bacharach to Chicago to Norah Jones to Alicia Keys. Willis' sound is entirely her own, though — cheery melodies, bouncy beats and clever arrangements flavored with Saturday-in-the-park brass. The music remains sunny throughout, even when Willis sings about rain.

This is an assertive young artist, as suggested by such song titles as "Shake It Off," "Spit It Out" and "Slow Down." With a record this good, she has reason to be confident.

CHECK THIS TRACK OUT: "The Song Song" starts with a piano figure worthy of "Teaching Little Fingers to Play," then blossoms into a hook-filled ode to composing. The lyrics lay out Willis' strategy: Keep things short and simple. She makes it sound easy. - The Associated Press


"All In The Family: Daphne Willis"

Daphne Willis seems to be on the verge of something big. Her debut album, What to Say, helped her build critical and commercial momentum last year. She moved from Chicago to Nashville. She surrounded herself with new talent. She began to write more of her own music. And, this spring, Willis put out her second album, Because I Can.

Willis tells Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon that she was discovered in a moment of serendipity. The head of her current label, Vanguard Records, was on an airplane when his iPod died, prompting him to plug his headphones in to the nearest armrest.

"One of my songs was playing," Willis says. "He went into the pamphlet and saw I was unsigned, and that's how it started. From there, it kind of all happened really quick."

Willis grew up steeped in both the art and the business of music: Her mother studied vocal performance at the University of Texas, while her father was an engineering major who went on to work at Sony BMG for more than 30 years. Her older brother is also musically inclined.

"My parents would rock us out to Elvis Costello and Stevie Wonder and Ella Fitzgerald and all the great, classic songwriters and vocalists," Willis says. "I kind of grew up surrounded in that world." - National Public Radio (NPR)


"All In The Family: Daphne Willis"

Daphne Willis seems to be on the verge of something big. Her debut album, What to Say, helped her build critical and commercial momentum last year. She moved from Chicago to Nashville. She surrounded herself with new talent. She began to write more of her own music. And, this spring, Willis put out her second album, Because I Can.

Willis tells Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon that she was discovered in a moment of serendipity. The head of her current label, Vanguard Records, was on an airplane when his iPod died, prompting him to plug his headphones in to the nearest armrest.

"One of my songs was playing," Willis says. "He went into the pamphlet and saw I was unsigned, and that's how it started. From there, it kind of all happened really quick."

Willis grew up steeped in both the art and the business of music: Her mother studied vocal performance at the University of Texas, while her father was an engineering major who went on to work at Sony BMG for more than 30 years. Her older brother is also musically inclined.

"My parents would rock us out to Elvis Costello and Stevie Wonder and Ella Fitzgerald and all the great, classic songwriters and vocalists," Willis says. "I kind of grew up surrounded in that world." - National Public Radio (NPR)


"All In The Family: Daphne Willis"

Daphne Willis seems to be on the verge of something big. Her debut album, What to Say, helped her build critical and commercial momentum last year. She moved from Chicago to Nashville. She surrounded herself with new talent. She began to write more of her own music. And, this spring, Willis put out her second album, Because I Can.

Willis tells Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon that she was discovered in a moment of serendipity. The head of her current label, Vanguard Records, was on an airplane when his iPod died, prompting him to plug his headphones in to the nearest armrest.

"One of my songs was playing," Willis says. "He went into the pamphlet and saw I was unsigned, and that's how it started. From there, it kind of all happened really quick."

Willis grew up steeped in both the art and the business of music: Her mother studied vocal performance at the University of Texas, while her father was an engineering major who went on to work at Sony BMG for more than 30 years. Her older brother is also musically inclined.

"My parents would rock us out to Elvis Costello and Stevie Wonder and Ella Fitzgerald and all the great, classic songwriters and vocalists," Willis says. "I kind of grew up surrounded in that world." - National Public Radio (NPR)


"All In The Family: Daphne Willis"

Daphne Willis seems to be on the verge of something big. Her debut album, What to Say, helped her build critical and commercial momentum last year. She moved from Chicago to Nashville. She surrounded herself with new talent. She began to write more of her own music. And, this spring, Willis put out her second album, Because I Can.

Willis tells Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon that she was discovered in a moment of serendipity. The head of her current label, Vanguard Records, was on an airplane when his iPod died, prompting him to plug his headphones in to the nearest armrest.

"One of my songs was playing," Willis says. "He went into the pamphlet and saw I was unsigned, and that's how it started. From there, it kind of all happened really quick."

Willis grew up steeped in both the art and the business of music: Her mother studied vocal performance at the University of Texas, while her father was an engineering major who went on to work at Sony BMG for more than 30 years. Her older brother is also musically inclined.

"My parents would rock us out to Elvis Costello and Stevie Wonder and Ella Fitzgerald and all the great, classic songwriters and vocalists," Willis says. "I kind of grew up surrounded in that world." - National Public Radio (NPR)


"Daphne Willis: Because I Can"

Daphne Willis delivers a fun and refreshingly smooth pop album, heavy with jazz, rock and soul influences.

Because I Can offers Willis the opportunity to show off her vocal capabilities, as she casually struts her stuff throughout the tracks as if to say “no big deal.” Her laid-back performance is complemented by lighthearted, breezy songs.

“Shake It Off”, an up-tempo, horn-heavy jam, leads off the album and sets the tone for a funky release full of toe-tapping songs.

Throughout the album Willis explores relationships in their various stages. “Spit It Out” and “Circumstances” discuss the end of relationships and moving on, and “Sad” focuses on just how hard that can be. Her songwriting skills stand out, as she uses imagery to convey the pain of a relationship that is over, “red, the shade of wine, the color of your voice when you said goodbye.”

“I Will Be Waiting” is all about dealing with being apart from that special someone. It speaks to the middle-school girl in me and is perfect for bouncing around and belting out along with Willis as she sings, “I miss the way you fill in the spaces/and I miss us in our favorite places/And I miss you, the way we turn the pages/And I will be waiting.” It is an adorable song that playfully tugs at the heartstrings of romantics and everyone else.

“Weatherman” and “I Want To” deal with the beginnings of a relationship, and how holding onto someone can take just as much convincing as when it is time for letting go. There is the spirit of a fighter, and Willis is obviously someone who is willing to fight for love.

Her fighting spirit is evident in the other songs on Because I Can. “Do What You Want” and “Is Anyone There” address the issues of who to be and how to fit into a world with high expectations and fleeting relationships. She encourages to listeners to “be anything as long as it is real.”

“One by One” is written in the same vein. Willis croons about changing her ways one-by-one and working her way from the bottom back to the top. The soothing strength in her vocals makes you believe that things will get better, not only for Willis but also for whatever hardships the you may be working through.

Surprisingly, the album ends on a softer note. Throughout her work there is a constant theme of strength and self-empowerment. The tenderness of “Slow Down” gives listeners a glimpse at the more delicate side of Willis.

A catchy and cheerful sophomore effort, Because I Can is enjoyable but leaves us wanting a little something extra. Potential is a double-edged sword, and with all of Willis’ talent we can’t help but expect more. This record is fun to listen to, but we’re already looking toward what she will create next. - Paste Magazine


"Daphne Willis: Because I Can"

Daphne Willis delivers a fun and refreshingly smooth pop album, heavy with jazz, rock and soul influences.

Because I Can offers Willis the opportunity to show off her vocal capabilities, as she casually struts her stuff throughout the tracks as if to say “no big deal.” Her laid-back performance is complemented by lighthearted, breezy songs.

“Shake It Off”, an up-tempo, horn-heavy jam, leads off the album and sets the tone for a funky release full of toe-tapping songs.

Throughout the album Willis explores relationships in their various stages. “Spit It Out” and “Circumstances” discuss the end of relationships and moving on, and “Sad” focuses on just how hard that can be. Her songwriting skills stand out, as she uses imagery to convey the pain of a relationship that is over, “red, the shade of wine, the color of your voice when you said goodbye.”

“I Will Be Waiting” is all about dealing with being apart from that special someone. It speaks to the middle-school girl in me and is perfect for bouncing around and belting out along with Willis as she sings, “I miss the way you fill in the spaces/and I miss us in our favorite places/And I miss you, the way we turn the pages/And I will be waiting.” It is an adorable song that playfully tugs at the heartstrings of romantics and everyone else.

“Weatherman” and “I Want To” deal with the beginnings of a relationship, and how holding onto someone can take just as much convincing as when it is time for letting go. There is the spirit of a fighter, and Willis is obviously someone who is willing to fight for love.

Her fighting spirit is evident in the other songs on Because I Can. “Do What You Want” and “Is Anyone There” address the issues of who to be and how to fit into a world with high expectations and fleeting relationships. She encourages to listeners to “be anything as long as it is real.”

“One by One” is written in the same vein. Willis croons about changing her ways one-by-one and working her way from the bottom back to the top. The soothing strength in her vocals makes you believe that things will get better, not only for Willis but also for whatever hardships the you may be working through.

Surprisingly, the album ends on a softer note. Throughout her work there is a constant theme of strength and self-empowerment. The tenderness of “Slow Down” gives listeners a glimpse at the more delicate side of Willis.

A catchy and cheerful sophomore effort, Because I Can is enjoyable but leaves us wanting a little something extra. Potential is a double-edged sword, and with all of Willis’ talent we can’t help but expect more. This record is fun to listen to, but we’re already looking toward what she will create next. - Paste Magazine


"Daphne Willis: Because I Can"

Daphne Willis delivers a fun and refreshingly smooth pop album, heavy with jazz, rock and soul influences.

Because I Can offers Willis the opportunity to show off her vocal capabilities, as she casually struts her stuff throughout the tracks as if to say “no big deal.” Her laid-back performance is complemented by lighthearted, breezy songs.

“Shake It Off”, an up-tempo, horn-heavy jam, leads off the album and sets the tone for a funky release full of toe-tapping songs.

Throughout the album Willis explores relationships in their various stages. “Spit It Out” and “Circumstances” discuss the end of relationships and moving on, and “Sad” focuses on just how hard that can be. Her songwriting skills stand out, as she uses imagery to convey the pain of a relationship that is over, “red, the shade of wine, the color of your voice when you said goodbye.”

“I Will Be Waiting” is all about dealing with being apart from that special someone. It speaks to the middle-school girl in me and is perfect for bouncing around and belting out along with Willis as she sings, “I miss the way you fill in the spaces/and I miss us in our favorite places/And I miss you, the way we turn the pages/And I will be waiting.” It is an adorable song that playfully tugs at the heartstrings of romantics and everyone else.

“Weatherman” and “I Want To” deal with the beginnings of a relationship, and how holding onto someone can take just as much convincing as when it is time for letting go. There is the spirit of a fighter, and Willis is obviously someone who is willing to fight for love.

Her fighting spirit is evident in the other songs on Because I Can. “Do What You Want” and “Is Anyone There” address the issues of who to be and how to fit into a world with high expectations and fleeting relationships. She encourages to listeners to “be anything as long as it is real.”

“One by One” is written in the same vein. Willis croons about changing her ways one-by-one and working her way from the bottom back to the top. The soothing strength in her vocals makes you believe that things will get better, not only for Willis but also for whatever hardships the you may be working through.

Surprisingly, the album ends on a softer note. Throughout her work there is a constant theme of strength and self-empowerment. The tenderness of “Slow Down” gives listeners a glimpse at the more delicate side of Willis.

A catchy and cheerful sophomore effort, Because I Can is enjoyable but leaves us wanting a little something extra. Potential is a double-edged sword, and with all of Willis’ talent we can’t help but expect more. This record is fun to listen to, but we’re already looking toward what she will create next. - Paste Magazine


"Daphne Willis: Because I Can"

Daphne Willis delivers a fun and refreshingly smooth pop album, heavy with jazz, rock and soul influences.

Because I Can offers Willis the opportunity to show off her vocal capabilities, as she casually struts her stuff throughout the tracks as if to say “no big deal.” Her laid-back performance is complemented by lighthearted, breezy songs.

“Shake It Off”, an up-tempo, horn-heavy jam, leads off the album and sets the tone for a funky release full of toe-tapping songs.

Throughout the album Willis explores relationships in their various stages. “Spit It Out” and “Circumstances” discuss the end of relationships and moving on, and “Sad” focuses on just how hard that can be. Her songwriting skills stand out, as she uses imagery to convey the pain of a relationship that is over, “red, the shade of wine, the color of your voice when you said goodbye.”

“I Will Be Waiting” is all about dealing with being apart from that special someone. It speaks to the middle-school girl in me and is perfect for bouncing around and belting out along with Willis as she sings, “I miss the way you fill in the spaces/and I miss us in our favorite places/And I miss you, the way we turn the pages/And I will be waiting.” It is an adorable song that playfully tugs at the heartstrings of romantics and everyone else.

“Weatherman” and “I Want To” deal with the beginnings of a relationship, and how holding onto someone can take just as much convincing as when it is time for letting go. There is the spirit of a fighter, and Willis is obviously someone who is willing to fight for love.

Her fighting spirit is evident in the other songs on Because I Can. “Do What You Want” and “Is Anyone There” address the issues of who to be and how to fit into a world with high expectations and fleeting relationships. She encourages to listeners to “be anything as long as it is real.”

“One by One” is written in the same vein. Willis croons about changing her ways one-by-one and working her way from the bottom back to the top. The soothing strength in her vocals makes you believe that things will get better, not only for Willis but also for whatever hardships the you may be working through.

Surprisingly, the album ends on a softer note. Throughout her work there is a constant theme of strength and self-empowerment. The tenderness of “Slow Down” gives listeners a glimpse at the more delicate side of Willis.

A catchy and cheerful sophomore effort, Because I Can is enjoyable but leaves us wanting a little something extra. Potential is a double-edged sword, and with all of Willis’ talent we can’t help but expect more. This record is fun to listen to, but we’re already looking toward what she will create next. - Paste Magazine


"Eclectricity: Daphne Willis"

Eclectricity: Daphne Willis & Co., May 29 at RIBCO
Wednesday, 28 May 2008
It's a busy day for Daphne Willis.

On the afternoon of our recent phone interview, the lead singer of the Chicago-based Daphne Willis & Co. was in the midst of a two-day shoot for promotional photos, an experience that Willis describes as "crazy. You know, we're all over the city doing shots - about 500 shots yesterday, and we're lookin' to do the same today."

And the day was about to become even more eventful, as the acoustic rockers - playing the Rock Island Brewing Company on May 29 - were also set to sign with Vanguard Records. "Actually, I'm signing the documents today," says Willis. "It's been a long process to get everything set up, and you know, I'm a musician and don't really have much of a sense of the business side of things, but I'm really excited about it."

A professional photo shoot, a contract-signing, a debut EP with last May's Matter of Time, and a hundred-plus gigs over the past year, including one at last summer's River Roots Live festival. Not bad for a 21-year-old, let alone one who first picked up a guitar a mere five years ago.

Raised in the Chicago suburb of Palatine, Willis says that music was always part of her upbringing, as her parents "have always been really musical, and play instruments [including piano and pedal-steel guitar], and both of my parents actually started gigging when they were in college. So it's just been, like, since day one."

She grew up listening to her folks' copies of Beatles and Bob Dylan classics, played saxophone in grade school and piano in middle school, and says her fascination with the guitar, at age 16, started purely by accident. "I used to play a lot of sports," she says, "and I started playing guitar because I tore my ACL, and I was laid up for a long period of time with really nothing else to do. So I would just practice guitar all day.

"You know," she adds with a laugh, "after, like, four or five months, you get used to it."

While in high school, says Willis, "I listened to a lot of Dave Matthews Band, Jack Johnson, Norah Jones. And I also listened to a lot of older stuff, like Elvis Costello, the Steve Miller Band," and other artists that would eventually influence her group's sound. "We really are eclectic in the sense that we all do different kinds of music, but I would say that it's kind of like a mix between pop and indie."

Willis attended DePaul University to pursue a secondary-education/English degree, yet found herself taken with Chicago's club scene. "I was doing all these open-mic nights all over the city," she says, "which are great, 'cause they're just a big network for different musicians to meet each other and connect."

The idea to pursue music full-time came through one such connection in late 2006. "I met Ryan Kolberg, our bass player," she says, "and we were, you know, just kind of jammin' out one night. And he had just graduated from Berklee's school of music, and he kind of said, ‘You know, maybe we should consider getting other people in on this and really pushin' for it.'"

Thanks to Chicago's networks of clubs, finding others wasn't difficult. "I met Ryan through an open-mic," says Willis with a laugh, "and John Cicora, our lead guitarist, was playin' at this other open mic that I was doin', and Josh Fox [Daphne Willis & Co.'s percussionist] we got through a friend of mine who actually was bartending at this other open-mic."

From their first rehearsal, Willis states that "it was really only a few months" before the musicians started landing regular gigs. ("I already had a couple of home-recorded demos that I had done," she says, "and I had an EP, so ... .") The band's initial, Chicago-area success convinced the singer to take a year off from DePaul, and by the fall of 2007, the group was averaging three to four bookings a week.

"He really does work his ass off," says Willis of band manager Zach Davis, who first introduced the singer to Kolberg. "And, you know, we're still trying to add to that. We're trying to do between 15 and 20 gigs a month if we can."

Following their RIBCO gig, Daphne Willis & Co. is currently scheduled for more than two dozen bookings through August, and Willis says that "we're hoping to get back into [River Roots Live] for this summer." Yet more than anything, states the singer, "I'm really anxious to get some new material out there," although, because of the contract with Vanguard, Willis admits that "the process has somewhat slowed.

"But it's also sped up," she adds, "in the sense that we're going to be releasing an EP prior to the first album. So it's cool, because even though it may take a little bit longer, there's essentially gonna be more material than there would've been if we'd just released an album."

Perhaps needless to say, Willis has consequently decided to extend her university sabbatical. But did the 21-year-old expect to be so busy so soon?

"O - River Cities' Reader


"Eclectricity: Daphne Willis"

Eclectricity: Daphne Willis & Co., May 29 at RIBCO
Wednesday, 28 May 2008
It's a busy day for Daphne Willis.

On the afternoon of our recent phone interview, the lead singer of the Chicago-based Daphne Willis & Co. was in the midst of a two-day shoot for promotional photos, an experience that Willis describes as "crazy. You know, we're all over the city doing shots - about 500 shots yesterday, and we're lookin' to do the same today."

And the day was about to become even more eventful, as the acoustic rockers - playing the Rock Island Brewing Company on May 29 - were also set to sign with Vanguard Records. "Actually, I'm signing the documents today," says Willis. "It's been a long process to get everything set up, and you know, I'm a musician and don't really have much of a sense of the business side of things, but I'm really excited about it."

A professional photo shoot, a contract-signing, a debut EP with last May's Matter of Time, and a hundred-plus gigs over the past year, including one at last summer's River Roots Live festival. Not bad for a 21-year-old, let alone one who first picked up a guitar a mere five years ago.

Raised in the Chicago suburb of Palatine, Willis says that music was always part of her upbringing, as her parents "have always been really musical, and play instruments [including piano and pedal-steel guitar], and both of my parents actually started gigging when they were in college. So it's just been, like, since day one."

She grew up listening to her folks' copies of Beatles and Bob Dylan classics, played saxophone in grade school and piano in middle school, and says her fascination with the guitar, at age 16, started purely by accident. "I used to play a lot of sports," she says, "and I started playing guitar because I tore my ACL, and I was laid up for a long period of time with really nothing else to do. So I would just practice guitar all day.

"You know," she adds with a laugh, "after, like, four or five months, you get used to it."

While in high school, says Willis, "I listened to a lot of Dave Matthews Band, Jack Johnson, Norah Jones. And I also listened to a lot of older stuff, like Elvis Costello, the Steve Miller Band," and other artists that would eventually influence her group's sound. "We really are eclectic in the sense that we all do different kinds of music, but I would say that it's kind of like a mix between pop and indie."

Willis attended DePaul University to pursue a secondary-education/English degree, yet found herself taken with Chicago's club scene. "I was doing all these open-mic nights all over the city," she says, "which are great, 'cause they're just a big network for different musicians to meet each other and connect."

The idea to pursue music full-time came through one such connection in late 2006. "I met Ryan Kolberg, our bass player," she says, "and we were, you know, just kind of jammin' out one night. And he had just graduated from Berklee's school of music, and he kind of said, ‘You know, maybe we should consider getting other people in on this and really pushin' for it.'"

Thanks to Chicago's networks of clubs, finding others wasn't difficult. "I met Ryan through an open-mic," says Willis with a laugh, "and John Cicora, our lead guitarist, was playin' at this other open mic that I was doin', and Josh Fox [Daphne Willis & Co.'s percussionist] we got through a friend of mine who actually was bartending at this other open-mic."

From their first rehearsal, Willis states that "it was really only a few months" before the musicians started landing regular gigs. ("I already had a couple of home-recorded demos that I had done," she says, "and I had an EP, so ... .") The band's initial, Chicago-area success convinced the singer to take a year off from DePaul, and by the fall of 2007, the group was averaging three to four bookings a week.

"He really does work his ass off," says Willis of band manager Zach Davis, who first introduced the singer to Kolberg. "And, you know, we're still trying to add to that. We're trying to do between 15 and 20 gigs a month if we can."

Following their RIBCO gig, Daphne Willis & Co. is currently scheduled for more than two dozen bookings through August, and Willis says that "we're hoping to get back into [River Roots Live] for this summer." Yet more than anything, states the singer, "I'm really anxious to get some new material out there," although, because of the contract with Vanguard, Willis admits that "the process has somewhat slowed.

"But it's also sped up," she adds, "in the sense that we're going to be releasing an EP prior to the first album. So it's cool, because even though it may take a little bit longer, there's essentially gonna be more material than there would've been if we'd just released an album."

Perhaps needless to say, Willis has consequently decided to extend her university sabbatical. But did the 21-year-old expect to be so busy so soon?

"O - River Cities' Reader


"Jammin at the Square w/ Pat McGee"

Jammin' at the Square: Pat McGee Band + MER + Daphne Willis & Co. + Andrew Ripp
Logan Square Auditorium | Find Tickets

2539 N Kedzie Blvd (at Albany Ave)
Humboldt Park/Logan Square, Chicago | Map

773-252-6179

El: Blue to Logan Square. Bus: 52 Kedzie/California, 56 Milwaukee | Directions

http://www.emptybottle.com

Prices

Tickets: $20–$50. 18 and older

Description
Richmond's Pat McGee headlines LSA's Jammin' at the Square playing watered-down, radio-ready rock. Don't bother driving up to Wrigleyville tonight; everything you're looking for is right here. When
- Time Out-Chicago


"Jammin at the Square w/ Pat McGee"

Jammin' at the Square: Pat McGee Band + MER + Daphne Willis & Co. + Andrew Ripp
Logan Square Auditorium | Find Tickets

2539 N Kedzie Blvd (at Albany Ave)
Humboldt Park/Logan Square, Chicago | Map

773-252-6179

El: Blue to Logan Square. Bus: 52 Kedzie/California, 56 Milwaukee | Directions

http://www.emptybottle.com

Prices

Tickets: $20–$50. 18 and older

Description
Richmond's Pat McGee headlines LSA's Jammin' at the Square playing watered-down, radio-ready rock. Don't bother driving up to Wrigleyville tonight; everything you're looking for is right here. When
- Time Out-Chicago


Discography

Because I Can (Vanguard Records) 2011
What To Say (Vanguard Records) - 2010
Exhibit A EP- 2008
Matter of Time EP- 2006

Photos

Bio

With Chicago roots and Texas ties, Daphne Willis brings both musicality and grit to the songs she writes and plays. Born in San Antonio to a classically trained vocalist and audio engineer, Daphne began singing at an early age and found her way to the guitar in high school. Since then, she’s developed the confidence, melodic mastery and vocal range that have won her admirers from here to Beijing.

Daphne didn’t plan a career in music. But as a student at DePaul University in Chicago, she found herself performing at open mic nights, which led to regular Chicago gigs and, eventually, a decision to leave school and hit the road. So she assembled a band and began playing 200 shows a year across the United States. Daphne released her independent EP Matter of Time in September 2007; in a twist of fate, Vanguard Records head Kevin Welk heard a track on an American Airlines flight. This led to a record deal in 2008 and the release of her second EP, Exhibit A.

To record her first full-length album, Daphne headed to the hills of Tennessee. She released What to Say in 2010, which was co-produced by Tim Lauer and Grammy winner Gary Paczosa. Album number two, Because I Can, came out in 2011 and reached the number two spot on iTunes’ Top 40 Singer/Songwriter Chart. On her latest EP, Inside Outright, Daphne co-wrote songs with Hunter Davis, Chris Faulk, Angela Lauer, John Oates of Hall & Oates, Keri Barnes and Tim Lauer.

Daphne currently calls Nashville home, where she crafts her distinct brand of pop and is poised to expand her fan base world wide.