David Cain & The Neighborhood Band
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David Cain & The Neighborhood Band

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"Doug's Top 5 for September | DAVID CAIN "LISTENING... NOW.""

The fine songwriting and innovative musical stayle of musician David Cain is immediately evident on his new CD "Listening...Now." He displays a penchant for lush instrumentation, soaring passages and skillful tempo changes. Coupled to his smooth, affective vocals, Cain takes listeners on a transfixing journey of magnanimous sounds.
At first listen, one may be tempted to compare David Cain to the great Dave Matthews because of their similar vocal nuances and dynamics, but after careful scrutiny, Cain emerges with a vacal delivery and style all his own.
Cain is accompanied by an army of fine musicians that include Tony Parlapiano and Tom Thorndike on keyboards, Paul Chase, Jason Shwartz and Mike Ringland on bass, Travis LaMothe on drums, Mike Nadeau on electric guitar, Anton Yurack on Harmonica, John O'leary and Aaron Pearsall on drums, Alan Veniscofsky on drum programming, Kurt Rinaldi on percussion, Chip Fenney on saxophone and Amanda Gookin on cello.
With a bevy of superb sounds and a collection of well designed songs, Cain is poised to the take New England music scene by storm. Be ready to listen when his music hits! Good Stuff.

-Douglas Sloan - Metronome Magazine September 2004 (Boston, MA)


"A mixer/showcase puts some life in Hartford's veins"

We all want Connecticut’s local music scene to get better, but the truth is that words like “scene” and “better” mean so many different things to different people that the sentiment is almost useless. Hartford doesn’t even have a grip on what its own major concerns and desires are. It’s been this way for a while. From time to time in the past, people have attempted to organize networks, panels, or events to discuss problems specific to Central Connecticut’s local music scene. But musicians are notoriously difficult to organize, and many scene vets have a tendency to come off as jaded finger-pointers, chastising fathers, and know-it-alls. (Funny, you’d expect music makers to be better listeners.)


But the beginnings of a dialogue came from left field this past Sunday, when a new venue called The Warehouse held its first major event. Housed in the building that used to be The Spaghetti Warehouse, and more recently the Trout Brook Brewery, The Warehouse is a massive space with two stages, two bars, a pool room, an outdoor patio, and a helicopter landing pad (not really, but it wouldn’t be a stretch). They gave the place a good housewarming, and put themselves on many a music fan’s entertainment map, by hosting a Music Industry Mixer that featured bands, promoters, merchants, and artists all strutting their stuff and networking for the night.

For me, the highlight set of the evening was David Cain and the Neighborhood Band. Cain, whose long work on a debut disc has finally paid off, is currently in the midst of some serious gigging. As a frontman, Cain has a mix of disheveled, boyish good looks and feminine vocals — which puts him high up there on the rock 'n' roll androgyny scale. You’d never know it here in the land of the straight and the home of the phobic, but a little androgyny is an instant-win rock formula, and it’s one that I think works exceptionally well for Cain, considering he plays catchy, danceable pop. His tunes make even more sense alongside those of fellow Tides Records labelmate Bill Carleton, though with more of a John Mayer edge and less of Carleton’s James Taylor influence.

I was also thrilled to see Eric Sack handling the bass duties for Cain. Sack's name is getting well-circulated of late, and it's about time: he's one of the nastiest, most energetic bass players in the state. While watching him shake and dance, smile at his bandmates, and stick his tongue out at a heckling André Balazs, I turned to my roommate Josh and said, "I think from now until the day he dies, he will never be bored playing bass."

"He should have a wireless amp so he can go out in the crowd and get in people's faces," said Josh.

"I think he could have sex while still playing this bassline," I responded.

I dare say Sack is underutilized in Cain's live band. Perhaps they can open up some room for him to solo now and then in their live compositions, so his talent for combining musical and visual performance can stand forth.

Perhaps a mixer/showcase style event like Sunday's is the solution no one's thought of yet. By placing musicians under the same roof to do what they do best — play tunes and party — there was no expectation of great revelations, no grim and gritty problem-solving atmosphere. Instead, there were just tons of happy run-ins: Alan Veniscofsky from Rane and Tides Records told me how excited he was to be recording the new Columbia Fields album; rapper Lump Sum gave me his latest mixtape. I even had a laugh with Mike Tierney (The Feed, AMS Studios) and rock photographer Rich Cianci over the Grand Band Slam cover story we ran two weeks ago. ("Hey, I wrote that story!" "Hey, I took that cover photo of Article 19!" "Hey, that’s my venue they were playing at!") Here’s hoping that The Warehouse has a bright future ahead—and that events like Sunday’s portend even fresher things to come.
- Dan Barry - The Hartford Advocate | Oct 2, 2008


"David Cain At Sully's"

Local mainstay David Cain has all the makings of a John Mayer-style rock star: boyish good looks, a distinctive vocal style and smooth skills on the guitar. He's also a solid songwriter on his second album 2007's "The Neighborhood Band"
Cain does his share of solo gigs, but his show goes to another level when he brings along the Neighborhood Band. On Jan 17, he plays at Sully's Pub in Hartford, backed by Jay Bernard on guitar, Erik Sack on Bass and Donny Fortin on drums. Hartford songwriter Alex P. Taylor opens the show.
The show starts at 10pm. The pub is at 2071 Park St. Tickets: $7. Information: 860-231-8881 or sullyspub.com.

-Brian Lee - The Hartford Courant


"Metronome Magazine Cover Story (Boston, MA)"

David Cain is maintaining the high note that seems to be a theme in his life and musical portfolio. He was a self-stated jock-type in high school, and started playing guitar late in his high school years for the simple fact that many of his friends also played instruments. In atypical style though, he entered the University of Connecticut as a music major. “When I was 19, one of my close friends introduced me to Miles Davis and George Benson, as well as the idea of studying music in college. I dove head first into the world of jazz, seeking out lessons from a local jazz guitarist. Soon after, I attended the University of Connecticut, spending most of my time concentrating on classical guitar yet still finding time to play in as many jazz groups as possible. As school was winding to its end my musical existence consisted of mainly random jazz gigs and solo guitar composition. Now that school is over I’ve decided to pursue music as a singer-songwriter, this allows me to present music to people in many different ways and in many different styles. It’s a real sense of total artistic freedom. Now that I can look back and see how far this singer-songwriter project has come in such a short amount of time I realize how much I’ve grown as a musician in these past months. At this point I feel open to anything and there’s no telling where all this may go.”
When I spoke with David on August 30th he was getting ready for a move back to Connecticut on the following day after living in Boston for a few years. David’s keyboard player, who has become a mainstay in his recently evolved band lives in Connecticut, and Cain himself is originally from Connecticut. His band currently practices in Connecticut and centralizing himself between Boston and New York just seems like a good move for East Coast gigging.
“The main reason for the move is because a lot of people that I deal with are there; we also have our rehearsals there. It’s nice to be directly in between Boston and New York City; we play in New York City quite a bit. Boston has a much more blossoming music scene, whereas places like Hartford (Connecticut) don’t have the greatest music scene. In Hartford and surrounding areas it’s very cover band oriented, but there are some really cool up-an-coming places that just do original music. The Main Pub in Manchester or Sully’s, which has actually been around for awhile are both Connecticut venues that embrace local music.
Our main goal for the next year is to be in this central area that allows us to go further South and build on what I started in Boston while maintaining the audiences that we built in and around Boston, as well as in New Hampshire and Vermont.”
His self produced debut CD, Listening... Now, marks the entry of David Cain and his band into the world of Jazz/Pop fusion with tightly skilled musical performance, and a wistful yet hopeful singing style reminiscent of Dave Matthews or John Mayer, juxtaposed with a certain exuberant and innocently simplistic songwriting. Listening... Now brings together an array of 15 guest musicians with instruments ranging from B3 Organ to Cello and alto sax; there are various drummers and bassists on this album that provide a sweeping array of styles that David envelopes into his singular pop sensibility and Jazz education. Currently, Cain’s band consists of himself as singer/songwriter and
guitarist with Tony Parlapiano adding B3 Organ, various keyboard stylings, and filling in bass parts. David also has Aaron Pearsall playing drums and feels that the evolution of his band encompasses a fusion of song styles from Pat Metheny guitar harmony and melody to Duncan Sheik-like song composition. There are even moments during David’s relaxed and knowing guitar playing where I can hear intonations of Steve Howe from Yes, or Andy Summers from the Police. Stand out songs include “Cafe ,” with its somber alto sax, “Here To Now,” a melodic number with driving beats and Pat Metheny leads, heard again on track 8, “Sitcom.” There are also songs that encompass a whirlwind of musical differences that David makes work well together, like “Sent To a Friend,” encompassing guitar that is reminiscent of Steve Howe paralleled with the singing of Paul Simon.
Three of the musicians from his eclectic line-up of fifteen stayed on board permanently to form David’s self-styled jam band, with Amanda Gookin’s Cello arriving at some very special gigs (about 50 to 75 percent; Amanda’s schedule prevents her from performing full time, but the trip to New York might be worth it to see a member of the Mannes Conservatory Orchestra perform in a club setting). Her position as muse can easily be seen in such songs as “Cello Girl,” on which there is, ironically, no Cello.
“My last gig was our new drummer’s first. Aaron had never even met Amanda before we played that gig together. That’s the beauty of it. We can give her a call and as long as I have the music written out, she can just jump right in and play. Many times the Cello is introduced in pop/jazz as a hook, written for some sort of melody or repeating line that is just kind of catchy. I write it into the harmony of the tune. It’s more like a pad of beautiful melodies arising in and out of the song. I write it as if I’m writing her into a string quartet rather than a jazz, pop, or jam band. It’s not just on top of the music and then it’s gone; for our songs the Cello parts are written for playing throughout the song. Sometimes it’s down where the bass is and other times it’s way up to the highest note, higher than anybody else in the band. It has this enormous range. That’s the beauty of the Cello. If I had a violinist in the band, they probably wouldn’t have that much to do, aside from little melodies. I can give Amanda a bass line, and then bring her up and give her a melody, or I can give her this middle area where she’s just in there like a pad of sound. Eventually she’ll start experimenting with effects and more modern sound, because that’s what we’ve been talking about. It’s like treating the Cello as a guitar where Amanda will use effects,” stated Cain.
After graduating from the University of Connecticut with a music degree just a few years ago, David’s entry into the world of mainstream musical performance has come in a rush of opportunities, starting with a well received gig at Bill’s Bar in Boston. When I asked about his marketing ideas and promotion to record companies, he was quick to say that due to the evolution from a singular artist writing on an acoustic guitar to a solid three piece and sometimes four piece with the introduction of Cello, the nature of the band had changed and the song-writing would change with it. David wants to see how the music and songwriting
evolves before entering a sound or songwriting skill into the canned musical genres that companies so robotically look for.
David elaborated, “I don’t want the music to get into a stagnant groove. I want to evolve in varying directions over multiple albums so that the creative work has the ability to cover a wide spectrum of genres and progressive innovation, while still appealing to our fan base; it helps not to be jaded. If I could say anything to up and coming musicians, I guess I’d say, don’t be jaded to any kind of music. While I’m very big into jam bands as well as artists like John Coltrane, Miles Davis, and Herbie Hancock, but I can also respect, listen to and learn from what an artist like Justin Timberlake is doing for exsample. The kid is an amazing singer and he’s got some pretty good songs. So you can’t be jaded to different styles or types of music. I’m into so many different things. It helps you more than hurts you to listen to everything in music. It’s not as if you have to worry about listening to a certain type of music and becoming corny. Listening to a lot of different things, trying it out, giving it a whirl, just helps with the diversity of your music.”
David met his keyboard player, Tony Parlapiano, through Alan Veniscofsky, who engineered and mixed Listening... Now. “I wish Tony was here to talk with you. He’s the master at coming up with great parts. He’s definitely my right hand man in all this. He’s the perfect guy to work with and he’s amazing at coming up with parts that fit the song and aren’t too much. Now that he’s playing the bass and keyboard parts, it does kind of limit him in a way, but for now it’s perfect because he gets the job done and he’s probably the most tasteful musician that I’ve ever gotten to play with.”
David and Tony played in a side project called Bad Jazz Manual, and when the two sat down to talk they found similar musical interests as well as the astounding fact that they grew up in the same Connecticut town. “He’s from my town and we graduated from high school the same year, but there are two high schools there and he went to the other one. We’re definitely on the same page musically. It’s like a match made in heaven. He’s a great partner to work with. I can just bring a song to him and it clicks. It’s also gotten to the point where I can tell him something sucks and not worry about hurting his feelings; and he can do the same with me.”
“Honesty is really what you need with a band. You can’t be worried about criticizing people in your band. If I don’t like something, or he doesn’t like the way I sing on a certain part, we can just rag on each other and there are no hurt feelings. There are musicians and friends that I grew up with and have that sort of relationship, but Tony and I have only known each other for a couple of years and already we have that kind of relationship. I can hear that feeling carry over on the album and it definitely flourishes on stage,” said Cain.
David also teaches guitar in and around Boston, not only striving to improve his students playing ability, but also challenge his own musical beliefs and direction. He feels that staying at the same level is just like digressing. In his live ability and successive albums, look for David and his band to grow and produce a wide spectrum of jam band music. As related by David, Tony would like to thank you for listening, or in this case, reading with the possibility of future listening.
Check out MP3 downloads and purchase David’s album, Listening... Now, at www.davidcainmusic.com or directly access www.tidesrecords.com/davidcain, the record label that David is currently with to purchase.
- The Metronome Magazine


"Billboard World Song Contest"

The song, “Cello Girl” from Dave’s “listening…now” album, was recognized by Billboard when it ranked in the top 500 in the world and received honorable mention in the Billboard World Song Contest.
- Billboard


"David Cain Live @ the Main Pub Manchester CT"

Dave Cain / Bill Carleton
The Main Pub
Manchester, CT
November 12, 2005


The Main Pub has become an A-list music venue in the Hartford area. When you consider that they follow the foolproof formula of having a good sound system, good music, and good beer, it’s not surprising.

The Bill Carleton Band played a brilliant opening set that captivated the audience long enough so they could comprehend the depth of Carleton’s songwriting. He comes equipped with a troubadour’s soul, a backlog of brilliant original tunes, and also with bandmates Lee Sylvestre (lead guitar/background vocals) and Craig Struble (harmonicas). Also playing supporting roles were Tony Parlapiano on keyboards and newcomer Travis LaMothe on drums.

Carleton played a set of acoustic music with emotion, catchy hooks, enchanting lyrics, and captivating melody. Sylvestre and Struble added an improvisational aspect and a great deal of depth to each of the songs. “Circle” served as a showcase of everyone’s skills — Carleton’s lyrics and vocals, Struble’s harmonica (as both a lead and rhythm instrument), and Sylvestre’s soloing antics.

Dave Cain knows more styles than your grandmother’s hairdresser. Bank on that. He took the stage at almost 11PM for the first song of what would be almost three hours of continuous but constantly evolving music. Musicians can envy Cain’s ability to appeal to fans at an alternative rock venue, a jazz club, a jam band festival, a folk music coffeehouse, or a high school prom. The way he switches from one genre to the next will make you feel like you’re walking through your favorite record store.

During his set, Cain was joined by a revolving door of musicians who showcased the versatility of his music. The core of his band is made up of bassist Luke Rutledge and the dynamic Aaron Pearsall on drums. Keyboard duties alternated between Tom Thorndike and Tony Parlapiano, and Amanda Gookin added vibrant color and texture with her cello on a handful of songs.

Cain even touched on a few cover songs, but presented them in very original arrangements. For example, his solo version of “Wait in Vain,” finger-picked on an acoustic guitar, showed the audience how the tune might’ve sounded had James Taylor written it instead of Bob Marley. Likewise, when his band joined him in a makeshift encore for a cover version of the Police’s “Walking on the Moon,” his call-and-answer soloing with pianist Tom Thorndike evoked images of Pat Metheny or a more disciplined Phish jam. Cain had something for everyone, revealing how much he has to offer Central Connecticut music fans.

-Keith McBride

www.davecainmusic.com
www.billcarleton.com


- Northeast Performer Magazine


"SNOE.DOWN ADDITIONS"

SNOE.DOWN '07 ADDS ADDITIONAL ARTISTS

LATE NIGHT VENUES, WINTER GAMES


moe.
(Lake Placid, NY) - Snoe.down '07, the all ages, weekend winter music festival hosted by indie-jam rockers moe., returns to beautiful Lake Placid, N.Y., March 23-25, 2007. Snoe.down kicks off the week-long Adirondack Almost Springfest celebration, which will take place at all the 1980 Olympic venues in Lake Placid, N.Y., including the Olympic Center, home of the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics, and at nearby Whiteface.

Friday and Saturday nights will feature moe. at the Olympic Center's 1980 Rink Herb Brooks Arena. Additional bands will perform with moe. as well as at other venues throughout the weekend, including afternoons in the base lodge at Whiteface. This year's lineup includes: performances by The Disco Biscuits, Little Feat, Brazilian Girls, The Slip, Tea Leaf Green, Vorcza, Moonboot Lover's Peter Prince, Sam Kininger Band, and Gordon Stone Band.

Late night shows will feature Brothers Past, The Brew, Lucy Vincent, Philadelphia roots-rocker Kate Gaffney, and the return of Gratefully Deadicated Sound System. Late night venues include Wise Guys, Lisa G's, the Northwoods Inn and Lake Placid Pub & Brewery.

The additionally added artists are: Vermont groove rockers The Casual Fiasco; Sonicbids competition winner David Cain & the Neighborhood Band; high energy, and gritty urban bluegrass band Hot Day at the Zoo.

Advance tickets will be available for late night shows taking place at Wiseguys through the Olympic Center box office starting Thursday, March 22, at 8:30 a.m. These tickets may only be purchased in person at the Olympic Center box office. Please note that all shows at Wiseguys are 21+. The complete performance schedule including late night shows and information on registering for the Snoe.down Winter Games may be found at www.Snoedown.com.

Snoe.down will host its first annual Winter Games on Saturday afternoon, March 24. Participants will compete to test his/her skills in tubing, snow luge, curling, luge paddle, hockey shot and fastest shot recorded by a radar gun. All activities will take place at the Olympic Center, home of the Miracle on Ice. Points will be awarded for each event, with both a male and female winner, and an overall competition champion. Winners will receive prizes including Olympic pins, ski vouchers, bobsled rides, medals, signed festival posters and other merchandise. Grand prizes will be awarded on stage Saturday night. The Winter Games will be limited to only 150 participants this year and all participants must register in advance. The cost to register is $8.00 per person and must be done in person Saturday morning March 24 between 11:30AM and 12:30PM at the Olympic Center. More specific information will be posted at www.Snoedown.com. For those who have purchased VIP tickets registration for the Winter Games is FREE.

Snoe.down attendees will be able to take advantage of a myriad of Lake Placid winter activities. During the concerts fans will even have the option of ice skating while listening to the show! Other area activities include: Public bobsled and luge rocket rides (weather permitting), outdoor public speed skating (weather permitting), gondola rides to the top of Whiteface, toboggan rides and dog sled rides on Mirror Lake, ice climbing and winter mountaineering, tubing on Saranac Lake, visiting the Olympic ski jump towers and touring the 1932 & 1980 Winter Olympic Museum.

Tickets are on sale now at the Olympic Center Box Office. Snoe.down tickets may also be purchased by phone at 518-523-3330 or via internet at www.Snoedown.com. The Olympic Center box office hours are Mon.–Fri. 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.; Sat. 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Prices are subject to change without notice. All VIP ticketing is sold out.

Festival Ticket: $81.00 (includes $2.00 charity donation) The festival ticket entitles purchaser to attend both concert performances on March 23 & 24 at the Olympic Center plus other activities including free or discounted admission to additional gatherings at various locations in and around Lake Placid. Festival attendees will be permitted to leave and re-enter the Olympic Center during the event. In addition, festival credentials will entitle purchaser to enjoy discounts and benefits offered by select area merchants.

Single day admission: $52.00 (includes $1.00 charity donation). Single day admission entitles purchaser to one evening's performance and activities at the Olympic Center on either March 23 or March 24.

Snoe.down/Lift Ticket Packages:

Festival Ticket/One Day Lift Ticket $126.00
Festival Ticket/Two Day Lift Ticket $164.00
Single Day Admission/One Day Lift Ticket $97.00
Single Day Admission/Two Day Lift Ticket $137.00
Whiteface 2-Day Lift Ticket Package will be valid two of any three days, March 23-25
Whiteface 1-Day Lift Ticket Package will be valid any one day, March 23-25
Day skiing and snowboarding at Whiteface will be available from 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

A limited number of festival and ski lift packages are available. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Applicable service shipping/handling fees:

A handling fee of $6.75 will be applied to all tickets purchased via phone or internet. A $10.00 delivery fee will be applied to each order.

Lodging information as well as more details on activities in and around Lake Placid may be found at http://www.lakeplacid.com or by calling the Lake Placid Essex County Visitor's Bureau at 800-447-5224.

For more detailed and continually updated Snoe.down information, please visit www.Snoedown.com . For detailed area information please visit www.whitefacelakeplacid.com.

Snoe.down '07 will make a charitable donation from a portion of each festival ticket sold to the following organizations: The Kelberman Center at Upstate Cerebral Palsy dedicated to the advancement of individuals with autism; Wilmington Volunteer Fire & Rescue and North Country Life Flight.

Ketel One Vodka has been welcomed back as an official sponsor of the festival. Each sponsor we chose to work with adds something special to the Snoe.down experience. They share in a common goal to create a vibrant, music-loving scene for festival attendees and the extended community.

About moe.
Formed in Buffalo, New York in 1991, moe. is one of the finest groups in the jamband movement today. Their tours have taken them from Woodstock '99 to New York's Central Park, as well as to Japan and England. moe. is a Bonnaroo favorite, having played the event four out of the five years of the festival's existence. They won the Jammy Award for Live Performance of the Year for their first Bonnaroo appearance: a crowd-pleasing six hour show that ran until dawn.

moe. has toured with such legendary acts as The Dead, The Allman Brothers Band, Robert Plant, and most recently, The Who. The band is also critically acclaimed for its songwriting and studio work; the group's 2001 studio album, DITHER, was awarded four stars by Rolling Stone. 2003's WORMWOOD received four stars by Blender Magazine. moe. has released 13 recordings in the past 15 years and their latest studio effort, THE CONCH, was released January 23, 2007 to rave reviews including Rolling Stone, Paste, Blender and many more.

moe. is also becoming recognized for its charitable work: the band hosted a Tsunami Benefit concert at the Roseland Ballroom in New York City on February 10, 2005 and raised $150,000 for Tsunami survivors. The concert earned moe. its second Live Performance of the Year Jammy Award this past April. moe. also raised over $50,000 for various charities, including the Red Cross for Hurricane Katrina survivors.

In addition to Snoe.down, moe. also hosts Summer Camp each Memorial Day Weekend and moe.down each Labor Day Weekend.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


SNOE.DOWN '07 ANNOUNCES ARTIST LINEUP
JOINING SNOE.DOWN FOUNDERS MOE. ARE
THE DISCO BISCUITS, BRAZILIAN GIRLS
LITTLE FEAT, TEA LEAF GREEN, THE SLIP AND MORE...


moe.
(Lake Placid, NY) -- Snoe.down '07, the all ages, weekend winter music festival hosted by indie-jam rockers moe., returns to beautiful Lake Placid, N.Y., March 23-25, 2007. Snoe.down kicks off the week-long Adirondack Almost Springfest celebration, which will take place at all the 1980 Olympic venues in Lake Placid, N.Y., including the Olympic Center, home of the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics, and at nearby Whiteface.

Friday and Saturday nights will feature moe. at the Olympic Center's 1980 Rink Herb Brooks Arena. Additional bands will perform with moe. as well as at other venues throughout the weekend, including afternoons in the base lodge at Whiteface. This year's lineup includes: performances by The Disco Biscuits, Little Feat, Brazilian Girls, Tea Leaf Green, The Slip, Vorcza, Brothers Past, Moonboot Lover's Peter Prince, Sam Kininger Band, Gordon Stone Band, and The Brew. Late night shows will feature Brothers Past, Lucy Vincent, and the return of Gratefully Deadicated Sound System with more to come.

Fans will be able to take advantage of a myriad of Lake Placid winter activities. During the concerts fans will even have the option of ice skating while listening to the show! Other area activities include: Public bobsled and luge rocket rides (weather permitting), outdoor public speed skating (weather permitting), gondola rides to the top of Whiteface, toboggan rides and dog sled rides on Mirror Lake, ice climbing and winter mountaineering, tubing on Saranac Lake, visiting the Olympic ski jump towers and touring the 1932 & 1980 Winter Olympic Museum.

Tickets are on sale now at the Olympic Center Box Office. Snoe.down tickets may also be purchased by phone at 518-523-3330 or via internet at www.tickets.com and www.orda.org. The Olympic Center box office hours are Mon.-Fri. 8:30 AM-5:00 PM; Sat. 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Festival Ticket: $81.00 (includes $2.00 charity donation)


http://www.moe.org/snoedown.php
[Published on 2/19/2007]


- JAMBASE.COM


Discography

2004 - "listening...now."
2007 - "THE NEIGHBORHOOD BAND""

Photos

Bio

David Cain is a young, dynamic songwriter with great stories and timeless songs. Led by his highly energetic guitar style, The Neighborhood Band, brings his songs songs to life with electifying flare, always giving the listener something to latch onto, whether it be well crafted songs or simply the energy of the music.
______________________________

"For me, the highlight set of the evening was David Cain and the Neighborhood Band. Cain, whose long work on a debut disc has finally paid off, is currently in the midst of some serious gigging. As a frontman, Cain has a mix of disheveled, boyish good looks and feminine vocals — which puts him high up there on the rock 'n' roll androgyny scale. You’d never know it here in the land of the straight and the home of the phobic, but a little androgyny is an instant-win rock formula, and it’s one that I think works exceptionally well for Cain, considering he plays catchy, danceable pop."

-Dan Barry | The Hartford Advocate

"Dave Cain knows more styles than your grandmother’s hairdresser. Bank on that. He took the stage at almost 11PM for the first song of what would be almost three hours of continuous but constantly evolving music. Musicians can envy Cain’s ability to appeal to fans at an alternative rock venue, a jazz club, a jam band festival, a folk music coffeehouse, or a high school prom. The way he switches from one genre to the next will make you feel like you’re walking through your favorite record store."

-Kieth McBride | Northeast Performer Magazine