David Kimbrough III
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David Kimbrough III

Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States | SELF

Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States | SELF
Band Blues

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Oct
12
David Kimbrough III @ King Biscuit Blues Festival

Helena, Arkansas, USA

Helena, Arkansas, USA

Aug
23
David Kimbrough III @ George's Majestic Lounge

Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA

Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA

Jul
06
David Kimbrough III @ Walton Arts Center Main Stage

Bentonville, Arkansas, USA

Bentonville, Arkansas, USA

Music

Press


The talented David Kimbrough Jr. performs live at Marshall's Disco, just outside of Holly Springs. At the end of the clip Ozy talks with Willie Wilkinson, manager/protector of David and long time friend of David's father, blues great Junior Kimbrough. Willie has been documenting the North Mississippi blues scene for many years. - Portrait of a Record Dealer


The talented David Kimbrough Jr. performs live at Marshall's Disco, just outside of Holly Springs. At the end of the clip Ozy talks with Willie Wilkinson, manager/protector of David and long time friend of David's father, blues great Junior Kimbrough. Willie has been documenting the North Mississippi blues scene for many years. - Portrait of a Record Dealer


The talented David Kimbrough Jr. performs live at Marshall's Disco, just outside of Holly Springs. At the end of the clip Ozy talks with Willie Wilkinson, manager/protector of David and long time friend of David's father, blues great Junior Kimbrough. Willie has been documenting the North Mississippi blues scene for many years. - Portrait of a Record Dealer


The talented David Kimbrough Jr. performs live at Marshall's Disco, just outside of Holly Springs. At the end of the clip Ozy talks with Willie Wilkinson, manager/protector of David and long time friend of David's father, blues great Junior Kimbrough. Willie has been documenting the North Mississippi blues scene for many years. - Portrait of a Record Dealer


The talented David Kimbrough Jr. performs live at Marshall's Disco, just outside of Holly Springs. At the end of the clip Ozy talks with Willie Wilkinson, manager/protector of David and long time friend of David's father, blues great Junior Kimbrough. Willie has been documenting the North Mississippi blues scene for many years. - Portrait of a Record Dealer


The talented David Kimbrough Jr. performs live at Marshall's Disco, just outside of Holly Springs. At the end of the clip Ozy talks with Willie Wilkinson, manager/protector of David and long time friend of David's father, blues great Junior Kimbrough. Willie has been documenting the North Mississippi blues scene for many years. - Portrait of a Record Dealer


I can hear the muffled thumping of a bass line coming from inside the house. I knock on the door, but no one answers.
A cat sidles up to my ankle and begins meowing. I kneel down to pet the animal, and as I run my fingertips through her short black fur, I notice she has only three legs.
I stand and knock again.
The cat meows, louder.
The lace curtain draws back, then the doorknob rattles. A tall thin man introduces himself as David Kimbrough’s manager.
The cat leaps over the threshold and disappears. I follow suit.
Inside David Kimbrough’s home, there is a familiar sense of the Deep South. In the living room, David sits on a bed that serves as a sofa. An acoustic guitar lies in his lap. In a green bassinet, next to the bed, lies a baby boy. A man with long blonde hair sits across from David, a bass slung around his neck.

Courtesy Photo: The Kimbrough family continues a egacy of Blues. Junior Kimbrough (top), David Kimbrough, Jr. (left) and David Kimbrough IV, nicknamed, "Bug" (right).
I am introduced to bass player Bruce Bennett and 2-month-old David Kimbrough IV, nicknamed “Bug.” Bug’s father appears relaxed, wearing a ski hat and a sleeveless shirt that reveals tattoos — Emmanuel and June June on either arm, the names of his other two sons. He also has a tattoo on his chest in honor of his eight daughters.
That day, Jan. 3, is David’s birthday.

“I have two birthdays,” he says. “Half my body was here at 11:59, and they couldn’t get the rest out until the next morning.” David says the hospital staff was unsure how to record it, so two dates are listed on his birth certificate. Born to blues legend Junior Kimbrough, David’s life has revolved around music.
At the age of 4, David would pull out his father’s guitar, which was often hidden out of reach in the rafters of their home in Holly Springs, Miss.
“I wanted to play the real guitar,” David explains. “I was bangin’ on it and breakin’ strings, but I never got a whoopin’.”
David says his father behaved the same way as a child, stealing his own father’s guitar, just to get a chance to pluck the strings.
“They called him ‘The Kang,’” says David, referring to his grandfather, the first David Kimbrough. “He was the one who was down in the Delta, with the Howlin’ Wolves and the Muddy Waters.”
The Kang was a legend in his own right. David tells the story: “My grandfather played the box guitar, but they wouldn’t let him play. He climbed up a tree and began to play, and when they found him, all the animals and rabbits were gathered around that tree.”
I ask if he thinks it’s true, and he says he believes it to be a semi-truth. “I think that it was true that he was up in that tree.”
The support and influence of his family encouraged David to begin performing at an early age. At 6 years old, David was singing on stage with local musicians. “People would stuff my pockets with money. My daddy let me keep two dollars, but that was a lot back then.”
At age 10, David began studying the guitar seriously, and at age 12, in the face of his parents’ divorce, he ran away from home, and landed in Albany, Ga. He joined a gospel group and a funk band, and found influence in Johnnie Taylor and the gospel group, The Soul Stirrers.
In Albany, David realized his capacity for music but it was in Chicago that he found a band.
“I walked by a house, and a sound was comin’ out of the basement,” recounts David. “And it was just so brilliant to me, that I just sat down to listen.”
Eventually, says David, one of the musicians saw him through the basement window.
“I can sing,” David told the man.
“You can sang?” replied the musician, mocking David’s Mississippi accent.
After a short “You-can’t”/“I-can” debate, the band invited David inside, whom they saw as a young country boy. “They said, ‘Let’s bring him down here and let him make a fool of himself,” recounts David. “When it was all over, the joke was on them because I hit the note dead on the money.”
The band came to be known as The Precise Band, gaining some notoriety in Aurora, Ill. It eventually disbanded due to tensions between band members.
Today, David is preparing for the International Blues Competition, which will be held in Memphis in early February. He and his band are practicing hard and often, nailing down the new material David has written since the birth of his son.
When David’s wife Stacy comes home, the musicians retreat to the back, where a keyboard is set up in the bedroom. When David sings, the muddiness of his accent disperses, leaving behind a clear, capable voice. He sings, at times, with his head tilted back and his eyes closed. He bends over, keeping time with his sneaker-clad foot.
In this Fayetteville bedroom, Delta Blues flows heavy, but it is layered with R&B, soul and funk.
One of David’s new songs, “Hard Times,” carries soulful R&B vocals. The tempo is more structured, and the notes are more polished and precise than the typical blues song. It seems that this is David’s own genre - The Free Weekly


I can hear the muffled thumping of a bass line coming from inside the house. I knock on the door, but no one answers.
A cat sidles up to my ankle and begins meowing. I kneel down to pet the animal, and as I run my fingertips through her short black fur, I notice she has only three legs.
I stand and knock again.
The cat meows, louder.
The lace curtain draws back, then the doorknob rattles. A tall thin man introduces himself as David Kimbrough’s manager.
The cat leaps over the threshold and disappears. I follow suit.
Inside David Kimbrough’s home, there is a familiar sense of the Deep South. In the living room, David sits on a bed that serves as a sofa. An acoustic guitar lies in his lap. In a green bassinet, next to the bed, lies a baby boy. A man with long blonde hair sits across from David, a bass slung around his neck.

Courtesy Photo: The Kimbrough family continues a egacy of Blues. Junior Kimbrough (top), David Kimbrough, Jr. (left) and David Kimbrough IV, nicknamed, "Bug" (right).
I am introduced to bass player Bruce Bennett and 2-month-old David Kimbrough IV, nicknamed “Bug.” Bug’s father appears relaxed, wearing a ski hat and a sleeveless shirt that reveals tattoos — Emmanuel and June June on either arm, the names of his other two sons. He also has a tattoo on his chest in honor of his eight daughters.
That day, Jan. 3, is David’s birthday.

“I have two birthdays,” he says. “Half my body was here at 11:59, and they couldn’t get the rest out until the next morning.” David says the hospital staff was unsure how to record it, so two dates are listed on his birth certificate. Born to blues legend Junior Kimbrough, David’s life has revolved around music.
At the age of 4, David would pull out his father’s guitar, which was often hidden out of reach in the rafters of their home in Holly Springs, Miss.
“I wanted to play the real guitar,” David explains. “I was bangin’ on it and breakin’ strings, but I never got a whoopin’.”
David says his father behaved the same way as a child, stealing his own father’s guitar, just to get a chance to pluck the strings.
“They called him ‘The Kang,’” says David, referring to his grandfather, the first David Kimbrough. “He was the one who was down in the Delta, with the Howlin’ Wolves and the Muddy Waters.”
The Kang was a legend in his own right. David tells the story: “My grandfather played the box guitar, but they wouldn’t let him play. He climbed up a tree and began to play, and when they found him, all the animals and rabbits were gathered around that tree.”
I ask if he thinks it’s true, and he says he believes it to be a semi-truth. “I think that it was true that he was up in that tree.”
The support and influence of his family encouraged David to begin performing at an early age. At 6 years old, David was singing on stage with local musicians. “People would stuff my pockets with money. My daddy let me keep two dollars, but that was a lot back then.”
At age 10, David began studying the guitar seriously, and at age 12, in the face of his parents’ divorce, he ran away from home, and landed in Albany, Ga. He joined a gospel group and a funk band, and found influence in Johnnie Taylor and the gospel group, The Soul Stirrers.
In Albany, David realized his capacity for music but it was in Chicago that he found a band.
“I walked by a house, and a sound was comin’ out of the basement,” recounts David. “And it was just so brilliant to me, that I just sat down to listen.”
Eventually, says David, one of the musicians saw him through the basement window.
“I can sing,” David told the man.
“You can sang?” replied the musician, mocking David’s Mississippi accent.
After a short “You-can’t”/“I-can” debate, the band invited David inside, whom they saw as a young country boy. “They said, ‘Let’s bring him down here and let him make a fool of himself,” recounts David. “When it was all over, the joke was on them because I hit the note dead on the money.”
The band came to be known as The Precise Band, gaining some notoriety in Aurora, Ill. It eventually disbanded due to tensions between band members.
Today, David is preparing for the International Blues Competition, which will be held in Memphis in early February. He and his band are practicing hard and often, nailing down the new material David has written since the birth of his son.
When David’s wife Stacy comes home, the musicians retreat to the back, where a keyboard is set up in the bedroom. When David sings, the muddiness of his accent disperses, leaving behind a clear, capable voice. He sings, at times, with his head tilted back and his eyes closed. He bends over, keeping time with his sneaker-clad foot.
In this Fayetteville bedroom, Delta Blues flows heavy, but it is layered with R&B, soul and funk.
One of David’s new songs, “Hard Times,” carries soulful R&B vocals. The tempo is more structured, and the notes are more polished and precise than the typical blues song. It seems that this is David’s own genre - The Free Weekly


Greenville bluesman T-Model Ford began playing regularly at Oxford’s Two Stick Sushi Bar recently, and tonight he’ll be joined by blues poet John Sinclair and David Kimbrough, the son of Junior Kimbrough. The event will pay tribute to the recently deceased Big Jack Johnson. John currently lives in Amsterdam, but every year shortly after Mardi Gras he stays here for a week or two or three. David recently moved from Holly Springs to the Fayetteville, Arkansas area, but seems to get back to the area pretty regularly.

The show at Two Stick last night was a great one. T-Model and David Kimbrough both played two sets, and John joined David’s band on their first set. At the end of the evening David brought up T-Model to join his band — T-Model isn’t generally an artist you see collaborating with other artists, but it worked out really well. David’s band included his younger brother Robert on bass, his longtime drummer Artemis Leseur, and the guitarist in his Fayetteville band, Jay Thomas. They’d just done three dates backing John Sinclair.

- Highway 61 Radio


The Heineken Soul `n’ Blues Festival takes over Harbourfront Centre July 18-20 with the usual array of new faces and established international artists. On Fri.: Alvin Youngblood Hart, Colin Linden, Colin James, Morgan Davis and Little Mack Simmons with Fathead. Sat.: Guy Davis, Fruteland Jackson, Doug Cox & Ken Hamm, Kevin Duke, Curley Bridges, Lester Quitzau, Carlos del Junco, David Kimbrough, Kenny “Blues Boss” Wayne with Mark “Bird” Stafford and James Peterson. Sun.: Les Sampou, Gayle Ackroyd, Corey Harris, Andrea Karam & The Fun Guys, Hans Theesink & Blue Groove with Terry Evans and DeeDee Slye & The Crawdads. The winner of the Toronto Blues Society’s new talent search will also appear and there will be films, workshops and more. The complete schedule will be printed here in the July issue of the newsletter.

- Toronto Blues Society


Saturday To-Do: David Kimbrough Jr.
Posted by John on Fri, Apr 30, 2010 at 2:01 PM
unknown.jpg



DAVID KIMBROUGH JR.
9 p.m., White Water Tavern. $10.

You know, I'd suspect that, by definition, it's impossible to be born into the blues. You've got to earn honest calluses on your fingertips, not to mention tap into some down deep mysticism or soulfulness, to really play the blues. Even if you're the only one of 28 children who chose to carry on the namesake of the venerable blues emperor for infinity and some, Junior Kimbrough. No sir, there's no room for nepotism on a juke joint stage and David Kimbrough Jr. certainly wasn't ushered onto the placards with a silver guitar in his hand. He began his career at 6, singing alongside his father at the local fish fry. He served time in Parchman Farm, the Mississippi state prison with a gory history of racism. Now he runs a juke joint outside of Holly Springs, carrying on the custom of his father's famous stomp shack, Junior's, and playing weekend gigs all around the South. Is it history repeating itself or a family tradition? Y'know, it doesn't really matter when he's taking his father's tribal repetition and salty licks and kneading it in with his generation's take on soul music. Mockingbird, self-described “fine purveyors of hillbilly psychedelia,” open alongside long-established local singer-songwriter Stacey Mackey. Before Kimbrough starts his blues set, all three acts will share the stage and perform a handful of what Mockingbird calls “genre bending” original songs. - Arkansas Times


Saturday To-Do: David Kimbrough Jr.
Posted by John on Fri, Apr 30, 2010 at 2:01 PM
unknown.jpg



DAVID KIMBROUGH JR.
9 p.m., White Water Tavern. $10.

You know, I'd suspect that, by definition, it's impossible to be born into the blues. You've got to earn honest calluses on your fingertips, not to mention tap into some down deep mysticism or soulfulness, to really play the blues. Even if you're the only one of 28 children who chose to carry on the namesake of the venerable blues emperor for infinity and some, Junior Kimbrough. No sir, there's no room for nepotism on a juke joint stage and David Kimbrough Jr. certainly wasn't ushered onto the placards with a silver guitar in his hand. He began his career at 6, singing alongside his father at the local fish fry. He served time in Parchman Farm, the Mississippi state prison with a gory history of racism. Now he runs a juke joint outside of Holly Springs, carrying on the custom of his father's famous stomp shack, Junior's, and playing weekend gigs all around the South. Is it history repeating itself or a family tradition? Y'know, it doesn't really matter when he's taking his father's tribal repetition and salty licks and kneading it in with his generation's take on soul music. Mockingbird, self-described “fine purveyors of hillbilly psychedelia,” open alongside long-established local singer-songwriter Stacey Mackey. Before Kimbrough starts his blues set, all three acts will share the stage and perform a handful of what Mockingbird calls “genre bending” original songs. - Arkansas Times



Show Info

The David Kimbrough Band with Special Guest SharBaby to play Wellington’s While Junior Kimbrough was living, David and his brothers Robert and Kinney operated the juke joint, "Junior's Place," in Chulahoma, Mississippi with their father. David has performed on many of his father's albums, as well as recordings by other artists. As a solo artist, David has released three albums with Fat Possum Records and his newest record, Shell-Shocked with Lucky 13 Records. Today David is emerging as the leading candidate to carry on his fathers’ musical legacy. His unique style fuses a more soulful element and vocal style with Junior Kimbrough's trademark North Mississippi guitar grooves - repetitive and trance inducing and not too far removed from the rhythms the earliest African Americans brought from Africa and passed from generation to generation, the primary source of joy in the cruel lives they endured. Unlike his legendary father, David's music draws from a deep well of influences that includes the contemporary R&B that was accessible via the media from which Junior was isolated in rural Mississippi. Band members are David Kimbrough Jr. - lead guitar & vocals, Kinney Malone Kimbrough - drums, Stacy Nicole Mackey - bass guitar, Jay Thomas - 2nd guitar. Also performing and sitting in with the band on rhythm guitar & vocals will be David’s special guest, Birmingham’s own Queen of the Jukes, SharBaby.
Ticket Price: $10
Door Time:8:30pm

- JamBase


Video: David Kimbrough Jr. plays some down home Mississippi Blues

July 13, 2009 by MusicThread
Filed under Blues, Featured, Hill-Country Blues, Videos

Leave a Comment

David Kimbrough Jr. On Demand!

By: Jabari Oliver

Media Provided by: Willie Wilkerson

World renowned award winning Hill-Country Blues artist David Kimbrough Jr. was spotted at a club in Mississippi by MusicThread.net’s journalist Willie Wilkerson. As many know, David Kimbrough Jr. is the son of the late internationally known blues legend Junior Kimbrough. David has emerged as the leading candidate to carry on his namesake’s musical legacy. His unorthodox blues style blends a more soulful element and vocal style with his father’s trademark North Mississippi guitar grooves. In this video which shows remnants of a lively blues juke joint, as seen in classic movies such as “The Color Purple,” David Kimbrough captures the crowd’s attention with his grandiose guitar skills that reaches inside you and grabs your soul.

David Kimbrough Jr. Live at Club Emotion from Jabari Oliver on Vimeo.

To request more footage or full (DVD) footage of this perfomance, send inquiries to info @ musicthread.NET - MusicThread.net


Video: David Kimbrough Jr. plays some down home Mississippi Blues

July 13, 2009 by MusicThread
Filed under Blues, Featured, Hill-Country Blues, Videos

Leave a Comment

David Kimbrough Jr. On Demand!

By: Jabari Oliver

Media Provided by: Willie Wilkerson

World renowned award winning Hill-Country Blues artist David Kimbrough Jr. was spotted at a club in Mississippi by MusicThread.net’s journalist Willie Wilkerson. As many know, David Kimbrough Jr. is the son of the late internationally known blues legend Junior Kimbrough. David has emerged as the leading candidate to carry on his namesake’s musical legacy. His unorthodox blues style blends a more soulful element and vocal style with his father’s trademark North Mississippi guitar grooves. In this video which shows remnants of a lively blues juke joint, as seen in classic movies such as “The Color Purple,” David Kimbrough captures the crowd’s attention with his grandiose guitar skills that reaches inside you and grabs your soul.

David Kimbrough Jr. Live at Club Emotion from Jabari Oliver on Vimeo.

To request more footage or full (DVD) footage of this perfomance, send inquiries to info @ musicthread.NET - MusicThread.net



TC's Lounge Presents: David Kimbrough Jr.
By Ccenteno0129 - Monday July 19, 2010 - 8:24 am
427 Views | 0 Comment | 0 Votes
TC's Lounge

He is the son of the Mississippi bluesman David "Junior" Kimbrough, and his name is David Kimbrough Jr. Kimbrough Jr., created his own music career, but he said in his MySpace account that he honors his roots and will "...continue to keep the family name alive" and to "strive to the fullest to bring our family name and my music worldwide."

And that he is doing. The modern bluesman released an album titled "Shell-Shocked" under the label Lucky 13/BC Records. He is set to show what he got the Live Music Capital of the World as he heads a bill with C.W. Ayon and Old Gray Mule for his father's 80th Birthday celebration.

Old Gray Mule's website announced the event will happen in "true North Mississippi Hill Country Juke House Night in Austin, TX," TC's Lounge on July 31.

You can listen to his music here. Or better yet, go to TC's Lounge as David Kimbrough Jr. fills the air with Delta Blues music.

Don't forget to bring your own bottle and $5 for cover charge.
- Austin Post


Shell-Shocked
by: David Kimbrough Jr.
Album Artwork

David Kimbrough Jr.
Shell-Shocked
(Blues Cool Records)

David Kimbrough, the son of the late and great North Mississippi bluesman Junior Kimbrough, recorded this album called “Shell-Shocked” less than a week after getting out of jail, having spent several years in the joint for drug dealing and whatnot. Well, I guess that gets the question of blues cred is out of the way. Actually, Kimbrough repents for his sins on here, with songs that tell the story of drugs getting him sent up the river, and how not fun that is. “I Don’t Do The Things I Used To Do” is a good example. Still, he recorded this album with his funk intact, and his desire to chase some ass back on line.

The best way I can describe this groove of an album is to compare it to the blues house party music from back in the day. These are the kind of jams that a good house party would have going on the record player, that are both smoking yet mid-tempo enough for folks to pair off and dance to, so you can show your groove off to the babe swaying in front of you who is smiling and looking you in the eye.

The album starts off with “Come Into My World,” a good sign of the soulful songs to come. The instrumentation backing Kimbrough is solid and strictly blues in nature, yet it allows his Curtis Mayfield-influenced soul singing to float on top of it effortlessly. There are nine songs on here, and six of them are over 7-minutes long, including the old school blues shuffle of “Jump To My Rules,” the funky “Will You Be My Wife,” and the nasty groove of the title cut. He also pays tribute to his late father with “I Dreamed Pop Gigged With Us.”

-Derek Halsey - Swampland


Shell-Shocked
by: David Kimbrough Jr.
Album Artwork

David Kimbrough Jr.
Shell-Shocked
(Blues Cool Records)

David Kimbrough, the son of the late and great North Mississippi bluesman Junior Kimbrough, recorded this album called “Shell-Shocked” less than a week after getting out of jail, having spent several years in the joint for drug dealing and whatnot. Well, I guess that gets the question of blues cred is out of the way. Actually, Kimbrough repents for his sins on here, with songs that tell the story of drugs getting him sent up the river, and how not fun that is. “I Don’t Do The Things I Used To Do” is a good example. Still, he recorded this album with his funk intact, and his desire to chase some ass back on line.

The best way I can describe this groove of an album is to compare it to the blues house party music from back in the day. These are the kind of jams that a good house party would have going on the record player, that are both smoking yet mid-tempo enough for folks to pair off and dance to, so you can show your groove off to the babe swaying in front of you who is smiling and looking you in the eye.

The album starts off with “Come Into My World,” a good sign of the soulful songs to come. The instrumentation backing Kimbrough is solid and strictly blues in nature, yet it allows his Curtis Mayfield-influenced soul singing to float on top of it effortlessly. There are nine songs on here, and six of them are over 7-minutes long, including the old school blues shuffle of “Jump To My Rules,” the funky “Will You Be My Wife,” and the nasty groove of the title cut. He also pays tribute to his late father with “I Dreamed Pop Gigged With Us.”

-Derek Halsey - Swampland


Biography
David Kimbrough, Jr. is the son of blues guitarist Junior Kimbrough. He first sang with his father at a fish fry at the age of six, but his parents separated when he was 12, and he went to live with his mother. He released his debut album in the early '90s, but his musical career was interrupted. As his 2006 press biography puts it, "In the past ten-plus years, Kimbrough has spent time trying to navigate through the oppressive system of government and law in the Deep South." This attempted navigation largely took place at the Parchman State Farm Penitentiary. Upon emerging from incarceration on February 19, 2005, Kimbrough recorded his second album, Shell-Shocked, released May 2, 2006, on B.C. Records. ~ William Ruhlmann, Rovi

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/david-kimbrough-jr#ixzz1ANdQ7XgI
- Answers.com


Weekend To-Do: David Kimbrough Jr.
Posted by John Tarpley on Fri, Nov 5, 2010 at 6:01 AM

davidkimbrough.jpg

DAVID KIMBROUGH JR.
Fri.: 9 p.m., Parrot Beach Cafe. $5.
Sat.: 10 p.m., White Water Tavern.

Who should we talk to about making David Kimbrough Jr. an honorary Little Rockian? For years, he's been no stranger to stages around town. No doubt, he knows his way around Little Rock's barstools. And we can always use someone as flat-out fun to watch as the contagiously exuberant son of Junior Kimbrough, the eternal emperor of the Delta blues. What I'm getting at is this: Have you seen David Jr. yet? If not, it may be time to stop denying yourself the foot-stomping, butt-shaking good time he brings to town every time. This weekend sees a two-night stand in town, playing Parrot Beach Cafe on Friday night, supported by husband and wife duo Jawbone and Jolene, and his regular hang-out, White Water Tavern, at 10 p.m. Saturday, supported by singer/songwriter (and his blues co-conspirator) Stacey Mackey.
- Arkansas Times


Weekend To-Do: David Kimbrough Jr.
Posted by John Tarpley on Fri, Nov 5, 2010 at 6:01 AM

davidkimbrough.jpg

DAVID KIMBROUGH JR.
Fri.: 9 p.m., Parrot Beach Cafe. $5.
Sat.: 10 p.m., White Water Tavern.

Who should we talk to about making David Kimbrough Jr. an honorary Little Rockian? For years, he's been no stranger to stages around town. No doubt, he knows his way around Little Rock's barstools. And we can always use someone as flat-out fun to watch as the contagiously exuberant son of Junior Kimbrough, the eternal emperor of the Delta blues. What I'm getting at is this: Have you seen David Jr. yet? If not, it may be time to stop denying yourself the foot-stomping, butt-shaking good time he brings to town every time. This weekend sees a two-night stand in town, playing Parrot Beach Cafe on Friday night, supported by husband and wife duo Jawbone and Jolene, and his regular hang-out, White Water Tavern, at 10 p.m. Saturday, supported by singer/songwriter (and his blues co-conspirator) Stacey Mackey.
- Arkansas Times


From the Heartless Bastards and the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion to Iggy & the Stooges, countless artists have channeled the dark hypnotism of late Mississippi bluesman Junior Kimbrough, but only his eldest son, David Kimbrough Jr., embodies his legacy. "I am my father," states Kimbrough, who, after doing hard time in the Mississippi State Penitentiary, released his 1994 debut for Fat Possum, I Got the Dog in Me, under the alias David Malone. "Don't nobody know him like I do. He always kept me with him. I know every move he made, his sound, and the history. I know the depths of it." Who better then to blow out the candles for Kimbrough's 80th birthday celebration at TC's Lounge on Saturday? The bash also features New Mexico's CW Ayon, Black Keys tribute the Black Squeeze performing Chulahoma in its entirety, and Austin's Old Gray Mule, which commemorates the release of its debut, Sound Like Somethin' Fell Off the House. As OGM guitarist and event organizer C.R. Humphrey boasts, "It'll be the closest thing to a North Mississippi juke joint night you'll see in here in Austin." For the complete interview with Kimbrough, see austinchronicle.com/earache. - Austin Chronicle


Got the Dog in Me 

Austin Powell  Thu Jul 29, 11:33am


David Kimbrough, Jr.
David Kimbrough, Jr. cut his Fat Possum debut I Got the Dog in Me under the alias of David Malone to avoid confusion with his father, Junior Kimbrough. Since the passing of the great Mississippi bluesman in 1998, however, Kimbrough has proudly carried on the family legacy, and on Saturday the juke-jointer headlines an 80th birthday tribute at T.C.'s Lounge.

Off the Record: My entry point into your father’s music was through the Black Keys. What did you think of their tribute album?
David Kimbrough: I thought it was great. It brought a lot more attention to my father. I’ve never met the guys, but their work is terrific.
OTR: What is it about your father’s style that so many people seem to connect to?
DK: I think people are drawn to that rhythm my father laid down. It has the same effect on me to this very day, and I came up with the music. It’s something about that groove, the way he prolonged it in such a great, redundant way. Once it gets going, it gets into your soul. It takes you to another level. To me, it’s got that spiritual vibe to it. It’s like you’re in church; it makes you want to shout. It gets into your soul.
OTR: When did you start playing with your father?
DK: I started tuning his guitar in 1983 and I did my first professional show with him in 1986. From that time, I had a taste of the guitar, whatever he did I wanted to do, but I couldn’t grasp it. My mind wasn’t developed enough to understand what he was doing. So I started playing the drums for him.
Later on as the years went by, I was incarcerated. My dad was singing at this place in Hollow Springs for the Deep Blues movie, right about in 1992. They were doing some recording, “All Night Long,” and I’m incarcerated and I’m sitting around playing with the prison band. I hear a song come on the radio, and I tell my partner, “I know I’m not going crazy. That’s my daddy playing that song.” They started to jiving with me. You how it goes… To make a long story short, the song came back on the radio again, and they said "Junior Kimbrough." We all celebrated that little moment. ...
Not even a week later, Robert Palmer and the guy from Fat Possum came down to Parchman.They had gone down to my daddy’s juke joint and he was just sitting there, sobbing a bit, and they asked him what was wrong. He said that he was thinking about his son, and that I had as much talent as he got or more. They said they wanted to get me out to play keyboards. They said they could get me out in two days to a week. It turned out that they wanted me to do my own thing, and not confuse myself with my dad. I went under David Malone.
OTR: What was your time like at Parchman?
DK: I don’t think anybody ever wants to be locked up, but when I got there, I actually got a second shot at life. My being locked up only enhanced how I felt about my career and music. Everything started coming to me right before my eyes. The band director there, bless his soul, he taught me how to care about things, and he told me, “You’ve got time to sit down and right some songs.” I wrote all of these songs while I was there, but I haven’t ever recorded them. I haven’t even touched them. They’re sacred to me. I just record brand new stuff off the top of my head. That stuff’s precious. It gave me a chance to really write about my life.
At some point in time, I know I’m going to record that stuff. Now that I’m sober I can do that. When you’re young, the blood running through your veins you’re thinking crazy things, and doing crazy things, but as you get older though you think more rational. Every night I look at my daddy on my computer. It seems like he’s talking to me through his music. It’s just my own little world with my dad. Now I’m just in the making of doing exactly what I need to be doing, to help complete history.
OTR: Do you feel a responsibility to carry on your father’s legacy?
DK: Don’t nobody know him like I do. He always kept me with him. I know every move he made, his sound and the history. I know the depths of it. In the future, once I get a nice toehold on things, I’m going to present these unheard songs to the public. I want to play it just like he would have. - Austin Chronicle


Got the Dog in Me 

Austin Powell  Thu Jul 29, 11:33am


David Kimbrough, Jr.
David Kimbrough, Jr. cut his Fat Possum debut I Got the Dog in Me under the alias of David Malone to avoid confusion with his father, Junior Kimbrough. Since the passing of the great Mississippi bluesman in 1998, however, Kimbrough has proudly carried on the family legacy, and on Saturday the juke-jointer headlines an 80th birthday tribute at T.C.'s Lounge.

Off the Record: My entry point into your father’s music was through the Black Keys. What did you think of their tribute album?
David Kimbrough: I thought it was great. It brought a lot more attention to my father. I’ve never met the guys, but their work is terrific.
OTR: What is it about your father’s style that so many people seem to connect to?
DK: I think people are drawn to that rhythm my father laid down. It has the same effect on me to this very day, and I came up with the music. It’s something about that groove, the way he prolonged it in such a great, redundant way. Once it gets going, it gets into your soul. It takes you to another level. To me, it’s got that spiritual vibe to it. It’s like you’re in church; it makes you want to shout. It gets into your soul.
OTR: When did you start playing with your father?
DK: I started tuning his guitar in 1983 and I did my first professional show with him in 1986. From that time, I had a taste of the guitar, whatever he did I wanted to do, but I couldn’t grasp it. My mind wasn’t developed enough to understand what he was doing. So I started playing the drums for him.
Later on as the years went by, I was incarcerated. My dad was singing at this place in Hollow Springs for the Deep Blues movie, right about in 1992. They were doing some recording, “All Night Long,” and I’m incarcerated and I’m sitting around playing with the prison band. I hear a song come on the radio, and I tell my partner, “I know I’m not going crazy. That’s my daddy playing that song.” They started to jiving with me. You how it goes… To make a long story short, the song came back on the radio again, and they said "Junior Kimbrough." We all celebrated that little moment. ...
Not even a week later, Robert Palmer and the guy from Fat Possum came down to Parchman.They had gone down to my daddy’s juke joint and he was just sitting there, sobbing a bit, and they asked him what was wrong. He said that he was thinking about his son, and that I had as much talent as he got or more. They said they wanted to get me out to play keyboards. They said they could get me out in two days to a week. It turned out that they wanted me to do my own thing, and not confuse myself with my dad. I went under David Malone.
OTR: What was your time like at Parchman?
DK: I don’t think anybody ever wants to be locked up, but when I got there, I actually got a second shot at life. My being locked up only enhanced how I felt about my career and music. Everything started coming to me right before my eyes. The band director there, bless his soul, he taught me how to care about things, and he told me, “You’ve got time to sit down and right some songs.” I wrote all of these songs while I was there, but I haven’t ever recorded them. I haven’t even touched them. They’re sacred to me. I just record brand new stuff off the top of my head. That stuff’s precious. It gave me a chance to really write about my life.
At some point in time, I know I’m going to record that stuff. Now that I’m sober I can do that. When you’re young, the blood running through your veins you’re thinking crazy things, and doing crazy things, but as you get older though you think more rational. Every night I look at my daddy on my computer. It seems like he’s talking to me through his music. It’s just my own little world with my dad. Now I’m just in the making of doing exactly what I need to be doing, to help complete history.
OTR: Do you feel a responsibility to carry on your father’s legacy?
DK: Don’t nobody know him like I do. He always kept me with him. I know every move he made, his sound and the history. I know the depths of it. In the future, once I get a nice toehold on things, I’m going to present these unheard songs to the public. I want to play it just like he would have. - Austin Chronicle


Discography

I Got the Dog in Me, by David Malone and the Sugar Bears, Fat Possum Records release 1994.

Up From the Ashes, by Juke Joint Boys featuring David Kimbrough Jr., Kinney Kimbrough, and Gary Burnside, Zebra Ranch Studio, produced by Luther Dickenson, Adrian Pinson and David Kimbrough Jr. 1999.

Shell-Shocked, by David Kimbrough Jr., Lucky 13 Records release 2006.

Kimbrough Brothers, self-titled CD featuring David Kimbrough Jr., Kinney Kimbrough and Robert Kimbrough, Chris Lewis Studio release 2008.

Going Down that Lonesome Road, by David Kimbrough Jr., Tom Jones Studio, Pine Bluff, AR, produced by David Kimbrough Jr., co-produced by Josh Aronow and Tom Jones 2008.

Live at Fortunes of Desire in Little Rock, AR by David Kimbrough Jr., directed by Dotty Oliver, field recording by Stacy Nicole Mackey and self-released 2010.

Live in Austin, by the David Kimbrough Jr. Band, Roadhouse Rags (studio) and David Kimbrough Jr. (producer), directed by Old Gray Mule, self-released 2010.

Live at the North Mississippi Hill Country Picnic, by the David Kimbrough Jr. Band, David Kimbrough Jr. (producer), recorded live by Hill Country Picnic, self-released summer, 2011.

Price of Life, by the David Kimbrough Jr. Band with John Sinclair, self-release, expected release winter, 2011.

A Time to Boogie, by David Kimbrough Jr., Lucky 13 records pending release.

Dog Affair, by David Kimbrough Jr., Peter Lee and Night Creeper Records still yet unreleased.

Oh Baby Please, by David Kimbrough III, self-release, 2013.

Photos

Bio

DAVID KIMBROUGH III (a.k.a. David Malone & David Kimbrough Jr.)
BIO

David is a genuine bluesman. He carries on his family tradition by creating music steeped in his Black American and Choctaw heritage while pushing the boundaries of tradition and expectation. David’s presentation of original, Delta, North Mississippi Hill Country and Cotton Patch Blues is the continuing source from which music enthusiasts may reference. His performance is the living blues.

Performance Highlights:

David Kimbrough "Jr." has a roster of festival bookings coming up in 2013 including Blues in the Natural State, the North Mississippi Hill Country Picnic, and the King Biscuit Blues and Heritage Festival.

David introduced a whole new sound in 2012 featuring his newest love, a custom dulcimer, under his true name, David Kimbrough III. Kimbrough soon added his nephew David Gray back on percussion.

2012 saw him as a guest artist at the Dulcimer Festival in Mountain View, a live recording with Cedell Davis, and representing the Buffalo River Blues Society at the 2013 International Blues Challenge in Memphis, TN. Kimbrough was a featured artist at the Deep Blues Festival in Bay Port, Minnesota in July 2012. And in February 2012, David with his band, the David Kimbrough Jr. Band, was a semi-finalist in the International Blues Challenge in Memphis, Tennessee, representing the Arkansas River Blues Society.

David headlined Bikes, Blues, and BBQ in Fayetteville, AR in 2011. He performed in 2010 at Memphis in May. And both years, he headlined Austin TX clubs TC's Lounge, Ruta Maya, and Roadhouse Rags. And, David is a mainstay at the North Mississippi Hill Country Picnic since its inception in 2006.

Furthermore, he has toured extensively with his father, as a headliner, and with multiple projects including David Malone and the Sugar Bears, the Precise Band, David Kimbrough Jr. and the Holly Springs Rhythm Section, the Kimbrough Brothers, and the David Kimbrough Jr. Band.

Over four decades, locations have stretched from juke joints and fair grounds in the south to premiere clubs from L.A., Phoenix, and San Francisco to New York and Toronto.

DAVID KIMBROUGH III (a.k.a. David Malone & David Kimbrough Jr.)
BIO

David is a genuine bluesman. He carries on his family tradition by creating music steeped in his Black American and Choctaw heritage while pushing the boundaries of tradition and expectation. David’s presentation of original, Delta, North Mississippi Hill Country and Cotton Patch Blues is the continuing source from which music enthusiasts may reference. His performance is the living blues.

The prince of North Mississippi Hill Country and Cotton Patch Blues, David was born on both the 3rd and the 4th of January in 1965 to his mother Magnolia Malone and father Junior Kimbrough in Holly Springs, Mississippi, right down the road from Junior's birthplace, Hudsonville. David began singing with his father as a young child at home.

When David was still too young to understand, Junior would encourage him to come play. David would often tell his dad, "I can't play like that." "Pop, I really don't understand what you are doing." But, David did learn, first on drums, then bass and keyboard, and kept banging the guitar until he finally got it down. As his younger siblings grew, David influenced them to play as well.

But, things started to fail between his mom and dad. Right in front of him his home became a nightmare. His mother and father separated when he was twelve years old, and David ran away to a job corps school in Georgia to find his brother. Soon expelled, he returned to Holly Springs to play drums for his dad again.

He was fifteen and already on his own for three years. He left again for Chicago, performing funk and R&B. He drifted between women, family, north and south, music and crime. This led to chaos and confusion, drugs and doing time. David served thirteen years at Parchman Farm, fathered several children, and produced several full-length recordings on with Fat Possum, Capricorn, and Lucky 13 records.

In 2010 author and publicist Dotty Oliver connected David with poet John Sinclair, founder of the White Panthers, manager of the MC5, and infamous for John Lennon's song "Free John Sinclair." John and David performed several shows together that February from the Clinton Library to southern dives. They performed and recorded together again in 2011.

David now lives in Fayetteville, Arkansas with his wife and sons, Stacy, David Kimbrough IV, and Frederick "Jun" Martin. He has several projects including solo, duo (with nephew David Gray), and full band. David is also completing his GED with his son Jun while writing and recording new music at a tremendous pace. Any opportunity to book or see him live should be met with the same devotion.