delexilio
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delexilio

New York City, New York, United States | SELF

New York City, New York, United States | SELF
Band Rock Latin

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"BILLBOARD Magazine Review, by Leila Cobo"

The 3-year-old fusion sextet Delexilio imbues Cuban rhythms and Latin percussion with a bluesy, bilingual mix of rock and funk. The New York-based band was formed by Cuban-American vocalist/guitarist David Sandoval, who previously played in mainstream rock and alternative bands before hooking up with a multicultural group of musicians.
[...]
Although Delexilio has a local fan base in New York, it's seeking broader distribution and a publishing deal with the help of new manager Ricardo Companioni, who met the band through mutual friends. Companioni programs AOL's Latin stations and is a former Latin charts manager for Billboard. In the meantime, Sandoval is looking into a radio promotion plan that will likely target college and alternative radio, as Delexilio's songs are bilingual. - BILLBOARD Magazine


"BILLBOARD Magazine Review, by Leila Cobo"

The 3-year-old fusion sextet Delexilio imbues Cuban rhythms and Latin percussion with a bluesy, bilingual mix of rock and funk. The New York-based band was formed by Cuban-American vocalist/guitarist David Sandoval, who previously played in mainstream rock and alternative bands before hooking up with a multicultural group of musicians.
[...]
Although Delexilio has a local fan base in New York, it's seeking broader distribution and a publishing deal with the help of new manager Ricardo Companioni, who met the band through mutual friends. Companioni programs AOL's Latin stations and is a former Latin charts manager for Billboard. In the meantime, Sandoval is looking into a radio promotion plan that will likely target college and alternative radio, as Delexilio's songs are bilingual. - BILLBOARD Magazine


"New York-Based Band Tips the Miami Melting Pot"

Cuba and South Florida have always maintained a symbiotic relationship.

As early as the 1960’s, hundreds of thousands of Cuban refugees have fled to the U.S. entering through Miami shores.

In 1980, the massive Mariel exodus granted asylum to over 10,000 Cuban islanders fleeing oppression, and in the early 1990’s political despair forced thousands more to face the 90-mile stretch of sea separating communism from democracy in search of equality.

Today, descendants of these displaced refugees have strived to carve their own niche in an ever-growing melting pot of soul, Spanish flavor, and salsa.

Cuban-Americans struggle to define their cultural status as they have been blessed with equal parts of two countries, yet inner conflict arises when the search for their true identities begins.

To those who are still in peril over their culture contrasts, Delexilio offers guidance, music, hope, and a place to belong.

An edgy sextet self-described as “rock 'n' roll plus Cuban soul,” their mission is to dissolve any clash of culture and embrace a culture fusion.

Comprised of David Sandoval (lead/guitar), Sarah Talbot (background vocal/hand percussion), Igor Arias (Congas), Justin Goldner (Bass), Jake Cohen (Drums), and Alex Fernandez Fox (Cuban Tres), Delexilio channels the vibrant energy of Cuban sounds and blends it with the funky, urban rhythms of American rock, pop, and even hip-hop.

Created in New York City by Sandoval, who is of Cuban descent, the name Delexilio means “from exile.” To anyone affiliated, related, or pertaining to anything Cuban, exile is a constant state of being.

To understand a Cuban, you must imagine being forcibly torn from all you know and love. Once there, you will know the plight of the Cubans and understand their resolution.

A lot of great music has come from this emotional strain, and Delexilio is no exception.

They are Miami Sound Machine meets The Foo Fighters. A sound so thick with Cuban salsa and American funk it can bring even the most devoted wallflower to the dance floor.

With tracks ranging in themes from a seductive temptress, “Santa Tentadora,” to an ode to a lovely American girl with Latin vibe, “Ameritina,” and even a political anthem asserting independence and revolution, “Revolucion2,” they have earned a following that is founded on that vivid, sultry, exotic lifestyle known as Cuban.

Sandoval’s and Talbot’s voices are at the forefront of the group, but complimenting the sexy, revolutionary, bilingual lyrics are the other four members, who give Delexilio its spice with a broad range of instrumentation from the traditional bass to the novel Cuban Tres.

After an energetic show on Friday at Miami’s Transit Lounge, Delexilio spoke with TheCelebrityCafe.com on their music, passions, and what fuels this eclectic band to unite and inspire change.

The New York natives were in town for the weekend for the Miami Music Festival and found the local music scene flavorful and refreshing.

“In New York there are music pubs everywhere!” said drummer Jake Cohen. “Everywhere you go there are people playing their music up to 3 a.m. There’s so much going on. Here (in Miami) I see people more into listening to the music.”

This oversaturation is every musician’s major obstacle. When creating new music, originality is crucial in ensuring success. Delexilio has found that staying true to their experiences is the best way to stand out and be heard.

“I write songs that come from my particular life experiences. Whenever I express myself through music I don’t try to be one way or another, I just write songs from growing up in a Cuban household in Jersey. I can’t make music any other way,” said lead vocalist David.

Unique to Delexilio is their group member’s eclectic backgrounds. Not all are Cuban or of Cuban descent, and it is because of this cocktail that their sound has reached this far down the East Coast.

When asked why they sing, Conga player Igor Arias exclaimed, “Freedom!”

Arias was born on the island and felt firsthand the heavy anvil of communism.

“In Cuba they tell me what I could and could not play. If you disobeyed them, you were reprimanded,” he added.

For bassist Justin, vocalist Sarah and drummer Jake, this level of oppression may be far off, but their musical contributions and racial diversity are equally important in fueling Delexilio’s message.

“We are a culture fusion. Music is about a connection and new experiences, and it was that culture that pulled me in,” said Goldner.

It seemed that when talking about their music and what it does for them, the entire group was rejuvenated and inspired to speak.

“I want to learn Spanish now because of them!” Cohen added.

“Music is the universal language,” Sandoval said.

“My ancestors fled to the United States 100 years ago escaping oppression. We’ve all been prosecuted in some way, that’s what brings us together. You can see how special i - The Celebrity Cafe


"Album Review (Noche Latina)"

Fresh Beats: Delexilio
by Gloria Renaud
04.08.2010

Is it possible to have a political agenda and still give audiences an amazing time on the dance floor? The members of Delexilio (which translates to “from the exile,” a nod to the Cuban-American experience) seem to think so. In fact, they do a damn fine job of convincing this listener with their first effort, the appropriately self-titled album from this NYC-based band. Thrown into the mix are hip-hop, Afro-Cuban beats, funk, and rock influences (imagine if Wyclef Jean was the love child of the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Carlos Santana), along with socially and politically conscious lyrics in Spanglish, these twelve tempting tracks open the mind while indulging the body with irresistible grooves.

In Delexilio, founder and front man David Sandoval, a Cuban-American musician committed to grassroots movements here in the U.S. and Cuba, easily transfers his determination for unity and freedom into his music with the help of an equally passionate and ultra hip band. “Hand in Hand,” the first track off the album is smooth, with a prominent Afro-Cuban beat that’s nicely juxtaposed with hard hitting lyrics of peace and liberty. “Fiesta en la calle de Miami” has enough funk and feel-good vibes to get you going no matter what time of the day it is. In “Revolucion2,” the sounds of Spanish and electric guitars intertwine for a mellow yet potent homage to the struggle from censorship and political oppression while, “Desaparecidos,” with its funky base line and amazing guitar solo, stresses the importance of speaking up against human injustices.

Although most of the album centers on revolution and social awareness, Delexilio does have a lighter side. “Santa Tentadora,” a song Sandoval wrote about being head over heals for a special someone yet only being able to express it through music, is an upbeat track that is both catchy and refreshing. Then there is “Ameritina,” a party anthem that celebrates the sensuality of Latin music, with a fun chant, “American girl get down tonight!” These two are definitely worth checking out if you just want to get your hips moving.

I will admit this: upon first hearing this album I was a bit skeptical, but the more I listened to it, the more I came around to it. Delexilio walks a fine between effortlessly unveiling memorable dance tracks while going political at the same time. This could have easily been a complete mess, but fortunately for the band, it provides listeners an interesting mix of musical influences. However, hip-hop enthusiasts should be warned that Sandoval’s skills as a rapper are slightly off. Overall, this is a great first album that takes on serious issues (for the most part) while still maintaining a casual atmosphere, proving that you can raise awareness on important issues concerning the Latino community and still have a good time. - NocheLatina.com


"Album Review (Noche Latina)"

Fresh Beats: Delexilio
by Gloria Renaud
04.08.2010

Is it possible to have a political agenda and still give audiences an amazing time on the dance floor? The members of Delexilio (which translates to “from the exile,” a nod to the Cuban-American experience) seem to think so. In fact, they do a damn fine job of convincing this listener with their first effort, the appropriately self-titled album from this NYC-based band. Thrown into the mix are hip-hop, Afro-Cuban beats, funk, and rock influences (imagine if Wyclef Jean was the love child of the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Carlos Santana), along with socially and politically conscious lyrics in Spanglish, these twelve tempting tracks open the mind while indulging the body with irresistible grooves.

In Delexilio, founder and front man David Sandoval, a Cuban-American musician committed to grassroots movements here in the U.S. and Cuba, easily transfers his determination for unity and freedom into his music with the help of an equally passionate and ultra hip band. “Hand in Hand,” the first track off the album is smooth, with a prominent Afro-Cuban beat that’s nicely juxtaposed with hard hitting lyrics of peace and liberty. “Fiesta en la calle de Miami” has enough funk and feel-good vibes to get you going no matter what time of the day it is. In “Revolucion2,” the sounds of Spanish and electric guitars intertwine for a mellow yet potent homage to the struggle from censorship and political oppression while, “Desaparecidos,” with its funky base line and amazing guitar solo, stresses the importance of speaking up against human injustices.

Although most of the album centers on revolution and social awareness, Delexilio does have a lighter side. “Santa Tentadora,” a song Sandoval wrote about being head over heals for a special someone yet only being able to express it through music, is an upbeat track that is both catchy and refreshing. Then there is “Ameritina,” a party anthem that celebrates the sensuality of Latin music, with a fun chant, “American girl get down tonight!” These two are definitely worth checking out if you just want to get your hips moving.

I will admit this: upon first hearing this album I was a bit skeptical, but the more I listened to it, the more I came around to it. Delexilio walks a fine between effortlessly unveiling memorable dance tracks while going political at the same time. This could have easily been a complete mess, but fortunately for the band, it provides listeners an interesting mix of musical influences. However, hip-hop enthusiasts should be warned that Sandoval’s skills as a rapper are slightly off. Overall, this is a great first album that takes on serious issues (for the most part) while still maintaining a casual atmosphere, proving that you can raise awareness on important issues concerning the Latino community and still have a good time. - NocheLatina.com


"Fresh Faces"

The 3-year-old fusion sextet Delexilio imbues Cuban rhythms and Latin percussion with a bluesy, bilingual mix of rock and funk. The New York-based band was formed by Cuban-American vocalist/guitarist David Sandoval, who previously played in mainstream rock and alternative bands before hooking up with a multicultural group of musicians.
-LEILA COBO - BILLBOARD Magazine


"Delexilio"

While Miami has made its mark on the musical landscape in the past few years with simmering Latin funk that shimmies across its city streets, there's no decree stating that Nueva York can't get in on the action. Led by NY-based Cuban exile David Sandoval, Delexilio throws down a Latin funk with a harder edge and spikier guitars. It's the kind of stuff that should get the crowds dancing, though it might rough them up a bit.
previewed by: Jason Jeffers
- Flavorpill


"Delexilio"

While Miami has made its mark on the musical landscape in the past few years with simmering Latin funk that shimmies across its city streets, there's no decree stating that Nueva York can't get in on the action. Led by NY-based Cuban exile David Sandoval, Delexilio throws down a Latin funk with a harder edge and spikier guitars. It's the kind of stuff that should get the crowds dancing, though it might rough them up a bit.
previewed by: Jason Jeffers
- Flavorpill


"Second-Generation Cuban Americans Keep Passions"

When 28-year-old David Sandoval and his band Delexilio gather this week in a brick midtown Manhattan studio to run through the group's funk beats and Cuban rhythms, he had a lot more than music on his mind.

[...]

These first- and second-generation Cuban-Americans are less overtly political and their views more nuanced than their parents or even grandparents. Yet they are passionate and nostalgic for a homeland many have never visited. - CBS News (online)


"Second-Generation Cuban Americans Keep Passions"

When 28-year-old David Sandoval and his band Delexilio gather this week in a brick midtown Manhattan studio to run through the group's funk beats and Cuban rhythms, he had a lot more than music on his mind.

[...]

These first- and second-generation Cuban-Americans are less overtly political and their views more nuanced than their parents or even grandparents. Yet they are passionate and nostalgic for a homeland many have never visited. - CBS News (online)


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

DELEXILIO, (or "Del Exilio,") means "from exile.

We just performed at the LATIN GRAMMY street parties (see profile pic)

BILLBOARD MAGAZINE said:
The 3-year-old fusion sextet Delexilio imbues Cuban rhythms and Latin percussion with a bluesy, bilingual mix of rock and funk.

BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music) said:
Although their name means "from exile" in Spanish, four-piece band DelExilio have created a musical home for themselves within their unique hybrid of American rock and lithe Cuban soul. The band is the brainchild of singer-guitarist David Sandoval, a New Yorker of Cuban descent, whose vigorous acoustic guitar playing is both the bands main engine and the bridge joining its disparate styles. Atop that foundation, expect spidery lines on the Cuban tres (guitar) winding through bongos and bass patterns, claves giving way to backbeats, and a general funk a lo Cubano that ultimately does justice to all of its influences.

DELEXILIO supports artistic expression on and off the island of Cuba, and looks forward to a post-Castro, post-embargo world of reconciliation and unity.

Band Members