Denis Jones
Gig Seeker Pro

Denis Jones

| INDIE

| INDIE
Band Alternative EDM

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


As I stood in the shadows on the balcony of the newly renovated Band on the Wall I felt as if I was witnessing something special.

Denis Jones likes the sound of his own voice; as each lyric is looped in a tense but rhythmic circle, each time gaining strength, picking up bass, brass, and acoustics along the way. The execution of his live work is impressive, and his music verges on the manic on more than one occasion. However, it is quite a sight to watch him perform, the remnants of support act Nancy Elizabeth’s performance still visible when she took to stage with four members of her band, which created a united front of ethereal backing singers, a trumpeter and percussionist. Elizabeth is a beautiful performer to watch, matching a sweet but complex voice with witty northern banter between songs, which lulled the audience into a peaceful state ahead of Jones’ performance. ‘Feat of Courage’ begins with howls of maracas and trumpet, which lends Elizabeth’s music a cinematic quality not too dissimilar to the Tindersticks; but with less of a powerful punch than a gentle meander to the end. Elizabeth’s music has a melancholic feel to it and as she ends with a harp-infused song that is delicate and subtle and reminiscent of Beth Orton via Yorkshire, which is no bad thing.

So, as one performer soothed the crowd the other added layer upon layer of technical tension to the room. As Jones performs his one man show he initially seems strangely isolated amongst the redundant instruments surrounding him. The focus is firstly on him, and then on the room shattering noises he creates. The repetitive loops are both interesting and unsettling as it can sometimes sound like his voice is in conflict and arguing with himself, which only adds to a feeling of uneasiness. However, tension soon turns to admiration as everyone’s eyes seem focused on Jones’ electronic performance. ‘Clap Hands’ is executed here in a slower but no less orchestrated approach and showcases Jones’ great voice which is needed to hold all of the contrasting sounds together.

It is quite a feat for a performer to almost expand or contract a note, a sound or lyric at will to emphasise a point; and Jones’ voice lingers in the air long after the song has finished. In more stripped down songs such as ‘Beginning’ Jones’ commanding but intricate voice really comes across and behind the electronic trickery and dexterity of his technical application he has a gentle and evocative sound that is both unusual and unique. It also confirms that Jones is also a great standalone singer songwriter. ‘Beginning’ was a good choice to end the performance on, bringing the audience full circle from ethereal singing to being engaged in a plethora of sounds and back again to somewhere quiet and gentle. It was interesting to view these two sides of Denis Jones: the folk singer and the musical artist, sometimes fighting for centre of attention on stage but it certainly made for a memorable experience. - High Voltage


As I stood in the shadows on the balcony of the newly renovated Band on the Wall I felt as if I was witnessing something special.

Denis Jones likes the sound of his own voice; as each lyric is looped in a tense but rhythmic circle, each time gaining strength, picking up bass, brass, and acoustics along the way. The execution of his live work is impressive, and his music verges on the manic on more than one occasion. However, it is quite a sight to watch him perform, the remnants of support act Nancy Elizabeth’s performance still visible when she took to stage with four members of her band, which created a united front of ethereal backing singers, a trumpeter and percussionist. Elizabeth is a beautiful performer to watch, matching a sweet but complex voice with witty northern banter between songs, which lulled the audience into a peaceful state ahead of Jones’ performance. ‘Feat of Courage’ begins with howls of maracas and trumpet, which lends Elizabeth’s music a cinematic quality not too dissimilar to the Tindersticks; but with less of a powerful punch than a gentle meander to the end. Elizabeth’s music has a melancholic feel to it and as she ends with a harp-infused song that is delicate and subtle and reminiscent of Beth Orton via Yorkshire, which is no bad thing.

So, as one performer soothed the crowd the other added layer upon layer of technical tension to the room. As Jones performs his one man show he initially seems strangely isolated amongst the redundant instruments surrounding him. The focus is firstly on him, and then on the room shattering noises he creates. The repetitive loops are both interesting and unsettling as it can sometimes sound like his voice is in conflict and arguing with himself, which only adds to a feeling of uneasiness. However, tension soon turns to admiration as everyone’s eyes seem focused on Jones’ electronic performance. ‘Clap Hands’ is executed here in a slower but no less orchestrated approach and showcases Jones’ great voice which is needed to hold all of the contrasting sounds together.

It is quite a feat for a performer to almost expand or contract a note, a sound or lyric at will to emphasise a point; and Jones’ voice lingers in the air long after the song has finished. In more stripped down songs such as ‘Beginning’ Jones’ commanding but intricate voice really comes across and behind the electronic trickery and dexterity of his technical application he has a gentle and evocative sound that is both unusual and unique. It also confirms that Jones is also a great standalone singer songwriter. ‘Beginning’ was a good choice to end the performance on, bringing the audience full circle from ethereal singing to being engaged in a plethora of sounds and back again to somewhere quiet and gentle. It was interesting to view these two sides of Denis Jones: the folk singer and the musical artist, sometimes fighting for centre of attention on stage but it certainly made for a memorable experience. - High Voltage


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


Possessing a halcyon guitar style and writhen northern vocals, Denis Jones spins sinuous roundelays around loops, rhythms and effects to create flummoxing mazes of melody and rhyme. Aided by such Manchester luminaries as Cinematic Orchestra's Luke Flowers, Homelife's Paddy Steer and jazz polymath Matthew Halsall, Jones's second album comes closest to capturing the ever-shifting moods of his live performances. With its floorboard squeaks and muted trumpet, Conception, Consumption And Radiation feels like dawn light forcing its way into rough, clucking tenement mornings, while the embrowned incantation of Rage suggests a street-drug John Martyn slurring curses in a Whalley Range flop house... at its best, Red + Yellow = straddles the same sinister border between urban and rural as Ken Loach's Kes, a melancholy landscape of unsparing sunlight and brute shadows. - Mojo


"The debut album from Manchester's Denis Jones arrives after the man's grafted and pulled himself all over the place perfecting his working man blues. Comparisons with John Martyn, (arguably) the pioneer of the British blues-folk-rock tradition are not without warrant, while the no fear attitude of Tunng or Psapp in the use of electronics and sequencers makes for a surprising dovetail. Comes in some of the most unique packaging we've ever seen. Fold-out plastic case with fabric inner and individually etched number of only 500.this week's thoughts...Hi,Your attention is needed for a new folk hero in the form of Manchester's Denis Jones. Drawing comparisons with the likes of John Martyn and Tunng this is set to have A&R hounds frothing at the mouth, so get on this early. Oh and the packaging is just wonderful too!!"
- Piccadilly Records


"There's something about his willingness to experiment, his bravery and risk-taking that makes him stand slightly aside from the now dissolving world of folktronica, this music is left of centre and quite happily so: if Denis wants to make noise he will do, and if he wants to make your heart weep then that's okay too. It's nice to hear a new generation of artists taking on so many different influences at the moment - I guess we can say that's the power of the internet? Maybe file sharing does have its place in the music scene eh? "Humdrum Virtue" is a mighty promising start from an artist who we should be seeing a lot more from in future�"
- BoomKat


"Expect Skelmersdale in Lancashire to arrive on the musical map very soon thanks to the rhythmical folk of Denis Jones...........his performances are utterly engaging. Sat in his stocking feet and rarely opening his eyes, Joness mournful voice fills the stage over beatboxed rhythms, looped samples and staccato guitars to beguiling effect."
- Music Week Magazine


Take a Manchester lad, let him wander around places like Sweden and Berlin to play with people as diverse as Ella Guru, Steve Tilston and Merz, then let come home to weave what he’d learned into a tapestry of looped acoustic beauty.

Denis Jones’ outstanding debut album has drawn comparisons with a ragtag of others - some way off mark (Bjork), others more on the money, from One World-era John Martyn to Tuung. You could add Stephen Malkmus since Jones shows the same sort of lyrical intelligence, musical cleverness and playfulness Malkmus brought to Pavement and his solo efforts.

Jones seems a master of song construction, demonstrated from the off on the opening ‘One Loop’, which languidly meshes an underlay of twisting hypnotic loops with pretty guitar strands and Jones excellent voice - husky, precise, very English - sitting within the mix rather than just riding on top.

The humour starts to show on ‘Two Slumber’ where, over delicately stumbling guitar Jones picks over the wreckage of a relationship in a world-weary vocal that promises he “won’t follow the cliché� before telling us that “Maybe it’s meant to be�…

Jones’ sense of fun probably gets its finest demo on the final track - naturally entitled ‘Beginning’ - where he reels off a string of pithy musical name-checks: “Vera Lynn on the violin/Elvis Costello playing the cello/… Yoko Ono, well, she’s mixing the phono�.

There’s much to enjoy musically, though, on pretty much every track - though the loose riffs and vaguely rebellious lyric (“I’m not obliged to sing/If it don’t mean anything) of ‘Five Papers’ seems to suffer a little from the sheer excellence of everything around it.

‘Third Song’ uses a telling image of a rollercoaster ride where “you became the track� and puts it into a gorgeous rhythmic mix of hypnotic guitar and layered electronica, while the pleasingly simple acoustic guitar backing on Four Water is a grower, with its heartfelt images of flooding reflecting on loss and loss of control - lives overwhelmed by outside forces “barging through the banks�.

‘£10 Of Electricity’ - a world wise reflection on various senses of paying for power - returns to clever musical mixing, bringing in a slowburn blues that‘s lit up by little honkytonk piano flickers and harmonica honks. ‘17’ provides a beautiful contrast, a gorgeous slice of chiming acoustic guitar where overdubbing creates shimmering harmonics with Jones’ vocal.

Then, full circle, ‘Beginning’ is an ending that mirrors the opening track with its perfect little loops over which acoustic guitar patterns swoop like birds in a steely blue late summer sky.

A beautiful album, whether you play it on a winter night or a summer afternoon. - Bearded


"Denis Jones is at ease as he casually creates a myriad of sounds with his trusty loop pedal. This is the modern day equivalent of a one man band, without the cumbersome inconvenience of a big drum on your back, he even throws in a touch of beat boxing just to mix things up a bit. At grass roots though this is a beautiful, heartfelt acoustic offering with vocals that contain an urgency and sincerity that are utterly compelling."

- XFM Onine


"Denis Jones is a different breed of showman. No costumes. No guitar heroics. No vocal gymnastics. Just a craftsman at work, forging pieces of robust delicacy, labours that absorb him and absorb the audience...........Unassuming genius in action."
- www.oppositiont.co.uk


"There is no suprise that denis jones keeps being invited back to play wherever he goes...he's quite simply one of the most exciting, engaging, inventive and purely entertaining performers you will see this year or next....."
- Humble Soul


If anything good is to come out of this evening, it’s the thankfulness that we got here early. Denis Jones is pretty special. He knows how to play his instruments. Even more impressive is that he uses synths on stage, in the way that synths should be used. He uses them to solidify his acoustic performance into something with musical altitude. Careful string plucks, cute little hums and murmurs, gentle flicks and strange beeps and a sophisticated use of analogue equipment, all add to the presumption that Denis Jones is a man that knows what he is doing. ‘Beginning’ is beautifully orchestrated and beguiling. Jones slaps his guitar in between strums; he plays perfectly in alignment with his backing track. He closes his eyes when he sings. Oh how we love people who do that! - Glasswerk


Discography

'Red + Yellow ='

Release date: 11 October 2010
Label: Humble Soul (distributed via Republic of Music/Universal)

Format: CD/MP3

Tracklist:
1. Clap Hands
2. Elvis
3. Sometimes
4. Rage
5. New Note
6. Conception, Consumption and Radiation
7. Bastion of Blood
8. Blengin

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
'Humdrum Virtue'

Release date:5 May 2008
Label: Humble Soul
Format: CD/MP3

Tracklist:
1. one loop
2. two slumber
3. third song
4. four water
5. five papers
6. £10 of electricity
7. 17
8. beginning

Photos

Bio

A truly ground-breaking songwriter, Denis Jones began playing the guitar while he was at school, but it was not until he moved from the North West to London that his music took the electronic direction that runs throughout his startlingly polished debut album, humdrum virtue and it's more adventurous follow up, Red + Yellow =.

Borrowing a sampler from a friend, Denis experimented with distorted chords and the manipulation of sound in the same way as Four Tet or Matthew Herbert had done before him, yet retaining the bluesy vocals and lyrical craft of his singer-songwriter roots. His shows have continued to develop, with Denis wielding an ever expanding array of electronics, yet never losing touch with the audience - a magician at work on the stage, drawing everyone in, spellbound.

Now relocated closer to his North West roots in Manchester, Denis has built a devoted following, with packed out shows in his home city. He has taken his distinctive live shows to festivals across Europe and as far afield as Vietnam; he has opened for the likes of Kieran Hebden and Steve Reid, Amp Fiddler, Efterklang, Murcof, Polar Bear and Acoustic Ladyland, and also tours regularly as a headliner throughout Europe.