DIANE ZEIGLER
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DIANE ZEIGLER

Band Folk Acoustic

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Jun
16
DIANE ZEIGLER @ Old Firehouse

Tinmouth, Vermont, USA

Tinmouth, Vermont, USA

Apr
20
DIANE ZEIGLER @ SITKA FOLK SOCIETY

Sitka, Alaska, USA

Sitka, Alaska, USA

Apr
14
DIANE ZEIGLER @ HOUSE CONCERT

Topsfield, Massachusetts, USA

Topsfield, Massachusetts, USA

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Music

The best kept secret in music

Press


Excerpts from Reviews of "Sting of the Honeybee", 1995 Rounder Records

"She has a gift for penning reflective personal anthems that turn hard truths to life-affirming purpose….The lilting folk-pop melodies are graceful, spacious and memorable; the lyrics intelligent, image-rich but never forced, wise and heartfelt. This could be a star-maker debut." --Boston Globe

"…contemporary folk music at its best." --Chicago Tribune

"Over the past few years, I have been introduced to the music of hundreds of songwriters. Few have impressed me more, however, than the haunting lyrics, captivating melodies, and crystalline voice of New England's Diane Zeigler. -- The Performing Songwriter

"Zeigler's songs are full of life, knowledge and disarming depth." --Boston Herald

"Her work brims with originality…Zeigler stands out among her contemporaries for the poet-turned-songstress within her." --Portsmouth Herald

"A superb lyricist with talent to spare…Diane Zeigler has come up with an impressive major-label debut here…." --Indie File, Charlotte, NC

"A significant new songwriter." --Sing Out

"Her voice remains steadily angelic, and her soft riffs are as haunting as the ghostly imagery in her songs." --Boston Phoenix

"You may be taken by surprise when the power and urgncy of an extended metaphor rises out of a pretty, lilting vocal, evincing a sort of wise innocence." -Acoustic Musician

"… up-tempo, spiritual meditations sung in a voice well suited to acoustic accompaniment - soft, uplifting, yet capable of a sharp sting." -Acoustic Guitar

"Take this one with you on your next road trip. You could listen to this well-produced album over and over, wear it out and buy another for the trip home."--Victory Music Review

" Her songs are honestly written short stories sung with strong, clean tones." --Burlington Free Press

”This is a beautiful record of spare, tuneful music that reverberates long after the album's ended." --Scope

"Sting of The Honeybee is a stunning debut album that showcases her thoughtful and touching songs, her beautiful and eloquent voice, and a certain quality that makes you instantly like her music." --Album Network

"Don’t miss this newcomer from New England…[she] writes songs with haunting perfection." --Denver Post

- Multiple


"Diane Zeigler has one of the clearest, most vividly gorgeous voices on the contemporary acoustic music scene. With Paintbrush, Zeigler makes a firm commitment to continuing her legacy of beautifully written tunes sung in that crystal clear voice. Paintbrush is a wonderful addition to Diane Zeigler's musical catalog. There's a song here for everyone who celebrates life and music created by one of New England's finest artists. And the sound of Zeigler's voice will linger long after the CD has ended. This is music to be played well into the summer night and beyond. It is something to be treasured." - The Music Matters


Diane Zeigler doesn't just write songs. She breathes life into them and then puts you right in the middle.
How does she do this? To start, Diane's slightly smoky soprano voice conveys strength yet is never forceful. It's always just right....Lyrics are sometimes hard-hitting and brutally honest but always couched in tenderness and quiet strength.

...The styles are varied, ranging from the Cajun/ folk on the opening "Ride that Rail" (with T-Bone Wolk on accordion) to the Celtic flavor of "Indian Paintbrush" to country/bluegrass/Appalachian/little-bit-o-blues "Prickly Pine" and "Say it isn't So." ....

Diane's lyrics need mentioning here, too. Remember the reference to "hard-hitting?" Well, "It Grew in Front of Me," is about watching a sister care for a dying husband. Sad enough, right? Wait...

"She was the first one to walk, the first one to drive
The first kid in college, the first as a bride
The first one to know the hard road of a wife
when you walk your true love to the end of his life."

The same gentleness that cradles those words is also the essence of a beautiful love song called "With My Eyes Closed:"

"...I could trace every line on your face
With my eyes closed
'cause I can see the shape of what can't be replaced
even with my eyes closed
and I never would have guessed
that Providence would be so kind
But I will always bless the day you showed up here
And struck me blind."

You don't just listen to Diane's songs -- you experience them. - IndieMusic.com


DIANE ZEIGLER IS WELCOMED BACK TO STAGE
The Burlington Free Press 2/22/99


Diane Zeigler is back - and the world of folk music is all the better for it. Returning after a two-year, self-imposed exile to focus on her family life, Zeigler played before a near capacity audience at the Barre Opera House Saturday night.

Given the sharpness of her performance; it is hard to imagine that Zeigler did not even open her guitar case during the two-year period.

In addition to the now familiar songs from her 1995 release "Sting of the Honeybee", Zeigler wove in a handful of new compositions while also drawing on her earliest work released on cassette only and now out of print.

Openly touched by the outpouring of affection of her local fan base, she contrasted the generally serious tone of her music with humorous quips about life as a mom and the difficulty of writing love songs.

"Leap of Faith" opened the show, and the incisive lyrics seemed particularly appropriate given Zeigler's leave of absence: "You can revel in your finest moments/but you're still sitting on fences; they say you'll never fail if you have never moved."

"Holy Ground", one of her new songs, bore remarkable testimony to the strength represented by marital union. "I Know My Baby's Cry" drew nods of affirmation by both moms and dads in the crowd, showing that Zeigler's exceptional songwriting gift has emerged not only unscathed but enhanced by her new life experience.

Zeigler is transparent in sharing where her inspirations come from, whether the songs gets its start at the hairdresser's ("Widow's Peak") or it centers on a family member, such as the tune written for her dad on Father's Day or "Kathleen" for her younger sister. "The Well," written for her two young children, spoke of her sometimes overwhelming feeling of a bottomless place where the line between joy and helplessness can be very fine.

The second set brought "With My Eyes Closed", "Legend of Enoch Arden", and "The Winter Sun", written just three weeks ago. Preceeding the encore "Rock of Ages", Zeigler finished the set with "You Will Get Your Due" - and when it comes to her prospects for long term success, there can be little doubt about that.

While one can imagine her music being latched onto by a producer who would add more instrumentation and deliver a more pop molded product, Zeigler will have none of that. "It's really important to let songs speak for themselves, not to adorn them too much," she said after the concert.

- The Burlington Free Press


I have no idea what I was doing the first time I listened to Diane Zeigler's Paintbrush. From the opening notes of "Ride That Rail," I was lost in fascination with the lovely view offered by her sweet, calm voice and the friendly exchanges of the instruments. A bright spring day of an album, Paintbrush presents odes to loves of all sorts, offered on light, open musical themes.

Zeigler's music has an optimism that wisely steers her work away from the maudlin, even when dealing with painful subjects. "Ride That Rail" is a farewell to a dear one caught in addiction, and in other hands would become a condemnation. Here it is a prayer for the future, a statement of faith in the one currently struggling. "Prickly Pine" may be a bluesy, lowkey mother's lament to her seduced daughter, but the last verse suggests that the wayward girl may be getting some joy out of her unapproved union.

It's always nice to hear a songwriter acknowledge that life is more than romantic relationships. The linked songs "Kathleen" and "It Grew in Front of Me" honor the bonds of family and the sometimes strained relationships of siblings. "It Grew in Front of Me," a younger sister's recounting of an older sister's blossoming romance, is one of the most powerful songs on the album.

The romantic songs that are on the album manage to share a feeling of real caring rather than the obsessive desperation evident in so many "love" songs. "With My Eyes Closed" captures a heart rejoicing in love without fear of loss. "Indian Paintbrush" holds the sweet excitement of future romance not yet discovered. One of the most poetic songs on the album, "Say It Ain't So," blends a traditional romance tale with a love for hometown, and leaves both love stories unresolved and leaning towards tragic.

Though Paintbrush certainly has its own sound, great variety of influences play throughout the album. "Ride That Rail" has a slight taste of zydeco, followed soon by the bluegrass feel of "Indian Paintbrush." Whether it's the bright romance of "With My Eyes Closed" or the careful sorrow of "It Grew in Front of Me," Zeigler works her musical influences into a gentle acoustic style that softens grief and turns joy into something piercing.

Paintbrush dissolves on the ear and bubbles through the brain, leaving the heart relaxed and calm. It's one of those albums that can change the mood of an entire day before it's halfway done, and still sound fresh on its third play.

- Rambles Magazine


MOTHERHOOD FIRES HER UP
By Scott Alarik, The Boston Globe
Sunday, March 7, 1999


In 1995, the hottest songwriter on the local scene seemed to be Diane Zeigler. Her debut Philo CD, "Sting of the Honeybee," displayed a voice both whisper-pretty and emotionally dynamic, and folk-pop songs with memorable melodies and smart lyrics.

Just as her star was rising, Zeigler became pregnant. She decided family came first, retiring to her native Vermont with her husband, Geoffry Sather. She assumed her career was over.

"After our first daughter, Nell, was born, I loved not having to write and put all my creative energy into her," she said. "After our son, Jaimen, was born last May, I started writing again, and it felt like finding a long-lost friend."

Zeigler has no idea how far her music can take her, only that she has never felt such a passion for it.

"I feel like I'm on fire now, letting go of all the fears and baggage I had as a performer. I swore I wouldn't go on and on writing songs about how great it is to be a mom, but I guess I have to get it out of my system. And there really aren't a lot of songs about what it's really like being a day-to-day parent, the times you find yourself on your knees, saying, `Please, just let me get through this afternoon."' Zeigler makes her "comeback" at Club Passim April 9.

- The Boston Globe


Balancing Act
Diane Zeigler: These Are the Roots
by Peter Hanson, Metroland Magazine, Albany, NY 9/15/01


On her soulful new record, These Are the Roots, Vermont folkie Diane Zeigler eloquently examines the eternal quandary of balancing the private and the professional. Throughout the 14-song disc, Zeigler tenderly pokes and prods her fulfilling existence, asking difficult questions about how happiness happens and finding universal truths about the regenerative powers of love and family. Whether she’s waxing anthemic on “This Too Shall Pass,” documenting tragic love in “The Legend of Enoch Arden” or wondering at the dignity of marriage in “Holy Ground,” Zeigler almost never fails to find striking words and honest music with which to express herself.


The crisp way that Zeigler’s girlish, plaintive voice energizes her unvarnished poetry recalls Shawn Colvin’s approach, but because Zeigler lacks Colvin’s pop hooks and esoteric excesses, she comes across as genuine and focused. In the bouncy “What You’ve Always Known,” which is powered by a skittish acoustic-guitar figure and a winding organ line, Zeigler humbly promises that faith can be enough: “So find a place where the light splits the dark,” she sings, “and hold it safe in the hollow of your heart.” Yet in “I Know My Baby’s Cry,” Zeigler admits that part of parenthood’s compromise is setting aside wanderlust to pursue a different kind of journey. The singer finds peace with the two halves of her soul in songs such as “In Defense of Eve,” which contains this telling lyric: “Looking out beyond the farthest shore/You were just a wife who wanted more.” The contentment that Zeigler celebrates throughout These Are the Roots is contagious because she, as Eve did, wants more—the tension of balancing her two lives makes the time she devotes to either of them precious, and the moments when her paths intersect miraculous.

Filled with melodic, emotional songs, These Are the Roots is one of the most satisfying records of the year—and considering the twisty path that led to its release, that’s quite an accomplishment. After releasing her acclaimed debut disc, 1995’s Sting of the Honeybee, Zeigler quit music to start a family. When she resumed her music career last year, the singer had lost her momentum and her deal with Rounder Records, forcing her to start from scratch as an indie artist. The involving melodies, delicate singing and articulate wordplay of These Are the Roots prove that Zeigler hasn’t been daunted by her stop-and-start career; quite to the contrary, her winding road forced the singer to dig deeper for strength, inspiration and material.

- Metroland Magazine, NY


Harnessing the Creative Force
THE PERFORMING SONGWRITER


by Chris Flischer


"Do things in your life that keep routine in it and keep your head straight and your feet on the ground. That's what's most important," says Rounder/Philo recording artist Diane Zeigler. "There is a lot of adoration in this business and there is also a lot of criticism. It is important not to get wrapped up in either and try to keep your focus on yourself, your music, and your goals."

Easily said and perhaps easily done, given the results this impressive singer-songwriter has achieved in a relatively sort career. In a mere five years, Diane Zeigler moved from the supportive comfort of small-town community in upstate Vermont, joined the ranks of Boston's hotly competitive acoustic music scene, and secured a multi-album recording contract wit hone of the industry's most visible singer-songwriter labels.

As her debut recording and rising status attests, this artist has a determination, spark and attitude that remains inspirational. Affable and humble, with a maturity that belies her physical youth, Zeigler plies this most difficult trade with grace and a healthy dose of philosophical balance.

"I approach music as something that I love to do. It's what drove me to do this in the first place; this love. And all I can do is take the point of view that says, 'These are my talents and this is what I have to bring to the table. Here it is, do wit hit what you want," she explains. "I couldn't feel more confident about my new songs. I feel it is the beset work of my life and if it doesn't appear that way to the critics, then that's OK, because I am proud of it."

Rightfully so. Her debut, "Sting of the Honeybee" finds this resolute songwriter addressing topics as boldly personal as death, spirituality, domestic abuse, love, and self-discovery with a candor and forthright honesty that is as emotionally stirring as it is universal. Whether angrily attacking the unjust hierarchy of the workplace ("Cog in the Wheel"), describing the hollow fear of a surviving spouse ("Widow's Peak"), boosting the morale of a hopeless artist ("You Will Get Your Due"), or extolling the determined ways of an Atalantic fisherman ("One Who Got Away"), Diane's songs move with a lyrical punch that exhibits a wisdom and strength well beyond her years. Perhaps best summed up in the two opening cuts, "Leap of Faith" and "Walk on Water", this songwriter threads songs with a deep spiritual constant that offers optimism and encouragement for any and all. Even a cover of James Taylor's "Millworker" fits nicely in this reflective tapestry.

Country, soft-rock, and acoustic folk carry the songs that are immediately appealing and melodic. Produced by venerable folkie, Artie Traum, the majority of the tunes are supported by a full bank, backup singers, tasteful instrumental flourishes, and display Diane's delicate vocal delivery with lasting effect.

Despite the lofty tone of her tittles and songs, Zeigler's lyrics never stray into self-serving navel-gazing, or worse, preachy sentiments. Rather, they move comfortably within the confines of one woman's view and hence, favor warmth and inspiration. Although seemingly easy, this single aspect illustrates a process that requires considerable emotional homework. Rather, they move comfortably within the confines of one woman's view and hence, favor warmth and inspiration. Although seemingly easy, this single aspect illustrates a process that requires considerable emotional homework.

"It is something that I continually wrestle with in this business," she confides. "One one hand you have this intensely personal stuff that you create from experience in a place so far removed from the studio and the stage and yet, on the other hand you have this forum for delivering these songs that is the exact opposite. The hardest part of this is reconciling these two extremes. But then again," she quickly chimes in, "I have to do it. It is a decision that rings on a very deep, personal level. I have to do this to feel like I can contribute something as a human being."

As if a strong commitment wasn't enough, this young idealist has faced considerable personal challenges as well. When she was 19, a close older brother succumbed to an untimely illness. Later, while continuing college in Vermont, she managed to raise enough money to leave school and become the director of a 60-child orphanage deep in the Venezuelan jungle, hoping the change the world. Life-hardened and culture-shocked beyond her wildest plans, Diane learned to cope with upheaval and change in a way that ultimately made her the person and writer she's become.

"I came out of those two experiences very positively," she recalls. "They forced me to think of life in much different terms and I became a better writer because of it. They didn't change what was lacking in my music, because musically my sense of melody is very simple, but it forced me to write songs and play more. I developed a singleness of mind that really saw no other option but to write better."

The obvious and often prevalent connection between crisis and creativity does not elude Zeigler. "I don't wear these things on my shoulder," she quickly admits, "but I do believe that these events helped shape me as a writer. She adds, " You can't let yourself be driven by negative things or put too much faith in that idea. It is mistake to get wrapped up in that, because it becomes a snowball when you have to have tragedy to create, so you make your own tragedy. That is abusive."

As one of five children from a close-knit, relatively non-musical family, Diane admits to being a "child of the 70s" with "standard" influences, including James Taylor, Jackson Browne, Dan Fogelberg, and, yes, Barry Manilow ("I can't deny it," she laughs, "that music is just part of what I heard so it counts as something that shaped my sense of music"). However it was one of her brother's guitars that ultimately snagged her interest. Kept under lock and key, Diane found a way to use that guitar to teach herself to rudimentary chords of her favorite songs.

Looking back at her progress in a field that eliminates many, Diane recalls her decision to become a performing singer-songwriter, "I can remember when I decided to do this. I had spent much of my life dreaming about how I wanted to be a songwriter, but I was always too lazy to do it," she admits. "Until things changed in my life to a point where I had to follow this dream - I just had to. It was really incredible," she exclaims. "I just threw myself into music and the guitar with almost obsessive force, practicing five, six, seven hours a day for six months until I mastered it. Maybe it was coming back from Venezuela, or my brother dying, or maybe it was falling in love with my husband. Whatever it was, I wish I knew how to harness that energy again, " she laughs, pausing, "I'd try and win the lottery or something."


- Performing Songwriter Magazine


"On a scale of one to ten, this new self-produced effort rates an eleven. Zeigler's personal best. -George Maida, WCVE (VA)

"Zeigler almost never fails to find striking words and honest music with which to express herself .This is one of the most satisfying records of the year." -Peter Hanson, Metroland Magazine (NY)

"The criminally under-recorded Zeigler enriches the contemporay folk tradition by synchronizing guileless vocals and expert instrumental accompaniment - a true singer and songwriter. She manages to elevate the humble yet celebratory virtues of her family , reinventing what could be cliche into near-holy, sincere homilies. The new CD showcases all the pretensionless talent which is Diane Zeigler ; Shyness, Spiritualuality and Ardor in equal measure." -Dave Leonatti, WUIS (IL)

"Sting of the Honeybee" was an excellent CD, but this one blows even that away!" -Steve Jerret, KOPN (MO)

"Diane Zeigler is one of the best-kept secrets in the world of contemporary folk. She has an achingly beautiful voice and she writes incredible songs. Diane is a great talent, and you simply must own all of her albums before you can call your collection complete. Her CD "These Are The Roots"was the "Messages" album of the year for 2000." - Stu Weaver, WFCF-FM (FL)

"STING OF THE HONEYBEE was great. THESE ARE THE ROOTS is better. This is an artist...whose depth of perspective and emotion is razor-sharp. Diane's beautiful lyrics, along with her distinctive guitar sound and of course, that ever-expressive voice, combine for one of the finest collections in recent memory. The years she took off to become a mother have given her new insights on life and music, and those of us who listen are better off for it." --Kent Anderson, KCSC ( OK)

"It is nice to find a songwriter who writes songs that reflect the concerns and joys of every day life. By combining superb songwriting skill with alluring melodies and beautiful vocals, this Cd is a must be heard effort for all music enthusiasts". -Dan Alloway, KTEP (TX)

"The first three songs tell you everything you need to know about Diane Zeigler's latest recording. In an industry rife with hype, she cuts through the clutter with stunning simplicity. Don't expect to find her vision on the surface. " These Are The Roots" taps into a deeper well. --Bob Allen, WIAA (MI)

"Tender subjects are delivered cliche-free; tough themes are handled with delicacy and grace. The voice? Lovely as ever....No wonder we're playing this one in "heavy" rotation!" -Marilyn Rae Bayer, WUMB (MA)

"An undeniably sweet and pretty voice is what really sets this disc apart. Zeigler's voice has an indefinable quality that simply makes it special...believe me when I say that Zeigler has the right stuff." -The Burlington Free Press (VT)

"Distinguishing oneself within the crowded field of folk-pop composers is no easy feat these days, but Diane Zeigler is not your average songwriter. Zeigler constructs graceful vignettes that exude a spirit of resolve and affirmation, in a voice that's as resonant and beautiful as the Vermont countryside in which she was raised." - Performing Songwriter Magazine

"Her songwriting is as sharp as ever. The songs cover tender and emotive subjects and she handles them all with tact and elegance, she manages to steer clear of well worn cliches - resulting in fresh, thought provoking and often disarming songs. [This CD] is a stylish and classy collection from start to finish, and one that has much to offer fans of acoustic singer songwriters." -Fish Records Catalog (England)

"Diane Zeigler's new CD 'These Are the Roots' is an appealing and articulate album by a talented singer-songwriter whose music can range from introspective to tunefully bouncy. The original material is uniformly high in quality, and the CD's production is a model of the right way to do a record like this -- with arrangements that widen the appeal of the songs, without undermining them. The playing by all the musicians is the model of restraint and good taste, adding just the right ingredients without distracting from the songs. Sonically, the album is a class act." -George Graham, WVIA-FM (PA)

- Multiple publishers


Excerpts from Reviews of 'Paintbrush':

(released 2002, produced by Diane Zeigler & Geoff Sather)
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"Diane Zeigler has one of the clearest, most vividly gorgeous voices on the contemporary acoustic music scene. With Paintbrush, Zeigler makes a firm commitment to continuing her legacy of beautifully written tunes sung in that crystal clear voice. Paintbrush is a wonderful addition to Diane Zeigler's musical catalog. There's a song here for everyone who celebrates life and music created by one of New England's finest artists. And the sound of Zeigler's voice will linger long after the CD has ended. This is music to be played well into the summer night and beyond. It is something to be treasured." -The Music Matters

"Diane Zeigler doesn't just write songs. She breathes life into them and then puts you right in the middle. You don't just listen to Diane's songs -- you experience them. " Indie-Music.com READ MORE

" Paintbrush' is an unassuming yet hugely impressive album, and should be on the list for all fans of acoustic singer/songwriters." Fish Records Catalog, U.K.

"In the over-saturated world of singer-songwriters, Diane Zeigler is a diamond in the not-so-rough...she is one of the most promising voices in the new-folk movement. 'Paintbrush' provides yet another example of Zeigler’s expansive skill. A very impressive album. " -Ethan Covey, Seven Days

"This is Zeigler's strongest work to date, and that's saying a lot." -Steve Netsky, Rounder Records

"With the release of her third album, Paintbrush, the Vermont-based songstress shows that she's here to stay. Showcasing Zeigler's songwriting talents with eight original tunes, Paintbrush reveals her mastery of interpretation with unique renditions of the Dave Carter-penned "Gentle Soldier of My Soul" and the traditional tune "Wild Mountain Thyme". - Dirty Linen

She might not be sizable in stature, but Montpelier's Diane Zeigler is a genuine giant among Vermont singer-songwriters. Her third album, released last month, is a striking collection of country-tinged torch and twang that features a full band sound behind Zeigler's powerfully crystalline voice. Decidedly upbeat and earthy, the album also offers some gentle laments as only she can deliver them." Burlington Free Press Best of 2002 List

'Paintbrush' is a heart-wise and musically vibrant new CD" - Scott Alarik, Boston Globe

"This is a good example of how incredibly fine an independent project can be ... from the songwriting to the arranging to the recording to the artwork, this is an album Zeigler should be very proud of." -Walt Graham WSHU-FM (CT)

"Diane Zeigler's 'Paintbrush' is simply beautiful music-making." - Times Argus Back to top



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Excerpts from Reviews of 'These Are the Roots'
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BACK TO CDS PAGE

"On a scale of one to ten, this new self-produced effort rates an eleven. Zeigler's personal best. -George Maida, WCVE (VA)

"Zeigler almost never fails to find striking words and honest music with which to express herself .This is one of the most satisfying records of the year." -Peter Hanson, Metroland Magazine (NY)

"The criminally under-recorded Zeigler enriches the contemporay folk tradition by synchronizing guileless vocals and expert instrumental accompaniment - a true singer and songwriter. She manages to elevate the humble yet celebratory virtues of her family , reinventing what could be cliche into near-holy, sincere homilies. The new CD showcases all the pretensionless talent which is Diane Zeigler ; Shyness, Spiritualuality and Ardor in equal measure." -Dave Leonatti, WUIS (IL)

"Sting of the Honeybee" was an excellent CD, but this one blows even that away!" -Steve Jerret, KOPN (MO)

"Diane Zeigler is one of the best-kept secrets in the world of contemporary folk. She has an achingly beautiful voice and she writes incredible songs. Diane is a great talent, and you simply must own all of her albums before you can call your collection complete. Her CD "These Are The Roots"was the "Messages" album of the year for 2000." - Stu Weaver, WFCF-FM (FL)

"STING OF THE HONEYBEE was great. THESE ARE THE ROOTS is better. This is an artist...whose depth of perspective and emotion is razor-sharp. Diane's beautiful lyrics, along with her distinctive guitar sound and of course, that ever-expressive voice, combine for one of the finest collections in recent memory. The years she took off to become a mother have given her new insights on life and music, and those of us who listen are better off for it." --Kent Anderson, KCSC ( OK)

"It is nice to find a songwriter who writes songs that reflect the concerns and joys of every day life. By combining superb songwriting skill with alluring melodies and beautiful vocals, this Cd is a must be heard effort for all music enthusiasts". -Dan Alloway, KTEP (TX)

"The first three songs tell you everything you need to know about Diane Zeigler's latest recording. In an industry rife with hype, she cuts through the clutter with stunning simplicity. Don't expect to find her vision on the surface. " These Are The Roots" taps into a deeper well. --Bob Allen, WIAA (MI)

"Tender subjects are delivered cliche-free; tough themes are handled with delicacy and grace. The voice? Lovely as ever....No wonder we're playing this one in "heavy" rotation!" -Marilyn Rae Bayer, WUMB (MA)

"An undeniably sweet and pretty voice is what really sets this disc apartÉ.Zeigler's voice has an indefinable quality that simply makes it specialÉbelieve me when I say that Zeigler has the right stuff." -The Burlington Free Press (VT)

"Distinguishing oneself within the crowded field of folk-pop composers is no easy feat these days, but Diane Zeigler is not your average songwriter. Zeigler constructs graceful vignettes that exude a spirit of resolve and affirmation, in a voice that's as resonant and beautiful as the Vermont countryside in which she was raised." - Performing Songwriter Magazine

"Her songwriting is as sharp as ever. The songs cover tender and emotive subjects and she handles them all with tact and elegance, she manages to steer clear of well worn cliches - resulting in fresh, thought provoking and often disarming songs. [This CD] is a stylish and classy collection from start to finish, and one that has much to offer fans of acoustic singer songwriters." -Fish Records Catalog (England)

"Diane Zeigler's new CD 'These Are the Roots' is an appealing and articulate album by a talented singer-songwriter whose music can range from introspective to tunefully bouncy. The original material is uniformly high in quality, and the CD's production is a model of the right way to do a record like this -- with arrangements that widen the appeal of the songs, without undermining them. The playing by all the musicians is the model of restraint and good taste, adding just the right ingredients without distracting from the songs. Sonically, the album is a class act." -George Graham, WVIA-FM (PA)



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Excerpts from Reviews of 'Sting of the Honeybee'
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"She has a gift for penning reflective personal anthems that turn hard truths to life-affirming purpose….The lilting folk-pop melodies are graceful, spacious and memorable; the lyrics intelligent, image-rich but never forced, wise and heartfelt. This could be a star-maker debut." --Boston Globe

"…contemporary folk music at its best." --Chicago Tribune

"Over the past few years, I have been introduced to the music of hundreds of songwriters. Few have impressed me more, however, than the haunting lyrics, captivating melodies, and crystalline voice of New England's Diane Zeigler. -- The Performing Songwriter

"Zeigler's songs are full of life, knowledge and disarming depth." --Boston Herald

"Her work brims with originality…Zeigler stands out among her contemporaries for the poet-turned-songstress within her." --Portsmouth Herald

"A superb lyricist with talent to spare…Diane Zeigler has come up with an impressive major-label debut here…." --Indie File, Charlotte, NC

"A significant new songwriter." --Sing Out

"Her voice remains steadily angelic, and her soft riffs are as haunting as the ghostly imagery in her songs." --Boston Phoenix

"You may be taken by surprise when the power and urgncy of an extended metaphor rises out of a pretty, lilting vocal, evincing a sort of wise innocence." -Acoustic Musician

"… up-tempo, spiritual meditations sung in a voice well suited to acoustic accompaniment - soft, uplifting, yet capable of a sharp sting." -Acoustic Guitar

"Take this one with you on your next road trip. You could listen to this well-produced album over and over, wear it out and buy another for the trip home."--Victory Music Review

" Her songs are honestly written short stories sung with strong, clean tones." --Burlington Free Press

”This is a beautiful record of spare, tuneful music that reverberates long after the album's ended." --Scope

"Sting of The Honeybee is a stunning debut album that showcases her thoughtful and touching songs, her beautiful and eloquent voice, and a certain quality that makes you instantly like her music." --Album Network

"Don’t miss this newcomer from New England…[she] writes songs with haunting perfection." --Denver Post

- Multiple


Discography

1995 STING OF THE HONEYBEE
2000 THESE ARE THE ROOTS
2002 PAINTBRUSH
2004 DECEMBER IN VERMONT
2006 (currently in studio recording upcoming CD)

Photos

Feeling a bit camera shy

Bio

With the release of her fourth CD 'December in Vermont", Diane Zeigler is established as an important voice in acoustic music. The winner of 8 national songwriting awards, Diane is
also a skilled performer with a quick laugh, and her live shows offer a full spectrum of entertainment and inspired musicianship. She combines a crystalline vocal style with distinctive open-tuning guitar work, crafting songs that have earned her respect among songwriters and critics as “one of the most talented singer-songwriters New England has produced.” (The Music Matters)

Her recordings have been consistently lauded by critics and have earned accolades including Best New Folk Album of 2004 (Just Plain Folks Music Awards in Hollywood, CA), Best New Folk Album of 2002 (Just Plain Folks Music Awards), and charting #1 on monthly playlists published at www.folkradio.org. Her new Christmas collection “December in Vermont” sold out of its first pressing in just three weeks without Zeigler doing a single concert to promote it, entirely from online sales to her fan base.

Despite the acclaim Zeigler has received as a songwriter, her career has taken an erratic path that reflects the multiple challenges facing a mother trying to choose between career and family. Her 1995 debut CD on Rounder Records, ‘Sting of the Honeybee’, was a favorite among critics of acoustic music, but before she could hit the road to support it, Zeigler learned she was pregnant with her first child. The CD, produced by Artie Traum and featuring musical guests such as banjoist Tony Trishka and drummer Jerry Marotta, was nominated for a Boston Music Award, and placed on Top 10 album lists at both The Boston Globe and WUMB Radio. Globe critic Scott Alarik called it ‘a star-maker debut’ but later dubbed it ‘the sleeper of the decade for the New England folk community’, as Zeigler’s choice to stay off the road certainly affected CD sales. She took a 3 year hiatus from music, gave birth to two children, and then re-emerged on the national folk scene in 1999, picking up where she left off by winning awards at Kerrville, Rocky Mountain Folks, and Telluride festivals.

Zeigler’s songs capture a sense of place and community, informed as they are by the unique landscape of Vermont. Her work is also rooted in her experiences with death and loss. Her 1995 debut CD was dedicated to her brother Jimmy, who died of cancer in 1984 at age 21. On “Paintbrush” she writes of the death of her sister’s husband in “It Grew In Front of Me”, with harmonies provided by her brother, sister, daughter, and husband. Zeigler’s songwriting reflects a personal life where the focal point is on family, place, and community, highlighting the universal emotions we all work through. Says the Boston Globe,” She has a gift for penning reflective personal anthems that turn hard truths to life-affirming purpose.”

Diane's work has been featured on dozens of compilation CD projects for many labels, including Rounder Records, Sony Music, Yankee Magazine, and National Geographic Magazine, among others. She performs both as a solo act and with bandmates: husband/co-producer/bassist Geoff Sather and dobroist Adam Frehm.

AWARDS:

·2004 Best New Folk Album, Just Plain Folks Music Awards
·2002 Best New Folk Album, Just Plain Folks Music Awards
· Winner, 1999 Kerrville Folk Festival (TX)
· Winner, 1999 Rocky Mtn Folks Fest (CO)
· 2nd Place Winner, 1999 Telluride Fest (CO)
· Winner, 1991 Napa Valley Festival (CA)
· Winner, 1991 Columbia River Fest (WA)
· Winner, 1990 Sugarbush Folk Fest (VT)
· Boston Music Award Nominee, 1995 (MA)
· Top 10 Album , 1995 WUMB Radio (MA)
· Top 10 Album, The Boston Globe 1995