Dick Dale and Laramie Dean
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Dick Dale and Laramie Dean

North Hollywood, California, United States

North Hollywood, California, United States
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The best kept secret in music

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"The Fast and Furious Sounds of Laramie Dean"


Listening to a Laramie Dean guitar set is probably like standing in the middle of a jailbreak stampede — if you don’t get out of the way, you’re bound to go home limping. It’s a minimal price to pay to hear the riveting surf-punk sounds of a direct disciple of the living surf guitar legend Dick Dale.

The guitarist from Troy, N.Y., has shared the stage with Agent Orange, the Queers, Fishbone and the Misfits, to name a few. But he’ll be playing songs from his “Surf Riot!” LP at Badlands Billiards Saturday. We did a quick round of Q&A with him.

Q. What first turned you on to surf music?
In the early ‘90s I had been introduced to artists like Link Wray, the Ventures and others through friends of mine who worked at Rhino Records …

Q. What was the first song you ever learned?
The first song I learned all the way, that would have to be (The Chantays ‘) “Pipeline.”

Q. You lived and toured with the King of Surf Guitar, Dick Dale. How’d you first meet him?
I wanted to record in an analog studio in New Hampshire, so I went to a place where the engineer had done a lot of work with Joe Queer (from The Queers) , so I met him and we eventually became buds. Then one day Joe was like “You gotta see Dick Dale, he’s playing” … so we drove up to Portland, Maine, and met him.

Q. What impact did being a pupil of Dick Dale have on your work ethic?
Dick is the guy that most speaks to me, style-wise. He sticks to a very strict formula, and it’s a very powerful formula. What I’ve always admired about him is you don’t take no for an answer; he’s been on labels, even books his own tours, and he’s always retained full rights to his music.

Laramie Dean
Saturday, Oct. 9 – 8 p.m.
Badlands Billiards, 7792 Franklin Dr.
$10
- Whats Up, El Paso Texas


"Agent Orange and Laramie Dean live review"

The punk momentum is broken up momentarily with more instrumentals; The Bel-Airs “Mr Moto“, and a belting version of “Miserlou” where they are joined on second guitar by the very dapper Laramie Dean… this is easily one of the highlights of the set. - Caught in the Crossfire, London, England


"Agent Orange and Laramie Dean live review"

We live in a land where surf rock was pioneered, where "Apache" is not a hip-hop song, and where Dick Dale is still a king. At the same time, Tacoma is home to hardcore bands such as Zeke (forget what Seattle tries to tell you) and South 11th - bands that relentlessly approach take-no-prisoners music with fists held high.

These two worlds met Saturday night at Hell's Kitchen, as SoCal's Agent Orange headlined a near sold-out show.

Opening for Agent Orange were local bands Victor Cutoff, the Dirty Birds, Broken Oars and South 11th. Victor Cutoff and the Dirty Birds had solid sets getting the crowd warmed up for Broken Oars' debut show with new drummer "Stubs." This was the best Broken Oars set I have seen yet. The band was spot on, inspiring circle pits and bloody noses with their anthemic sing-along Tacoma-pride street punk.

Tacoma natives South 11th took the stage after Broken Oars. I had never seen South11th before Saturday, and as I watched the band all I kept thinking was, "These guys are a perfect blend between Minor Threat and early Pantera." Then, much to my pleasure, the band covered "Seein' Red." Be sure to check the split South 11th did with the now defunct Sarah Connor.

Mike Palm, lead singer of Agent Orange, was pumped to be playing the new Hell's Kitchen location, saying, "The Avenue has changed, but all the same great Tacoma faces are here, and that's what we love coming back to."

Agent Orange formed in Orange County in 1979, blending the guitar influences of Dick Dale with the aggression of the Ramones. On Saturday night at Hell's Kitchen Laramie Dean joined the band as they tore through an hour of earsplitting surf rock, both old and new. It was great to hear pretty much all of the gems off of Living in Darkness. The new stuff was good, too - leaning a bit more towards the Ventures than the Lewd. But, hey, what can you expect they're getting old?

Laramie thought it was a blast to play in the home of the Ventures; "Its just really cool to be playing in the town where some of the most influential surf music was written," he told the crowd.

Agent Orange put on a hell of a show, respectfully paying homage to a city of their heroes - the Weely Volcanoe


"100 greatest guitarists of all time"

Dick Dale reigns across the decades as the undisputed king of the surf guitar. In Dale's own words, "Real surfing music is instrumental, characterized by heavy staccato picking on a Fender Stratocaster guitar." Moreover, it's best played through a Fender Showman Amp — a model built to spec for Dale by Leo Fender himself. Igniting California's surfing cult with such regional hits as "Let's Go Trip-pin'," "Surf Beat" and "Miserlou," Dale made waves with his fat, edgy sound and aggressive, proto-metal attack. "Miserlou," released in 1962, marked the first use of a Fender reverb unit — creating an underwater sound with lots of echo — on a popular record. Fittingly, it sparked a surf-music revival when director Quentin Tarantino used it in the opening scene of Pulp Fiction. - Rollingstone Magazine


Discography

Surfers' Choice (Deltone 1962)
King of the Surf Guitar (Capitol 1963)
Checkered Flag (Capitol 1963)
Mr. Eliminator (Capitol 1964)
Summer Surf (Capitol 1964)
Rock out with Dick Dale and his Del-Tones: Live at Ciro's (Capitol 1965)
The Tiger's Loose (Balboa 1983) [live album]
Tribal Thunder (HighTone 1993)
Unknown Territory (HighTone 1994)
Calling Up Spirits (Beggars Banquet 1996)
Spacial Disorientation (Dick Dale Records / The Orchard 2001)

Photos

Bio

taken from Rollingstone Magazine's top 100 guitarists of all time.

Dick Dale reigns across the decades as the undisputed king of the surf guitar. In Dale's own words, "Real surfing music is instrumental, characterized by heavy staccato picking on a Fender Stratocaster guitar." Moreover, it's best played through a Fender Showman Amp — a model built to spec for Dale by Leo Fender himself. Igniting California's surfing cult with such regional hits as "Let's Go Trip-pin'," "Surf Beat" and "Miserlou," Dale made waves with his fat, edgy sound and aggressive, proto-metal attack. "Miserlou," released in 1962, marked the first use of a Fender reverb unit — creating an underwater sound with lots of echo — on a popular record. Fittingly, it sparked a surf-music revival when director Quentin Tarantino used it in the opening scene of Pulp Fiction.

Laramie Dean drove 3000 miles to meet Dick, and learn how to be a pro touring entertainer. After living and touring with Dick, he went on to tour with Agent Orange, playing " Miserlou" on stage around the world to a new audience. He has since played 500 shows across the US, Canada, Europe, and the UK..

Laramie's main influence is Dick Dales early renditions of his classics " Miserlou" and ' Surf Beat"

This tour is going to Dick returning to his iconic big band approach, with horns and piano, along with Laramie on guitar.