Didjeridu Dingo

Didjeridu Dingo

BandWorld

Biography

Didjeridu Dingo is not your average white band. Formed in 2001, their music defies description but has variously been described as earthy, wild, a fusion of world music, tribal, funk, dance, ambient, with a hint of blues. A combination of the rhythmic drone of the didjeridu, the haunting melody of the didjeribone and the drive of a drums, bass and guitar rhythm section, the music is very much of the place from which it is inspired, the wild and sublime landscape of the Blue Mountains of Australia.

“Our music expresses our feelings about the landscape. There are pieces about specific issues, such as 'Waiting for Rain' (bushfires), but many, like 'Soakin’ the View', 'Way Out There', 'Narrowneck' and 'Warrumbungles – Spirit Of The Land', celebrate the serenity - the sufficiency of simply being there”.

Didjeridu Dingo generally does a concert style performance of original, instrumental music for up to two hours or 3 x 45 minute sets. Their material ranges from gentle ambient through to fast rhythmical dance music and can be chosen to suit the event. Didjeridu/didjeribone workshops can be offered as well as there is usually much interest in the instruments after a gig.

The key to their unique sound comes from the didjeribone. It is a new instrument developed to allow a didjeridu player access to a wider range of notes than can be achieved from a conventional, monotone didjeridu. Comprising of two sliding polycarbonate pipes, it can be played rhythmically as a didjeridu or melodically as a haunting horn. The sound of the didjeribone has been likened to an electronic trombone crossed with didjeridu and a touch of French horn.
Didjeridu Dingo’s lead didjeribone player, Michael Jackson, is arguably the world’s leading exponent of this instrument and has recently met with American composer Philip Glass and the national composer of Australia, Peter Sculthorpe to discuss its possible use in future orchestral works.

Didjeridu Dingo released their independent CD, 'Soakin’ the View' in 2003. It set the benchmark for an evocative mix of melodic instrumentation with didjeridu and didjeribone and together with Jackson’s solo didjeridu recordings 'Axis' and 'Behind the Mike', they have sold over 10,000 copies. Didjeridu Dingo are currently in pre-production for a new CD to be released in 2007.

Didjeridu Dingo's unique sound and affinity with the landscape and environment lead them to perform in some amazing settings and a diverse range of venues; Under the stars In the Warrumbungles National Park, Shark and Goat Islands In the middle of Sydney Harbour, Coolah Tops Jazz Festival, The Basement (Sydney's premier jazz club), Jenolan Caves and the 70th Anniversary celebrations of the saving of the Blue Gum Forest, a landmark event in Australian conservation. They walked with their instruments down 2000 feet to the bottom of the forest to play!

Other concerts include:
Sydney Town Hall - Bridge For Asylum Seekers benefit concert
Blue Mountains Music Festival
Nymagee Outback Festival
Coolah Tops - Jazz in the Tops Festival
Warrumbungles Festival of the Stars with Sirocco (2003), James Morrison (2005), Vince Jones and Stringmansassy (2006)
Shark Island, Sydney Harbour
Goat Island, Sydney Harbour
Rock Against Racism Concert, Blue Mountains
Ironfest, Lithgow, NSW
Winter Magic Festival, Katoomba
Biodiversity Gardens and Shoyoen Gardens opening ceremonies, Dubbo
World Heritage Conference Katoomba
National Aboriginal and Islander Day Of Celebrations (Naidoc)

Discography

Soakin' The View - 2003

Set List

Rhodo Fest: Acknowledges the Rhododendron Festival, a Blue Mounatins community festival held annually for over 50 years.

Splitting Hairs: The name of this piece derives from the highly technical and detailed didjeridu rhythm, split between the didge’s three main tones.

Narrowneck: A 12km long irregular-shaped peninsula south of Katoomba with views of the Wild Dog Mountains, Kanangra, the Jamison and Megalong Valleys.

Kinetic: A dance track based on the frenetic but controlled breath rhythm for the didge riff…120 breaths per minute.

Waiting for Rain: Drought, fires, thirsty wildlife, habitat destruction. When rain finally comes it offers not only relief but community celebration.

Soakin’ the View: Evokes a deep sense of place where you can step aside for a while and watch the world go by.

Scarab: A fusion of funk, ska and Spanish feel.

Phantom Falls: A build up of mist in the Megalong Valley that spills over the Narrowneck peninsula and falls like a ghostly water