DJ Forrest Getemgump
Gig Seeker Pro

DJ Forrest Getemgump

Akron, Ohio, United States | Established. Jan 01, 1993 | SELF | AFTRA

Akron, Ohio, United States | SELF | AFTRA
Established on Jan, 1993
DJ EDM DJ

Calendar

Music

Press


"Run, Forrest, Run! Former break dancer runs 20th race in a year in Akron Marathon relay"

Run, Forrest, Run! Former break dancer runs 20th race in a year in Akron Marathon relay
Posted Sep 22, 2016 at 11:00 AM
Forrest Webb’s nickname is Get ’em Gump.
It’s a play on Forrest Gump, the movie character who broke free of his leg braces running as a child and rediscovered the skill when he ran clear across the country after his mom died.
Like Forrest Gump, Webb ran as a kid, only to rediscover his love for running long distances when he moved back to Akron several years ago after the unexpected death of his mom.
But that’s not how he earned his nickname.
“Get ’em Gump” is what people would shout to him when he was on the floor dancing.
Webb was a world-class competitive “b-boy,” or, in layman’s terms, break dancer -- a term, he said, only used by people who know nothing of the high-energy hip-hop dance.
His first exposure to breaking was in junior high when he saw people dancing competitively between classes.
“I went home to try it that night and never stopped,” Webb said.
Through the 1990s, Webb danced and battled in New York City nightclubs alongside some of the best b-boys in the city.
From 1999 to 2011, breaking took Webb across the world as he performed shows with dance groups, some of which even won Bessie Awards for performance and choreography. During that time, Webb performed for the likes of Michael Jackson and Princess Stephanie of Monaco and in countries from France to Australia.
′′[Australia] was a very enlightening time,” Webb said. “One of the greatest times of my life, actually.”
That time came to an abrupt halt, though, in 2013 when Webb moved back to Akron, his birthplace, from New York.
Webb said he had a falling out with a business partner in a dance company he started. Shortly after, he received the news that his mother died. In a short matter of time, Webb had fallen from a career he had worked so hard to achieve and was left with little direction on where to go next.
“I think I was kind of angry in that period of time,” Webb said. “I had all that at one time and it just kind of fell out of my hands.”
Webb spent the next three years in a haze. He had been a DJ for years, but the scene changed once digital music came into play, and the only group he was breaking with was a local one he formed in Ohio called Illstyle Rockers.
One day, his wife, Marlo Cook, looked at him and noticed how much weight he’d put on after years of inactivity.
Webb agreed to start looking into exercise, and naturally, he went back to his roots. “One day I just got up and said, ‘I wanted to run a marathon,’?” Webb said.
Webb took to running well, as he had done it in grade school, and he soon signed up for his very first race, the Thirsty Dog 8k.
That was in 2015.
Since then, in just a year’s time, Webb has run 19 races. His 20th race will be the Akron Marathon relay, part of the Akron Children’s Hospital race series this Saturday.
“Running kind of set me free. It puts my whole day in motion,” Webb said. “It’s something I can do by myself. With breaking, you’re always the center of attention. There’s always pressure on you to perform. ... With running, the only competition is myself.”
Webb, now 46, still DJs in local clubs and breaks when he hears good music, but he finds running is a peaceful break.
“Running calms me, relaxes me, it helps me channel my energy,” Webb said. “It kind of helps me put my thoughts in order, put my feelings in order.”

And for Webb, running a race is a lot like dealing with life’s many changes.
“You start out, and you know you never know what’s going to happen in the race,” Webb said. “It’s just synonymous with what goes on in life. You’re supposed to have a goal. So you start, and you finish.”
Theresa Cottom can be reached at 330-996-3216 or tcottom@thebeaconjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @Theresa_Cottom.
Run, Forrest, Run! Former break dancer runs 20th race in a
year in Akron Marathon relay
Posted Sep 22, 2016 at 11:00 AM
Forrest Webb’s nickname is Get ’em Gump.
It’s a play on Forrest Gump, the movie character who broke free of his leg braces running as a child and rediscovered the skill when he ran clear across the country after his mom died.
Like Forrest Gump, Webb ran as a kid, only to rediscover his love for running long distances when he moved back to Akron several years ago after the unexpected death of his mom.
But that’s not how he earned his nickname.
“Get ’em Gump” is what people would shout to him when he was on the floor dancing.
Webb was a world-class competitive “b-boy,” or, in layman’s terms, break dancer -- a term, he said, only used by people who know nothing of the high-energy hip-hop dance.
His first exposure to breaking was in junior high when he saw people dancing competitively between classes.
“I went home to try it that night and never stopped,” Webb said.
Through the 1990s, Webb danced and battled in New York City nightclubs alongside some of the best b-boys in the city.

From 1999 to 2011, breaking took Webb across the world as he performed shows with dance groups, some of which even won Bessie Awards for performance and choreography. During that time, Webb performed for the likes of Michael Jackson and Princess Stephanie of Monaco and in countries from France to Australia.
′′[Australia] was a very enlightening time,” Webb said. “One of the greatest times of my life, actually.”
That time came to an abrupt halt, though, in 2013 when Webb moved back to Akron, his birthplace, from New York.
Webb said he had a falling out with a business partner in a dance company he started. Shortly after, he received the news that his mother died. In a short matter of time, Webb had fallen from a career he had worked so hard to achieve and was left with little direction on where to go next.
“I think I was kind of angry in that period of time,” Webb said. “I had all that at one time and it just kind of fell out of my hands.”
Webb spent the next three years in a haze. He had been a DJ for years, but the scene changed once digital music came into play, and the only group he was breaking with was a local one he formed in Ohio called Illstyle Rockers.
One day, his wife, Marlo Cook, looked at him and noticed how much weight he’d put on after years of inactivity.
Webb agreed to start looking into exercise, and naturally, he went back to his roots. “One day I just got up and said, ‘I wanted to run a marathon,’?” Webb said.
Webb took to running well, as he had done it in grade school, and he soon signed up for his very first race, the Thirsty Dog 8k.
That was in 2015.
Since then, in just a year’s time, Webb has run 19 races. His 20th race will be the Akron Marathon relay, part of the Akron Children’s Hospital race series this Saturday.

“Running kind of set me free. It puts my whole day in motion,” Webb said. “It’s something I can do by myself. With breaking, you’re always the center of attention. There’s always pressure on you to perform. ... With running, the only competition is myself.”
Webb, now 46, still DJs in local clubs and breaks when he hears good music, but he finds running is a peaceful break.
“Running calms me, relaxes me, it helps me channel my energy,” Webb said. “It kind of helps me put my thoughts in order, put my feelings in order.”
And for Webb, running a race is a lot like dealing with life’s many changes.
“You start out, and you know you never know what’s going to happen in the race,” Webb said. “It’s just synonymous with what goes on in life. You’re supposed to have a goal. So you start, and you finish.”
Theresa Cottom can be reached at 330-996-3216 or tcottom@thebeaconjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @Theresa_Cottom. - Akron Beacon Journal


"Coffee and Crates with Forrest Getem Gump"

Coffee and Crates with Forrest Getem Gump
$ April 2nd, 2018
You never know who’s in the room
Forrest Webb aka Forrest Getem Gump is an internationally known DJ, B-boy and Dancer. Born in Akron, he grew up in NY during Hip-Hop’s golden years. It was high school friends like DJ Tony Touch and DJ Swell who introduced him to a world that would take him to more places than he can remember. He was a mem- ber of the legendary Rock Steady Crew before starting his own collective, the ILL Style Rockers (who cele- brated their 21st anniversary this past December) here in Akron.
In the past 32 years, he’s rubbed shoulders with Hip-Hop legends and been in theater productions that have been nominated for international awards. He’s also performed in front of Michael Jackson. Talking with Forrest is a subtle reminder of the fact that you never know who’s in the room.
Floco Torres: You’re from Akron, but you grew up in NY. How did you link up with the legendary Rock Steady Crew?
by Floco Torres
Forrest Getem Gump: Tony Touch and I got put into Rock Steady the same day. I’ve been doing martial arts all my life so when I got out of college, I moved to Harlem. There was a guy in Harlem named Jerry Fontenez. At that time, he was the world champion, so I wanted to go and check out his school. I met him and talked to him and it was crazy because the conversation went from martial arts to Hip-Hop. I met Crazy Legs, I met Fast Feet, then I met Q-Unique and Q-Unique was the connection to Rock Steady. I was going to Crazy Leg’s house at the time and we were practicing on his back porch. There wasn’t a big b-boy scene in New York at the time. Any b-boy was a treasure in New York at the time. I hung out for a while and eventu- ally got down with Rock Steady. I wasn’t expecting it but I gladly took it.
FT: So you’re Deejaying and you’re a b-boy, and that leads to collecting records for the craft, right? How did you get into the art of record collecting?
FGG: I’ve always done that. My family owned a record store, Calhoun Record shop, here in Akron. The store started in 1950. It was my grandfather’s store. I kept the name and brought it back to Firestone Park.
FT: So all the records that your grandfather had were passed down to you?
FGG: They did but then they were burned up in a fire. We had an attic full of 45’s and a basement full of records that all went up in flames. I got my knowledge on records from working in New York. I worked at a store called Big City Records (formerly the sound library). It was the producer’s hub for records. Legend has it that Dr. Dre got the sample for “The Chronic” out of that store. DJ Premier, Lord Finesse, Q-Tip and Large Professor all shopped there regularly. They were always looking for records and sounds to sample. That’s how I got to be friends with all those guys, from working in that store.
FT: You’ve traveled all over the world to do what you love. What’s one of the most meaningful things you learned through rocking with so many different cultures and styles?
FGG: In 2000, we did a show at UCLA. It was one of the worst [theater] shows that we did with Rennie Har- ris. We were goofing off in the middle of the show and acting a fool. I don’t know what was going on that night but everyone noticed this weird looking light skinned dude in the audience with a turban on. No one could point out who it was. Before the show was over, we took our bows and the person left. We come to find out later that it was Michael Jackson.
Michael Jackson and Debbie Allen came to our show. And this was AFTER we won a Bessie award which is like the Grammy’s for theater. For us that was important because you never know who’s watching.
(Photo courtesy of LSquared Photography.)
Floco Torres wishes he could’ve put in a lot of the conversation that didn’t make the cut, but you’ll just have to chat with Forrest yourself next time you see him. - The Devil Strip


"Calhoun Record Shop: The best record store in Akron to go unnoticed"

Calhoun Record Shop: The best record store in Akron to go unnoticed
October 29, 2015 by Kyle Cochrun
Thumping drum breaks kick
through the store speaker
system as Forrest Webb sits
behind the counter, surrounded
by colorful album covers in silky
shrink-wrapped cases. James Brown, Donald Byrd, Lynn Collins, Miles Davis, Roy Ayers. The LPs are the fruit of years spent digging in the record crates, immersing himself in music with soul.
Webb is the owner of Calhoun Record Shop, the best record store in Akron to go almost completely unnoticed. Located at 356 Reed Ave. in South Akron, the store is relatively unknown outside of the neighborhood and serious record collectors in Northeast Ohio. The shop is nestled in the corner of a two- story brick building housing a row of small businesses.
After two and a half years, the shop still does not have a sign.
What it does have is an impressive array of funk, soul, jazz, hip-hop, rock and rare records for sale at a reasonable price.
Forrest Webb, owner of Calhoun Record Shop in South Akron, named the store after his grandfather, Homell Calhoun, who also owned a record store. (Photo: Dale Dong)
“Records are something that have always been with me from the time I came out,” Webb said.

His grandfather, Homell Calhoun, owned a record shop named Calhoun Records on Wooster Avenue (now Vernon Odom Boulevard) from the early 1950s through the early 1980s. This inspired the name for Webb’s new store.
(Photo: Dale Dong)
Webb remembers days he spent as a child riding in his grandfather’s 1969 Cadillac DeVille convertible, helping
him stock 45 rpm records and collect cash from the city’s jukeboxes in bars like the Hi-De-Ho Lounge and the Tropicana Lounge. As a kid, he would comb through his mother’s record collection in the attic of their home.
Webb’s mother moved the family from Akron to New York when he was 10 years old. In New York City, he was introduced to hip-hop culture and began listening to early rap groups like Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five and Funky Four Plus One. He took to breakdancing around age 12 and started DJing seriously at 16.
“I was going to the shops back then, buying all the 12 inches and records that came out,” Webb said, thinking back to the days when new hip-hop singles cost only $1.99 and albums were $2.99.
After anishing graduate school at Adelphi University, Webb kept DJing and breakdancing, eventually showcasing his dance moves in “Rome & Jewels,” an award winning hip-hop dance theater production put on by hip-hop dance company Rennie Harris Puremovement.
Webb eventually started working for Big City Records, a shop in Manhattan, and became a manager for the store’s location in New Jersey. However, a raise in rent and the effects of digital technology on the music- buying industry caused the store to close its doors in September of 2012.
Back to Akron
His mother died unexpectedly around this time, bringing him back to Akron.
“I’ve always been connected to Akron, even when I lived in New York, because I had family and friends here still,” Webb said. Because handling his mother’s estate in Akron was a didcult task while living in New York, Webb decided to move back home.
He discovered the location for his new shop while digging through records one day in a store on the opposite corner of the building. The store’s owner advised him to check out the open space for rent, which

had previously been a tattoo shop.
“It was pretty trashed in here, but I thought if I could get it cleared out, maybe I could open a store.”
Webb did just that and designed his new shop similar to Big City Records, with the priciest, rarest records hanging on the wall, the middle-range records stacked in chest-high racks for customers to eip through and the cheaper records in bins on the eoor. The walls are adorned with autographed artwork of noteworthy hip- hop records, original eyers for early rap concerts and pictures of Webb’s grandfather and his record delivery van.
“I just dove in and took a chance,” Webb said.
Calhoun Record Shop opened on
April 20, 2013. Opening day featured
Webb and other local DJs, as well as
some big named hip-hop personages like Large Professor and J-Zone, spinning records while customers shuged through to get their ax of funky, soulful or obscure music.
The shop has received positive reviews from customers since its opening.
“He’s not just putting anything on the rack,” said Alex Gnap, a Highland Square resident who frequents the shop in search of lesser-known rock records and other “deep cuts.”
“It’s very selective and it’s priced well, which is probably why I come back,” he added.
“This place has the best vibe and the best selection,” said Pat Brooks, who lives in West Virginia, but makes sure to stop by the store whenever he’s in town visiting friends and family.
“He always has good jazz stuff,” Brooks said, handling his modest stack of purchases by jazz greats John Coltrane, Yusef Lateef, Horace Silver and Coleman Hawkins. “This is one of the better jazz selections around.”
Priced to sell
Webb is a one-man band, running the store without any hired help. He works his store hours around his out- of-town DJing, breakdancing and breakdance judging gigs, while also anding time to buy up record collections for the store from local sellers and record conventions. Still, he ands a way to make it all work
(Photo: Dale Dong)

and keep his loyal customers happy.
“Like the band Funk Inc. said, ‘Keep it priced to sell,’” Webb said, stating his mantra for the shop.
Although he keeps his usual arst-rate collection of funk, soul and jazz, Webb stocks more rock records than normal, perceiving the change in customer demographic from New York City to Akron.
“To survive as a record store you have to watch the trends and move with the times,” Webb said.
Although he has witnessed the effects digital technology has made on the vinyl record industry, he remains conadent that people will continue buying records into the future.
“I don’t think records will ever go completely out,” Webb said. “There’s going to be a lot of private press records that you’re never going to and on CD or digitally that somebody will look for.”
Webb will continue to dig through the record crates and discover music to inspire those who and their way into the little vinyl shop without a sign.
Calhoun Record Shop is open Tuesday through Saturday from noon to 6 p.m. Call (330) 212-5334 for more information. - The Akronist by Kyle Cochran


"Doin’ It In The Park"

Flea Market Funk Always Diggin'
Doin’ It In The Park
August 20, 2014 · by fleamarketfunk · in Crate Digging, DJ, Flea Market Funk, Hip Hop, Hip Hop Culture, music, New York City, NYC, Record Digging, records, Respect, vinyl, Vinyl Record Culture. ·
(https://fleamarketfunk.com/2014/08/20/toosofwarjam2014/10557364_929276130421157_9031395866083398560_n/#main)Photo Courtesy of Kenny Dope Just like the pioneers of hip hop who threw park jams and birthed the genre, the tradition continues today through The Tools of War’s True School NYC Park Jam Series. These Digger’s Delight events are legendary, and yesterday’s session was one for the history books. Drawing people from all over the City as well as all over the world, it’s a chance to see hip hop legends up close and personal for free. This Summer’s series of events were held in Harlem at 135th Street and Saint Nicholas Ave at Saint Nicholas Park. A natural amphitheater with a rolling hill and event area, there isn’t a bad seat in the house.

(https://fleamarketfunk.com/2014/08/20/toosofwarjam2014/10524629_10154448121550262_3988084477724772894_n/#main)Louie Loo and DJ Jazzy Jay photo by Christe Z-Pabon Arriving early yesterday, while waiting to met up with our buddy Brian Coleman (of Check The Technique fame), a familiar face was setting up the sound system. It was none other than the legendary Jazzy Jay. Still doing it like they used to do it, setting up equipment, speakers, and getting ready to throw down. Where else in the world are you going to see a hip hop pioneer setting up his own stuff? At the Tools of War jam, that’s where. After a quick Soul Food lunch
special at Yvonne Yvonne (get the smothered steak!), we walked back up. From the get go, it was a who’s who of hip hop all night. You had legends like Kid Capri, DJ Scratch, DJ Spinna, JuJu from The Beatnuts, Joe Conzo, JS-1, DJ Clear, DJ Eclipse, Charlie Ahearn, Large Professor, Breakbeat Lou, Danny Dan The Beatman, DJ Mellestar, and more mingling with the crowd. Hosted by Lord Finesse and impromptu emcee Kool DJ Red Alert (who Nesse called a bum!), the DJ line up was stellar: Forrest Getemgump, Kenny Dope, Louie Loo, and Jazzy Jay. They all dug deep that day to give the people a chance to hear what they wouldn’t hear every day, rare grooves and original break beats on vinyl. Forrest Getemgump brought out a stack of wax without covers and proceeded to kill it with drum breaks for his entire set. Doubles of country and rock bangers, he had jaws wide open with his selection of records. Kenny Dope was up next and had all the legends fiending for what was in his record bag. He played an hour of rare 45s that had heavy diggers like Finesse wondering what he was dropping. Seamless mixes and cutting doubles of 7′′s had the crowd (many who couldn’t get the concept of 45s) and B Boys up rocking through his whole set. As if KD’s set wasn’t enough, Upper West Side legend Louie Loo (King Sun’s DJ) murdered an all vinyl set with scratched off labels that had Finesse and Red Alert oohing and aching. Last up was Jazzy Jay, who in true Jazzy Jay fashion cut doubles of classics until the jam was over.
(https://fleamarketfunk.com/2014/08/20/toosofwarjam2014/10485530_10154448122480262_8439621400894451796_n/#main)Kool DJ Red Alert and Lord Finesse photo by Christie Z-Pabon
These park jams are a way for people to see how it was done back in the day. In the true spirit of hip hop, these legends give back to the people, let you live in the moment and just be. Enjoy the music, enjoy the culture and be at peace with your fellow man. It goes deep. There was no filming of the jam, and at one point they stopped and Finesse declared: “If we see you filming for more than 10 seconds, we are gonna break yo’ shit”. It was all in peace though, but a little encouragement from The Funky Man to live in the moment never hurt anyone. We encourage you to support these events, as it’s important to educate the public about the culture. We were just humbled being within such great hip hop company. If you’re in the NYC area, they run every Tuesday night at Saint Nicholas Park from 4pm until 8pm through September 26th. - Flea Market Funk


"Rubber City Grooves DJ Forrest Getemgump returns to his B-boy roots with Smoking Soul."

Rubber City Grooves
DJ Forrest Getemgump returns to his B-boy roots with Smoking Soul.
By Denise Grollmus Email Us!
Forrest Webb offers a brief glimpse behind the DJ's curtain.
All it took was one sweaty afternoon in the early '80s, and Forrest Webb was hooked.
Webb, just a tween at the time, was killing the summer hours in the basement of his grandparents' ranch-style house in Akron when he stumbled across a heap of shrink-wrapped records. It was dead stock from his grandfather's old record store, Calhoun's, a small Rubber City storefront that peddled all things soul and funk.
Webb sifted through the albums, retrieving the first one that caught his eye: the Emotions' So I Can Love You, the 1970 debut from this female trio. He laid the slick black disc on his grandfather's turntable and listened with total surprise as the song "I Like It" began to play. "It was the bass line from the 3rd Bass song 'The Gas Face,'" Webb says. "That's when I realized how important records were to me. That's when I really started collecting and beat-digging."
Over the next 20-plus years, Webb -- better known as DJ Forrest Getemgump --

amass ed a record collection now 10,000 strong. He also dedicated himself to the B-boy way of life, cutting up a truckload of break beats, rubbing elbows with folks like Bootsy Collins and Kurtis Blow, and touring the world as a premier breakdancer.
But Webb never forgot his roots. As hip-hop traded in B-boys and breaks for blunts, bling, and bitches, Webb moved in an entirely different direction.
In the past few years, Webb -- who resides in Manhattan -- has spent more and more time in Akron, checking in with his breakdancing crew, the Illstyle Rockers, and combing record stores for forsaken local soul albums. His grandparents' basement is no longer filled with dead stock, but a modest chunk of his own collection. And in January, he put his dusty grooves to work at the Lime Spider. Every Thursday night is Smoking Soul, where he and fellow vinylphiles spin classics and hyper-obscure jams.
On one Thursday evening, a chunk of Webb's set is made up almost entirely of local soul. He spins acts that were on the Akron record label Heat (alongside the Cleveland group S.O.U.L.) and later jumped into a track by Akron's Soul Tornadoes. He then pulls out an extremely rare album by a Cleveland group, but is hesitant to share the name. "There were only 500 of these pressed," he says. "If I tell you the name, then everyone will be out buying it, and it's kind of my thing."
His secretiveness isn't about keeping the music from the public's reach, but about maintaining his signature sound. It's the trademark of any B-boy to do so -- a lesson he learned long ago.
He was just 10 years old, an Akron transplant living in New York, when the city was giving birth to hip-hop. Webb quickly made a name for himself as a fearless breakdancer, performing dizzying combinations of head spins, back flips, and frozen poses wherever the DJs were spinning the latest Sugarhill records. "He was just the best," says Dre Borders, a member of the break crew Illstyle Rockers. "He was head-spinning in my friend's basement, and he didn't stop. He just kept going. And he was a cool-looking cat, too."
After seeing DJ Swell cut up breaks at a house party in 1986, Webb ran out and bought his first set of Technics turntables. He became an obsessive crate-digger, hunting down multiple copies of rare soul and funk records that he'd manipulate into extended uptempo break beats. "Buying records was my life," Webb says. "It was always about finding the record that no one had -- finding the freshest stuff."
But it was breakdancing, not DJing, that made him a household name in the hip- hop world. He was enlisted to dance with the Rocksteady Crew -- one of the oldest and best-known break crews -- and toured the world. He appeared in Rakim and Bootsy Collins videos, and made Adidas commercials with Grandmaster Flash.
By 1996, however, B-boys like Webb were becoming an endangered species, replaced by jewel-encrusted men with pimp cups and drum machines. But that didn't deter Webb from founding the Illstyle Rockers. They discovered a new, paler- faced audience of kids who showed love for their old-school stylings. They continue to perform everywhere from Australia to Poland, opening for acts like Beck and Kid Rock. "A lot of people, like the older cats, thought [breaking] was just a fad," Borders says. "In the last 15 years, the black kids are really the minorities. It's very bizarre."
As Webb continues to travel the world, often to teach clinics on breaking and

Like Share Be the first of your friends to like this.
Tweet 0Share

spinning, he's made sharing his love for soul paramount. "In terms of the hip-hop history, the samples all came from soul music," he says. "The art of beat-digging, the dancing -- all came out of the soul music."
Lime Spider's Smoking Soul is a tribute to the soul and funk classics that laid the foundation for hip-hop. Here, you can hear everything from Stax hits to local soul cuts that haven't seen the light of day in over 30 years. "We're just spinning a lot of stuff that inspired hip-hop," says Jared Boxx, an N.Y.C. DJ who has performed at Smoking Soul. "People have always spun classic soul and funk alongside hip-hop, but we're just digging deeper, spinning stuff that's rarer and rarer."
Though Webb collects everything from Dutch funk to marching-band music, his collection of local soul is what makes his set so rare. You won't hear many other DJs spinning Tommy Johnson and Elegance, Brute Force, "Come On Cavs" -- the Cavaliers' theme song from the '70s -- or that one group whose name Webb refuses to reveal.
And even if they are -- they're not doing it with the same native pride as Webb. - Scene Magazine


"BEST Of CLEVELAND 2007 Best Soul DJ...DJ Forrest Getemgump"

BEST OF CLEVELAND 2007
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Best Soul DJ
DJ Forrest Getemgump
www.forrestgetemgump.com


With a record collection 10,000 deep and an old-school sound all his own, DJ Forrest Getemgump's skills on the ones and twos are unparalleled. And why not? The Akron native was raised in New York, where he rubbed shoulders with everyone from Grandmaster Flash to Bootsy Collins, and made his name as a world-renowned B-boy and master of breaks. These days, you'll find him playing classic soul tunes as often as he spins Afrika Bambaataa. From Stax Records releases to obscure local soul numbers from folks like Cleveland's Brute Force, DJ Forrest's set lists keep the dance floor streaked in sweat. And he spins his wax all over, from B-boy conferences in Cleveland to battles in Berlin, Germany. - Scene Magazine


"DJ Getemgump's top 10 list of Cleveland's best soul"

DJ Getemgump's top 10 list of Cleveland's best soul
Posted By Pete Kotz Email Us! on Wed, Apr 11, 2007 at 1:17 pm
Both Detroit and Philadelphia overshadow Northeast
Ohio when it comes to classic soul, funk, and R&B.
But that doesn't mean the region didn't produce a
wealth of great music. If you read "Rubber City
Grooves," writer Denise Grollmus' feature on Akron
DJ Forrest Getemgump, then you know
Getemgump specializes in rare, old jams from around
the area. Luckily for us, the dude decided to supply us with 10 of his personal faves: 1) The Variations, "Yesterday is Gone" (Okeh) 2) Slave, "Slide" b/w "Son of Slide" (Cotillion) 3) Sun, "Sun Is Here" (Capitol) 4) Roger Troutman, "So Ruff So Tuff" (Warner Brothers) 5) Timmy Willis, "Mr. Soul Satisfaction" (Veep) 6) Charles Davenport, "I've Gotta Message To You" (Warner Brothers) 7) Tommy Johnson & Elegance, "Cherokee" 8) Soul Toranodoes, "Go For Yourself" (Magic City) 9) S.O.U.L, "The Joneses" (Musicor) 10) Unique Blend, "Mommy and Daddy" (Eastbound) - Scene Magazine


Discography

The Best Part Volume 1 (Getem 001) 2005
The Best Part Volume 2 (Getem 002) 2006
A New York Phenomenon Buffalo Gals Back to School (Virgin Records) 1998

Photos

Bio

Currently at a loss for words...

Band Members