DODI PHY
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"Men Emerging"

South Mpls-raised rapper aspires to be hip-hop ‘No. 1 Draft Pick’
By: Jeremy O''Kasick
Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder
Originally posted 8/23/2006

With roots stretching from Southside Minneapolis to Sierra Leone, Dodi Phy has a hip-hop vision that sets him apart from everybody else in the game.

This son of West African immigrants, a.k.a. Mohamed Turay, started writing lyrics when he was seven and free-styling in the hallways in junior high. Hundreds of rhyme-filled notebooks later, Dodi Phy now has his sights set on doing exactly what he describes in his track “Capture the Moment”:

“The city’s under siege

But we another breed

We rap-a-letes now

This a whole another league


Now I gotta be the No. 1 Draft Pick…”

To make it into that top selection, Dodi Phy has been refining his skills in the studio, working with underground producers Big Head and Platinum Mind, as he gets ready to drop his debut album.

With jazzy, soul-filled tracks like “In My Neighborhood” and “Ladies and Gents,” Dodi Phy mixes a grimy style with just an edge of attitude set to some throwback beats compliments of Automatic. His lyrical talent and smooth flow quickly become evident, with a vibe that mixes the best of the old with the new.

“If you put out something original, you are gonna shine,” Dodi Phy says. “Even if it balances old and new, people will stand up and notice. That’s how I want to do it.” Now in his early 20s, Dodi grew up around Minneapolis’ Phillips neighborhood where he had a rough-and-tumble time like many teens. Yet, he is quick to point out that just because he sometimes rhymes about hustling and surviving in that environment, his history doesn’t easily fall into pre-packaged labels for mass consumption.

“It’s like you can take one script, and ten different directors will direct it in ten different ways,” says Dodi Phy. “At the end of the day, you have ten different movies and realities.”

For Dodi, that describes how he sees himself, not as another thug MC or a street-conscious poet, but a complete, multi-dimensional man of many talents and perspectives. Part of that came from growing up as the second-generation son of immigrants from Sierra Leone. The history of his ancestral homeland alone, and Dodi’s knowledge of that, tells you something deeper about him.

Once a notorious hub of the slave trade, Sierra Leone became a home for repatriated American slaves, some of who had even fought for the British against their former slave-masters in the Revolutionary War. In the 1990s, the independent West African nation became divided in its own brutal conflict, forcing many people to flee the continent.

From his early years, Dodi remembers his own home being a way station for refugees and immigrants, as his parents helped them any way they could. He says that his parents and West Africa, along with such international exposure under his own roof, have influenced everything about him from his music to simply how he carries himself.

“Another thing is that I just always try to be aware of what’s going on, whether it’s in Africa or next door,” he says. Like Senegal-born hip-hop star Akon, those roots give Dodi Phy a truly pan-African perspective.

Thus, it is also not surprising that Dodi Phy inspiration list has a range that defies description, from Twin-Cities stalwarts Raw Villa and Muja, to Nas and Ice Cube, all the way to the likes of Paul Simon and the Eagles. (For real, Dodi?)

Dodi adds that he has long watched the development of underground rap across Minneapolis, and, as a child of the ’80s who dove into the full hip-hop depths throughout the ’90s, he is ready to there make his own mark in the 21st century.

In the same vein as Rhymesayers’ P.O.S., Dodi sometimes spins his name into countless acronyms to describe his mood, inspiration, or whatever happens to be in his head. His current choice pick: (D)on’t (o)ver (d)o (i)t. That not only describes Dodi’s take-it-easy mentality in a time when every other rapper is constantly hollering and shouting just to be heard, but also his laid-back rhymes and beats that are reminiscent of a mid-1990s Wu Tang/Gang Starr vibe.

“Dodi is both a confident and a humble cat. As soon as I heard one of his demos, I knew I had to track him down and start working with him,” says Roosevelt Fry of FGM Management. “He is very focused in his business, and his sounds are piercing to the ear. They are street-filled, but with deep soul. He speaks from many different communities, and his music can and will go anywhere around the planet.”

Ultimately, Dodi sees hip hop not only as his life but also as a stepping stone to a higher calling to both move people and build up a business.

“I’m part of that renaissance of hip hop,” he says.



For more information about Dodi Phy, explore his Myspace.com site at www.myspace.com/dodiphy.com.

Jeremy O’Kasick welcomes reader responses to jokasick@yahoo - Spokesman- Recorder


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

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Bio

Dodi Phy Bio

With roots stretching from Southside Minneapolis to Sierra Leone, Dodi Phy has a hip-hop vision that sets him apart from everybody else in the game.

This son of West African immigrants, aka Mohamed Turay, started writing lyrics when he was 7 and freestyling in the hallways in junior high. Hundreds of rhyme-filled notebooks later, Dodi Phy now has his sights set on doing exactly what he describes in his track �Capture the Moment�:

�The city�s under siege
But we another breed
We rap-a-letes now
This a whole another league

Now I gotta be the No. 1 Draft Pick��

To make it into to that top selection, Dodi Phy has been refining his skills in the studio, working with underground producers, Big Head and Platinum Mind, as he gets ready to drop his debut album. (You can still get a sneak listen to some of his upcoming hot singles at www.myspace.com/dodiphy.)

With jazzy, soul-filled tracks like �In My Neighborhood� and �Ladies and Gents�, Dodi Phy mixes a grimy style with just an edge of attitude set to some throwback beats compliments of Automatic. His lyrical talent and smooth flow quickly become eminent with a vibe that mixes the best of the old with the new.

�If you put out something original, you are gonna shine,� he says. �Even if it balances old and new, people will stand up and notice. That�s how I want to do it.�

Now in his early 20s, Dodi grew up around Minneapoli�s Phillips neighbourhood. In fact, he has known his producers, Charlie and Automatic with Big Head Productions, almost as far back as before Dodi�s rhyme-spitting days when he was just another shorty on the block. That connection has enriched their experience in the studio, making their mix all the more potent as they stir up their first album together. Big Head and Platinum Mind have worked with many other Twin Cities hip-hop acts in recent years, such as GRIP and Un-easy, Dodi has long respected the local groups that have come before him, and with that kind of production support, he says that he truly feels he is taking his game to the next level.

Back in his teenage days in South Minneapolis however, Dodi had a rough-and-tumble time like many kids. Yet, he is quick to point out that, just because he sometimes rhymes about hustling and surviving in that environment, his history doesn�t easily fall into pre-packaged labels for mass consumption.

�It�s like you can take one script, and ten different directors will direct it in ten different ways,� says Dodi Phy. �At the end of the day, you have ten different movies and realities.�

For Dodi, that describes how he sees himself, not as another thug MC or a street-conscious poet, but a complete, multi-dimensional man of many talents and perspectives. Part of that came from growing up as the second-generation son of immigrants from Sierra Leone. The history of his ancestral homeland alone, and Dodi�s knowledge of that, tells you something deeper about him.

Once a notorious hub of the slave trade, Sierra Leone became a home for repatriated American slaves, some of who had even fought for the British against their former slave-masters in the Revolutionary War. In the 1990s, the independent West African nation became divided in its own brutal conflict, forcing many people to flee the continent.

From his early years, Dodi remembers his own home being a way station for refuges and immigrants, as his parents helped them any way they could. He says that his parents, West Africa, along with such international exposure under his own roof, has influenced everything about him from his music to simply how he carries himself.

�Another thing is that I just always try to be aware of what�s going on whether it�s in Africa or next door,� he says. Like an Akon or another African rap icon, those roots give Dodi Phy a truly pan-African perspective.

Thus, it is also not surprising that his inspiration list has a range that defies description, from Twin Cities stalwarts Raw Villa and Muja to Nas and Ice Cube all the way to the likes of Paul Simon and the Eagles. (For real, Dodi?) He also throws in Special Ed, Scarface, Cuba, the C.I.A., Mother Earth, and Hennessy all up in there. Dodi Phy adds that he has long watched the development of underground rap across Minneapolis, and, as a child of the 80�s who dove into the full hip-hop depths throughout the 90�s, he is ready to there make his own mark circa the 21st century.

In the same vein as Rhymesayers� P.O.S., Dodi sometimes spins his name into countless acronyms to describe his mood, inspiration, or whatever happens to be in his head. His current choice pick: (D)on�t (o)ver (d)o (i)t. That not only describes Dodi�s take-it-easy mentality in a time when every other rapper is constantly hollering and shouting just to be heard, but also his laid-back rhymes and beats reminiscent of a mid-80�s Wu Tang/Gang Starr vibe.

Dodi is bo