DORAN DANOFF
Gig Seeker Pro

DORAN DANOFF

Nashville, TN | Established. Jan 01, 2015 | SELF | AFM

Nashville, TN | SELF | AFM
Established on Jan, 2015
Band Alternative Soul

Calendar

Nov
18
DORAN DANOFF @ The Hotel Cafe

LOS ANGELES, California, United States

LOS ANGELES, California, United States

Nov
20
DORAN DANOFF @ black rabbit rose

Los Angeles, California, United States

Los Angeles, California, United States

Dec
11
DORAN DANOFF @ Dee's Country Cocktail Lounge

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nov
14
DORAN DANOFF @ The Cobra

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Jul
22
DORAN DANOFF @ Petit Ermitage

Madison, Tennessee, United States

Madison, Tennessee, United States

Jun
09
DORAN DANOFF @ Sofar Sounds Nashville

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

May
19
DORAN DANOFF @ The 5 Spot

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

May
11
DORAN DANOFF @ Sofar Sounds

California, United States

California, United States

Apr
26
DORAN DANOFF @ Novel Music Row Apartments

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Apr
23
DORAN DANOFF @ Petit Ermitage

West Hollywood, California, United States

West Hollywood, California, United States

Apr
10
DORAN DANOFF @ Blue Bar

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Mar
31
DORAN DANOFF @ The 5 Spot

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Mar
20
DORAN DANOFF @ The Hotel Cafe

LOS ANGELES, California, United States

LOS ANGELES, California, United States

Jan
06
DORAN DANOFF @ Acme Feed & Seed

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nov
22
DORAN DANOFF @ The Hotel Cafe

LOS ANGELES, California, United States

LOS ANGELES, California, United States

Oct
22
DORAN DANOFF @ Mercy Lounge

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Sep
22
DORAN DANOFF @ The Sayers Club

Los Angeles, California, United States

Los Angeles, California, United States

Aug
15
DORAN DANOFF @ The High Watt

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

May
24
DORAN DANOFF @ Acme Feed & Seed

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Music

Press


"Doran Danoff – King of Crown City | Album Review"

Doran Danoff – King of Crown City, Self-Produced, Aug 2018
9 songs, (41:16)

Wow! That was my first impression after slipping Doran Danoff’s latest self-produced CD, King of Crown City, into my car’s CD player. The funk was strong with this one!

Born in 1981 and growing up in L.A., Danoff is a Nashville-based singer, songwriter, composer and arranger. He’s the son of Yemenite-Israeli folk-pop singer Hedva Amrani, and his musical upbringing was rich in the heritage of his family’s Middle Eastern culture. That, combined with the influence of urban L.A. culture and American popular music, provided an expansive palette for exploration by this self-taught jazz and blues pianist. Danoff began his career playing in local underground bands in the L.A. scene, where he honed his chops across a wide assortment of genres, from classical to soul to R&B to hip-hop. Making his way to New York City, Danoff went on to study Musical Composition at Columbia University, eventually receiving a graduate degree in Composition and Film Scoring from New York University. The combination of his innate musical talent with his extensive study of theory and composition has made for an eclectic, energetic blend of soul and sophistication that is both invigorating and pleasing to even the most jaded listener.

For the material on his 4th CD, Doran had, a few years ago, tracked 6 of the album’s 9 songs live-to-tape in the now-defunct Crown City studios in Pasadena, CA, with his full band and a very tight 3-piece horn section. He never got around to doing anything with these tracks until a few years later, when he shared the raw tracks with a friend who encouraged Danoff to finish them up and get them out into the wild. In the interim, he’d been working on some new songs, and decided to combine all these efforts into an album release. So, after some additional tracking, mixing, and mastering, the result was what we now know as King of Crown City. And a wonderful stew of vintage funk, soul, gospel, R&B, and jazz it has turned out to be!

The musicians are all top-notch, and have put together some astonishingly tight performances. The L.A. band features Danoff on keys and vocals, along with Nick Rosen on bass, Shay Godwin on drums, Zachary Ross on guitar, as well as Tim McKay, Wes Smith, and James Blackwell on horns. The New York band featured on Young Love includes Danoff, Taylor Floreth on drums, Scott Metzger on guitar, and Jay Foote on bass. The Nashville horn section includes Fredrick Weathersby, Stefan Forbus, and Vernon James.

From the funky bass riff that opens the opening track, “So Bad” (co-written with Nashille producer Tony Esterly), it feels a little like James Brown got together with the Family Stone and Prince for an all-out jam at Stax’ Memphis studios. Which is to say, a righteous, soulful, musical blast! With crisp percussion, tight horns, and a catchy chorus, it announces that this record will have some serious funk on it!

The second track, “Amazed,” a song about disillusionment after being hurt by someone close to him, has an ‘Otis Pickett’ (or is that ‘Wilson Redding?’) vibe that took could easily have been produced back in the late sixties.

“Young Love” channels Motown by way of the Philadelphia soul sound of Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff. Fred Wesley, the trombonist of James Brown’s band and Parliament-Funkadelic, once described the signature sound of Philly as “putting the bow tie on funk.” And that definitely applies here, in this tale about trying the navigate the intertwining complexities of youth and love.

“Winning” features crisp drumming, tight horn arrangements, outstandingly rhythmic guitar work, great hooks and a memorable chorus… It feels familiar, in spite of being completely original… one of those songs you’d swear you’ve heard before, but can’t quite place where or when.

“Lady Be Good” is a mid-tempo New Orleans-style rocker, and tells a story is about a World War II plane, The Lady Be Good, which disappeared without a trace on its first combat mission during the war, only to be accidentally discovered more than a decade later in the Libyan desert.

The piano-driven minor-keyed “Dr. Solution” continues with the New Orleans influence, and has almost a vaudeville character to it, with a dash of Professor Longhair and Mac Rebennak (a.k.a. Dr John) thrown in for good measure.

“Gertrude’s Blues” is a straight-ahead 50s-style rocker of the type you might associate with Brian Setzer.

“Queen of Hearts” draws its theme from Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Wonderland,” and the risk of going too deep into your own imagination. It features some very tasty guitar work.

The closing track, “Over the Roll,” has a rootsy Americana feel, which lends itself well to the song’s theme that hope and love can help us through the challenging times.

Bottom line? The bands and performances are incredibly tight and will have you tapping your feet from the very first note. Danoff’s songwriting and arranging are top-notch, his songs are lyrically interesting, and his distinctive voice sounds both fresh and yet familiar.

Folks who appreciate bluesy, old-school funk and soul will not be disappointed. In addition to a healthy dose of funk and soul, King of Crown City contains – to my ears, at least – traces of a wide variety of influences, from 50s rock and roll, to old-school R&B, to Broadway musicals, to gospel, to early Van Morrison, and even the Beatles (particularly the McCartney side of things). But no matter how you look at it, if you like funk, soul, and old-school R&B, you need to check out Doran Danoff’s King of Crown City! - Blues Blast Magazine


"DORAN DANOFF: KING OF CROWN CITY"

Doran Danoff has an impressive musical resume, but he’s quick to brush that off as second to what actually matters in the industry—a combination of unbending drive and a love for the craft that is so ingrained, doing anything else is out of the question.

We spoke to Doran back in 2016 about his musical roots and his first album, The Ghost & The Scratch. Doran has a new album, King of Crown City, coming out August 17. It’s funky and hot, a step in a different direction from his earlier stuff, and a testement to his inredible dexterity.

The seed for this album was planted years ago, not long after The Ghost & The Scratch was finished. The recordings were made, but shelved because the first album release happened, fatherhood happened, life happened, time flies. Until one day, Doran played the raw tracks for a friend, who demanded they see the light of day, and to that friend we are indebted. We roped Doran back in to talk about it.

King of Crown City is faster and funkier than your first record, The Ghost & The Scratch, which has a folky feel. Tell me about the path from that record to this one.

Yes, indeed it is funkier than The Ghost & The Scratch. I set no boundaries as to what kind of songs I write and what styles I might explore. I have an eclectic mix of influences and I am always mixing and blending them into my songs. I hope that my fans will keep coming back with a curiosity as to what I might do next. Subsequently, the funk, soul, blues, and jazz on King of Crown City is an exploration into a different world. The music is different. The lyrical themes are different. Even the recording techniques we used were different. But hopefully, the quality of song and musicianship that we had on The Ghost & The Scratch will be apparent here too, and my hope is that listeners find it exciting and different but still connected to the music of The Ghost & The Scratch.

The actual making of the recordings for King of Crown City is somewhat of a long story. The process of working on The Ghost & The Scratch took some time (as making records does), and during that period I was writing new material, much of which would become King of Crown City. When the album finally dropped, we had been performing some of the music out in clubs around L.A. and the band was really tight. So I booked a session at a great studio in Pasadena that is now sadly shuttered (like so many great studios in the US these days). The studio was called Crown City, run by an amazing engineer and producer named Eric Lilavois. I got the full band in there including a 3 piece horn section, and we recorded 6 songs live to tape.

The process was fast, raw, and totally authentic. I was extremely satisfied with the results we got. Then recordings became somewhat forgotten until a few years later, when I played the tracks for a colleague. He punched me in the shoulder and said, get that music out there. I thought perhaps too much time had passed and the music didn’t feel relevant anymore, but that was just fear talking shit in my ear. So I decided to try to finish the tracks up. Problem was we couldn’t find the session drives anywhere! We thought it was all lost. We ended up recovering the original tapes and then started going through the process of finishing the arrangements with some additional tracks and the mixing.

Throughout that period I had also been working on some newer recordings on my own, including two songs So Bad and Winning, which I wrote with an incredible producer in Nashville named Tony Esterly. Those two songs have done really well in the sync world already with placements in a few movies and some TV shows. Those two songs, plus my song Young Love were added to the album. Now after all of these years and a true fight, the album will be released this August.

This album, unlike The Ghost & The Scratch, is much more of a collection of songs, rather than a concept record. There is a consistent theme throughout the material—the existential struggle for love, success, and ultimately happiness. But honestly, what record isn’t about those things. Ha!

Has the songwriting process changed for you as you’ve evolved as a musician?

Sure, I would hope so. When I first started writing songs I had no idea what I was doing. It was a totally raw, throw something against the wall and see if it sticks kind of process. Some of that is still in me for sure. I record dozens of melody snippets, riffs, and lyrical ideas into my phone on a daily basis. I’ll need many lives to finish all of them! After all of these years and having written hundreds, if not thousands of tracks, I have definitely learned a lot more about form and structure and the technical aspects of the songwriting craft. But the truth is that the art of songwriting always circles around to the emotion behind the song.

I have done more co-writing over the last few years, which is very fun. Collaborating is an extremely generous and positive process, but I find that my most honest and real songs come to me through my own process, usually at the piano really grinding away at a story or a melody or a chord progression until boom! the magic is there.

I also should say that over the years my tools as a songwriter have evolved. On my first EP, The Icarus Suite, I was really just writing on the piano and so much of the rawness was there because at the time, that was all I knew how to do. But over the years I’ve acquired new musical skills, studio equipment, and the knowledge of how to write for different types of musicians, like horns and strings.

Also, as a young writer I really turned to my own life as the source of material for the subject of my songs. More recently, I have been exploring new avenues of storytelling, like contemplating social issues, or describing different types of people or experiences of others—things that are far from me that I want to understand and study. I used to just write about my feelings, but that can get boring. I mean, how many sad love songs are already out there LOL! I think the minute things become rote or mechanical, the music becomes stale. And who wants to do that for a living?

Who were some of the inspirations behind this record?

I think King of Crown City definitely shows my love for vintage styles like funk, soul, R&B and jazz. I grew up listening to everything under the sun. My musical education was just a total immersion into everything from classical, jazz, blues, rock, hip-hop, electronic genres, and everything in between. I think with this record I was really trying to write songs that were fun, toe-tapping, and passionate, but also that told stories that were outside of myself.

Some of my jazz influences like Dr. John and Professor Longhair could be heard on the song Dr. Solution, which is one of my personal favorites on the album. It has a spooky New Orleans jazz vibe that paints a story of how I feel about music in general, and the ghosts hark back to my last record, tying the music together. The wild and swinging blues track Gertrude’s Blues was actually inspired by the character in Shakespeare’s Hamlet. The music definitely channels some Van Morrison and maybe even some Allman Brothers (who I listened to a lot growing up). The song Amazed is probably the most personal on the album. It tells a difficult story about being hurt by someone close to me. The music there is almost like some old Italian ‘70s pop. There are some seriously obscure and funky gems that came from outside the U.S. during the late ‘60s and ‘70s that I have been obsessed with.

The song Lady Be Good is actually a topical subject (something new for me at the time). The story is about the WWII plane The Lady Be Good, which disappeared without a trace on its first combat mission during the war. It was later discovered, accidentally, in the Libyan desert in 1958. The song tells the story of what I imagine the crew might have gone through in whatever simplified way a song can. The music has a kind of ‘80s groove, but the band is definitely playing like a ‘70s rock band. It all makes for a pretty cool mix of ideas and sounds.

Queen of Hearts is about Alice in Wonderland and about using your imagination, but also the dangers of going too deep into the world of dreams and losing your grip on reality and your relationships. The songs So Bad and Winning, which I co-wrote with Tony Esterly, are written from the somewhat ironic perspective of a character who thinks he’s some kind of badass, someone who is just exuding ultra-confidence to the point where it’s over-the-top and arrogant (kinda like one of our new world leaders who’s really all about #winning). Those songs are just straight up soul/funk bangers.

Young Love is a bit modern compared to the rest of the record. The idea is based around that concept of the title, love and youth and figuring out how to navigate the complexities of all of that. I really like that song. The last song on the record “Over The Roll” is much more rootsy Americana-influenced sound, and the message behind the song—that hope and love will bring us through the hard times—brings the collective story of the album to a close in a way that nods to my past work, and also hopefully to my future work.

A self-produced record exhibits an impressive level of artistry. Tell me about your role as producer. What are the benefits and the challenges that come from producing your own record?

I have always produced or co-produced my records. I’m a perfectionist, sometimes to a detrimental degree, so I need to be involved with every aspect of my recordings, which is both a curse and a blessing. My role as producer for most of these songs boils down to writing the music and lyrics, composing the arrangements, working with the band in the studio on all of the details of the performances, working on all of the overdubs, vocals, editing of the tracks, and overseeing the mixing and mastering process. I really love producing because I get to interact with everyone at every stage, and I get to realize my vision in every nook and cranny of the recording. Even though as producer the final decisions are ultimately mine, there is so much collaboration and exchange of ideas and experimenting that involves everyone in the process.

I could never achieve any of this without the help and talent of everyone involved, the immensely skilled musicians who put their passion and soul into every note of every song. The engineers Eric Lilavois and my long-time friend Emile Kelman were like magicians that captured every nuance of the sound in such rich fidelity. Tony Esterly wrote and co-produced with me on our two songs, which was an incredibly inspiring collaboration. The mix engineer Ari Raskin worked tirelessly with me over many months to get each song to the perfect balance and vibe, and our mastering enginner Richard Dodd took us to the finish line and made this record a finished product. This record in particular was so long and emotional, and at so many points I tried to just throw the whole thing away. Seeing it through to the end has been one of the greater accomplishments of my career.

I imagine this record was incredibly fun to record. How did you assemble your band?

The record was really fun to record. I mean we get to play rock-n-roll and call it a job. I feel very lucky to know so many amazing musicians in many cities. The L.A. band features some of my oldest friends and bandmates, all of them brilliant musicians and artists in their own right. Nick Rosen on bass connected me to Shay Godwin, the drummer. I met Zachary Ross, who plays guitar on the album, at a taqueria in Silverlake. He was a friend of a friend. Tim McKay, Wes Smith, and James Blackwell, the horn players, were all cats that ran with our scene, and are all just monster musicians.

The NY band on Young Love is Taylor Floreth on drums, Scott Metzger on guitar, and Jay Foote on bass. These geniuses are old bandmates and collaborators from my NY days. And the Nashville band are all new friends I have made in the last year and a half while living in Nashville. I am on a quest to have bands in as many cities in the world as possible….LOL.

You have a degree in Composition from Columbia and a graduate degree in Composition and Film Scoring from NYU. You’ve been a composer, singer, songwriter, collaborator, producer, AND you’re extremely well-versed in a variety of genres. Since you’ve done it all, I think it seems fitting to ask— how has the music industry changed over the course of your career? What advice would you give the next generation of aspiring musicians?

Well first of all, thanks for all of that. Don’t let the pedigree fool you. It’s all just a lot of hogwash in the end, and I don’t think I have even come close to doing it all. I still feel very much like I am reaching new levels of discovery every day. It’s a neverending job to just create and release my music out in the world, especially as an independent artist. As far as the music industry and changes and all of that, I don’t think change is new at all, it’s just a different kind of change. The medium for record production and distribution has been evolving since the beginning of the recording business in the 20th century. It will never stay in the same place, but I think it will always come back to the same thing: honesty and quality.

The one thing that I think is so exciting about right now, is that all of us have so much power and potential right at our fingertips. Technology has given us access to so many amazing tools, enabling artists to push the boundaries of the expected. There is a real opportunity to reach millions of people around the world from your bedroom. That’s fucking crazy. It’s a serious power that we all have, and it’s up to us to find a way to seize that opportunity and make it our own. It’s really kind of the best time to be an artist because you can truly be independent, find your audience, and get your work out into the world.

And that’s why the only advice that matters at all isn’t even advice, it’s just the truth: just be yourself in whatever ways that are relevant to your creativity. Write from the heart and try to make the best recordings you can. If you keep doing that, and you really want to make a life of doing that, then you will find a way. There is no easy way to anything when it comes to art, especially music, so if you don’t want to be making music with every fiber in your body, then this is probably not gonna work out for you. Also, have as much fun as you can and be a really nice person.

What’s up next for you?

More music! There is a film coming out in September that I did the music for called Active Measures. It’s all about Russian interference in the 2016 US election. Also, I’ve got another EP of my music already in the can ready for release following King of Crown City. I have stacks of songs and arrangements that are waiting for their chance to get out into the world. I’m looking forward to doing some touring to promote King of Crown City. I haven’t done a lot of touring in my career, but hopefully this year I’ll figure out how to make it work.

I just wanna give a big thanks to all the people who listen to my music and support me as an independent artist. I’m going to keep making records until I drop dead, so I hope you stick around to hear what I come up with. - Frontrunner Magazine


"MANO-E-MANO: DORAN DANOFF"

Available today is King of Crown City by Doran Danoff, a record that we are WILD about. So wild, in fact, that we talked to the man himself, covering everything from his musical influences, lucky socks, the specific tracks, and his fictional celebrity doppelganger.

Described by Danoff as “in your face“ and “a kick in the teeth“, King of Crown City pulls a lot from the rich past of American Music. Citing inspiration from artists like Dr. John and Tom Waits, Danoff knows his music relies on old sounds “I have one foot very much in classic styles on this record, like you said soul and rock and blues… I was trying to, in a way, make the sound modern, make it feel old, but have a new take on it. Because that’s really what it is. I’m not recreating the wheel”.

Maybe he’s not recreating the wheel, but Danoff’s genius is in his ability to take dated genres and package them in a way that inconspicuously fits into 2018. The first track, So Bad, has a distinct soul sound. However, it’s not necessarily for soul fans. It is for music fans. This track makes you want throw your shades on and strut down the street. Or, if you are Conner, rob a casino.



The bellowing horns, belting vocals, and energized groove are a new approach for Danoff. His last full-length release, The Ghost & The Scratch, has a sound he describes as more “orchestral”. It’s definitely more mellow, heavily driven by an acoustic sound and melodic charm. But to Danoff, the two drastically different sounds make sense, “To me they are different but they are connected in terms of my writing and what I’m interested in”. What does separate them, Danoff claims, is uniqueness of each track on the record: “King of the Crown City is much more of an individually song-based album where each song really stands on its own”.

And that’s one thing that both of us really loved about this new record. The tracks stand alone as great songs. It shows, as both of us really gravitated towards different songs. I love So Bad and Young Love, another stand-out track with soul roots but big-time pop potential.



Conner gravitated towards Dr. Solution, a unique sound which Danoff claims was written to encapsulate the feeling of an “Old speak-easy, or some old club in New Orleans where it’s late and it’s hot and sweaty, and everyone is intoxicated“.



Overall, this is an incredible record written and performed by a normal dude who seems to really love what he does (and is damn good at it). When we had finished asking him about music, we dove into the hard-hitting questions.

Doran has insane hair. If this guy was a restaurant, he’d be Olive Garden, because he has unlimited salad. When asked about his flow and whether he’d be comfortable acting as a stunt double for Jon Snow in Game of Thrones, Danoff said, “That would be unbelievable! I don’t think I could handle Daenerys Stormborn, I think she would rock my world too hard”. That’s the kind of forward thinking we applaud here at Incubator.

“How do you like your eggs?”

“Green!”

Who the hell is this guy? He said it with confidence too and then laughed at how absolutely dumbfounded we were. Because we were getting the voodoo vibe earlier, we asked if he has any superstitions. He has a pair of lucky socks that he wears when he performs. “They’re pretty much done. I may have to turn them into a golf club cover or something”. This guys is a one-man electric factory.

So if you’re looking for some incredible new music from a guy that fits the demographic of this website like a glove, check out Doran Danoff’s new album King of Crown City, released today on Urbivor Records. And say hi to Danny Ocean when you end up knocking over the Belagio.



Website: https://www.dorandanoff.com/

Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2wb8Elj - Incubator


"Doran Danoff - King of Crown City // Limited to 300 Orange Vinyl LPs"

RIYL: Benjamin Booker, The Arcs, Gary Clark Jr., Curtis Harding

Label: Urbivor Records

Nashville singer/songwriter Doran Danoff has that stuff. The ‘good at everything’ stuff, the ‘hard to pigeonhole stuff, the stuff that sends you into sweaty fevers. That stuff. Fusing blues chords, tight AF soul grooves and plenty of rock and roll stank, Danoff has crafted a brand new full-length that will undoubtedly force your jaw line to relax and your smile to reach from ear to ear. Leadoff single So Bad has the potential to catapult him into the same arena as Benjamin Booker, St. Paul & the Broken Bones and The Arcs. Hot damn, I can’t wait to hear the rest of this thing!

Listen to the two available tracks below and grab a copy of the album on orange vinyl after the ‘buy’ link. Only 300 were pressed, and I imagine that sometime down the line, these are gonna be hard-to-find collector’s items.

The Details

150-gram deluxe vinyl edition of "King of Crown City"
Item ships out on or around September 27, 2018
Edition of 300 - Sly Vinyl


"“King of Crown City” shows love for vintage funk, soul, R&B and jazz. About the newest album from Doran Danoff"

Multi musical man DORAN DANOFF is an emerging indie soul & rock artist from Los Angeles, CA with a piano based sound that fuses soul, rock, jazz and folk in a unique modern pop music. Last week his newest album “King of Crown City” was released. The seed for this album was planted years ago. The recordings were made, but shelved because the first album release happened, fatherhood happened, life happened, time flies. Until one day, Doran played the raw tracks for a friend, who demanded they see the light of day, and to that friend we are indebted. (full article here) The single “So Bad” was featured on the Fox show “Lucifer.”

About the new album: “I think “King of Crown City” definitely shows my love for vintage styles like funk, soul, R&B and jazz. I grew up listening to everything under the sun. My musical education was just a total immersion into everything from classical, jazz, blues, rock, hip-hop, electronic genres, and everything in between. I think with this record I was really trying to write songs that were fun, toe-tapping, and passionate, but also that told stories that were outside of myself.”( read the full article in Frontrunner Magazine)

More music at our stream playlist and here - Frequenzy


"Doran Danoff original song "So Bad" featured on "You're The Worst" (FXX)"

Sync alert: the new single "So Bad" from inide-soul marauder Doran Danoff is featured in this week's episode of "You're The Worst" on FXX. - Tune Find


"Doran Danoff song "Winning" featured in Lego: Ninjago movie (2017)"

Doran Danoff's original song "Winning" was featured in the 2017 worldwide smash hit film Lego: Ninjago - Soundtrack Mania


"Singer-Songwriter Doran Danoff Performs Live On KCAL9"

Singer-Songwriter Doran Danoff Performs Live On KCAL9
Singer-songwriter Doran Danoff stopped by the KCAL9 studio Sunday morning for a live performance. For more of his music, go to www.dorandanoff.com. - KCAL 9 / CBS LA


"HuffPost exclusive: Doran Danoff's new single "Young Love""

Doran Danoff is an up and coming singer-songwriter from Los Angeles with a new single "Young Love" care of the MuseBox.

According to Doran Danoff...

"The song is about innocence of love at any age. The fact that it's called 'Young Love' doesn't mean it's about young people. It's about the blind foolishness, helpless hopefulness, and wild abandon of any love. It's about the loss of losing something that can never last forever, heartbreak, the inevitability of every love, no matter how magical, to eventually crush the totality of it's greatness for everyone involved... there are some very real dimensions to the lyrics and the story of the 'Young Love.' But on 'Young Love,' I'm not taking myself too seriously. I kinda just want people to dance...or maybe make some babies to my cut." - HuffPost


"Doran Danoff: The Versatile Music Man"

Doran Danoff: The Versatile Music Man

Posted by MacEagon Voyce on 4/20/16 • Categorized as MUSIC

Doran Danoff is a bit of an everything man, musically speaking. The LA-based composer, producer, and multi-instrumentalist grew up listening to an array of music that spanned gangster rap, ‘60s rock, and jam bands. Then, during his college years, he spent his time emulating iconic stride pianists like Art Tatum. He’s also studied classical composition, released an excellent orchestral folk album called The Ghost and the Scratch, and played in a live hip-hop group called The Herbivores.

An adaptation of the name—Urbivore—has come to encapsulate everything Danoff does, from film scoring to songwriting. His most recent output is a funky pop-rock single called “Young Love.” The new track, which premiered on The Huffington Post in February, prefaces a yet-to-be-named, quasi-live EP that will arrive sometime this summer.

I spoke to Danoff while he was waiting for a flight to Nashville, where he does most of his composing. En masse, his career has existed—and still does, to some extent— between LA, Nashville, and New York—again demonstrating his penchant for artistic variation. Over the phone, we talked about that career triangle, his many musical loves, and the future of his own sound.

So, you live in LA. You’re from LA. Spent some time in New York. Now you’re splitting time between Nashville and LA.

D. Exactly.

Cool. So how do you alternate your time? What do you do in each place?

D. As of lately, in LA I’ve been working on a couple different record projects that I’ve got going with some other artists. I have a side project—an original project of mine—an electro pop thing called Little Fortune. We’re working on an EP and then I’ve been writing and working on a record with this other artist, and I come out here for gigs and stuff. In February when I was out here, I had the single release party at Hotel Café, which is a really well known venue here in LA. So yeah, when I’m here in LA I’m working on a lot of different record projects, and when I’m in Nashville I’ve been doing a lot of my composing work. I’m doing stuff for film and TV and other media projects. And I’ve been getting into some songwriting projects with some local artists there as well; some different people through my publishing connections, like at Downtown Music Publishing. And in both places I’ve been working on my new stuff.

doran_large

I’m surprised you have time to work on [your own stuff] amidst all these other things you’re doing.

D. Very little sleep [laughs], just doing it, you know? I don’t stop. This is what I love to do; music is my full-time everything. If I’m not working on a specific project or gigging,

I’m writing with other artists or writing my material. I’m practicing. Just constantly creating.

When did you decide that music was what you wanted to do with all your time and energy?

D. I really felt like it was going to be my path when I got to college, like 18 or 19. I wasn’t a classically trained musician. I didn’t really play as a kid growing up. I started playing a little bit later in high school and played in some bands, but it wasn’t until I got to college that I really felt like that was what I was supposed to do. I got really into it. Studying music, practicing music in different ways, more formal stuff. But for my musical journey, I always remember this story.

When I was really little, my parents had me taking some piano and I totally hated it and gave it up. But I still had some of the basic skills and I would sit down and improvise and make things up at the piano. And then, when I was about 15 a friend of mine had been taking some jazz/blues piano lessons from a teacher and he taught me the 12-bar blues. That was a real revelation for me, kind of framing improvisational energy into the form of the blues, and that really sent me off on a journey. 20th century piano music—like jazz and blues and ragtime—has been a really big influence on me. And then after that I went back to classical and studied classical piano and classical composition.

When you first decided that music was going to be your life, were you still pretty entrenched in that world of blues and jazz?

D. For sure. At that point, I was really only a keyboard player. I was only a pianist and I loved it. I wanted to be a great jazz piano player. I think I quickly realized how good real jazz piano players are and I thought well maybe I should try some other stuff, which I did. I started writing songs and I started producing tracks and thinking a bit more outside instrumental music, which led me to songwriting and singing.

Who were some of the jazz pianists that you really loved?

D. Oh man, that’s always such a hard question to answer because I listened to everyone. I listened to so much music – I mean my record collection is pretty deep. I think the real cornerstones of what I loved were the bebop guys, the stride piano guys like Art Tatum. Oscar Peterson. Bud Powell. Chick Corea. Herbie Hancock of course. The blues stuff like Pinetop Perkins. People like Dr. John. Professor Longhair. I mean it just goes on man. I’m a big fan of Thelonious Monk and how he was just a man from outer space [laughs].

Yeah and that’s what me and my friends would do every day after class in college—it was just full-on jazz class. We would share records and totally chill out, smoke a joint and listen to piano shit. That was what we did. And then at night I was shedding in the rehearsal room, trying my best to learn what they were doing.

What was the natural progression from there to get where you were for The Ghost and the Scratch – what was the next evolution?

D. I think the next evolution of my musical journey was when I started writing songs. I had bounced around the country a little bit. I lived for a while in Colorado; I had my first band there, which was like a funky soul kind of thing. But I was always writing my own stuff on the side. And then I moved to New York and that was when I really started to connect the dots of my musical education that I had given myself. Because before I had ever listened to jazz—actually, ironically, the first music I ever listening to was strictly rap and gangster rap and hip-hop. And the first band I ever played in was a live hip-hop band called The Herbivores. And actually the guy who I started that band with – his name was Robert Paulson—was a really famous rapper that goes by the name of Cadalack Ron. But he actually just died just two months ago from a heroin overdose.

Ah that’s brutal. Really sorry for the loss.

D. Yeah it was a big blow. A blow to his music community, to me and my friends and his family…

So the rap thing was first, but after that I was super into ‘60s music, pretty exclusively. Like ‘60s rock and folk, pretty much everything from Neil Young… Bob Dylan was fucking on repeat. Had every Dylan album. The Doors. All that stuff, and jam bands too. That was kind of an early influence.

Wow you’ve been everywhere!

D. Yeah I really have [laughs]. That’s why it’s taken me a really long time to boil all of it down into something that’s really mine, something that feels really honest. And it draws from all that all the time. It’s kind of cool. When I look back at all the music that I’ve listened to, all the music that I’ve gone to see, all the music that I’ve bought over the course of my life: I can hear it in all the different stuff that I do, and I feel like I’m genuinely part of the musical evolution.

One of the things I noticed when I listened to The Ghost and the Scratch was that it’s pretty orchestral. You combine a lot of different instruments – it’s reminiscent of Patrick Watson. Do you know him?

Doran Danoff June 2011

D. Yeah for sure. Yeah the [orchestral sound] was a really special part of that record. I got to work with this really amazing orchestrator, this guy Olivier Manchon who took my orchestral sketches and my ideas and helped bring them to life. He’s amazing. So that was really exciting. And The Ghost and the Scratch we recorded at this really amazing studio that just closed down called The Magic Shop, which was in Soho. It got priced out of Soho and it was super sad. That place was really legendary and we recorded all the songs live to tape; we did it the old-fashioned way. That was a really special experience to get to work at this incredible studio, and to do it that way and work with the band in the studio like that. I think that really contributed to the lushness and the richness of the tracks.

And then “Young Love” has more pop sensibilities that The Ghost and the Scratch – what was the impetus for that?

D. For sure. I wouldn’t say it’s a departure, but it’s definitely an evolution. Because of all these influences, all these different styles that I’ve played and listened to, my songbook reflects that in every way. After I had gotten all The Ghost and the Scratch songs in a can, I had started writing a bunch of soul-rock material. Eventually I kept writing songs in that vein, and some more American songs, but the newest song, “Young Love,” is a song that I wrote late last year. I was excited about it. It’s a fun song. It’s a feel-good song. It was super fun to record. I recorded it in New York and finished it up and mixed it in Nashville. Actually I kind of did it in my new life triangle. I did the rhythm section tracks in New York. I did the vocals in La. And then I mixed it in Nashville, so it was perfect representation of my new life triangle of music in America. - Frontrunner Magazine


"Artist Interview: LA-based singer songwriter Doran Danoff"

Doran Danoff is a talented singer songwriter. I found him on Tradiio a few months ago and wanted to learn a bit more about his story. Once you hear his sound, you’ll want to know more too.

1) When did you get your start in music? What originally motivated you?
Before I was ever a singer or even a musician I was into writing. Lots of poetry. All the time. Before I was a singer I was a pianist I started on piano lessons as a kid and totally fucking hated it. I used to sit down and make up my own songs on the piano. I liked to improvise. My mother is a singer. She was famous back in the ’60’s and ‘70s in Europe so I think I inherited the music from her. There was always music in the house. My grandmother lived with us. She was born in Yemen in like 1913 and came to Europe on a donkey. She used to sing all kinds of crazy old songs from Yemen and Africa. My mother used to sing all the time. My dad loved jazz…and the Beach Boys. That was my first tape. Surfin USA. When I was a teenager a close friend of mine taught me the 12 bar blues. That was like Pandora’s box opening up for me. After that it was like all blues all the time. And then jazz. And then funk and rock n roll. The first band I was ever in was a hip hop band called The Herbivores with the rapper Cadalack Ron. He just died. Very sad. That was high school shit. As I got more and more serious with piano I eventually returned to trying to study some Classical and more formal stuff like composing and arranging. It wasn’t until I was like 23 that I wrote my first song.

2) What are some of your key influences to your style?
Well the first music I ever listened to was gangster rap like Ice T and Body Count, and NWA and all the 90’s hip hop that was amazing like Tribe Called Quest, Digable Planets and Guru and GrandPuba, Jeru The Damaja, Pharcyde, The Roots and stuff. After that it was a lot of hippie stuff. I was obsessed with The Doors. They were from LA like me and I always dug their psychedelic inspiration. I am pretty sure Jim Morrison inspired me to be a poet. Jim Morrison and Bob Dylan were probably my biggest early influences in terms of writing. Early folk influences from The Guthries, Donovan, Joan Baez, Cat Stevens, and old string band music was an influence. After that it was strictly rock and folk from the ’60s and jam bands: all the classic shit like Pink Floyd, Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix, and of course The Beatles, like tons of Beatles… Beatles, Beatles, Beatles! And bands like The Grateful Dead were a huge influence on me in terms of seeing what music could really do to people and the way it could create a community and elevate people’s minds and psyches to a whole other plane. We were doing a lot of acid back then. Going to Dead shows and Phish and the like. It was all a very open, very inspiring time, reaching for a higher plane through music and poetry. When I finally got serious into piano I was gathering up tons of old vinyl, going crazy on the stride piano cats like Art Tatum, Oscar Peterson, Bud Powell, Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers and all the bebop cats. I was super deep into modern jazz like Miles and Mingus and Thelonious Monk and the funk stuff from Herbie Hancock and guys like Jimmy Smith on the B3 organ. As I got older I learned about other great songwriters like Harry Nilsson and Tom Waits and Dr. John and Nina Simone. I never really got into contemporary music or pop until I was older. I was very much in the old school music for a long time. Nowadays inspiration is coming from everywhere. Over the years I got very much into more modern music, electronics, dance music, experimental genres, orchestral music, etc. I really don’t set any limits to what inspires me. I am a music fanatic and listen to everything and draw it all into my own work.

3) Your track “The Ghost and the Scratch” is one of my favorites. Can you tell me how you wrote the song? How did you decide to incorporate the strings?

Thank you. It is the title track from my first full length record “The Ghost & The Scratch.” It’s hard to say how I wrote the song. It’s built off a pretty straightforward pentatonic folky melody. I think I came up with it walking home one night in Manhattan after working at a bar or something. The story is really about life and death and war and fear and the infinite cycle of the whole thing. Here is something I wrote about the record.

On “The Ghost & The Scratch” by Doran Danoff
It’s always a funny thing when people ask you about the music you write, what those lyrics are about, what that song title really means, why that style or that sound was used to capture that idea. In my mind, the answer to questions like that always seem trite and cliché. A song or a melody or even a poem can mean so much or so little to a different set of eyes or ears, so I have always avoided putting my work within the confines of some suffocating description. The songs that I wrote for this record represent a time in my life where I was coming out of a period deeply entrenched in classical, jazz and blues and was becoming increasingly interested in the world of American folk and rock. At the time, I was writing poetry and songs that had one foot in the words and symbolism of transcendentalist writers like Melville and Whitman and the other foot in the crushing real world rhyming and structural sensibility of songwriters like Dylan, Young, and Waits. The musical material was all ragtime and shanty-pirate folk mashed with Beethoven and John Lennon. It is the kind of musical quilt that I always wrap myself in– never too far from anything so as to always be close to everything. That was what would come out. It was never intentional. And the subject always seemed to draw from the same source. It was my reaction to watching a modern world around me start to implode by it’s own recklessness. Everyone’s race to the end of time seemed so absolutely focused and frightening and I had to shake myself out of total despair. This is no original thought. Kerouac wrote about it along with the rest of the Beats. Hip-hop and punk-rock was talking about it. It’s all around and it’s never really gonna’ change. “The Ghost & The Scratch” is a song about a town where the boys go off to war, and the old men watch. But the old men too were once themselves mere boys going off to war. Some of them made it and many did not. It’s about a cycle of life and loss. Of love and forgiveness. The Ghost is the spirit, of all things, of all life. The Scratch is that brief moment in time, that one improbable opening, to feel the pain of having lived and the joy of having loved, and the magic of knowing you had the chance…But really, it’s all up to you. Don’t believe a word I say.

Doran Danoff April 2011

4) How do you enjoy being involved with Tradiio? What’s it like on the artist side?

Yeah I am excited about a platform like Tradiio. I think having a community based radio station where listeners can really get behind an artist and have a stake in their music is a really cool concept. I am always just looking for new ways to get my music into the ears of new listeners. Having the support of a platform like Tradiio that is committed to giving independent artists a space to be heard, is really great for everyone. I look forward to making new fans and meeting new artists on Tradiio.



5) What projects are you currently working on?

Currently, I am about to release my new single called “YOUNG LOVE” this Friday Feb.19th. It’s a really fun song, a bit of a departure from the folkier sound on my last record. I am really excited to share it with everyone. The single is off of an upcoming EP for release later this year. I am also working on another side project with some friends in LA called LITTLE FORTUNE. It’s a bit more of an electro-pop vibe. We are about to drop our first single next month followed an EP later this year. I keep busy as a writer and producer working on my own records, other artists and various composition projects for Film and TV.

6) What other musicians are you listening to right now? Do you listen to other folk artists, or a mix?
So much! I listen to everything. Definitely other folk artists. I recently saw the Milk Carton Kids live. They are incredible. I have been into some of the elctro folk stuff going on with groups like Sylvan Esso and I am really into the group Son Lux. I recently discovered British pianist and singer Tom Odell who is dope. Also someone in the folk world who I have been following for years who I love is Icelandic singer/songwriter Olof Arnolds. She is amazing. Also a big fan of First Aid Kit and Sharon Van Etten, Michael Kiwanuka, Tallest Man On earth, and so many other folk artists.

7) What does your songwriting process look like?

Like madness! No just kidding. It looks like a lot of things. Sometimes it looks like a moose. Other times like an owl. Sometimes it’s naked in the shower or it’s in a crowded bar into my iPhone. sometimes it’s like an instantaneous lightning bolt, other times it’s like giving birth over 9 months. I am usually alone. I write all of my songs by myself. Usually at the piano…usually really late at night, or early in the morning, or in the afternoon, and also at dusk. The hardest thing a lot of times is to finish a song all the way. I have hundreds of half finished songs and ideas waiting to be finished…I better stop this interview so I can get back to it!

8) Is there anything you want our readers to know about you?

Go download my new single! Buy my records or steal them or get the from Napster (does that still exits!??). Just listen to my music if you want to. And share it with your friends. I am a totally independent artist so this is a real bedroom operation. Come to see some shows. I am playing at Hotel Cafe in Hollywood on Saturday 2/20 to celebrate the new release. I want your readers to know how much I love each and every one of them…except that weird one over there. I don’t like that one. - Ear To The Ground Music


"Comic Pop Reviews new single "Young Love" from Doran Danoff"

Doran Danoff Shares “Young Love”
AMV Spotlight/Music, News by RAB

Doran Danoff is sharing with the ComicPop listeners his single “Young Love”. This has a great bluesy/rock feel to it that the listener can get into easily. After listening to it a few times it reminded me of the style of something the Eagles would have put out back in the day. I enjoyed “Young Love” and I think many of you will to. Thanks again to Doran for sharing “Young Love” through SoundCloud – Richard: - Comic Pop Library


"Reviewing & Shining - "The Ghost & The Scratch" by Doran Danoff"

Yes, it's that time of the month when we tune you in to some of the many fine records that have come our way courtesy of ReviewShine.

You aren't going to get the usual amount of woffle from me. Real life has been rather hectic over the last couple of weeks and, as I woffle for a living as well as for a hobby, I find tonight that the woffle well has run dry.

Fortunately I don't think it matters too much, because this music speaks for itself. We'll give you the name, rank and number and then get straight on with it.

The first album is "The Ghost & The Scratch" by Doran Danoff, who describes himself as a folk-jazz pianist and songwriter. He's a lot better than that sounds though. The album came out last Sunday on Urbivor Records. Here is the title track.

"The Ghost & The Scratch" - Doran Danoff - 27 Leggies


"Doran Danoff featured on Buzz Bands L.A. on KCSN"

L.A. Buzz Bands Show, tonight at 7 on KCSN
by KEVIN on MARCH 25, 2012

Back from the South by Southwest Music Festival, blisters healed and email folders bulging with new music, I’ll convene this week’s edition of the L.A. Buzz Bands Show at 7 tonight on KCSN (88.5 FM, streaming at KCSN.org). What’s in store? How about new music from Silversun Pickups? Or another new track from the mystery band the Neighbourhood? I’ll have those along with fresh tracks from Races, Meg Myers, Doran Danoff, Nightmare Air, Jim Hanft, Dante Vs Zombies and Right the Stars. That should make for plenty of variety on a rainy SoCal Sunday … Tune in, won’t you?

After the jump, I’ll have the playlist:

Silversun Pickups, “Bloody Mary (Nerve Endings)”
Meg Myers, “Curbstomp”
The Neighbourhood, “Sweater Weather”
Right the Stars, “Stay (Don’t Go Away)”
Races, “All for You”
Dante Vs Zombies, “Natural Disaster”
Whispertown, “Open the Other Eye”
Blacks&, “Tonight”
Jim Hanft, “Kerosene”
Doran Danoff, “Friend of Mine” (featuring Leslie Stevens)
Nightmare Air, “Can Not Escape”
Ethan Gold, “Nonstop”
The Mowgli’s, “San Francisco”
Electric Guest, “This Head I Hold”
Davis Fetter, “I Loved You So”
Troup, “Edge of the World”

… thanks for listening
- buzzbands.la


"John West Delivers Beautiful Acoustic Version of Rihanna's "We Found Love" featuring Doran Danoff on keys"

Doran Danoff performs with John West in cover of Rihanna's "We Found Love"

Just a few years ago, up-and-coming singer-songwriter John West was working as a street performer on the sidewalks of Santa Monica. Now, the musician is on the brink of superstardom with the upcoming release of his debut album on Mercury/Island Def Jam.

West, who hails from Baton Rouge, La., already has a rapidly growing fan base, but this number is bound to increase after pop lovers witness his beautifully haunting rendition of Rihanna‘s No. 1 hit single ‘We Found Love.’ While Rihanna’s original is a club-ready track with booming bass and swirling synth, West is slowing things down and delivering a much more organic version of the song on his cover tune.

Equipped with an acoustic guitar and a small backing band, West will leave you with goosebumps as he sails through the gorgeous cover. The performer gives the song his own R&B spin, with his smooth and sultry voice becoming the main focal point. West has a wide vocal range, and he exhibits this with his flawless falsetto during the ‘We Found Love’ chorus. He truly makes the song his own, and we think Rihanna might be moved to tears over this acoustic rendition of her ‘Talk That Talk’ track.

If you are a fan of West’s ‘We Found Love’ cover, chances are you will love his solo material. “The creative process comes organically for me,” West has said of his songwriting. “I’m usually just trying to come up with lyrics that pool on me because ultimately you’re trusting your emotional center. Then you’re trying to use your inner sense: does that note feel right there or is that line too obvious. Ultimately you want a lyric or melody that’s going to make a random person’s heart soar.”

The crooner is catching a lot of buzz for his song ‘Lovely’ (watch the video here), which is a collaboration with rapper Pusha T of the Clipse, and is working with some major artists (he collaborated with Big Sean for ‘Already There’) and producers for his full-length debut. If you are loving John West as much as we are, be sure to check out more of his material on his official website. - Pop Crush


"Doran Danoff - L.A.'s Newest Emerging Artist -"

A pop singer by trade, and roots songwriter written across his soul, Doran Danoff preaches his gospel from country to blues, with a voice recalling muses like David Gray, and even Jeff Buckley at times. His stories will take you from the blinding lights of Hollywood ("Go Lightly Hollywood"), to the invisible threats described in my fave 'Paper Tigers. In his latest record "The Ghost & The Scratch", all these spirits are captured together and let loose in an eclectic melange of Americana. - Mike Levine @Goldnuggets - The Deli Magazine


"Concert Picks: Voomz, Niki & The Dove, Doran Danoff…"

Doran Danoff | Sunday, March 18 | 12:00 am | 21+ | $12 | Bootleg Theater, Los Angeles, CA – Map | There ‘s a totally undeniable good-feeling, rich, nostalgic kind of singer-songwriter vibe we get from Doran Danoff. It’s almost as if he’s singing through a voice and genre from the late sixties through the seventies as well as a contemporary filter. With all of that, he manages takes us to moods and memories where we all want to go, and some that we don’t. Once in a blue moon does someone come around to successfully shake this particular type of one-man bared-heartedness in such a way that is universal. His full-length album, The Ghost & The Scratch, is of awesome variety, and yes, includes a piano and guest vocalist. Which means that hopefully we’re into a live treat (no one ever faulted wishful thinking). With Dave Poe - Beat Crave


"Concert Picks: Voomz, Niki & The Dove, Doran Danoff…"

Doran Danoff | Sunday, March 18 | 12:00 am | 21+ | $12 | Bootleg Theater, Los Angeles, CA – Map | There ‘s a totally undeniable good-feeling, rich, nostalgic kind of singer-songwriter vibe we get from Doran Danoff. It’s almost as if he’s singing through a voice and genre from the late sixties through the seventies as well as a contemporary filter. With all of that, he manages takes us to moods and memories where we all want to go, and some that we don’t. Once in a blue moon does someone come around to successfully shake this particular type of one-man bared-heartedness in such a way that is universal. His full-length album, The Ghost & The Scratch, is of awesome variety, and yes, includes a piano and guest vocalist. Which means that hopefully we’re into a live treat (no one ever faulted wishful thinking). With Dave Poe - Beat Crave


"SONGWRITER DORAN DANOFF TO RELEASE HIS DEBUT ALBUM "THE GHOST & THE SCRATCH" ON FEBRUARY 7"


Music Releases (more headlines) 12-20-2011

SONGWRITER DORAN DANOFF TO RELEASE HIS DEBUT ALBUM "THE GHOST & THE SCRATCH" ON FEBRUARY 7

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Email: kelly@kelleemackpr.com
Website: http://www.facebook.com/dorandanoffmusic

Los Angeles, CA, December 20, 2011 -- Los Angeles-based emerging artist, pianist, singer and composer, Doran Danoff, will release his new album "The Ghost & The Scratch" digitally on February 7, 2012 through his own label, Urbivor Records. With musical roots in jazz, blues, Americana and soul, Doran fuses a piano driven contemporary sound with a new rock style that pays homage to classic acoustic genres. Recorded at The Magic Shop in New York, "The Ghost & The Scratch" features 11 original tracks produced by T. Bone Burnett protege, Emile Kelman. The album also features performances by Leslie Stevens, Maxim Ludwig, David Poe and orchestrations by Olivier Manchon.

Doran explains his mindset when writing the album: "The songs represent a time in my life where I was coming out of a period deeply entrenched in classical, jazz and blues and was becoming increasingly interested in the world of American folk and rock." He continues by saying, "And the subject always seemed to draw from the same source. It was my reaction to watching a modern world around me start to implode by it's own recklessness."

Recently local L.A. radio station KCSN played the album's lead track "Old Moon Bay," which Doran describes as being about, "a metaphoric place that embodies all of the greatest moments of our life. It's a place that always seems so close yet so elusive. It's like the way your first taste of chocolate, your first kiss, or your first high will never ever be the same but you always believe it will be and never stop trying. The story is about this place "Old Moon Bay" but it's really about the world around it: the experiences of life, love, pain and happiness that create the ideal world of our hopes and dreams." Another album highlight is the title track "The Ghost & The Scratch," which Doran sums up as "The Ghost is the spirit, of all things, of all life. The Scratch is that brief moment in time, that one improbable opening to feel the pain of having lived and the joy of having loved, and the magic of knowing you had the chance. The simplicity of the music and the melody paired with the lush orchestrations of Olivier Machon make what is in reality a simple folk song into some kind of other worldly tale."

He just finished a month long residency at The Hotel Cafe in Hollywood, where he customized each night's set list by incorporating different guests, which included Ben Peeler (Wallflowers, Lisa Loeb, Shelby Lynn) on pedal steel and guitars, David Poe, Mariana Bell, Yonatan Elkayam and a special horn section echoing Stax-era Motown and modern soul.

Since the release of his first EP The Icarus Suite, Doran has received airplay from KCRW in Los Angeles, WFUV and WNYC in New York, KBFR in Boulder and WCFA in Cape May. Besides playing throughout his hometown and New York (where he recorded the album), Doran is starting to see the fruits of his labor come alive. He recently performed at an official CMJ Showcase during the CMJ Music Festival in New York in October and in addition, he signed a licensing deal with The Sounds Company.

"The Ghost & The Scratch" Track Listing:
1. Old Moon Bay
2. Go Lightly Hollywood
3. Friend of Mine (feat. Leslie Stevens)
4. Suicide Rag
5. Paper Tigers
6. Diamond Shores
7. Vagrant Woolf
8. The Ghost & The Scratch
9. Happy Days
10. Raised In The Dark
11. Back To You

Exclusive Single w/B-Side Track Listing:
1. Boys & Girls
2. I <3 U (I Love You)

### - Music Industry News Network


"MUSICIAN DORAN DANOFF CONTINUES MONTH LONG RESIDENCY AT THE HOTEL CAFE"

Three Dates Remaining: Saturday, November 5, 19 & 26

WHO: Los Angeles-based emerging artist, pianist, singer and composer, Doran Danoff locks down first month long residency at The Hotel Cafe after his recent official CMJ performance to promote his upcoming album, The Ghost & The Scratch, which will be
released digitally on December 13.

WHAT: With roots in jazz, blues, Americana and soul Doran fuses a piano driven rootsiness with a new rock style that pays homage to classic acoustic genres while incorporating
big beat rock groove and raucous blues and soul.

His new album, The Ghost & The Scratch features 13-tracks mixing up acoustic Americana styles with piano pop and rock. Emile Kelman produced the album and features guest performances by Leslie Stevens, Maxim Ludwig, David Poe and orchestrations by Oliver Manchon.

Doran’s live set includes a horn section echoing Stax-era Motown and modern soul. Though his backing band is a tight knit unit, expect special guests to accompany Doran throughout his residency.

Since the release of his first EP The Icarus Suite, Doran has received airplay from KCRW in Los Angeles, WFUV and WNYC in New York, KBFR in Boulder and WCFA in Cape May. Besides playing throughout his hometown and throughout New York (where he recorded the album), Doran is starting to see the fruits of his labor
having performed at an official CMJ Showcase during the CMJ Music Festival in New York last month. In addition, he signed a licensing deal with The Sounds Company and new management representation from Zimmanagement.

To listen to “Boys & Girls” off Doran’s debut album, The Ghost & The Scratch, please visit: http://dorandanoff.bandcamp.com/album/the-ghost-the-scratch-pre-release

WHEN: Saturday, November 5, 19 & 26, 2011
Doors: 8:00pm
Performance: 11pm
21+, $10

WHERE: The Hotel Cafe
1623 Cahuenga Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90028

www.dorandanoff.bandcamp.com
www.dorandanoff.com
www.facebook.com/dorandanoffmusic

# # #


For review tickets or more information on DORAN DANOFF, please contact:
Kelly MacGaunn
(818) 430-8926
kelly@kelleemackpr.com
- Kellee Mack PR


"Earbits Live Review - Doran Danoff Hotel Cafe (Hollywood) Residency"

Indie Blues Soul Pop Music with Brilliant Twinges of Folk & Americana is Alive and Well in Hollywood

by Scott Feldman, Artist Relations Manager, Earbits, Inc.

I had the distinct pleasure of catching Doran Danoff and his very large and talented band at Hotel Café in Los Angeles last Saturday night. It was the last show of a month long residency, and I’m sincerely grateful that I got the chance to see them. First off, homeboy can play the freakin’ piano, and the dudes that play a smattering of instruments behind him (including bass/drums/guitar/3 piece horn section/sometimes ukulele) have no problem keeping up.

** LIKE Doran Danoff on Facebook **

Doran opened his set with a pretty dirty sounding, almost vaudevillian tune which featured some really grimy and sexy sounding horns, followed it with a pretty classic sounding boogie woogie tune; the piano playing from which would impress the likes of Jelly Roll Morton or Jerry Lee Lewis.

After navigating a few more songs in the soul & blues genres, Doran stripped things down to focus on some music from his forthcoming album. The horn section took a break, and Danoff welcomed his ukulele player and female background vocalist on stage. The first song was phenomenal; the perfect blend of male and female voices. Each singer had to bend their individual notes, and stay in tune with themselves and each other – I was quite impressed.

** FOLLOW Doran Danoff on Twitter **

All in all, this dude (based on his overall lack of online presence, label and hype) is, in my opinion, undervalued, underrated and underappreciated. People go see him, and buy his music. Record industry: give him a deal of some sort, please. He’s eclectic and proficient enough to fit on a bill with anyone from The Black Keys to Fitz & The Tantrums to Deer Tick (Listen to Deer Tick on Earbits Radio) and a lot in between.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention the, always impeccable, mix from the sound engineer at hotel café. Vocals were always balanced, whether Doran was soulfully shouting over his horn section or softly blending with a chick vocalist, it always sounded clean and volume appropriate. A final kudos to Hotel Café: you seem to consistently book exciting, interesting and supremely talented artists, in a city where the dull, uninteresting and mildly talented run amok! - Earbits : blog


""Good Music Los Angeles""

Guys you have to check out Doran at the Hotel Cafe this Sat as the show changes every week in his one month Residency... If you enjoy brass...then this upcoming week is for you....
- Good Seanie music blog


""Good Music Los Angeles""

Guys you have to check out Doran at the Hotel Cafe this Sat as the show changes every week in his one month Residency... If you enjoy brass...then this upcoming week is for you....
- Good Seanie music blog


"Profile: Doran Danoff | Frontrunner Magazine"

Doran Danoff is a composer, musician, and band leader based in Los Angeles and Brooklyn. He has produced and arranged for a number of films, modern dance, and recording artists in New York and Los Angeles. His lineup includes: King Wilkie (Rounder Records), Sahara Smith (T. Bone Burnett), Irv Irving, Foster McGinty, and Dub Is A Weapon.

Recently, he released the first single from his debut album, The Ghost and the Scratch. After a six year tenure in New York City, he found himself out west for a part of the new album working alongside producer Emile Kelman, protégé of T. Bone Burnett. Described as a mix of Jack White and Dr. John in live performances, he leads his band Doran and the Violents and formed Brooklyn based CHILDE.

Doran was the musical director of The Black Magic Piano that showed at Frontrunner in January 2010 with choreographer Elizabeth Wilkinson and filmmaker Edward Symes.

He has released the first single “Boys & Girls” from his upcoming album The Ghost and the Scratch through his newsletter earlier this month. To get a sneak visit: http://dorandanoff.bandcam?p.com/

Doran and the new L.A. crew has been playing the Hotel Cafe for the past months. There next show is FRIDAY AUGUST 12TH. Word is he will continue bringing a horn section with him. - Frontrunner Magazine


"The Rev. John Delore and Doran Danoff collaborate on Hurricane Irene tribute song"


Aw8ingTheFlood profile

Aw8ingTheFlood A truly inspired NYC version of "Good Night, Irene" from Brooklyn's own @RevJohnDeLore. http://t.co/v4sCsCL 22 hours ago · reply · retweet · favorite
Aw8ingTheFlood profile

Aw8ingTheFlood Truly inspired song by the Reverend John DeLore http://t.co/VOwlpe7 21 hours ago · reply · retweet · favorite
Aw8ingTheFlood profile

Aw8ingTheFlood Truly inspired song by the Reverend John DeLore http://t.co/98FVVVQ 21 hours ago · reply · retweet · favorite
MartyRivers profile

MartyRivers @CountryMusicPri hello please allow me to introduce @MartyRivers http://t.co/Nl8Mt3m Grazzi :)) 7 hours ago · reply · retweet · favorite
CountryMusicPri profile

CountryMusicPri JAKE OWEN - BAREFOOT BLUE JEAN NIGHTS - the album is OUT TODAY ! here's a cool coupon for a hot album ... don't... http://t.co/uKApqZV 4 hours ago · reply · retweet · favorite
slowhand17 profile

slowhand17 RT @MartyRivers: @CountryMusicPri hello please allow me to introduce @MartyRivers http://t.co/Nl8Mt3m Grazzi :)) 2 hours ago · reply · retweet · favorite
Join the conversation
A celebration of snake-oil salesmen and rural-road rock messiahs, AwaitingTheFlood.com seeks the sounds of stadiums and barrooms alike, as long as it's got that whiskey-soaked wild-country spirit.
Tags
acoustic album album review alt-country american Americana Atlanta audience Austin Texas Awaiting The Flood bluegrass blues caption com Country country music Dolly Parton Drive-By Truckers Emmylou Harris folk guitar home jazz Jim Simpson John Prine Jon Black Lucinda Williams\' music Nashville news piano pop recording rock rockabilly rock and roll show song songwriter studio Those Darlins video voice way work
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* Heather Bond Trio Blows My Mind – August 13, 3rd and Lindsley Heather Bond Trio Blows My Mind – August 13, 3rd and Lindsley
August 28, 2011 20:08
* A Night with Buffalo Clover (and Others) – August 20, The Basement A Night with Buffalo Clover (and Others) – August 20, The Basement
August 28, 2011 19:08
* Good Night, Hurricane Irene — Rev. John DeLore Good Night, Hurricane Irene — Rev. John DeLore
August 28, 2011 15:08
* Lee MacDougall Speaks – Interview, August 13 Lee MacDougall Speaks – Interview, August 13
August 25, 2011 17:08
* Not So Loud: An Acoustic Evening with Bottle Rockets Not So Loud: An Acoustic Evening with Bottle Rockets
August 23, 2011 20:08

*
Maria in CT:
Fantastic review! I've been lucky enough to see Lee 3 times this year - all in
*
Jenny:
Great review! I have yet to see Lee play live but I have heard many great things
*
Tracy Purdy:
Glad to see this talented group of musicians doing so well! Can't wait to see th
*
Tara:
What a great review Jennifer! I was at this show and was equally impressed with
*
Nicole:
Oops, my bad I meant great article by Jennifer Barry & great picture by MD L

o Those Darlins FREE Vinyl and CD Giveaway! (45 comments)
o Contest Giveaway: Signed Copies of Marty Stuart's Ghost Train (33 comments)
o Contest Giveaway: Signed copy of Rosanne Cash memoir, Composed (26 comments)
o Those Darlins - "Screws Get Loose" Signed CD Giveaway (22 comments)
o Jakob Dylan “Seeing Things” Columbia/Starbucks Entertainment (9 comments)
o Earl Scruggs (7 comments)
o Giveaway: Signed John Prine CD! (7 comments)
o Those Darlins - Those Darlins (self titled debut) Oh Wow Dang Records (6 comments)
o Q&A with The Secret Sisters – (Way More Than 12 Questions) (6 comments)
o If Walls Could Talk - Lee MacDougall EP Review (6 comments)

acoustic album album review alt-country american Americana Atlanta audience Austin Texas Awaiting The Flood bluegrass blues caption com Country country music Dolly Parton Drive-By Truckers Emmylou Harris folk guitar home jazz Jim Simpson John Prine Jon Black Lucinda Williams\' music Nashville news piano pop recording rock rockabilly rock and roll show song songwriter studio Those Darlins video voice way work

Good Night, Hurricane Irene — Rev. John DeLore
Artists, Features, Rev. John DeLore — By Jim Simpson on August 28, 2011 3:06 pm

As a Florida native, I’ve been through a handful of major hurricanes. Now, living in the Georgia Piedmont, I’ve also experienced the horrifying fury of a tornado. It tore off the top of my neighbor’s house and obliterated my aluminum shed, which I never did find, not one piece of it.

Nature truly is — to use a word tossed around much too often these days — awesome. Among the uprooted ancient oaks, the smashed cars, the flooded streets, the lives turned upside-down and the lives lost, there are artists creating beauty from impending chaos and destruction.

So many of us have heard the song in our heads lately, that old Leadbelly classic, “Good Night, Irene,” and seen numerous images of the title spraypainted on plywood boards nailed over windows. Now, Brooklyn singer/songwriter Rev. John DeLore has taken that song and tweaked the lyrics, giving it a timely Gotham City theme, a musical plea to spare the island metropolis. DeLore recorded a solo acoustic version around 3pm yesterday (Aug. 28), emailed it to a number of his musician friends across the city’s five boroughs, who in turn recorded additional parts and emailed them back to him. DeLore (a part-time sound engineer with WNYC’s Studio 360) then mixed the 19 tracks (there’s even a Glockenspiel!) for the final version, all of it conceived, recorded and produced within a 10-hour span.

DeLore added a note to Irene. “Thanks for not knocking the electricity out while we were putting this together.” - Awaiting The Flood


"The Rev. John Delore and Doran Danoff collaborate on Hurricane Irene tribute song"


Aw8ingTheFlood profile

Aw8ingTheFlood A truly inspired NYC version of "Good Night, Irene" from Brooklyn's own @RevJohnDeLore. http://t.co/v4sCsCL 22 hours ago · reply · retweet · favorite
Aw8ingTheFlood profile

Aw8ingTheFlood Truly inspired song by the Reverend John DeLore http://t.co/VOwlpe7 21 hours ago · reply · retweet · favorite
Aw8ingTheFlood profile

Aw8ingTheFlood Truly inspired song by the Reverend John DeLore http://t.co/98FVVVQ 21 hours ago · reply · retweet · favorite
MartyRivers profile

MartyRivers @CountryMusicPri hello please allow me to introduce @MartyRivers http://t.co/Nl8Mt3m Grazzi :)) 7 hours ago · reply · retweet · favorite
CountryMusicPri profile

CountryMusicPri JAKE OWEN - BAREFOOT BLUE JEAN NIGHTS - the album is OUT TODAY ! here's a cool coupon for a hot album ... don't... http://t.co/uKApqZV 4 hours ago · reply · retweet · favorite
slowhand17 profile

slowhand17 RT @MartyRivers: @CountryMusicPri hello please allow me to introduce @MartyRivers http://t.co/Nl8Mt3m Grazzi :)) 2 hours ago · reply · retweet · favorite
Join the conversation
A celebration of snake-oil salesmen and rural-road rock messiahs, AwaitingTheFlood.com seeks the sounds of stadiums and barrooms alike, as long as it's got that whiskey-soaked wild-country spirit.
Tags
acoustic album album review alt-country american Americana Atlanta audience Austin Texas Awaiting The Flood bluegrass blues caption com Country country music Dolly Parton Drive-By Truckers Emmylou Harris folk guitar home jazz Jim Simpson John Prine Jon Black Lucinda Williams\' music Nashville news piano pop recording rock rockabilly rock and roll show song songwriter studio Those Darlins video voice way work
Blogroll

* American Twang
* Captain Obvious
* Dead Journalist
* District Noise
* Front Porch Musings
* Its Great To Be Alive
* More Cowbelle
* Nine Bullets
* Record Dept.
* The 9513

Partners

* Country Music Pride
* Driftwood Media Group

* Recent
* Comments
* Popular
* Tags

* Heather Bond Trio Blows My Mind – August 13, 3rd and Lindsley Heather Bond Trio Blows My Mind – August 13, 3rd and Lindsley
August 28, 2011 20:08
* A Night with Buffalo Clover (and Others) – August 20, The Basement A Night with Buffalo Clover (and Others) – August 20, The Basement
August 28, 2011 19:08
* Good Night, Hurricane Irene — Rev. John DeLore Good Night, Hurricane Irene — Rev. John DeLore
August 28, 2011 15:08
* Lee MacDougall Speaks – Interview, August 13 Lee MacDougall Speaks – Interview, August 13
August 25, 2011 17:08
* Not So Loud: An Acoustic Evening with Bottle Rockets Not So Loud: An Acoustic Evening with Bottle Rockets
August 23, 2011 20:08

*
Maria in CT:
Fantastic review! I've been lucky enough to see Lee 3 times this year - all in
*
Jenny:
Great review! I have yet to see Lee play live but I have heard many great things
*
Tracy Purdy:
Glad to see this talented group of musicians doing so well! Can't wait to see th
*
Tara:
What a great review Jennifer! I was at this show and was equally impressed with
*
Nicole:
Oops, my bad I meant great article by Jennifer Barry & great picture by MD L

o Those Darlins FREE Vinyl and CD Giveaway! (45 comments)
o Contest Giveaway: Signed Copies of Marty Stuart's Ghost Train (33 comments)
o Contest Giveaway: Signed copy of Rosanne Cash memoir, Composed (26 comments)
o Those Darlins - "Screws Get Loose" Signed CD Giveaway (22 comments)
o Jakob Dylan “Seeing Things” Columbia/Starbucks Entertainment (9 comments)
o Earl Scruggs (7 comments)
o Giveaway: Signed John Prine CD! (7 comments)
o Those Darlins - Those Darlins (self titled debut) Oh Wow Dang Records (6 comments)
o Q&A with The Secret Sisters – (Way More Than 12 Questions) (6 comments)
o If Walls Could Talk - Lee MacDougall EP Review (6 comments)

acoustic album album review alt-country american Americana Atlanta audience Austin Texas Awaiting The Flood bluegrass blues caption com Country country music Dolly Parton Drive-By Truckers Emmylou Harris folk guitar home jazz Jim Simpson John Prine Jon Black Lucinda Williams\' music Nashville news piano pop recording rock rockabilly rock and roll show song songwriter studio Those Darlins video voice way work

Good Night, Hurricane Irene — Rev. John DeLore
Artists, Features, Rev. John DeLore — By Jim Simpson on August 28, 2011 3:06 pm

As a Florida native, I’ve been through a handful of major hurricanes. Now, living in the Georgia Piedmont, I’ve also experienced the horrifying fury of a tornado. It tore off the top of my neighbor’s house and obliterated my aluminum shed, which I never did find, not one piece of it.

Nature truly is — to use a word tossed around much too often these days — awesome. Among the uprooted ancient oaks, the smashed cars, the flooded streets, the lives turned upside-down and the lives lost, there are artists creating beauty from impending chaos and destruction.

So many of us have heard the song in our heads lately, that old Leadbelly classic, “Good Night, Irene,” and seen numerous images of the title spraypainted on plywood boards nailed over windows. Now, Brooklyn singer/songwriter Rev. John DeLore has taken that song and tweaked the lyrics, giving it a timely Gotham City theme, a musical plea to spare the island metropolis. DeLore recorded a solo acoustic version around 3pm yesterday (Aug. 28), emailed it to a number of his musician friends across the city’s five boroughs, who in turn recorded additional parts and emailed them back to him. DeLore (a part-time sound engineer with WNYC’s Studio 360) then mixed the 19 tracks (there’s even a Glockenspiel!) for the final version, all of it conceived, recorded and produced within a 10-hour span.

DeLore added a note to Irene. “Thanks for not knocking the electricity out while we were putting this together.” - Awaiting The Flood


"Inter-Web Collaboration in honor if Hurricane Irene"

Monday, August 29, 2011
HURRICANE IRENE

The Reverend John DeLore And Friends, "Goodnight Irene"
By Dave Bry @ 11:00 am

"I told my girlfriend I had the notion to write my own NYC-based version of 'Good Night, Irene,' and her roommate sent me the link to your post on The Awl, 'Twenty Three Versions of What May Be the Last Song You'll Ever Hear.' That spurred me on to write version #24. I'm a singer-songwriter living in Brooklyn, NY, and like most folks, I was sitting in my apartment yesterday as the storm rolled in. After I re-wrote the lyrics & recorded a simple solo-acoustic version, I got the idea to send it out to a bunch of my fellow NYC musicians, figuring they were also sitting in their apartments, drinking beer & watching the weather channel."
—The Reverend John DeLore and friends put the weekend's weather to good use.
- The Awl


"DORAN live @ 92Y (NYC)"

5/23/10 11:33 AM
Resident Noise! | Event Review
Page 1 of 9

OFFICIAL EVENT PAGE-->http://bit.ly/resnoisemay15
POSTED BY RESIDENT NOISE!
LABELS: GRETA GERTLER, JO WILLIAMSON, RESIDENT NOISE, UNIVERSAL
THUMP
Pete Mitchell, Doran & The Violents bring the
violence!
photos by Ambyr D'Amato

Doran Danoff and his killing country-tinged blues, soul, rock
explosion tore the roof off 92Y Tribeca Cafe on Saturday night.
Doran's songs remind me of a psychedelic wild-west shoot out
between Tom Waits and Jeff Buckley and his meaty arrangements
brought the house down. In addition to Doran's fine piano chops, The
Violents featured banjo, electric and acoustic guitars, upright bass
and a tasteful dose of drums.
Resident Noise! @ 92Y Tribeca Cafe

PAST ARTISTS
Doran & The Violents / Pete Mitchell - Resident Noise!


"DORAN DANOFF live on Sirius XM radio @ The Living Room (NYC)"


FROM THE LIVING ROOM TO THE LOFT
ON SIRIUS/XM
XM Radio Channel 50 °°° Sirius Radio Channel 29
From The Living Room to The Loft is an hour of today's most
celebrated artists, recorded live at the Living Room in New
York City's Lower East Side.
A new show premieres every other Sunday at 7pm EST.
Encore presentations on following Tuesdays at 12noon
Upcoming Broadcasts
Sunday 3/14 – Starling Crush / OneEskimo
Sunday 3/28 - Doran Danoff / Kelly Ryan
Sunday 4/11 - Jim Campilongo
.
- The Living Room NYC


"New Brooklyn Artist rocks the House in BK!!"

Los Angeles import to Brooklyn pianist and singer DORAN DANOFF brings his indie-swagger and eerily poetic lyrics to The Bitter End as he rocks the piano with his band THE VIOLENTS (Steve Lewis, Taylor Floreth, Russ Manning). This up-and comer songwriter and singer is making his way into the ears and hearts of NYC music fans with his modern piano rock. Expect a tasty set with flavors of soul, a dash of jazz, and an American folk sensibility to boot. - The L Magazine


"Doran featured on "Myth of the Heart" new record by Sahara Smith (Produced by T. Bone Burnett)"

Texas singer-songwriter Sahara Smith creates Cinemascope-like wide-screen portraits of romantic passion, loneliness and unrequited love in her richly impressive, intensely soulful debut album.

“Blue light breaking on the window glass and cool wind shaking in the long white grass, the ocean speaks the language of the dawn,” she sings in the achingly beautiful opening track, “Thousand Secrets,” which quickly places this 21-year-old in the Emmylou Harris-Alison Krauss camp of country-rock singers of exquisite tastefulness.

“Train Man” is a Chris Isaak spaghetti western-soaked adventure in the search for love on the wrong side of the tracks. In “Are You Lonely,” Smith preemptively tells a would-be lover, “It’s OK if you forget me in the morning/I’ll forget you too.” She’s throwing in the towel after fruitless attempts to find true love when she sings, “Why don’t we treat it like a real thing” in the deliciously eerie “The Real Thing.”

She’s got an eminently empathetic partner in producer Emile Kelman, who’s learned his lessons well studying under T Bone Burnett. Kelman gives her songs plenty of sonic air in which to breathe, supporting her deeply felt takes on matters of the heart with painterly applications of yearning guitar and marrow-deep bass and drums served up by Burnett stalwarts Marc Ribot, Dennis Crouch, and Jay Bellerose, respectively.

If Smith and her team err occasionally on the side of self-restraint, it’s hard to argue in an age of pop music in which excess is the rule rather than the exception. And as any good storyteller knows, myths are better whispered than shouted.

--Randy Lewis

Sahara Smith
- Los Angeles Times


"Slumber Brew- Doran Danoff (Bridges & Tunnels)"

Doran Danoff is almost completely unknown, and “Bridges and Tunnels” is just a purely great song. Production is sparse. Production is too often the crutch artists lean on to compensate for unfounded writing. Doran uses only his voice, his story, and his piano and the outcome is heart wrenching. The lyrical intent is broad in ambition, but he is bold for not hiding behind confused metaphor and ‘self-congratulatory’ hip. I have had this song in my iTunes since 9.11.09, and is #6 on my most played list. - Audio Absinthe


"DORAN on "Peach Red" by Foster McGinty"

CD Review: Foster McGinty “Peach Red”
February 12, 2010 by Matheson Kamin
When people say that there is no one out there creating straight-out rock music anymore, they just don’t know where to look. Throughout the last decade, many bands and musicians have been going back to the bands and musicians that were big in decades past and taking these people as influences. As a result of this, many classic rock sounds are making their ways back into the music being made by today’s musicians. One of the people who have incorporated a lot of the classic rock sound into their modern day music is the musician Foster McGinty. When listening to Peach Red, the debut album from Foster McGinty, the first thing that immediately comes to mind is that McGinty seems to channel musicians like Hendrix, and bands like Cream or any of the other bands that were around at the end of the sixties and beginning of the seventies. In fact, had Foster McGinty had been alive and about 20 years old at the time of Woodstock, he could easily had fit with the rest of the musicians that had taken to the stage at that famous gathering of some of the most popular musical acts of the time.
Foster McGinty’s writing, guitar playing and singing are perfect to create a classic rock sound, but to create the whole package; McGinty had some help in creating the music on Peach Red. Along with McGinty, the other musicians on Peach Red include: Trifon Dimitrov on electric bass, David Butler on drums, and Doran Danoff on organ & Wurlitzer. These musicians help to create a wonderful musical combo that sound like they were born to play this style of rock. And together, the four players make a combo that would give any classic rock lover plenty to enjoy with their style of music.
Other things that make the listener think that Foster McGinty’s music fits into a different time period would be the subject matter of the songs and the production value of the music. The songs written by McGinty reflect back to a time when people were interested in peace, love, and harmony. When not singing about the emotion of love, songs like “Dream Catcher,” ”Turquoise,” “Can’t Help But Shine” and others from McGinty contain elements of colors, sights, and feelings. McGinty even takes a stand against conflict with his anthem “War Machine”.
When talking about the feeling of the album, the production value of the music includes things like music fading from one channel into another, which creates a stereo effect, the use of a wah-wah pedal, and echo effects on the vocals, all of which give the album a great retro feeling. If it was McGinty’s desire to make an album that takes the listener back to a time that featured some of the most creative writing, he certainly achieved that with his debut album of Peach Red.
Peach Red features ten tracks of great classic rock. Starting with “Can’t Help But Shine,” and going all the way through to “My Time of Uncertainty,” there isn’t one track that will disappoint. Along with “Can’t Help But Shine,” some of the best tracks to jam out to include: “Hard Jelly,” “Burning Bee Hive,” and “Darlyn Giver”. These and other tracks are great to listen to and hard not to sing along with.
If you like people like Hendrix, Clapton, Cream, or other bands from that time period, Foster McGinty has created a great release of music that you need to hear. McGinty’s Peach Red is the ultimate time machine to the era when people were making the style that has since been called “Classic Rock”. To discover the music of Foster McGinty, you can find him at www.fostermcginty.com. You can also find him on MySpace at www.myspace.com/myfostermcginty.
To purchase a copy of the album, click on the album cover below:
- Rock and Roll Report


"DORAN selected for Cape May Compilation CD"

DORAN's song "Joy Is Your Prize" from his 2008 release "THE ICARUS SUITE" was selected for the compilation CD of the SS Cape May Singer/Songwriter Festival and Music Conference - SS Cape May


"Grammy Award nominated Engineer Ari Raskin"

"Dynamic, impulsive piano playing with smooth, rocking vocals and major soul... Very memorable songs too. Certainly an artist to look out for in 2009"

Ari Raskin

Senior Engineer at Chung King Studios, NY, NY
grammy award-nominated engineer who has worked with Kanye West, Alicia Keys, D'Angelo, and many more. - Chung King Studios


"No Country Presents: Walking Man, Doran Danoff, & The Walking Guys | Tuesday, May 24 @ Acme Feed & Seed"

DORAN DANOFF

A genre bending indie artist, Doran Danoff’s sound is beyond just hard to pin down. With the most extensive list of influences on his FB page that we have ever seen, it’s safe to say his tastes are diverse. We think his songwriting most heavily evokes soul, jazz and rock, however, elements of folk, classical and even pop music are sprinkled in for dramatic affect. Below you can sample his most recent release, “Young Love”, which will be the first single off his sophomore LP, set to drop sometime this summer. The track highlights his songwriting and showcases his ever evolving production. Don’t miss a second of this rising artist’s set. - No Country For New Nashville


"[REVIEW + PHOTOS] Walking Man, Doran Danoff, & The Walking Guys | 5.24.16 @ Acme Feed & Seed"

Next up was Doran Danoff and his impressive stable of musicians. One of the larger bands to grace our showcase with Acme, Doran’s group featured him on keys/lead vocal, tenor sax, baritone sax, trumpet, electric guitar and bass, plus drums. From the jump, it was obvious every single one of them had performed together before. The seemingly well rehearsed set was as clean and precise as any we’ve hosted, and I was thoroughly impressed with the frontman’s natural flowing charisma. After sound check was complete, and the players were in place, they immediately they hit us with the funk. It was their first time ever playing Nashville, let alone the hallowed gutters of Broadway, and they did not disappoint. Danoff was truly the band leader, allowing all the performers the chance to shine, although the brass bravado is what I was liked the best. When he sent the brass section off to focus on a more stripped down interpretation of “Tallest Man,” I was genuinely moved by the quality of his lyrics as well.

His brass returned for a newer song, “World War Five,” and brought the vibe back up to full blown rock ’n’ roll dance party. He writes arrangements similar to an Elton John or Billy Joel, but manages to keep it extra fresh and more grounded than the sometimes flamboyant and slightly ego-centric piano-man super stars. His first ever attempt at performing “Party Treats” live with a band also went exceedingly well, and got most of the people still in attendance on their feet. By the time they’d finished it was safe to say their Music City debut was an astounding success. - No Country For New Nashville


Discography

"King of Crown City" full-length LP (Urbivor Records) 2018

"So Bad" (Urbivor Records) 2017 

"Winning" (Urbivor Records) 2017

"Unpeeled" by Cage The Elephant (RCA Records) 2017 - original string arr. by Doran Danoff

"Young Love" (Urbivor Records) 2016 

"The Ghost & The Scratch" (Urbivor Records)
2012 - Debut full-length record from DORAN DANOFF
featuring 13 original songs written & performed by Doran
Produced by Emile Kelman

"Little John The Conqueror"
2011 full-length release by The Rev. John Delore
Doran featured on piano, organ, and vocals

"Myth of the Heart" (Playing In Traffic Records)
2010 full-length release by Sahara Smith
Produced by T. Bone Burnett
Doran featured on piano

"King Wilkie: The Wilkie Family Singers" (Casa Nueva Industries)
2009 full-length
Doran featured on piano, accordion, harmonium, and harmonica

"The Icarus Suite" (Urbivor Records)
2008 debut EP from Doran Danoff

"Irv Irving"
2008 release
Doran featured on piano, harmonium, accordion

"Peach Red"
2008 record by Foster McGInty
Doran on organ, wurlitzer, and piano

RADIO AIRPLAY:
KCRW (Los Angeles) - DJ Garth Trinidad
KPFK (Los Angeles) - DJ Steve Martin "MoodIISwing"
WFUV (NYC)
EAST VILLAGE RADIO (NYC)

Photos

Bio

Singer, keyboardist, songwriter and composer DORAN DANOFF is an emerging indie soul & rock artist from Los Angeles, CA with a piano based sound that fuses soul, rock, jazz and folk in his original pop music. He has been featured nationally on radio stations including the world famous KCRW and KCSN in Los Angeles, as well as WFUV and WNYC in New York, Lightning 100 in Nashville, and on Good Morning LA. Doran has performed extensively across the U.S. in concert halls, clubs, and music festivals. 

Doran's brand new full length album "King of Crown City" is now available on Urbivor Records with limited edition orange vinyl and CDs for sale. In 2018 the single "So Bad" was featured on the Fox show "Lucifer." 2017 saw the single "Winning" in the feature film "Lego: Ninjago" (Warner Bros.) as well as the single "So Bad" which appears in an episode of the FX show "You're The Worst." The modern soul-funk tracks are the first two singles off of the new LP "King of Crown City." The new album from Doran features 9 original songs,the bulk of which were recorded live in studio at the now-shuttered Crown City Studios in Pasadena, CA. The LP features a party-ready collection of original soul, blues, and rock influenced songs that bring an updated and fresh approach to classic styles and vintage sounds.

DORAN is the son of world famous Yemenite-Israeli folk singer Hedva Amrani and had a musical upbringing rich in the heritage of his family's Yemenite culture. Growing up in Los Angeles he fused his Middle-Eastern roots with the influences of urban L.A. culture and the sounds and styles of American music. A self-taught jazz and blues pianist,he began playing in local underground bands in L.A. Eventually landing in NYC, DORAN became well known as a pianist and keyboardist and as a composer where he found much of his early success. It wasn't until 2013 that he revealed himself as a singer and songwriter on the 2013 full-length record “The Ghost & The Scratch.” 

In addition to his work as a recording artist and songwriter DORAN has collaborated with major and indie artists including composing string arrangements for the 2017 album "Unpeeled" from Cage The Elephant, performing and writing with artists including David Poe, John West, actor/musician Bryan Greenberg, Hollis Brown, Ashley Leone, Matt White, Sahara Smith, ZZ Ward, Leslie Stevens, LIZ (Mad Decent), King Wilkie, The Rev. John Delore, Bonnie Peese, amongst many others. 


His work has been used in film, television, and in commercials including original songs and musical scores for award-winning films and documentaries shown in festivals throughout the world. Visit iMDB for more info.


www.dorandanoff.com

Social Media: 

www.twitter.com/dorandanoff

www.facebook.com/dorandanoffmusic

For interviews, booking requests, and additional information contact:

urbivorrecords@gmail.com

RIYL (Recommended if you like)

The Dap Kings, Ray Charles, Jamie Cullum, Ben Folds, Ray Lamontagne, Tom Odell, M Ward, Ruffus Wainwright, Harry Nillsson, Beirut, Fleet Foxes, Jeff Buckley, Jack White, Dr. Dog, The Band, Dr. John, Nina Simone, Feist, Fitz & The Tantrums...

Los Angeles venues where DORAN has performed include:

The Mint, The Hotel Cafe, The Bootleg Theater, The Satellite, Silverlake Lounge, Molly Malones, The Whiskey A Go Go, The Roxy, The Key Club, The Viper Room,Hard Rock Cafe -Universal City, Bar 1642, Room 5 Lounge

New York venues where DORAN has performed include:

Highline Ballroom, Bowery Ballroom, The Bitter End, Rockwood Music Hall, Joe's Pub


Band Members