Drew32
Gig Seeker Pro

Drew32

Troy, Michigan, United States | INDIE

Troy, Michigan, United States | INDIE
Solo Hip Hop Hip Hop

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

Music

Press


BY JOSEPH ABRO
OU News Bureau

Drew32 is becoming a nationally known name.
Andrew Parks — a Michigan rap artist who goes by the name of Drew32 — has produced and performed his music for more than eight years. His work has put the 21-year-old in the spotlight.
The Oakland University student from Auburn Hills is studying to get his degree in marketing. He said he believes knowledge of business is important.
Drew32 has a self-described “do it yourself” attitude. He does the majority of his producing and recording in his own home because he has all the essential equipment.
“No one’s going to hand you anything,” Drew32 said.

“I took it upon myself to learn how to produce my own beats, record my own vocals, design my own mixtape covers and website, and when it came to getting my music out, I took the initiative to go out and develop relationships with the right people who have shown me support throughout my career.”
ESPN’s widely viewed sports debate show, First Take featured Drew32’s music throughout February. He’s also recently had his music played nationally on Shade 45, on Sirius XM satellite radio.
“When I started off it was definitely more of a local thing, but I never really considered it a hobby because I was constantly putting out music and my fan base was slowly but surely growing,” Drew32 said. “It led to me to meeting my manager, Mark Hicks, and he is well-connected in the music industry.”
Hicks was a co-manager of D-12, Eminem’s old group.
Drew32 opened for J. Cole in 2011 and also Gym Class Heroes at last year’s Grizzlypalooza part two at Meadowbrook Music Festival on Oakland University’s campus.
He’s also performed on the same stage as The New Boyz, Kirko Bangz, Hoodie Allen, Timeflies and Travis Porter. He’s collaborated with artists such as Royce da 5’9”, Jon Connor and Shorty Da Prince.
He recently was in Austin, Texas, to perform at the SXSW Music Festival.
“Along the way, while putting out eight mixtapes online, I met a lot of DJs that would spin my tracks, including the Channel 955 Bomb Squad, who helped me gain a lot of my local support,” Drew32 said.
DJ Skee, who has been recognized as one of the most influential figures in today’s entertainment business by both Forbes and Billboard magazine, hosted his latest mixtape, “Label Me.”
Drew32’s remix of Drake’s “Headlines” has more than 300,000 views on YouTube. His new music video for “I Am King” featuring Jon Connor was digitally distributed by Empire Distribution. The music video can be viewed on his new VEVO channel.
“Drew’s success has been a culmination of something we’ve been working on for a few years now — this is just the fruits and spoils of all the development and hard work Drew has put in,” Hicks said.
“I’ve been doing this for over 20 years now and I can tell this is climaxing at the right point at the right time. This is how artists break.” - OU News Bureau


BY JOSEPH ABRO
OU News Bureau

Drew32 is becoming a nationally known name.
Andrew Parks — a Michigan rap artist who goes by the name of Drew32 — has produced and performed his music for more than eight years. His work has put the 21-year-old in the spotlight.
The Oakland University student from Auburn Hills is studying to get his degree in marketing. He said he believes knowledge of business is important.
Drew32 has a self-described “do it yourself” attitude. He does the majority of his producing and recording in his own home because he has all the essential equipment.
“No one’s going to hand you anything,” Drew32 said.

“I took it upon myself to learn how to produce my own beats, record my own vocals, design my own mixtape covers and website, and when it came to getting my music out, I took the initiative to go out and develop relationships with the right people who have shown me support throughout my career.”
ESPN’s widely viewed sports debate show, First Take featured Drew32’s music throughout February. He’s also recently had his music played nationally on Shade 45, on Sirius XM satellite radio.
“When I started off it was definitely more of a local thing, but I never really considered it a hobby because I was constantly putting out music and my fan base was slowly but surely growing,” Drew32 said. “It led to me to meeting my manager, Mark Hicks, and he is well-connected in the music industry.”
Hicks was a co-manager of D-12, Eminem’s old group.
Drew32 opened for J. Cole in 2011 and also Gym Class Heroes at last year’s Grizzlypalooza part two at Meadowbrook Music Festival on Oakland University’s campus.
He’s also performed on the same stage as The New Boyz, Kirko Bangz, Hoodie Allen, Timeflies and Travis Porter. He’s collaborated with artists such as Royce da 5’9”, Jon Connor and Shorty Da Prince.
He recently was in Austin, Texas, to perform at the SXSW Music Festival.
“Along the way, while putting out eight mixtapes online, I met a lot of DJs that would spin my tracks, including the Channel 955 Bomb Squad, who helped me gain a lot of my local support,” Drew32 said.
DJ Skee, who has been recognized as one of the most influential figures in today’s entertainment business by both Forbes and Billboard magazine, hosted his latest mixtape, “Label Me.”
Drew32’s remix of Drake’s “Headlines” has more than 300,000 views on YouTube. His new music video for “I Am King” featuring Jon Connor was digitally distributed by Empire Distribution. The music video can be viewed on his new VEVO channel.
“Drew’s success has been a culmination of something we’ve been working on for a few years now — this is just the fruits and spoils of all the development and hard work Drew has put in,” Hicks said.
“I’ve been doing this for over 20 years now and I can tell this is climaxing at the right point at the right time. This is how artists break.” - OU News Bureau


Andrew Michael Parks, better known by his stage name Drew32, is a Greek-American rapper, record producer and songwriter. Drew32 began producing, rapping, writing and recording music at age 13.

He first gained some national notoriety when his music video “Beyond Me” was added to FuseTV and Comcast OnDemand in early 2010. He is also known for performances at various concerts in Michigan and at national events including the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, and the SXSW Music Conference in Austin, Texas.

Drew32 has performed shows with J. Cole, Gym Class Heroes, The New Boyz, Kirko Bangz, Travis Porter, Royce Da 5’9?, and more. In 2012, Drew32 was one of 18 artists in the United States selected by Billboard magazine to compete in the 2012 Billboard Music Awards Battle of the Bands competition. Several sources have identified Drew32 as an up and coming artist including an August 2011 feature article on MTV Rapfix that indicated “Detroit rapper and producer Drew32 is up next”. In a fall 2012 article, Ambassador Magazine called Drew32 “Detroit’s next big thing".

Drew32 recently released a mixtape with DJ Skee entitled, “Label Me”, which featured tracks with Jon Connor, Royce Da 5’9?, and Shorty Da Prince (of BET 106 & Park). One of the fan favorites from “Label Me” was the track “I Am King” featuring Jon Connor, which is currently getting airplay on Sirius XM Shade 45. The music video for “I Am King” is on VEVO, distributed through Empire Distribution.For more information about Drew32, please visit his official website, www.drew32.com and check out my one on one with him below:

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): When did you realize that music was something you had to do?

Drew32: “I first started hearing hip-hop & rap music when I was like eight or nine years old, but I first made a song when I was like nine years old with the help of my dad. I don’t think I made my full commitment to music until my senior year of high school, because that was the first year that I decided to do music over basketball. I’ve been playing basketball since I was a toddler, and varsity basketball in high school, and my senior year I decided to not even try out for the team, because I wanted to pursue my music.”

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): How many times do you often get compared to Eminem and how has his style influenced your music?

Drew32: “I would think that I would get compared, but I actually don’t as often…people usually compare me to Drake or Lupe Fiasco. Eminem has definitely influenced my style, especially coming from Michigan, he was all over the place when I was falling in love with hip-hop.”

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): What other artist would you say influence your style of music?

Drew32: “I would definitely have to say Royce Da 5'9" he has been a huge influence, in terms of how I structure my rhymes and my flow. Kanye West a lot, he makes the dopest beats ever, and that’s important because I also produce my own music as well, and the fact that he has the underground respect as well as the mainstream respect, and that influences me as well. Lastly, Dr. Dre, everything he has done has been great.”

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): How difficult was it to develop a fan base, a voice, and overall acceptance from the hip-hop culture?

Drew32: “Definitely! I’ve been rapping since I was ten years old, and I feel like I still don’t get the acceptance after so long. I’m still building my fan base, and that’s something I’m working on every single day. In terms of my voice, I don’t think I found my voice until 2010, 2011, because everything before that was more experimental.”

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): You’re very involved with your music, how important is that to you?

Drew32: “I think it’s what makes any artist authentic, there’s a lot of people that can rap, but it really gets down to those people who can make their own beats, record it, mix it, master it, and do the cover art work…I’m there from beginning to end of a project. Growing up I didn’t have money to pay for studio time, my dad believed in me and purchased some early stat up music software for me, and that made me do everything by myself. To me it makes the music more real, and they can understand the artist better because the artist involved in the whole process.”

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): What are three of your career aspirations?

Drew32: “My main thing is that I love making music, if I can make music and make a living out of it and be able to provide for my future family, then I would be happy. I would also like to get into doing movies, and make my label even bigger, and definitely go on tour.”

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): How competitive is the rap world, and what do you think it takes to go mainstream?

Drew32: “I think it’s definitely competitive until you really find your lane…there are a lot of artist from Detroit that are making moves, but I don’t necessarily view them as competition, - Examiner.com


Andrew Michael Parks, better known by his stage name Drew32, is a Greek-American rapper, record producer and songwriter. Drew32 began producing, rapping, writing and recording music at age 13.

He first gained some national notoriety when his music video “Beyond Me” was added to FuseTV and Comcast OnDemand in early 2010. He is also known for performances at various concerts in Michigan and at national events including the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, and the SXSW Music Conference in Austin, Texas.

Drew32 has performed shows with J. Cole, Gym Class Heroes, The New Boyz, Kirko Bangz, Travis Porter, Royce Da 5’9?, and more. In 2012, Drew32 was one of 18 artists in the United States selected by Billboard magazine to compete in the 2012 Billboard Music Awards Battle of the Bands competition. Several sources have identified Drew32 as an up and coming artist including an August 2011 feature article on MTV Rapfix that indicated “Detroit rapper and producer Drew32 is up next”. In a fall 2012 article, Ambassador Magazine called Drew32 “Detroit’s next big thing".

Drew32 recently released a mixtape with DJ Skee entitled, “Label Me”, which featured tracks with Jon Connor, Royce Da 5’9?, and Shorty Da Prince (of BET 106 & Park). One of the fan favorites from “Label Me” was the track “I Am King” featuring Jon Connor, which is currently getting airplay on Sirius XM Shade 45. The music video for “I Am King” is on VEVO, distributed through Empire Distribution.For more information about Drew32, please visit his official website, www.drew32.com and check out my one on one with him below:

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): When did you realize that music was something you had to do?

Drew32: “I first started hearing hip-hop & rap music when I was like eight or nine years old, but I first made a song when I was like nine years old with the help of my dad. I don’t think I made my full commitment to music until my senior year of high school, because that was the first year that I decided to do music over basketball. I’ve been playing basketball since I was a toddler, and varsity basketball in high school, and my senior year I decided to not even try out for the team, because I wanted to pursue my music.”

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): How many times do you often get compared to Eminem and how has his style influenced your music?

Drew32: “I would think that I would get compared, but I actually don’t as often…people usually compare me to Drake or Lupe Fiasco. Eminem has definitely influenced my style, especially coming from Michigan, he was all over the place when I was falling in love with hip-hop.”

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): What other artist would you say influence your style of music?

Drew32: “I would definitely have to say Royce Da 5'9" he has been a huge influence, in terms of how I structure my rhymes and my flow. Kanye West a lot, he makes the dopest beats ever, and that’s important because I also produce my own music as well, and the fact that he has the underground respect as well as the mainstream respect, and that influences me as well. Lastly, Dr. Dre, everything he has done has been great.”

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): How difficult was it to develop a fan base, a voice, and overall acceptance from the hip-hop culture?

Drew32: “Definitely! I’ve been rapping since I was ten years old, and I feel like I still don’t get the acceptance after so long. I’m still building my fan base, and that’s something I’m working on every single day. In terms of my voice, I don’t think I found my voice until 2010, 2011, because everything before that was more experimental.”

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): You’re very involved with your music, how important is that to you?

Drew32: “I think it’s what makes any artist authentic, there’s a lot of people that can rap, but it really gets down to those people who can make their own beats, record it, mix it, master it, and do the cover art work…I’m there from beginning to end of a project. Growing up I didn’t have money to pay for studio time, my dad believed in me and purchased some early stat up music software for me, and that made me do everything by myself. To me it makes the music more real, and they can understand the artist better because the artist involved in the whole process.”

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): What are three of your career aspirations?

Drew32: “My main thing is that I love making music, if I can make music and make a living out of it and be able to provide for my future family, then I would be happy. I would also like to get into doing movies, and make my label even bigger, and definitely go on tour.”

Examiner (Anthony Bowles): How competitive is the rap world, and what do you think it takes to go mainstream?

Drew32: “I think it’s definitely competitive until you really find your lane…there are a lot of artist from Detroit that are making moves, but I don’t necessarily view them as competition, - Examiner.com


It’s so cold in the D, but Drew32 is up for the challenge. The Detroit rap phenom has grinded in the music game since he was just 13-years-old. With 2012’s "Label Me" mixtape, he’s grabbed the ears of DJ Skee, Royce Da 5’9” and hopes to catapult into the national spotlight. VIBE caught up with Drew32 to chat about touring for big names, Detroit hip-hop and his dream collaborations.

You’re been aggressively touring all year. Are you back on the road soon?
Drew32: Hopefully soon. I’ve done some pretty big shows in the past, opening up for artists that come through Michigan. I’ve opened up for J.Cole, GymClass Heroes, Kirko Bangz, Hoodie Allen, Travis Porter, Chris Webby. I’ve done spot shows. I’ve done SXSW the last two years. I did some shows in Missouri, I did a show at Sundance Film Festival in Utah. Definitely, this year I want to hit the road and put a full tour together, because that’s what I’ve been missing.

Between Big Sean, Danny Brown and now you, Michigan hip-hop seems to be enjoying a resurgence.
Talent wise, I think it’s at a high. I think that there’s a lot of talent coming out of Detroit musically. Big Sean, Jon Connor, everybody is just making noise. Royce da 5’9, Eminem, there’s too many to name really. A lot of the guys that I haven’t named, I’m pretty close with. People are supportive and there’s a lot of talent coming out of there, I just don’t think it has the scene of like a NY or an LA to gain that type of exposure.

For a lot of people, Detroit rap is what they saw in Eminem’s 8 Mile. Is the shelter still big?
The shelter’s a real place, for people who haven’t actually been to Detroit the shelter’s a real spot. Eminem performed there, I performed there; plenty of people have performed there. It’s not the one in the movie. That’s not what it really looks like. I invite you to come to Detroit and catch a show there.

Do you think Detroit have a distinct sound? It seems like artists from the D all have a different sound.
I think that the diversity is actually a gift, not a curse. I think that it’s definitely cool, coming out here to New York, you definitely have that New York sound that has been crafted throughout the years, LA has their sound and the south has their sound. Detroit, you’re right, it’s hard to put a finger on what exactly the sound. I like that though, because you get diversity, you’re not like getting the same thing every time.

Do you feel any competition with guys like Eminem and Big Sean who have made it?
I don’t necessarily see it as a competition, because if I see it as a competition, how am I going to compete with someone like Eminem? You can’t. You can’t compete. I just have to make the music that I love to
make.

You also produce records. How do you divide your focus?
I was lucky enough that I got my hands on some recording software. I was just like, I don’t want to have to deal with relying on other people. I just want to do it myself. It wasn’t like I should focus on one thing, I actually
wanted to do both, especially because I’m inspired by people who do both. Kanye West is a huge inspiration for me. He produces and raps. J.Cole produces and raps.

In the beginning, people told Kanye not to rap and just stick with producing.
Well, you see what kind of mistake they made when they told him that. He’s one of the biggest rappers in the game now.

What rappers do you want to collaborate with?
This might sound weird because I don’t think that people would say that my music fits with this combination, but I actually want to do something with some of the cats from Odd Future, I think that would be cool as hell,
I don’t know why. People don’t think my music is as crazy as them, wild. I just think that they’re fun and funny to listen to and stuff. I think that would be a fun collaboration to do.

It would definitely be a different kind of energy.
And on the other side of things, I think Joey Bada$$ is definitely making moves. His whole movement is making noise.

- See more at: http://www.vibe.com/article/drew32-talks-detroit-hip-hop-diversity-actually-gift#sthash.GZAhoQxx.dpuf - Vibe Magazine


It’s so cold in the D, but Drew32 is up for the challenge. The Detroit rap phenom has grinded in the music game since he was just 13-years-old. With 2012’s "Label Me" mixtape, he’s grabbed the ears of DJ Skee, Royce Da 5’9” and hopes to catapult into the national spotlight. VIBE caught up with Drew32 to chat about touring for big names, Detroit hip-hop and his dream collaborations.

You’re been aggressively touring all year. Are you back on the road soon?
Drew32: Hopefully soon. I’ve done some pretty big shows in the past, opening up for artists that come through Michigan. I’ve opened up for J.Cole, GymClass Heroes, Kirko Bangz, Hoodie Allen, Travis Porter, Chris Webby. I’ve done spot shows. I’ve done SXSW the last two years. I did some shows in Missouri, I did a show at Sundance Film Festival in Utah. Definitely, this year I want to hit the road and put a full tour together, because that’s what I’ve been missing.

Between Big Sean, Danny Brown and now you, Michigan hip-hop seems to be enjoying a resurgence.
Talent wise, I think it’s at a high. I think that there’s a lot of talent coming out of Detroit musically. Big Sean, Jon Connor, everybody is just making noise. Royce da 5’9, Eminem, there’s too many to name really. A lot of the guys that I haven’t named, I’m pretty close with. People are supportive and there’s a lot of talent coming out of there, I just don’t think it has the scene of like a NY or an LA to gain that type of exposure.

For a lot of people, Detroit rap is what they saw in Eminem’s 8 Mile. Is the shelter still big?
The shelter’s a real place, for people who haven’t actually been to Detroit the shelter’s a real spot. Eminem performed there, I performed there; plenty of people have performed there. It’s not the one in the movie. That’s not what it really looks like. I invite you to come to Detroit and catch a show there.

Do you think Detroit have a distinct sound? It seems like artists from the D all have a different sound.
I think that the diversity is actually a gift, not a curse. I think that it’s definitely cool, coming out here to New York, you definitely have that New York sound that has been crafted throughout the years, LA has their sound and the south has their sound. Detroit, you’re right, it’s hard to put a finger on what exactly the sound. I like that though, because you get diversity, you’re not like getting the same thing every time.

Do you feel any competition with guys like Eminem and Big Sean who have made it?
I don’t necessarily see it as a competition, because if I see it as a competition, how am I going to compete with someone like Eminem? You can’t. You can’t compete. I just have to make the music that I love to
make.

You also produce records. How do you divide your focus?
I was lucky enough that I got my hands on some recording software. I was just like, I don’t want to have to deal with relying on other people. I just want to do it myself. It wasn’t like I should focus on one thing, I actually
wanted to do both, especially because I’m inspired by people who do both. Kanye West is a huge inspiration for me. He produces and raps. J.Cole produces and raps.

In the beginning, people told Kanye not to rap and just stick with producing.
Well, you see what kind of mistake they made when they told him that. He’s one of the biggest rappers in the game now.

What rappers do you want to collaborate with?
This might sound weird because I don’t think that people would say that my music fits with this combination, but I actually want to do something with some of the cats from Odd Future, I think that would be cool as hell,
I don’t know why. People don’t think my music is as crazy as them, wild. I just think that they’re fun and funny to listen to and stuff. I think that would be a fun collaboration to do.

It would definitely be a different kind of energy.
And on the other side of things, I think Joey Bada$$ is definitely making moves. His whole movement is making noise.

- See more at: http://www.vibe.com/article/drew32-talks-detroit-hip-hop-diversity-actually-gift#sthash.GZAhoQxx.dpuf - Vibe Magazine


GrizzlyPalooza will once again invade the campus of Oakland University April 12 at 7 p.m.
“SPB (Student Program Board) is so excited to put on another concert for the student body,” SPB Mainstage Chair Kate Rozek said. “It is very exciting to be able to put on GrizzlyPalooza Part Two — we were blessed to be able to do Part One.”
GrizzlyPalooza Part Two will take place at the Meadow Brook Music Festival and will feature Gym Class Heroes as the headlining act.
“I wanted to make it more diverse. Gym Class Heroes is not just strictly a rap act,” Rozek said.
The lineup will also feature a female artist, which was lacking from the first part of the event.
“I wanted to make sure we had a lineup with a female artist,” said Rozek.
OU student Drew “Drew 32? Parks will be performing as the opening act at the event.
“There’s a lot of great local artists out here, and a lot that attend Oakland, so I’m definitely grateful for my talents to be recognized and to be chose to open up GrizzlyPalooza,” Parks, a sophomore double majoring in business and marketing at OU, said.The concert will be held a week before finals.
“This is a great way to end the year, and just let loose before finals,” Rozek said. “Kate and the rest of the OU SPB put together a sweet lineup, and it has set the stage for Oakland to really get to know me and my music.”
Rozek said she hopes the turnout is as good for Part Two as it was for Part One.
“GrizzyPalooza Part One was amazing,” she said. “There were so many students — it looked like it was completely full.”
Tickets for the event go on sale Feb. 13 for OU students, staff and faculty and are $15 each. - Oakland Post


GrizzlyPalooza will once again invade the campus of Oakland University April 12 at 7 p.m.
“SPB (Student Program Board) is so excited to put on another concert for the student body,” SPB Mainstage Chair Kate Rozek said. “It is very exciting to be able to put on GrizzlyPalooza Part Two — we were blessed to be able to do Part One.”
GrizzlyPalooza Part Two will take place at the Meadow Brook Music Festival and will feature Gym Class Heroes as the headlining act.
“I wanted to make it more diverse. Gym Class Heroes is not just strictly a rap act,” Rozek said.
The lineup will also feature a female artist, which was lacking from the first part of the event.
“I wanted to make sure we had a lineup with a female artist,” said Rozek.
OU student Drew “Drew 32? Parks will be performing as the opening act at the event.
“There’s a lot of great local artists out here, and a lot that attend Oakland, so I’m definitely grateful for my talents to be recognized and to be chose to open up GrizzlyPalooza,” Parks, a sophomore double majoring in business and marketing at OU, said.The concert will be held a week before finals.
“This is a great way to end the year, and just let loose before finals,” Rozek said. “Kate and the rest of the OU SPB put together a sweet lineup, and it has set the stage for Oakland to really get to know me and my music.”
Rozek said she hopes the turnout is as good for Part Two as it was for Part One.
“GrizzyPalooza Part One was amazing,” she said. “There were so many students — it looked like it was completely full.”
Tickets for the event go on sale Feb. 13 for OU students, staff and faculty and are $15 each. - Oakland Post


NEW YORK – Billboard.com and Chevrolet are giving 18 up-and-coming bands from across the country a chance to compete for the gig of a lifetime: a road trip to Las Vegas and a live performance at the 2012 Billboard Music Awards.

The winning band will be determined by consumer votes, fan engagement and live performances through a “Cruze-ing To Vegas” road trip contest that launches today on Billboard.com and presented by Chevrolet.

Through March 27, fans can visit www.billboard.com/battle to view and listen to each band, watch videos and cast their vote by region. Voters are automatically entered to win two tickets to the Billboard Music Awards, along with hotel accommodations and airfare.

Based on votes, six regional finalists will receive the keys to an all-new Chevrolet Cruze – Chevrolet’s No.1-selling passenger car – for a road trip that takes them from their home base to Las Vegas. There, on May 17, the musicians will participate in a battle of the bands competition to determine who will be honored and perform at the awards to be televised on ABC. Last year’s show won its time slot.

“The talent at last year’s Cruze-ing to Vegas competition was incredibly strong, said Billboard Editorial Director Bill Werde. “What we’re already seeing this year in terms of talent and diversity of acts is nothing short of amazing. I can’t wait to unleash a new superstar on the world.”

Said Kevin Mayer, director, Chevrolet Advertising and Sales Promotion: “Chevrolet wants to help emerging artists achieve their dreams; after all, most of today’s superstars got their start driving from gig to gig in hopes of being discovered. We’re thrilled to be so deeply involved in one of the hottest music shows there is.”

Billboard editors identified three bands from six U.S. regions based on several factors, including Heat Score, a formula that measures online fan engagement and drives Billboard’s Uncharted chart of emerging artists. They are:

Northwest

Savannah Outen, pop vocalist, Hillsboro, Ore.
J. Rice, R&B vocalist, Seattle, Wash.
The Scene Aesthetic, indie pop duo, Seattle
Southwest

Saints of Valory, rock, Austin, Texas
Courrier, alternative/indie quartet, Austin, Texas
Macy Maloy, singer/songwriter, Denton, Texas
Midwest

Gemini Club, electro pop, Chicago
Take the Day, pop/rock, Milwaukee
Drew 32, rap, Detroit.
Northeast

Collin McLoughlin, electro soul songwriter, Bedford, N.Y.
Patent Pending, pop/punk, Mount Sinai, N.Y.
Hollis Brown, singer/songwriter, Queens and Brooklyn, N.Y.
West

Nude, pop punk, Hollywood, Calif.
Joseph Vincent, singer/songwriter, San Fernando Valley, Calif.
Doe Eye, singer/songwriter, San Francisco, Calif.
Southeast

Fit for Rivals, rock punk, Jacksonville, Fla.
Buck Ford, country, Nashville
After the Smoke, rap duo, Tallahassee, Fla.
The six finalists will document their journey as they “Cruze” to Las Vegas, and fans can travel along via www.Billboard.com/battle. A camera crew will follow their every move as they play gigs along the way, rock out to Cruze’s standard XM radio and connect with fans through blogging, Tweeting, and creating personalized playlists as they strive to improve their social Heat Score.

About Chevrolet
Founded in 1911 in Detroit, Chevrolet is now one of the world's largest car brands, doing business in more than 140 countries and selling more than 4 million cars and trucks a year. Chevrolet provides customers with fuel-efficient vehicles that feature spirited performance, expressive design and high quality. More information on Chevrolet models can be found at www.chevrolet.com.

About Billboard
Billboard is the world’s most influential music media brand reaching key executives and tastemakers in and around the music business through Billboard Magazine, Billboard.biz, Billboard Conferences, Billboard Bulletin, and other targeted newsletters, and millions of music fans through Billboard.com and Billboard Events. The Billboard brand is built on its exclusive charts and unrivaled reporting on the latest news, issues and trends across all genres of music. Billboard receives hundreds of millions of brand impressions daily through many strategic relationships with major companies across various industries. These relationships leverage Billboard’s brand recognition, proprietary chart data and information resources to develop products, live events and print, television, radio, digital and mobile platforms. In addition to North America, Billboard operates businesses in Brazil, Greece, Japan, Korea and Russia.

Billboard is owned by Prometheus Global Media, a diversified company with leading assets in the media and entertainment arenas, including: Music (Billboard and its related conferences and events, including The Billboard Latin Music Awards), Entertainment (The Hollywood Reporter, Backstage, ShowEast, Cineasia, and CineEurope); and Advertising & Marketing (Adweek, Adweek Conferences and The CLIO Awards). - GM / Billboard


NEW YORK – Billboard.com and Chevrolet are giving 18 up-and-coming bands from across the country a chance to compete for the gig of a lifetime: a road trip to Las Vegas and a live performance at the 2012 Billboard Music Awards.

The winning band will be determined by consumer votes, fan engagement and live performances through a “Cruze-ing To Vegas” road trip contest that launches today on Billboard.com and presented by Chevrolet.

Through March 27, fans can visit www.billboard.com/battle to view and listen to each band, watch videos and cast their vote by region. Voters are automatically entered to win two tickets to the Billboard Music Awards, along with hotel accommodations and airfare.

Based on votes, six regional finalists will receive the keys to an all-new Chevrolet Cruze – Chevrolet’s No.1-selling passenger car – for a road trip that takes them from their home base to Las Vegas. There, on May 17, the musicians will participate in a battle of the bands competition to determine who will be honored and perform at the awards to be televised on ABC. Last year’s show won its time slot.

“The talent at last year’s Cruze-ing to Vegas competition was incredibly strong, said Billboard Editorial Director Bill Werde. “What we’re already seeing this year in terms of talent and diversity of acts is nothing short of amazing. I can’t wait to unleash a new superstar on the world.”

Said Kevin Mayer, director, Chevrolet Advertising and Sales Promotion: “Chevrolet wants to help emerging artists achieve their dreams; after all, most of today’s superstars got their start driving from gig to gig in hopes of being discovered. We’re thrilled to be so deeply involved in one of the hottest music shows there is.”

Billboard editors identified three bands from six U.S. regions based on several factors, including Heat Score, a formula that measures online fan engagement and drives Billboard’s Uncharted chart of emerging artists. They are:

Northwest

Savannah Outen, pop vocalist, Hillsboro, Ore.
J. Rice, R&B vocalist, Seattle, Wash.
The Scene Aesthetic, indie pop duo, Seattle
Southwest

Saints of Valory, rock, Austin, Texas
Courrier, alternative/indie quartet, Austin, Texas
Macy Maloy, singer/songwriter, Denton, Texas
Midwest

Gemini Club, electro pop, Chicago
Take the Day, pop/rock, Milwaukee
Drew 32, rap, Detroit.
Northeast

Collin McLoughlin, electro soul songwriter, Bedford, N.Y.
Patent Pending, pop/punk, Mount Sinai, N.Y.
Hollis Brown, singer/songwriter, Queens and Brooklyn, N.Y.
West

Nude, pop punk, Hollywood, Calif.
Joseph Vincent, singer/songwriter, San Fernando Valley, Calif.
Doe Eye, singer/songwriter, San Francisco, Calif.
Southeast

Fit for Rivals, rock punk, Jacksonville, Fla.
Buck Ford, country, Nashville
After the Smoke, rap duo, Tallahassee, Fla.
The six finalists will document their journey as they “Cruze” to Las Vegas, and fans can travel along via www.Billboard.com/battle. A camera crew will follow their every move as they play gigs along the way, rock out to Cruze’s standard XM radio and connect with fans through blogging, Tweeting, and creating personalized playlists as they strive to improve their social Heat Score.

About Chevrolet
Founded in 1911 in Detroit, Chevrolet is now one of the world's largest car brands, doing business in more than 140 countries and selling more than 4 million cars and trucks a year. Chevrolet provides customers with fuel-efficient vehicles that feature spirited performance, expressive design and high quality. More information on Chevrolet models can be found at www.chevrolet.com.

About Billboard
Billboard is the world’s most influential music media brand reaching key executives and tastemakers in and around the music business through Billboard Magazine, Billboard.biz, Billboard Conferences, Billboard Bulletin, and other targeted newsletters, and millions of music fans through Billboard.com and Billboard Events. The Billboard brand is built on its exclusive charts and unrivaled reporting on the latest news, issues and trends across all genres of music. Billboard receives hundreds of millions of brand impressions daily through many strategic relationships with major companies across various industries. These relationships leverage Billboard’s brand recognition, proprietary chart data and information resources to develop products, live events and print, television, radio, digital and mobile platforms. In addition to North America, Billboard operates businesses in Brazil, Greece, Japan, Korea and Russia.

Billboard is owned by Prometheus Global Media, a diversified company with leading assets in the media and entertainment arenas, including: Music (Billboard and its related conferences and events, including The Billboard Latin Music Awards), Entertainment (The Hollywood Reporter, Backstage, ShowEast, Cineasia, and CineEurope); and Advertising & Marketing (Adweek, Adweek Conferences and The CLIO Awards). - GM / Billboard


Headliners: Drew32 and DJ Skee

Representing: Michigan

Mixtape: Label Me

Real Spit: Drew32 (born Andrew Parks) is on a mission to debunk stereotypes and prove everyone wrong. Of Greek descent from Michigan, the twenty-year-old rapper/producer has been rapping since the age of 14 and first garnered buzz with his music video “Beyond Me” in 2010, followed by a slew of live shows including sets at the Sundance Film Festival and SXSW.

Drew’s latest offering, Label Me, is hosted by DJ Skee and despite being Drew’s eighth mixtape, it serves as an introduction to the ostensibly new artist (The title is also perhaps a play on words telling record labels to sign the indie rapper). The opener “You Ain’t Know (Intro)” is a biographical summation, delineating Drew’s history and the challenges he faces as both a white rapper as well as an artist trying to make it beyond state lines. “Just another kid, trying to make it big,” he describes himself and tells his detractors, “I’m more than that/I’m more than songs/I’m more than rap/I’m more than when you saw me and told me I was ‘wack.’”

Regionalism is a major point of contention and Drew grapples with hailing from the Midwest, hip-hop’s oft-forgotten coast. On “Ride On” he laments, “Sometimes I feel like if I was in New York, I would have been blown” and “I love my city but yo home is where the hater is/And we don’t work together, we just hate so no one makes it big.” Luckily, Drew does have some friends from “The Mitten” and enlists adept Michigan rappers (not named Marshall) Jon Connor and Royce Da 5’9” for “I Am King” and “Spazz Out,” respectively. The robotic bragger “I Am King” displays some nice name-checks by Drew of kings ranging from King Tut and Leonidas to Detroit Pistons legend Isiah Thomas. Historical win on all fronts. “Spazz Out” has been in circulation for almost a year now, but it still serves as a jewel on the tape. Over a melodious beat sprinkled with live pianos and helmed by Drew, Royce serves up tasty zingers that just beg to be replayed: “You motherf---in birds know/I don't got too many words for you/ I keep a pelican brief.”

The majority of tracks on Label Me are produced by Drew and like the mixtape’s moniker, they’re difficult to categorize into just one box. “Long Gone” is gritty and horn-laden, “Ride On” is imbued with Reggae signatures while “Two Bee Stings” (a tongue-and-cheek nod to Kanye West’s “Run This Town” lyric) is synthy and playful. With the dexterity to genre-jump so effortlessly, it wouldn’t be surprising if Drew32 makes some moves behind the board as a producer for other artists down the line. But for right now, he’s still focusing on proving himself as a rapper. “Call me what you wanna/Say what you need to say/But at the end of the day, Imma do me,” he says on the closer.

With confidence like that, who needs labels anyway?

Joints to Check For:
“I Am King” featuring Jon Connor
“Spazz Out” featuring Royce da 5’9” - MTV Rapfix


Headliners: Drew32 and DJ Skee

Representing: Michigan

Mixtape: Label Me

Real Spit: Drew32 (born Andrew Parks) is on a mission to debunk stereotypes and prove everyone wrong. Of Greek descent from Michigan, the twenty-year-old rapper/producer has been rapping since the age of 14 and first garnered buzz with his music video “Beyond Me” in 2010, followed by a slew of live shows including sets at the Sundance Film Festival and SXSW.

Drew’s latest offering, Label Me, is hosted by DJ Skee and despite being Drew’s eighth mixtape, it serves as an introduction to the ostensibly new artist (The title is also perhaps a play on words telling record labels to sign the indie rapper). The opener “You Ain’t Know (Intro)” is a biographical summation, delineating Drew’s history and the challenges he faces as both a white rapper as well as an artist trying to make it beyond state lines. “Just another kid, trying to make it big,” he describes himself and tells his detractors, “I’m more than that/I’m more than songs/I’m more than rap/I’m more than when you saw me and told me I was ‘wack.’”

Regionalism is a major point of contention and Drew grapples with hailing from the Midwest, hip-hop’s oft-forgotten coast. On “Ride On” he laments, “Sometimes I feel like if I was in New York, I would have been blown” and “I love my city but yo home is where the hater is/And we don’t work together, we just hate so no one makes it big.” Luckily, Drew does have some friends from “The Mitten” and enlists adept Michigan rappers (not named Marshall) Jon Connor and Royce Da 5’9” for “I Am King” and “Spazz Out,” respectively. The robotic bragger “I Am King” displays some nice name-checks by Drew of kings ranging from King Tut and Leonidas to Detroit Pistons legend Isiah Thomas. Historical win on all fronts. “Spazz Out” has been in circulation for almost a year now, but it still serves as a jewel on the tape. Over a melodious beat sprinkled with live pianos and helmed by Drew, Royce serves up tasty zingers that just beg to be replayed: “You motherf---in birds know/I don't got too many words for you/ I keep a pelican brief.”

The majority of tracks on Label Me are produced by Drew and like the mixtape’s moniker, they’re difficult to categorize into just one box. “Long Gone” is gritty and horn-laden, “Ride On” is imbued with Reggae signatures while “Two Bee Stings” (a tongue-and-cheek nod to Kanye West’s “Run This Town” lyric) is synthy and playful. With the dexterity to genre-jump so effortlessly, it wouldn’t be surprising if Drew32 makes some moves behind the board as a producer for other artists down the line. But for right now, he’s still focusing on proving himself as a rapper. “Call me what you wanna/Say what you need to say/But at the end of the day, Imma do me,” he says on the closer.

With confidence like that, who needs labels anyway?

Joints to Check For:
“I Am King” featuring Jon Connor
“Spazz Out” featuring Royce da 5’9” - MTV Rapfix


By AMY ALLEN
Special to The Oakland Press



Click to enlarge
Avondale High School senior tries to make it big as a rapper

While Andrew Parks’ manager is in New York meeting with record labels who may be interested in signing him, the 18-year-old rapper known as Drew32 will be continuing his senior year at Avondale High School in Auburn Hills and trying to break into the music industry by spending late nights recording in his bedroom-turned-studio in Troy.

“Typically I make my music really, really late at night,” Drew32 said. “It will be 1, 2 in the morning. I’m up, I have this melody stuck in my head, and I just play it and make a beat out of that.”

Drew32 produces his own beats using professional software such as Reason 3.0 or Pro Tools. He writes rhymes, too, finding inspiration for songs through personal experience and music he listens to.

Drew32 listens mainly to rap, he said, and for musical influences he looks to his favorite artists including Detroit rappers Royce da 5’9” and Eminem.

Lately Drew32 finds himself listening to Drake, he added, and people are drawing comparisons.

“I’ve heard it a lot ... people say I sound like Drake,” Drew32 said. “That’s just because I listen to him. I wasn’t trying to sound like him. When he emerged recently as this really big artist, it was kind of like, ‘Hey, you guys are doing the same thing.’ ”

That “thing” Drew32 refers to is rapping and sometimes singing on the chorus, he said.

“I’m a rapper first and a singer second,” he continued.

Drew32’s favorite artists aren’t the only ones offering him inspiration.

Listening to the radio further motivates him “to make music, do my own thing for myself and keeps pushing me to keep going,” he said. “I am just as good as some of these guys on the radio.”

Channel 955’s playing Drew32’s single “Beyond Me” supports that sentiment by making him one of those guys.

“A single getting on the radio – that was really big for me,” Drew32 said, adding that “it made me realize, ‘Hey, I can actually do this.’ ”

Adding to his confidence are other December events, including dropping his first mixtape, he said.

A mixtape differs from an album by offering the artist more freedom. “An album you make with the intention of selling it commercially. Everything has to be original,” Drew32 explained. With a mixtape, “you can rap songs to other people’s music. The catch is that you aren’t supposed to sell them. My mixtape is all original though,” he added.

His mixtape, a free downloadable seven-song podcast available on iTunes, poses the question, “Who is Drew32?” with its title.

Answers to that question include Andrew Parks, an Avondale High School honors student, former Avondale varsity basketball team member and, of course, rapper.

Friends and acquaintances posting videos on YouTube in a campaign promoting the mixtape leading up to its mid-December release offered their own answers, ranging from serious descriptions of the young rapper’s dedication and drive to make it in the music industry to what Drew32 calls stupid, funny responses.

Every video directs the viewer to “download ‘Who is Drew32?’ ... to find out for yourself,” and one video features Royce da 5’9” following a holiday concert in Pontiac with fellow Detroit rapper Trick Trick in which Drew32 was an opening act.

Performing offers Drew32 a way past what he considers most challenging about being a rapper: “Getting people to listen to your music.

“You could make the best music ever, but if you can’t get people to listen to it, you won’t get heard,” he said. “That’s why I put out a lot of songs free.

“I’m thinking about giving out an album for free, but I’m not sure right now,” Drew32 added.

Releasing an album depends on what happens during his manager’s trip to New York this month.

“If a label is interested in signing me, I’d let them handle that. Otherwise, I’m planning on releasing something in early February,” Drew32 said.

Releasing an album is a process that depends on more than just songs, he continued.

“A lot of it deals with promotion, too ... You have to promote and market.”

Drew32 has been rapping “for half my life, since I was 9,” he said. “Whenever my dad was driving around to basketball or school, I would always be rapping along with songs on the radio. That’s when he realized I had a talent for it.

“(My dad) decided to contact the MPA (Music Publishers’ Association) and we recorded a song called ‘Pray for Peace (We Need Love)’ to the tune of the LL Cool J song ‘I Need Love,’ ” Drew32 said.

The song got its beginning as a poem Drew32’s father Peter Parks wrote following Sept. 11, 2001.

That first time recording, Drew32 “really fell in love with the experience,” he said.

Drew32’s remix of Owl City’s “Fireflies” featuring his friend and mentor, local rapper Jay Hussle echoes that sentiment with the lyrics “I fell in love when I stepped inside the studio.”

Recording and rapping “did - The Oakland Press


By AMY ALLEN
Special to The Oakland Press



Click to enlarge
Avondale High School senior tries to make it big as a rapper

While Andrew Parks’ manager is in New York meeting with record labels who may be interested in signing him, the 18-year-old rapper known as Drew32 will be continuing his senior year at Avondale High School in Auburn Hills and trying to break into the music industry by spending late nights recording in his bedroom-turned-studio in Troy.

“Typically I make my music really, really late at night,” Drew32 said. “It will be 1, 2 in the morning. I’m up, I have this melody stuck in my head, and I just play it and make a beat out of that.”

Drew32 produces his own beats using professional software such as Reason 3.0 or Pro Tools. He writes rhymes, too, finding inspiration for songs through personal experience and music he listens to.

Drew32 listens mainly to rap, he said, and for musical influences he looks to his favorite artists including Detroit rappers Royce da 5’9” and Eminem.

Lately Drew32 finds himself listening to Drake, he added, and people are drawing comparisons.

“I’ve heard it a lot ... people say I sound like Drake,” Drew32 said. “That’s just because I listen to him. I wasn’t trying to sound like him. When he emerged recently as this really big artist, it was kind of like, ‘Hey, you guys are doing the same thing.’ ”

That “thing” Drew32 refers to is rapping and sometimes singing on the chorus, he said.

“I’m a rapper first and a singer second,” he continued.

Drew32’s favorite artists aren’t the only ones offering him inspiration.

Listening to the radio further motivates him “to make music, do my own thing for myself and keeps pushing me to keep going,” he said. “I am just as good as some of these guys on the radio.”

Channel 955’s playing Drew32’s single “Beyond Me” supports that sentiment by making him one of those guys.

“A single getting on the radio – that was really big for me,” Drew32 said, adding that “it made me realize, ‘Hey, I can actually do this.’ ”

Adding to his confidence are other December events, including dropping his first mixtape, he said.

A mixtape differs from an album by offering the artist more freedom. “An album you make with the intention of selling it commercially. Everything has to be original,” Drew32 explained. With a mixtape, “you can rap songs to other people’s music. The catch is that you aren’t supposed to sell them. My mixtape is all original though,” he added.

His mixtape, a free downloadable seven-song podcast available on iTunes, poses the question, “Who is Drew32?” with its title.

Answers to that question include Andrew Parks, an Avondale High School honors student, former Avondale varsity basketball team member and, of course, rapper.

Friends and acquaintances posting videos on YouTube in a campaign promoting the mixtape leading up to its mid-December release offered their own answers, ranging from serious descriptions of the young rapper’s dedication and drive to make it in the music industry to what Drew32 calls stupid, funny responses.

Every video directs the viewer to “download ‘Who is Drew32?’ ... to find out for yourself,” and one video features Royce da 5’9” following a holiday concert in Pontiac with fellow Detroit rapper Trick Trick in which Drew32 was an opening act.

Performing offers Drew32 a way past what he considers most challenging about being a rapper: “Getting people to listen to your music.

“You could make the best music ever, but if you can’t get people to listen to it, you won’t get heard,” he said. “That’s why I put out a lot of songs free.

“I’m thinking about giving out an album for free, but I’m not sure right now,” Drew32 added.

Releasing an album depends on what happens during his manager’s trip to New York this month.

“If a label is interested in signing me, I’d let them handle that. Otherwise, I’m planning on releasing something in early February,” Drew32 said.

Releasing an album is a process that depends on more than just songs, he continued.

“A lot of it deals with promotion, too ... You have to promote and market.”

Drew32 has been rapping “for half my life, since I was 9,” he said. “Whenever my dad was driving around to basketball or school, I would always be rapping along with songs on the radio. That’s when he realized I had a talent for it.

“(My dad) decided to contact the MPA (Music Publishers’ Association) and we recorded a song called ‘Pray for Peace (We Need Love)’ to the tune of the LL Cool J song ‘I Need Love,’ ” Drew32 said.

The song got its beginning as a poem Drew32’s father Peter Parks wrote following Sept. 11, 2001.

That first time recording, Drew32 “really fell in love with the experience,” he said.

Drew32’s remix of Owl City’s “Fireflies” featuring his friend and mentor, local rapper Jay Hussle echoes that sentiment with the lyrics “I fell in love when I stepped inside the studio.”

Recording and rapping “did - The Oakland Press


2011 has shown us a lot about hip-hop. One of the most emerging characteristics of hip-hop spotlighted in 2011 has been emcees coming up in all different shapes, colors and creeds. Mac Miller has made us all reconsider the pretense behind “independent.” Action Bronson rocks the fuck out of a ginger beard. And now Detroit‘s got something up its sleeve with the 19-year-old Greek-American Drew32. While the kid still has some maturing to do, he’s already garnered some love from XXL , thisis50.com and MTV. On his latest mixtape, The B.U.R.N. Project, he goes verse-for-verse with Royce Da 5’9” on “Spazz Out” while weaving in and out of rap and more rhythmic tunes produced primarily by him. Not a bad look for the young Detroit spitter. Check out what he has to say. - Respect Magazine


2011 has shown us a lot about hip-hop. One of the most emerging characteristics of hip-hop spotlighted in 2011 has been emcees coming up in all different shapes, colors and creeds. Mac Miller has made us all reconsider the pretense behind “independent.” Action Bronson rocks the fuck out of a ginger beard. And now Detroit‘s got something up its sleeve with the 19-year-old Greek-American Drew32. While the kid still has some maturing to do, he’s already garnered some love from XXL , thisis50.com and MTV. On his latest mixtape, The B.U.R.N. Project, he goes verse-for-verse with Royce Da 5’9” on “Spazz Out” while weaving in and out of rap and more rhythmic tunes produced primarily by him. Not a bad look for the young Detroit spitter. Check out what he has to say. - Respect Magazine


ROC NATION’S FIRST ARTIST: J. COLE

19 year old Andrew Parks (Drew32) of Michigan was one of the opening acts for J. Cole recently at The Royal Oak Music Theater. Drew is a recording artist (rapper/producer), who has been rapping, producing, writing and recording since age 14. MTV Rapfix writes “Detroit rapper and producer Drew32 is Up Next.”
After seeing his skills live I would say that this comment is on point.
Drew32, accompanied by his partner B-Smooth, pumped up the crowd with his clever lyrics and old school beats. Since he has been performing all over Michigan and at so many national events including the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah and the SXSW Music Conference in Austin, Texas, it’s only natural that he worked the crowd like a pro. Although J. Cole is the biggest artist he has opened for, Drew32 definitely held his own. No doubt we will be hearing a lot more from this talented Michigander. His latest album, “The B.U.R.N. Project,” features a collaboration with Shady Records artist Royce Da 5’9”. Drew32 has been featured on various hip-hop sites and blogs including HipHopDX, Rap Basement and Thisis50. You can download his album at www.drew32.com.

Before the main attraction was MC/DJ Dummy. Dummy spun the crowd into frenzy from the moment he started. Keeping the beats going he made it a point to let anyone who didn’t already know that J. Cole’s latest album, ”Cole World: The Sideline Story” has made it to number one in the country. Dummy mixed his beats for about a half hour before Cole’s name was being chanted in anticipation of his performance. At 26, Cole is the first artist signed to Jay Z’s label Roc Nation. Finally making his way to the stage Cole seemed to still be genuinely excited about his newfound fame, reiterating what DJ Dummy had already announced. Cole also told the crowd that rapping has been his dream since he was 12-13 yrs old. During “Lights Please” he walked over to keyboards and began to play them. Not only is he a great rapper, but Cole is a trained violinist.
Hooking us with his Eminem story-telling rhymes with a touch of that raspy masculine tone DMX owns, Cole seemed to be somewhat of a lyrical genius, flowing on point and hypnotizing the crowd.
J. Cole: www.jcolemusic.com
Drew32: www.drew32.com
By: Vera Khzouz - Hear Magazine


ROC NATION’S FIRST ARTIST: J. COLE

19 year old Andrew Parks (Drew32) of Michigan was one of the opening acts for J. Cole recently at The Royal Oak Music Theater. Drew is a recording artist (rapper/producer), who has been rapping, producing, writing and recording since age 14. MTV Rapfix writes “Detroit rapper and producer Drew32 is Up Next.”
After seeing his skills live I would say that this comment is on point.
Drew32, accompanied by his partner B-Smooth, pumped up the crowd with his clever lyrics and old school beats. Since he has been performing all over Michigan and at so many national events including the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah and the SXSW Music Conference in Austin, Texas, it’s only natural that he worked the crowd like a pro. Although J. Cole is the biggest artist he has opened for, Drew32 definitely held his own. No doubt we will be hearing a lot more from this talented Michigander. His latest album, “The B.U.R.N. Project,” features a collaboration with Shady Records artist Royce Da 5’9”. Drew32 has been featured on various hip-hop sites and blogs including HipHopDX, Rap Basement and Thisis50. You can download his album at www.drew32.com.

Before the main attraction was MC/DJ Dummy. Dummy spun the crowd into frenzy from the moment he started. Keeping the beats going he made it a point to let anyone who didn’t already know that J. Cole’s latest album, ”Cole World: The Sideline Story” has made it to number one in the country. Dummy mixed his beats for about a half hour before Cole’s name was being chanted in anticipation of his performance. At 26, Cole is the first artist signed to Jay Z’s label Roc Nation. Finally making his way to the stage Cole seemed to still be genuinely excited about his newfound fame, reiterating what DJ Dummy had already announced. Cole also told the crowd that rapping has been his dream since he was 12-13 yrs old. During “Lights Please” he walked over to keyboards and began to play them. Not only is he a great rapper, but Cole is a trained violinist.
Hooking us with his Eminem story-telling rhymes with a touch of that raspy masculine tone DMX owns, Cole seemed to be somewhat of a lyrical genius, flowing on point and hypnotizing the crowd.
J. Cole: www.jcolemusic.com
Drew32: www.drew32.com
By: Vera Khzouz - Hear Magazine


At just 19 years of age, rapper and producer Drew32 has been on a steady grind since the age of 14, dropping his debut album Awakening in 2007. Making headlines and gaining the attention of folks such as Radio Disney and one of Eminem’s D-12 crew members, the artist born Andrew Parks is set to add another achievement to his still growing career with the release of the rapper’s latest mixtape The B.U.R.N. Project.

Before Drew32’s seventh mixtape sponsored by Quarter To Life Entertainment dropped to the masses earlier this summer, the Motor City teenager has already rubbed elbows with some insiders in the industry. Last year, DJ Pauly D of reality TV show Jersey Shore fame co-hosted Drew32’s mixtape Take The World: Who Is Drew32? Mixtape Volume 2. Shady Records artist and Slaughterhouse rhyme slinger Royce Da 5’9 was featured on the Pauly D-hosted affair and also appears on Drew32’s latest project as well.

Primarily self-produced save for a handful of tracks, Drew32’s sound would be best described as heavy on live playing and instruments and straight ahead cocksure raps. On the track “Spazz Out,” Drew32 holds his own alongside Royce Da 5’9 who delivers a blistering double-time verse with some hilarious punchlines to boot. Other features include fellow Michigan natives Ro Spit, a former collaborator of Big Sean and other Detroit area notables, and rising rapper Jay Hussle as well.

Drew32 also made some noise recently with a remix of Drake’s “Headlines” track making its rounds via the blogosphere. The young artist is positioning himself to stand out in a crowded Hip Hop landscape by sticking to a tried and true formula with honest portrayals of his image and epic sweeping productions.

Check out more from Drew32 by following this link: http://drew32.com/ - MTV Rapfix


At just 19 years of age, rapper and producer Drew32 has been on a steady grind since the age of 14, dropping his debut album Awakening in 2007. Making headlines and gaining the attention of folks such as Radio Disney and one of Eminem’s D-12 crew members, the artist born Andrew Parks is set to add another achievement to his still growing career with the release of the rapper’s latest mixtape The B.U.R.N. Project.

Before Drew32’s seventh mixtape sponsored by Quarter To Life Entertainment dropped to the masses earlier this summer, the Motor City teenager has already rubbed elbows with some insiders in the industry. Last year, DJ Pauly D of reality TV show Jersey Shore fame co-hosted Drew32’s mixtape Take The World: Who Is Drew32? Mixtape Volume 2. Shady Records artist and Slaughterhouse rhyme slinger Royce Da 5’9 was featured on the Pauly D-hosted affair and also appears on Drew32’s latest project as well.

Primarily self-produced save for a handful of tracks, Drew32’s sound would be best described as heavy on live playing and instruments and straight ahead cocksure raps. On the track “Spazz Out,” Drew32 holds his own alongside Royce Da 5’9 who delivers a blistering double-time verse with some hilarious punchlines to boot. Other features include fellow Michigan natives Ro Spit, a former collaborator of Big Sean and other Detroit area notables, and rising rapper Jay Hussle as well.

Drew32 also made some noise recently with a remix of Drake’s “Headlines” track making its rounds via the blogosphere. The young artist is positioning himself to stand out in a crowded Hip Hop landscape by sticking to a tried and true formula with honest portrayals of his image and epic sweeping productions.

Check out more from Drew32 by following this link: http://drew32.com/ - MTV Rapfix


A few weeks ago Andrew M. Parks, AKA "Drew32" www.myspace.com/drew32 was contacted by AM 910 Radio Disney who had received a copy of Drew's newly released CD "Awakening" and liked what they heard. Andrew (Drew32) has been invited to perform at the Rhythm & Rhymes Festival as part of the International Freedom Festival (the night of the fireworks) on the main stage at Hart Plaza on Wednesday, June 27th at 8:00 P.M. So, young Drew32 will be up there in front of an expected overflowing audience. Drew32 has his own unique sound and raps about having a good time. No swear words here, his lyrics send a clear message that life is a good thing and here is a young man making the most of it. It's about the beat and the sound.

Drew 32" is a Greek-American rapper who was born on December 3, 1991 in Royal Oak, Michigan. He started playing organized basketball at age 4 and began Capoeira training at age 6. At around age 9 Drew began rapping to Lil' Bow Wow songs that he heard played on the radio. A short while later, after purchasing Bow Wow's "Beware of Dog" CD, Drew was able to skillfully flow to the album's tracks.

After the terrorist acts of September 11th, Drew's father, Peter Parks, wrote a poem entitled, "Pray for Peace". Drew's first experience with recording involved his rapping the lyrics to a beat inspired by LL Cool J's "We Need Love" with the result being a song entitled, "Pray for Peace (We Need Love)". The song was recorded at MPA Studios, Canton, Michigan and was produced by Terry Simaan and Chuck Alkazian. Although the song was not commercially released, it was distributed to students at Drew's elementary school and elsewhere as well as to several local radio stations.

The name "Drew 32" was derived from Drew's first basketball number, 32, and his name, Andrew. The name appeared for the first time on the "Pray for Peace (We Need Love)" single.

At around age 10, Drew began creating hip hop beats on his home computer using Magix Hip Hop Maker software. Over the following year or so, Drew graduated to ACID Music Studio 5.0 and Cakewalk Kinetic and began incorporating keyboards into the mix. Gradually Drew began creating his own catalogue of beats as well as poetic lyrics. His first efforts to create complete songs, though displaying advanced talent for his age, were lacking in audio quality.

At 13, with the acquisition of a better microphone and an Alesis Multimix12USB Mixer, Drew began recording and re-recording his songs in his bedroom studio, aptly known as "Drew's Crib". He also returned to MPA Studios where the songs "Get Up" and "Come 2 Conquer" were recorded. Around this time, Drew began working closely with rapper and VH1 Freestyle 59 Contest finalist, Jay Hussle. Hussle's studio experience and rap style helped further mature Drew's sound.

Drew's first live performance was at a junior high talent show where he rapped "Get Up" and brought the house down, receiving the loudest applause from the crowd. Later that year he performed at the local high school's Spring Fest as part of a group called the "Enayalatas" along with rappers, Young Poet and B Smooth. The Enayalatas were a crowd favorite and word of Drew's rapping abilities began to circulate among high school kids.

At 14, Drew completed a self-produced album, "Awakening", consisting of 10 pumped-up hip hop tracks along with 4 skits, which display Drew's clever lyrics and smooth flow. The album was release in March, 2007 and is available for purchase on iTunes.

Parents Peter and Jane Parks, are going to have a busy time in the future. Watch for this young man at 15 he's got nowhere to go but Up, Up, Up, and Up, Yup. (Yo)

Malista! - Malista.Com


A few weeks ago Andrew M. Parks, AKA "Drew32" www.myspace.com/drew32 was contacted by AM 910 Radio Disney who had received a copy of Drew's newly released CD "Awakening" and liked what they heard. Andrew (Drew32) has been invited to perform at the Rhythm & Rhymes Festival as part of the International Freedom Festival (the night of the fireworks) on the main stage at Hart Plaza on Wednesday, June 27th at 8:00 P.M. So, young Drew32 will be up there in front of an expected overflowing audience. Drew32 has his own unique sound and raps about having a good time. No swear words here, his lyrics send a clear message that life is a good thing and here is a young man making the most of it. It's about the beat and the sound.

Drew 32" is a Greek-American rapper who was born on December 3, 1991 in Royal Oak, Michigan. He started playing organized basketball at age 4 and began Capoeira training at age 6. At around age 9 Drew began rapping to Lil' Bow Wow songs that he heard played on the radio. A short while later, after purchasing Bow Wow's "Beware of Dog" CD, Drew was able to skillfully flow to the album's tracks.

After the terrorist acts of September 11th, Drew's father, Peter Parks, wrote a poem entitled, "Pray for Peace". Drew's first experience with recording involved his rapping the lyrics to a beat inspired by LL Cool J's "We Need Love" with the result being a song entitled, "Pray for Peace (We Need Love)". The song was recorded at MPA Studios, Canton, Michigan and was produced by Terry Simaan and Chuck Alkazian. Although the song was not commercially released, it was distributed to students at Drew's elementary school and elsewhere as well as to several local radio stations.

The name "Drew 32" was derived from Drew's first basketball number, 32, and his name, Andrew. The name appeared for the first time on the "Pray for Peace (We Need Love)" single.

At around age 10, Drew began creating hip hop beats on his home computer using Magix Hip Hop Maker software. Over the following year or so, Drew graduated to ACID Music Studio 5.0 and Cakewalk Kinetic and began incorporating keyboards into the mix. Gradually Drew began creating his own catalogue of beats as well as poetic lyrics. His first efforts to create complete songs, though displaying advanced talent for his age, were lacking in audio quality.

At 13, with the acquisition of a better microphone and an Alesis Multimix12USB Mixer, Drew began recording and re-recording his songs in his bedroom studio, aptly known as "Drew's Crib". He also returned to MPA Studios where the songs "Get Up" and "Come 2 Conquer" were recorded. Around this time, Drew began working closely with rapper and VH1 Freestyle 59 Contest finalist, Jay Hussle. Hussle's studio experience and rap style helped further mature Drew's sound.

Drew's first live performance was at a junior high talent show where he rapped "Get Up" and brought the house down, receiving the loudest applause from the crowd. Later that year he performed at the local high school's Spring Fest as part of a group called the "Enayalatas" along with rappers, Young Poet and B Smooth. The Enayalatas were a crowd favorite and word of Drew's rapping abilities began to circulate among high school kids.

At 14, Drew completed a self-produced album, "Awakening", consisting of 10 pumped-up hip hop tracks along with 4 skits, which display Drew's clever lyrics and smooth flow. The album was release in March, 2007 and is available for purchase on iTunes.

Parents Peter and Jane Parks, are going to have a busy time in the future. Watch for this young man at 15 he's got nowhere to go but Up, Up, Up, and Up, Yup. (Yo)

Malista! - Malista.Com


Drew 32 is the name Troy resident Andrew Parks uses on his debut hip-hop album, "Awakening," but a more important number is 15. That's Drew 32's age, and while just finishing his freshman year at Avondale High School, he already has the know-how to write his own rhymes and produce his own beats. He recorded most of the roughly 45- minute album at his Troy home, plus one track with another producer's beats at MPA Studios in Canton.
"Awakening" has 14 tracks that loosely parallel a school year. He raps about familiar hip-hop topics such as his rhyming skills and getting girls on tracks including "U Can't Be Me," "Pleasure Island" and "International Love."
The album includes one song, called "Twisted," with another Avondale student, Ben "B-Smooth" McKether, 17. A disc jockey for the school's radio station, McKether saw Drew 32 perform in a school talent show and started acting as his hype man.
"I think to be his age, he's really talented," said McKether, an Auburn Hills resident. "I think Drew has a lot of potential in music."
Though the album has an aggressive sound throughout, Drew 32 stops short of swearing on the album. He said that people encouraged him to swear in the past, but he wants a younger, wider audience to hear his music.
In the album's liner notes, Drew 32 cites such artists as Bow Wow, Eminem, Bob Marley and Kanye West as his inspirations.
"Drew has his own kind of sound," said McKether. "He raps about having a good time." One might think that Drew 32's
age would create skeptics of his musical ability, but Drew 32 said that people encourage him because of his age.
"People take it seriously, I guess, because when they see the CD, it looks all professional," said Drew 32.
"I don't think his age is going to hinder him," said McKether.
Those wondering about Drew 32's other meaningful number should know that he originally wanted to wear 23 on his basketball jersey, but someone else had the number forever linked to Michael Jordan, so Drew decided to reverse the digits.
"So, I went with that and it just stuck," he said.
Drew 32 plans to perform five or six songs from the album during a release party for "Awakening" from 7-10 p.m. June 15 at the Troy Community Center, 3179 Livernois. He also plans to perform "Twisted" with McKether, who will serve as the party's DJ.
"I have big plans for the party," said McKether.
Tickets for the event cost $5 at the door.
Drew 32 said that he doesn't really have any expectations for his first album. He would like to make a career in the entertainment business.
"Eventually, later on in life, I want to be a music producer and maybe go to New York," he said.
People can learn more about Drew 32 at his Web site, www.myspace.com/drew32.
You can reach David Wallace at dwallace@candgnews.com or at (586) 498-1053.

Caption:Troy resident Andrew "Drew 32" Parks has a record release party from 7-10 p.m. June 15 at the Troy Community Center.


Copyright, 2007, Troy Times (MI), All Rights Reserved. - Troy Times


Drew 32 is the name Troy resident Andrew Parks uses on his debut hip-hop album, "Awakening," but a more important number is 15. That's Drew 32's age, and while just finishing his freshman year at Avondale High School, he already has the know-how to write his own rhymes and produce his own beats. He recorded most of the roughly 45- minute album at his Troy home, plus one track with another producer's beats at MPA Studios in Canton.
"Awakening" has 14 tracks that loosely parallel a school year. He raps about familiar hip-hop topics such as his rhyming skills and getting girls on tracks including "U Can't Be Me," "Pleasure Island" and "International Love."
The album includes one song, called "Twisted," with another Avondale student, Ben "B-Smooth" McKether, 17. A disc jockey for the school's radio station, McKether saw Drew 32 perform in a school talent show and started acting as his hype man.
"I think to be his age, he's really talented," said McKether, an Auburn Hills resident. "I think Drew has a lot of potential in music."
Though the album has an aggressive sound throughout, Drew 32 stops short of swearing on the album. He said that people encouraged him to swear in the past, but he wants a younger, wider audience to hear his music.
In the album's liner notes, Drew 32 cites such artists as Bow Wow, Eminem, Bob Marley and Kanye West as his inspirations.
"Drew has his own kind of sound," said McKether. "He raps about having a good time." One might think that Drew 32's
age would create skeptics of his musical ability, but Drew 32 said that people encourage him because of his age.
"People take it seriously, I guess, because when they see the CD, it looks all professional," said Drew 32.
"I don't think his age is going to hinder him," said McKether.
Those wondering about Drew 32's other meaningful number should know that he originally wanted to wear 23 on his basketball jersey, but someone else had the number forever linked to Michael Jordan, so Drew decided to reverse the digits.
"So, I went with that and it just stuck," he said.
Drew 32 plans to perform five or six songs from the album during a release party for "Awakening" from 7-10 p.m. June 15 at the Troy Community Center, 3179 Livernois. He also plans to perform "Twisted" with McKether, who will serve as the party's DJ.
"I have big plans for the party," said McKether.
Tickets for the event cost $5 at the door.
Drew 32 said that he doesn't really have any expectations for his first album. He would like to make a career in the entertainment business.
"Eventually, later on in life, I want to be a music producer and maybe go to New York," he said.
People can learn more about Drew 32 at his Web site, www.myspace.com/drew32.
You can reach David Wallace at dwallace@candgnews.com or at (586) 498-1053.

Caption:Troy resident Andrew "Drew 32" Parks has a record release party from 7-10 p.m. June 15 at the Troy Community Center.


Copyright, 2007, Troy Times (MI), All Rights Reserved. - Troy Times



January 22, 2008

BY GINA DAMRON

FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER

They're tracing black cords and wiring everywhere, trying to find the problem.

Unplug the mic. Plug it back in. Turn up this dial on the mixing board. Now this one.

Maybe the headphones aren't working?

Clearly, there are some glitches at the studio this winter night.

Joe Murphy is used to this sort of thing. These are the quirks that come with running a music production business out of your basement, especially when you're 17 and that basement belongs to your mom.

"Is this plugged in?" the Rochester Hills teen asks his client, checking the microphone cord one more time.

Murphy and the friends he produces are still in high school, but they're trying to become the next Timbaland, the next Kanye, the next My Chemical Romance. They hope someone important will discover the beats they're engineering, or music they're posting on MySpace, the social-networking site.

With music production software becoming more accessible and affordable, teens and young adults everywhere are taking advantage. They're setting up in basements and bedrooms and making music on their own.

Long gone are the days of sitting with your band mates, making a scratchy recording on a cassette tape, then sending it to a recording company, or selling it from the trunk of your LeBaron.

"Everybody has a studio now" at home, said Martin (Tino) Gross, lead singer of the Howling Diablos and a producer in Royal Oak. "It's crazy."

The big change, Gross said, is the ubiquity of production software programs and the rise of music stores with home recording departments.

"I wish I had this when I was younger," laments Vince Mattias, 37, store manager of Roseville's Guitar Center, which sold more than 500 production software bundles over the holidays -- a 30% rise over the previous year. Most of the buyers were in their teens or 20s. Mattias said similar increases are being seen at Guitar Centers throughout metro Detroit.

The prices range from about $60 for basic programs to the $450 Pro Tools starter package, on the high-end of budget software. It may not be as professional, but it's more economical, some say, than spending a few hours at a recording studio at $60 an hour.

While the proliferation of home studios is difficult to quantify, producers around the country say the increase in teenage producers can be seen at Web sites like MySpace, where thousands have set up pages devoted to their craft.

Sites like MySpace are "going to turn everything on its head," said David Farinella, a freelance music writer in Oakland, Calif., and author of "Producing Hit Records: Secrets from the Studio." "There's going to be so much product on the market."

Five years ago, the admissions office at New York's Institute of Audio Research received about 500 inquiries a month. Now, the school gets more than 1,000 and most of the applicants are interested in music production.

Michael Rosen, a San Francisco-area producer, said about half the calls he receives from musicians are requests to mix recordings they've already made at home.This trend, he said, is starting to take business away from big studios. Even Rosen produces from his basement because there are no overhead costs. He can charge $750 to $1,000 a day from home, a fee that would jump to $2,000 at a studio."Everybody who does what I do has had to scale back," because people don't like to pay thousands to record, Rosen said.

Teens like Drew Parks of Troy use MySpace as a free way to promote music they've produced on a shoestring.

"It's my life," said the 16-year-old, a.k.a. Drew32. "I come home from school, forgetting to do my homework, and do music." He has a small studio in his bedroom closet and made his first rap album at 14.

Joe Murphy's MySpace page showcases musicians he's recorded through his business, Gem City Records. He made nearly $2,500 in 2007, thanks to a steady flow of clients -- many are classmates at Orchard Lake St. Mary's Preparatory School -- whom he charges $15 an hour.

"I like my music loud so I can get lost in it," said Justin Sanford, 18, Murphy's client one night last month. "Like I'm swimming in the beat."

Standing behind a makeshift recording booth, made from discarded doors and foam padding, Sanford, of Farmington Hills, rapped over a remix Murphy crafted from Lupe Fiasco's "Superstar." Murphy listened through is headphones, bobbing his head.

"When you produce, you always want the people you're producing to be successful," Murphy said. "If they're successful, you're successful."

While his mom likes to remind people that her son is going into public relations or journalism, Murphy might have other plans. He sees himself someday working with the best hip-hop artists around.

But fashioning a career isn't easy, said Terry Simaan, a 32-year-old from Bloomfield Hills who rose through professional studios and ran one in Canton for a few years. Now, as he develops l - Detroit Free Press



January 22, 2008

BY GINA DAMRON

FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER

They're tracing black cords and wiring everywhere, trying to find the problem.

Unplug the mic. Plug it back in. Turn up this dial on the mixing board. Now this one.

Maybe the headphones aren't working?

Clearly, there are some glitches at the studio this winter night.

Joe Murphy is used to this sort of thing. These are the quirks that come with running a music production business out of your basement, especially when you're 17 and that basement belongs to your mom.

"Is this plugged in?" the Rochester Hills teen asks his client, checking the microphone cord one more time.

Murphy and the friends he produces are still in high school, but they're trying to become the next Timbaland, the next Kanye, the next My Chemical Romance. They hope someone important will discover the beats they're engineering, or music they're posting on MySpace, the social-networking site.

With music production software becoming more accessible and affordable, teens and young adults everywhere are taking advantage. They're setting up in basements and bedrooms and making music on their own.

Long gone are the days of sitting with your band mates, making a scratchy recording on a cassette tape, then sending it to a recording company, or selling it from the trunk of your LeBaron.

"Everybody has a studio now" at home, said Martin (Tino) Gross, lead singer of the Howling Diablos and a producer in Royal Oak. "It's crazy."

The big change, Gross said, is the ubiquity of production software programs and the rise of music stores with home recording departments.

"I wish I had this when I was younger," laments Vince Mattias, 37, store manager of Roseville's Guitar Center, which sold more than 500 production software bundles over the holidays -- a 30% rise over the previous year. Most of the buyers were in their teens or 20s. Mattias said similar increases are being seen at Guitar Centers throughout metro Detroit.

The prices range from about $60 for basic programs to the $450 Pro Tools starter package, on the high-end of budget software. It may not be as professional, but it's more economical, some say, than spending a few hours at a recording studio at $60 an hour.

While the proliferation of home studios is difficult to quantify, producers around the country say the increase in teenage producers can be seen at Web sites like MySpace, where thousands have set up pages devoted to their craft.

Sites like MySpace are "going to turn everything on its head," said David Farinella, a freelance music writer in Oakland, Calif., and author of "Producing Hit Records: Secrets from the Studio." "There's going to be so much product on the market."

Five years ago, the admissions office at New York's Institute of Audio Research received about 500 inquiries a month. Now, the school gets more than 1,000 and most of the applicants are interested in music production.

Michael Rosen, a San Francisco-area producer, said about half the calls he receives from musicians are requests to mix recordings they've already made at home.This trend, he said, is starting to take business away from big studios. Even Rosen produces from his basement because there are no overhead costs. He can charge $750 to $1,000 a day from home, a fee that would jump to $2,000 at a studio."Everybody who does what I do has had to scale back," because people don't like to pay thousands to record, Rosen said.

Teens like Drew Parks of Troy use MySpace as a free way to promote music they've produced on a shoestring.

"It's my life," said the 16-year-old, a.k.a. Drew32. "I come home from school, forgetting to do my homework, and do music." He has a small studio in his bedroom closet and made his first rap album at 14.

Joe Murphy's MySpace page showcases musicians he's recorded through his business, Gem City Records. He made nearly $2,500 in 2007, thanks to a steady flow of clients -- many are classmates at Orchard Lake St. Mary's Preparatory School -- whom he charges $15 an hour.

"I like my music loud so I can get lost in it," said Justin Sanford, 18, Murphy's client one night last month. "Like I'm swimming in the beat."

Standing behind a makeshift recording booth, made from discarded doors and foam padding, Sanford, of Farmington Hills, rapped over a remix Murphy crafted from Lupe Fiasco's "Superstar." Murphy listened through is headphones, bobbing his head.

"When you produce, you always want the people you're producing to be successful," Murphy said. "If they're successful, you're successful."

While his mom likes to remind people that her son is going into public relations or journalism, Murphy might have other plans. He sees himself someday working with the best hip-hop artists around.

But fashioning a career isn't easy, said Terry Simaan, a 32-year-old from Bloomfield Hills who rose through professional studios and ran one in Canton for a few years. Now, as he develops l - Detroit Free Press


Discography

2013
"I Am King" - Single
Featuring Jon Connor
[Licensed to ESPN for their show 'First Take]
[Received airplay on Sirius XM Shade 45]

2012
"New Level" - Single
Featuring Shorty da Prince (of BET's 106 n Park)
[Licensed to ESPN for their show 'First Take']

2012
"Live it Up" - Single
Featuring JiG
[Received some radio play in Detroit]
[Licensed to ESPN for their show UNITE]

2012
"Label Me" - Mixtape
Hosted by DJ Skee of Sirius XM fame

2011
"Like Yeah" - Single
Got radio play in multiple markets nationally
[Detroit, Philadelphia, Orlando, Reno, Fort Wayne, Oklahoma City, and Salt Lake City]
[Licensed to ESPN for their show UNITE]

2011
"Spazz Out" - Single
featuring Royce Da 5'9" (Shady Records)

2011
"The B.U.R.N. Project" - Free album/mixtape

2010
"Get it Started" - Single
[Got some radio play in Detroit]

2010
"Sunrise on Your Dreams" - Mixtape

2010
"Take the World: Who is Drew32? Vol. 2" - Mixtape
Co-hosted by DJ Pauly D [from MTV's Jersey Shore]

2009
"Who is Drew32?" - Mixtape

2009
"TwitterMania" - Mixtape Hosted by DJ Mo Beatz

2009
"Beyond Me" - Single

2009
"Quarter 2 Infinity" - Mixtape Hosted by DJ Mo Beatz

2007
"Awakening" Album

Photos

Bio

Andrew Michael Parks, better known by his stage name Drew32, is a Greek-American rapper, record producer, and songwriter.
Drew32 began producing, rapping, writing, and recording music at age 13, and first gained some national notoriety when his music video Beyond Me was added to FuseTV and Comcast OnDemand in early 2010. He is also known for performances at various concerts in Michigan and at national events including the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, and the SXSW Music Conference in Austin, Texas. Drew32 has performed shows with J. Cole, Gym Class Heroes, The New Boyz, Kirko Bangz, Travis Porter, Royce Da 59?, and more. In 2012, Drew32 was one of 18 artists in the United States selected by Billboard magazine to compete in the 2012 Billboard Music Awards Battle of the Bands competition. Several sources have identified Drew32 as an up and coming artist including an August 2011 feature article on MTV Rapfix that indicated Detroit rapper and producer Drew32 is up next. In a fall 2012 article, Ambassador Magazine called Drew32 Detroits next big thing. Drew32 recently released a mixtape with DJ Skee entitled, Label Me, which featured tracks with Jon Connor, Royce Da 59?, and Shorty Da Prince (of BET 106 & Park). One of the fan favorites from the mixtape was the track I Am King featuring Jon Connor, which is currently getting airplay on Sirius XM Shade 45. The music video for I Am King is on VEVO, distributed through Empire Distribution. Throughout February 2013, "I Am King", "New Level", and other music by Drew32 was featured on ESPN's show "First Take" with Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless. Drew32 is currently finishing his new EP for release in Summer 2013.

For more information about Drew32, please visit his official website, www.drew32.com

Band Members